Monthly Archives: August 2012

Agave Syrup. Miracle Sweetener or Metabolic Nightmare?

Blue agave

photo used under a creative commons license via flickr user jay8085

Recently, I’ve received a few inquiries about the healthiness of agave nectar. Agave nectar is marketed as being a low glycemic, natural, plant-based sweetener with numerous health benefits such as improved calcium absorption, improved immune system function, and increased energy. How healthy is agave nectar? Is it the miracle sweetener that we should all be using?

Most agave nectar that is sold in stores today is a highly processed, man-made, condensed fructose syrup. This type of agave nectar contains a varying amount of fructose ranging from 70-97%. In comparison, high fructose corn syrup contains about 55% fructose. Anytime we consume more than 25 grams of fructose per day, it begins to take a toll on metabolic function. When consumed in excess, there is often an increase in insulin resistance. The majority of fructose is metabolized by the liver and converted directly to fat; often unhealthy visceral fat. In “The 76 Dangers of Sugar”, Dr. Mercola reports that fructose also –

  • elevates uric acid, which decreases nitric oxide, raises angiotensin, and causes your smooth muscle cells to contract, thereby raising your blood pressure and potentially damaging your kidneys. Increased uric acid also leads to chronic, low-level inflammation, which has far-reaching consequences for your health. For example, chronically inflamed blood vessels lead to heart attacks and strokes; also, a good deal of evidence exists that some cancers are caused by chronic inflammation.
  • Fructose tricks your body into gaining weight by fooling your metabolism—it turns off your body’s appetite-control system. Fructose does not appropriately stimulate insulin, which in turn does not suppress ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) and doesn’t stimulate leptin (the “satiety hormone”), which together result in your eating more and developing insulin resistance.
  • Fructose rapidly leads to weight gain and abdominal obesity (“beer belly”), decreased HDL, increased LDL, elevated triglycerides, elevated blood sugar, and high blood pressure—i.e., classic metabolic syndrome.
  • Fructose metabolism is very similar to ethanol metabolism, which has a multitude of toxic effects, including NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). It’s alcohol without the buzz.

Coconut nectar is an excellent substitute for agave nectar. While processed agave nectar is nutrient void, coconut nectar contains 17 amino acids, potassium, magnesium, zinc, iron, vitamin C, and vitamin B. In addition, it has a very low glycemic load. There are several companies that make coconut nectar, the brand I use is by a company called Coconut Secret and can be purchased online, at some health food stores or at Whole Foods.

Sources: Shocking! This ‘Tequila’ Sweetener if Far Worse than High Fructose Corn Syrup

Agave a Triumph of Marketing over Truth

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Aug 21-28 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 21-28 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Why Rapid Weight Gain Decreases Treatment Success Rates

At many inpatient eating disorder treatment centers patients with anorexia nervosa are required to restore their weight quickly; I’ve had patients that were forced to gain 20 pounds in 21 days! Not coincidentally, 21 days was the amount of time that managed care would cover.  There are numerous reasons as to why gaining weight this quickly actually sets the patient up for relapse. Let’s look at what gaining weight at a rapid rate does to leptin levels.

In the malnourished, underweight anorexic, leptin levels are typically very low, due to low fat reserves. Usually, leptin levels reach normal levels during weight restoration. However, when weight is gained too quickly, leptin levels rise too quickly and may exceed the normal range. Of course this has the opposite effect needed for refeeding and individuals experience suppressed appetite and suppressed energy expenditure. As a result, it becomes increasingly difficult for the patient to eat, often interfering with the refeeding process.  Many of the patients who have had this experience, were told, in effect, that they were at fault, or “not trying”. The reason that this happens is that not enough practitioners know about Leptin and the role that it plays in re-feeding. For someone who already has control issues, this is an extremely painful and often damaging experience.

At the Norton Center, our anorexic patients are helped to restore their weight slowly, but steadily. This, along with other important nutritional factors, plays a major role in our high success. It is important to note that many treatment programs use weight gain at the conclusion of treatment as the measure of success.  This is a distortion in as much as the 20 pound weight gain is often gone in a matter or months, and sometimes in a matter of weeks. We measure success as weight gain that is maintained for a at least one year post treatment.  Currently, our success rates  for those patients that remain in treatment is about 90%; in comparison, many inpatient treatment centers experience a much lower success rate, or about 30 to 40%.

