Monthly Archives: April 2012

The Norton Center – News You Can Use

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 15 – April 22 2012!”

Urge Surfing – Riding the Wave of the Urge to Use Eating Disorder Behaviors
Spike in US Autism Rates Linked to HFCS Consumption
Pepsi’s ‘Next’ Generation – Less Sugar, More Toxins
The Four Best Functional Beverages for Health and Performance
Dr Russell Blaylock on Vaccinations
Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia: Not Just a Potted Pet. Now It’s a Health Food
Vegetarian Fed Meat, BCAAs and Bland Grassfed Beef

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Recipe: Tunegg Salad

Tunegg Salad Ingredients
“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”
Ingredients
6 oz white albacore or fresh tuna steamed (try to avoid canned tuna)
3 chopped hard boiled eggs (grass fed Omega 3 organic)
1/2 cup diced organic onion
1/2 cup diced organic dill pickle
1/2 cup diced organic celery
Salt & pepper to taste

Toss with:
1/2 cup Wilderness Family Naturals mayonnaise blended with 1 tblsp hot mustard (or make your own Coconut Oil Mayonnaise or Coconut-Macadamia Nut Oil Mayonnaise)
Serve on organic Romaine lettuce leafs (makes a wrap for Tunegg mix)

Nutrition (Entire Recipe)
1240 calories
35 g fat
71 g protein
24 g carbs
9 g fiber

Working-In vs. Working-Out

photo used under creative commons license

Working-in involves engaging in slow, relaxed movements that don’t tend to elevate heart and respiratory rates. When you work-out, your body burns energy through the process of pumping blood from the organs and glands to your muscles. Conversely, when you work-in you keep blood in your organs and glands, increasing energy by allowing your organs and glands to take in fresh, arterial blood. Additionally, working-in:

  • Moves nutrition through your body
  • Improves your body’s breathing mechanism
  • Helps detoxify your body by moving waste through your body
  • Stimulates energy throughout your body to run cellular and biological systems
  • Resets natural biological rhythms, allowing your body to run more efficiently. The result? More energy to do other activities you love.

Practicing yoga and meditation are the most popular ways to engage in working-in. Incorporating yoga and meditation into your routine can also help in recovery from your eating disorder. A study from the Psychology of Women Quarterly reported that people who practice yoga reported “less self-objectification, greater satisfaction with their physical appearance, and fewer disordered eating attitudes”. Yoga is an excellent way to improve your ability to “be in the moment” by requiring you to focus on breathing and sensations throughout the body. If you experience body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), yoga has the potential to relieve the symptoms by allowing you to experience your body in a physical way, as opposed to a visual way. Meditation is proven to reduce depression, anxiety, and episodes of binge eating.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 8-15 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 8 – April 15 2012!”

Tree nut consumption lowers chronic disease risks and assists successful weight loss

The Definitive Guide to Traditional Food Preparation and Preservation

Brain Activity Gives Scientists Clues About Eating Disorders


Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Childhood Obesity [A Norton Center Infographic]

photo used under a creative commons license

“For the past 10 years, I have noticed a connection between childhood obesity, eating disorders, and the increasing complications of both in my clinical work as well as in my research.  As part of my mission to shed light on these problems, particularly as they relate to US children, I find it important to provide both by readers and clients with relevant informative articles. You can view all of my Childhood Obesity Articles here. Also, be sure to read my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

The average child spends almost 53 hours/week (7 hours 38 min/day) watching television, playing video games, using computers and/or cell phones. Add another 1 hour 25 minutes/week if you include texting. Clearly our children need more physical activity. However, parents who come home from work exhausted, have a difficult time being good role models. Likewise it is a challenge for overworked parents to ensure that their children are less sedentary and more active. Schools are generally not in a position to help. In 2011 the median Physical Education (PE) budget in elementary schools in the U.S. was $460/year. Many PE programs are optional, depending upon the grade. Some PE classes can even be taken online.

