Monthly Archives: January 2012

Health Benefits of Chick Peas + A Recipe for Mediterranean “Rice” Salad

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

This dish is great served hot, but also makes a fabulous cold salad. Garlic, zucchini, red onion, chick peas, goat cheese and oregano make a really satisfying dish.

Chickpeas are a great source of protein. They also contain folic acid, iron, copper, zinc and magnesium.

I used cauliflower rice, instead of white rice to cut back on the carbohydrates. This recipe can be made with quinoa, rice or orzo, if you prefer. I grated a medium head of cauliflower in my food processor with the grater attachment. This can also be done with a regular grater. Microwave it in a covered dish for six minutes, no need to add any water.

Based on a recipe by Rachael Ray, this is a quick + easy weeknight dinner. I served this with shrimp cocktail. My favorite shrimp and cocktail sauce are both Trader Joe’s brand. Absolutely delicious!

Mediterranean “Rice” Salad

4 cups organic cauliflower rice

1 medium organic zucchini, diced

salt + pepper

1/2 cup organic red onion, chopped

3 cloves thinly sliced organic garlic

1 can of organic chickpeas (15 oz)

1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped

1/4 cup fresh oregano

3 oz organic  goat cheese cheese, crumbled

In a medium skillet, saute zucchini, onion, garlic, salt and pepper in coconut oil. Cook til tender (about 6 minutes).

Add chickpeas, cook til warm.

Next, add cauliflower rice, parsley, oregano and crumbled goat cheese. Gently stir to combine.

Prior to serving, top with additional goat cheese, if desired.

Makes 4 servings.

Enjoy!
Nutritional Breakdown (per serving)

146 calories

5 g of fat

8 g protein

17 g carbs

7 g fiber

News You Can Use – Jan 22 – 29 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 22-29 2012”

Deception Diet: How Optical Illusions Can Trick Your Appetite
Why McDonald’s In France Doesn’t Feel Like Fast Food

Think Positive (Seriously, it could lead to healthier behavior!)
One More Reason Not to Eat Microwave Popcorn: Vaccine Effectiveness
Prisoners Lawsuit Against Soy Products Given Green Light by Judge
Raw Milk Vending Machines Growing in Popularity Across Europe
Obesity Tops List of “Winnable” Health Battles

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – January 15 – 22

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 12-22 2012”

Obama says NO to WhiteHouse.gov petition to legalize raw milk at federal level
Popular orange juices flavored with secret “flavor packs” not listed on the label
New scientific study links bee deaths to pesticides

Consumers’ thirst for organic milk exceeds supply
Effort gets underway to require GMO food labeling
The Truth About Natural Foods
3 Surprising Reasons to Give Up Soda
Watching ‘The Biggest Loser’ may increase anti-fat attitudes
A randomized controlled trial of adjunctive family therapy and treatment as usual following inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa adolescents
Children Diet To Keep Off Pounds And Ward Off Bullying, Survey Says
Good Intentions Ease Pain, Add to Pleasure
Mindful Eating Restaurant Study

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

iTherapy – Integrating the iPhone into Therapy

iPhone Therapy

photo used under creative commons license

I recently read an article by Dr. Weissman of the Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis that introduced the concept of using an iPhone in the treatment of anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder.

Times are changing faster than ever. Technological advances, such as the introduction of the iPhone, have drastically changed the way we communicate and perform everyday activities. We can easily observe our everyday lives via the video and photo component of the iPhone. Weissman believes that this component of iPhone technology could be an effective tool in the treatment of the body dysmorphia that often accompanies anorexia.

Many of my patients that are in treatment for anorexia also experience some level of body dysmorphia; they see an obese person looking back at them in the mirror even though they are drastically underweight. Today, body dysmorphia is typically treated through psychotherapy, nutritional support and medication. For some patients, these approaches have limited success rates.

When a patient talks to me about the “obese person” that they see in the mirror, I often introduce a body image exercise involving “photo-therapy”. I ask the patient to take a photograph of themselves and bring it to their next treatment session. Oftentimes, when the patient returns and we talk about the photograph, the same body that was once described as being “fat” and “obese” is now described as being “underweight” and “malnourished”.

Weissman explains that when an anorexic patient looks in the mirror, their self perception is instantly fused with a distorted body image. The brain is so overwhelmed by this distortion, that it cannot process the image of the “real” body. The brain becomes trapped in this optical illusion, this distorted view. In contrast, when an anorexic patient sees his or her self in a photograph, the brain first acknowledges that there is a person in the photograph, it then focuses on the physicality of the photographed person. The brain then sends the message to the patient that they are the person in the photograph.