How Low Leptin Effects the Physical Complications and Behaviors Typical of Anorexia Nervosa

Low leptin plays a significant role in many of the physical complications and behaviors that are typically associated with anorexia nervosa; amenorrhea, hypothyroidism, hypercortisolism, osteopenia, immune changes, and increased physical activity.

Leptin levels of less than 1.85 µg suggests amenorrhea and subnormal luteinizing hormone (a hormone that stimulates ovulation) in women with anorexia nervosa. As leptin levels normalize through weight restoration, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be activated. Not all patients with anorexia nervosa resume menses upon weight restoration.

The majority of women with anorexia nervosa exhibit osteopenia. Low leptin levels are also associated with a reduction in bone formation rate. Although there are other endocrine changes that contribute to osteopenia, low leptin levels appear to play a significant role.

Individuals with anorexia nervosa, often experience a compromised immune system. This could also be due, in part to low leptin levels although most of the compromised immunity is due to increased cortisol levels.  Cortisol is the hormone that we associate with stress.  Patients who are gaining weight too rapidly, are under considerably more stress, and may also be experiencing increased cortisol levels

Finally, up to 80% of patients with Anorexia Nervosa tend to engage in excessive physical activity. It is believed that there is an inverse correlation between food intake and physical activity during the weight loss phase. In other words, the lower the leptin levels, the more drive there is to exercise excessively, which causes more weight loss or less weight gain. One study demonstrated that patients reported a decreased feeling of restlessness or hyperactivity (need to exercise) as leptin increased during the refeeding/weight restoration phase of treatment.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: Monteleone P. Di Lieto A. Castaldo E, et al. Leptin functioning in eating disorders. CNS Spectrums. 2004;9:523–529. [PubMed]

News You Can Use! August 14-21 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 14-21 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Effects of Macronutrient Intake on Binge Eating and Satiety in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder

Macronutrient Ratios

Photo Credit: greggavedon.com – Creative Commons

Research shows that diets that are high in protein may reduce the frequency of binge eating episodes in individuals with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) or Binge Eating Disorder (BED).

Eighteen women with Bulimia Nervosa or Binge Eating Disorder participated in a five-week study to determine if macronutrient ratio affected the frequency of binge-eating episodes. The study was completed in two phases, one phase was a high-protein phase, one phase was a high-carbohydrate phase; both phases were separated with a one-week “washout” phase. Each participant was provided with a two-week supply of high-protein supplementation, and a two-week supply of high-carbohydrate supplementation. The 280-calorie high-protein supplement contained 75.47% protein, 10.31% carbohydrates, and 14.23% fat; the 280-calorie high-carbohydrate supplement contained 0% protein, 67.3% carbohydrates, and 1.33% fat. The supplements were taken one hour before meals. Participants were required to keep a food diary for the duration of the study.

After each two-week phase, each participant was required to fast overnight and then consumed one 420-calorie supplement of the same composition of the supplement given throughout the phase. Three hours after consuming the supplement, each participant was placed in a private room and presented with a buffet of foods that were typical of both meals and binges. The buffet consisted of a wide variety of foods with varied macronutrient ratios; examples include cheese, cake, cookies, bread, potato chips, ice cream, fruit, vegetables, meat, eggs, fish, beans, and peanut butter.

Upon completion of the study, it was determined that the frequency of binge eating episodes were 62% lower during the high-protein phase than during the high-carbohydrate phase. Three hours after high-protein supplementation, participants reported a greater sense of fullness and a reduced sense of hunger; they also consumed 21% less food than they did during the high-carbohydrate phase. It was also noted that participants gained a significant amount of body weight during the high-carbohydrate phase, while body weight during the high-protein phase was stable. The researchers hypothesize that a diet high in protein may protect both eating disordered individuals and non-eating disordered individuals from overeating or binge-eating.