The implications of the epidemic of childhood obesity are staggering when one considers that obesity leads to many of the most debilitating and costly medical problems of our time. It is not uncommon today for a child to leave the pediatrician’s office with a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart condition or joint deterioration. These diseases, which have historically been associated with middle age, are now showing up in younger and younger children. At the current rate of childhood obesity, it is estimated that the U.S. will have $344 billion in medical-related expenses driven by obesity and it’s complications by the year 2018 or 21% of medical costs. More importantly, today’s children will be the first generation since the Great Depression, projected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents.

Childhood Obesity Infographic

“While the medical costs and complications of childhood obesity are frightening, it could get worse. We don’t really know the extent to which these problems will impact the quality of life of individuals who suffer from chronic diseases so early in life, as this is an entirely new phenomenon. We know that depression, reduced earning power, infertility and isolation are common among adults who are obese. But what about individuals who have been obese since they were 3 or 4 and who suffer from Type II Diabetes when they are 10 or 11? What are the developmental issues at stake?” J. Renae Norton, 2012

And then there are the psychological costs. In a recent national survey of overweight sixth graders, 24 percent of the boys and 30 percent of the girls experienced daily teasing, bullying or rejection because of their size. The number doubles for overweight high school students with 58 percent of boys and 63 percent of girls experiencing daily teasing, bullying or rejection because of their size. The psycho-social conditions of overweight children and teens are depression, anxiety, social isolation and marginalization and low self-esteem. Obese children, as well as children who believe that they are overweight, are also at higher risk for suicide.

“The sad thing is that the problems plaguing America’s children are very preventable for parents in the know. Unfortunately, and through no fault of their own, most parents are not in the know, as the information they need is difficult to find and even more difficult to put into practice.” J. Renae Norton, 2012

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
Mean Body Weight, Height, and Body Mass Index, United States 1960-2002
Childhood Obesity in the United States
Fast Food Facts

News You Can Use – April 1-8 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 1 – April 8 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Recipe: Grassfed Whipped Cream

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

Rich in CLA, Snowville Whipped Cream  is one of my favorite guiltless pleasures. I use it in my “Grassfed Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping“, on a bowl of fresh fruit, and as a dip for bananas (I usually eat slightly green bananas, to lower the glycemic load).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Snowville Whipped Cream

Ingredients
1 cup Snowville Whipping Cream
1/4 cup organic powder sugar or Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals (Coconut Crystals will give more of a caramel taste)
1/2 tbsp pure vanilla

Directions
In a glass bowl, beat the cream and vanilla in a chilled non-reactive bowl with a whisk or an electric mixer just until they hold a loose peak.
Add the sugar, beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not too overbeat!
Refrigerate, up to four hours.

Makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)
Calories – 190
Fat – 19 grams
Protein – 0 grams
Carbs – 6 grams

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com

Characteristics of The Traditional Diet (as discovered by Dr. Weston A Price)

Dr Weston A Price

Dr Weston A Price

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Born in 1870, Weston A. Price was a dentist that was known for his discoveries in the relationship between nutrition, dental health, and physical health. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Price traveled to remote parts of the word that were virtually unaffected by western civilization to determine what type of diet was necessary to attain optimal health. Price found fourteen groups of people ranging from inhabitants of remote Swiss Valleys, South Sea Islanders and Eskimos that had perfect dental health, beautiful facial structure, excellent physical development, and virtually no degenerative diseases.

Price analyzed the diets of all fourteen groups of people and made a great discovery: although each groups varied greatly, dependent on geographic location, all the diets had some definite commonalities. All of their diets were the exact opposite of the “politically correct” nutrition standards, and of the guidelines set out in the food pyramid that is published by the USDA. Specifically, all of their diets:

  • Contained no refined or denatured foods or ingredients (refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, white flour, canned foods, pasteurized/homogenized lowfat milk products, refined/hydrogenated vegetable oils, protein powders, artificial vitamins, food additives and colorings.)
  • Contained some sort of animal product, typically the entire animal was consumed (muscle meat, organs, bones, fats). Bones were consumed in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths
  • Had 4 times more minerals and water-soluble vitamins then that of that found in the Standard American Diet (SAD), and 10 times more fat-soluble vitamins from animal sources (Vitamin A, D and K2)
  • Contained some cooked foods, but all traditional cultures ate at least a portion of their animal foods raw (raw dairy, etc)
  • Incorporated foods that were high in food enzymes and beneficial bacteria from lacto-fermented foods.
  • Included grains, seeds and nuts that were prepared by soaking, sprouting, fermenting or naturally leavening to neutralize anti-nutrients
  • Contained between 30%-80% fat calories, only about 4% of these coming from naturally occurring polyunsaturated oils. The remaining fats were in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Had an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids
  • Contained some salt
  • Made provisions for the health of generations to come. Pregnant women and children were provided with additional nutrient-rich animal foods