Integrating iPhone Therapy into the treatment of anorexia could definitely be a powerful tool in overcoming the body dysmorphia associated with anorexia. Based upon psychotherapy techniques developed by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann in Principles of Intensive Psychotherapy I, the steps below are Weissman’s suggested approach to integrating the iPhone into treatment:

  1. Patient and therapist look at patient in the mirror. Patient describes what they see.
  2. Therapist takes a photograph of the patient with iPhone. Patient describes what s/he sees.
  3. Therapist and patient discuss the differences between the description of the patient in the mirror and the patient in the photograph.
  4. A photograph of the patient standing beside the therapist is taken. Patient describes the image of the therapist. If the patient see distortion in the therapists image, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the therapist.
  5. Patient describes image of self. If patient sees distortion, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the patient.

Weissman points out the importance of the therapist not correcting the distorted view of the patient. If the patient does experience distortion in the photograph, the therapist should remind the patient that they both agreed on the description of the image of the therapist in the same photograph. It is necessary that the therapist and patient try to come to an agreement on the description of the patient.

Weissman predicts that utilizing this iPhone exercise will lead to an eventual reduction in the amount of distortion that the patient experiences when looking in the mirror. A combination of iPhone Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and nutritional counseling may lead to the patient gaining the important ability to maintain a healthy weight with little outside assistance. If the therapist successfully teaches the patient to be able to independently perform this exercise on a regular basis, there could be a drastic drop in relapse rates.

Sources: “Photo-Therapy: A Promising Intervention in Anorexia Nervosa?”

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Jan 9 – 16 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 9-16 2012”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Morning Rush + A Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipe

The Morning Rush to Work

photo used under a creative commons license

 

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

Many of my patients experience a lot of stress first thing in the morning. Getting ready for work or school, making breakfast, getting kids ready to go to daycare, facing rush hour traffic can all inflict stress on even the most healthy individual. In order to ease the stress of my patients, I have discovered a breakfast recipe for Overnight Oats that is nutritious, delicious and convenient.

Overnight Oats provide a delicious blast of protein in the morning. You can make a few days worth in advance, put them in individual serving size containers, and grab it as you head out the door in the morning. I have created a few variations on this recipe that you can rotate between, just to switch things up a bit. This is definitely not your granny’s hot bowl of oatmeal! No cooking involved on this one, it’s eaten chilled.

This recipe contains two types of protein; casein (from the cottage cheese) and whey (from greek yogurt). Whey protein is a naturally complete protein; it contains all essential amino acids. It is easy to digest, our bodies absorb it quickly. Our bodies absorb casein protein more slowly, so the amino acids in the protein are released into the bloodstream at a more steady pace.

Photo courtesy of lwphotographics.com

Overnight Oats

1 cup organic old-fashioned oats (not instant oats, minute oats, or flavored oatmeal)

2 cups grassfed cottage cheese (my favorite is Kalona Supernatural)

12 oz plain grassfed greek yogurt

2 tbsp Coconut Crystals (more if you like it sweeter)

cinnamon (to taste, I like lots)

Combine everything in a medium sized bowl and mix away! Store in the fridge overnight, and you will wake up to a delish breakfast.

Makes 4 servings

Approximately (depending on which brands of ingredients used) – 235 cal, 6 g fat, 24 g protein, 20 g carbs

Variations:

-add 4 tablespoons of coconut flour and organic dark chocolate chips or organic raisins for Overnight Oats that taste like cookie dough

-top with cashew nut butter, raw honey or coconut nectar

-put a layer of frozen fruit in the bottom of each portion, or a layer of nuts on top (walnuts are best because they have such a high orac -oxidative radical absorption capacity- value)


Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

 

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Jan 1 – Jan 8, 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 1-8 2012”

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Depression

Georgia Draws Fire for Grim Childhood Obesity PSAs

Chemical in Fast Food Wrappers Show Up In Human Blood

Standardize Measurement of Child Eating Disorders

Deep Brain Stimulation Appears Effective for Depression, Bipolar Disorder

The Biggest Food System Threat of 2012

Why We’re Fat: Outside Forces Affect What We Eat + How Much Exercise We Get

MSG, Transfats, High Fructose Corn Syrup Boost Liver Disease Risk

Binge Eating Disorder May Be Added to DSM-5

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
http://www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
http://www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]