Why did the episodes of binge-eating decrease during the high-protein phase? The researchers believe that when participants consumed the high-protein supplement there was an increased release of the satiety agents CCK and glucagon. When CCK and glucagon is increased, satiety signals are improved or restored. When this occurs, participants were less likely to binge on high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods. By not binge eating on high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods there was inherently an increased proportion of protein in the participant’s diet.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Source:

Latner, J.D., Wilson, G.T., (2004), Binge Eating and Satiety in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder: Effects of Macronutrient Intake, Int J Eat Disord 2004 Dec;36(4):402-15.

Meditation-Based Intervention for Binge Eating Disorder (BED)

Meditation and Binge Eating Disorder

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License via AlicePopkorn

Is it possible that individuals with Binge Eating Disorder could gain a greater sense of control over eating by giving up a certain amount of conscious control? It’s quite the paradox, really. A study completed at the University of Indiana examined this very idea. The study explored the use of meditation-based intervention for Binge Eating Disorder. The six-week study introduced 18 obese women to standard and eating-specific mindfulness meditation. After completing the study, episodes of binge-eating decreased from 4.02 episodes per week, to 1.57 episodes per week. Additionally, the women’s scores on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) decreased significantly; anxiety and depression went from mild-moderate to non-clinical levels.  The women also reported an improvement in their sense of mindfulness, perceived control, awareness of hunger and satiety cues.

There are numerous reasons that meditation may be a successful form of therapy for individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED):

– people that regularly meditate exhibit greater control over random flow of thought

– meditation lowers brain reactivity; this may lower the impulses associated with Binge Eating Disorder

– it is believed that the act of meditating puts a space between thought and action, allowing for more time to think situations through before acting

– people that meditate regularly show an increased amount of connection in the white matter that connects the Anterior Cingulate Gyrus (ACG) to the rest of the brain; deficiencies in these connections are associated with addiction (including food addiction), depression, ADHD, obsessive behaviors, compulsive behaviors, and eating disorders

If you want to incorporate the art of meditation into your everyday life, there are several free downloadable meditations available through Buddha Net. A good meditation to start with is the Body Scan, which gives instructions on bringing awareness to bodily sensations. Buddha Net also offers meditations for progressive relaxation, learning how to calm the body with breath, cultivating peace and joy with the breath, mindful standing and walking, mindfulness of breath, mindfulness of sound and thought, healing painful emotions, and loving-kindness meditation.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

J Health Psychol May 1999 vol 4 no 3 357-363

News You Can Use – Aug 9-16

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 9-16 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Upcoming Podcast: Food Additives, Obesity and Eating Disorders – MSG

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License

Join us on Tuesday, August 13 at 7:30 pm for our next podcast on “Food Additives, Obesity and Eating Disorders – MSG

One of the primary additives used in food products in the United States is Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), a chemical added to enhance flavor. Tonight we’ll be talking about the effects that MSG has on our nation’s health.

Dial   646-378-0494 to ask your questions ON THE AIR! You can also email your questions to drnortonPR@gmail.com! Tune in to the show on HERE.

Be sure to check out these blog posts that discuss MSG –

Defensive Eating – Protecting Your Brain from the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

An Intro to MSG: The Nutritional Truth

Baby Formula: MSG, Excitatory Neurotoxins, and High Fructose Corn Syrup

How Has MSG Slowly Been Poisoning America?

Monosodium Glutamate – Poison the Body to Better the Taste!

Ramen Noodles and MSG (a Guest Post by Maria Emmerich)

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Defensive Eating – Protecting Your Brain from the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

Protecting The Brain from the Effects of Neurotoxins

“O is for Occipital Lobe” by Eric on Flickr. Used under Creative Commons license.

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a chemical that food manufacturers add to their products to enhance flavor; it is a cheap way to make very low quality foods taste great. What food manufacturers don’t want us to know is that MSG is a neurotoxin. A neurotoxin is a chemical that has a degenerative effect on the brain and nervous system.

Consumed on a regular basis, MSG creates lesions in the hypothalamus part of the brain.  When this occurs, neurotoxins enter the brain and cause damage. The damage caused results in abnormal development such as obesity, impaired growth, sexual reproductive problems, sleep difficulties and emotional problems.