So, how can we integrate some of Weston A. Price’s findings into our diets? Here are some things that the Weston A. Price Foundation suggests you can do – keep in mind that while it may be difficult and in some cases unrealistic to follow all these guidelines 100% of the time, anything that you can integrate into your diet will offer health benefits.

  • Eat whole, unprocessed foods
  • Eat meat and animal products from grass-fed animals, which are rich in CLA
  • Eat wild-caught fish and shellfish from unpolluted water
  • Eat full fat dairy products (raw or fermented when available) from grass-fed cows
  • Use animal fats, specifically butter liberally
  • Use traditional vegetable oils only. This includes extra virgin olive oil, expeller-expressed sesame oil, small amounts of expeller-expressed flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil
  • Supplement with Cod Liver Oil
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, when possible)
  • Use properly prepared whole grains, legumes and nuts (soaked, sprouted or sour leavened)
  • Make fermented foods a regular part of your diet (examples include – kefir, miso, kimchee, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, sour cream – Bubbie’s brand of sauerkraut and pickles are properly fermented)
  • Incorporate bone broth into your diet on a regular basis
  • Use filtered water for cooking and drinking
  • Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and a small amount of expeller-expressed flax oil.
  • Use natural sweeteners in moderation (raw honey, maple syrup, maple sugar, date sugar, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder)
  • Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals
  • Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel
  • Use only natural, food-based supplements
  • Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light
  • Think positive thoughts and practice forgiveness

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: The Weston A Price Foundation www.westonaprice.org

Recipe: Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

If you want a meal in 8 minutes that is mouth watering and really good for you, all you need is a chicken breast (Organic and free range), organic frozen green beans, some coconut fat and the right spices!  Just look at that au jus and the fat glistening off of the beans. Yum!

1 heaping tbsp + 1 tsp extra virgin, unrefined coconut fat
1 organic, free-range chicken breast
Bourbon Barrel Bourbon-Smoked Paprika
garlic salt
garlic pepper
himalayan salt or sea salt
any other MSG-free seasonings that you love

1. In a cast iron (or stainless steel) frying pan, heat up coconut fat.
2. Wash and dry the chicken breast and place it in the hot coconut fat.
3. Coat both sides of the chicken breast with the fat.
4. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken with Bourbon Smoked Paprika, Garlic Salt, Garlic Pepper, Himalayan Salt or Sea Salt and any other seasonings that you love.
5. Brown on both sides and reduce heat. Put lid on pan.
DO NOT OVERCOOK THE CHICKEN – It only needs 7 or 8 minutes and just barely done to be the most mouthwatering
6. While the chicken is finishing: Microwave for 3 minutes organic frozen green beans.
7. Drain the beans and salt them and put a teaspoon of coconut fat on them and microwave them for 30 more seconds.
8. You can either throw the green beans into the frying pan to coat them with the delicious juices from the fried chicken or leave them in a ceramic bowl and throw the chicken and the juice on top of them like I did.

It is the smoked paprika that makes this dish so delicious!


Nutrition Information (using an 8 oz chicken breast, 2 cups of green beans)
Calories – 459
Fat – 23 g (all coconut fat)
Protein – 48 g
Carbs – 10 g
Fiber – 4 g

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – March 26 – April 1 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 26 – April 1 2012!”

FDA will not ban BPA in Food Packaging

What’s Inside the 26-ingredient School Lunch Burgers?

Hunger Games: 20 Tips to Teach Healthy Eating to Kids (and Ourselves)

How to Give Your 7-Year-Old Daughter an Eating Disorder

What are the Real Differences Between EPA and DHA?

Anxiety and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

One Million Americans Demand Labeling for GMOs

What is a ‘Hormone Disruptor’ Anyways?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’