One source of MSG is derived from fermented sugar beets. Currently, thanks to a company called Monsanto, 90% of sugar beets in the United States today are genetically modified to contain the pesticide gene of Roundup. So, by ingesting MSG we also ingest a known carcinogen.

At first glance, it would seem that removing MSG from our diets would be easy. I mean, just look at the food label, and make sure the product doesn’t list “MSG” or “Monosodium Glutamate” in the ingredients list.  Nothing to it, right? In an ideal world, this would be the case. Unfortunately, if the ingredient is made up of less than 99% MSG, the food manufacturer doesn’t have to list MSG in the ingredients list. MSG can be “hidden” in our foods under more than 50 alternative names and forms including, autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, dry milk powder, dry milk protein, gelatin, glutamate, glutamic acid, hydrolyzed corn gluten, hydrolyzed soy protein, hydrolyzed wheat protein, monopotassium glutamate, monosodium glutamate, natrium glutamate, sodium caseinate, textured protein, yeast food, yeast nutrient, etc.

The best way to protect yourself from the neurological effects of MSG is adapt a lifestyle of “clean eating”. Clean eating involves eliminating all processed foods from our diet; a processed food is any food that comes in a bottle, box, bag, can, carton or shrink-wrap, as well as the vast majority of deli and restaurant foods. It is virtually impossible to avoid these foods your entire life; never eating in a restaurant is a somewhat unrealistic expectation in today’s society. So, what can we do to protect ourselves from the neurological effects of MSG when we are in situations where MSG is nearly impossible to avoid?

In 2008, Phytomedicine released a report for a study which explored the use of Red Clover to protect the brain from the effects of MSG. Red Clover contains phytoestrogenic isoflavones which can possibly protect the brain from glutamate toxicity. The study found that by taking Red Clover before consuming MSG, there was a significantly increased cell survival rate and significantly decreased release of cellular lactate dehydrogenase, an indicator of cell damage. You can supplement with Red Clover in a variety of forms (such as teas, tinctures, tablets, capsules, liquid extracts, and extracts), but a whole herb supplement is thought to be the most effective.

Another way to protect our brain from the effects of MSG, is to supplement with Pyruvate. Pyruvate produces energy in the brain. When energy is produced in the brain, the brain is protected against neurotoxicity. Pyruvate is available as a supplement in most health food stores.

Keep in mind, these supplements are good to use when you can’t avoid ingesting MSG. Obviously it is better to avoid MSG altogether, when possible. As I heard a health professional say “it’s like putting a helmet on your head so you can strike yourself with a sledgehammer.”

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

The phytoestrogenic isoflavones from Trifolium pratense L. (Red clover) protects human cortical neurons from glutamate toxicity. Occhiuto F, Sangla G, Samperi S, Palumbo DR, DePasquale R, Circosta C. Phytomedicine. 2008 Sep; 15(9):676-82.

Health Ranger interviews neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock on MSG and brain-damaging excitotoxins

Hidden Names for MSG

News You Can Use – July 29-August 5 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 29- August 5 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Fewer U.S. Students Buy Sodas, Sports Drinks Still a Problem
“Half as many U.S. adolescents as in 2006 can still buy high-calorie sodas in schools, but other sugary beverages remain easily available onsite, a survey showed.” READ MORE

Why Manufacturers DON’T Want Nutrition Labels to Include Added Sugars Info
“Sugar is an interesting nutrient. We are all consuming way too much sugar daily. According to all health organizations, people should drastically reduce the amount of added sugars they consume. But if one turns to the nutrition facts label of products, the only sugar info available is “sugars”, which is a sum of naturally occurring sugars in a product and the added sugars.” READ MORE

‘Butter Flavoring’ linked to harmful brain process, Alzheimer’s
“Chronic exposure to an artificial butter flavoring ingredient, known as diacetyl, may worsen the harmful effects of a protein in the brain linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.” READ MORE

GMOs Cause Animals to Lose their Ability to Reproduce, Russian Scientists Discover
“A study presented at the Days of Defense Against Environmental Hazards in Russia has unveiled once again the implicit dangers associated with the consumption of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs). According to Voice of Russia, scientists from the National Association for Gene Security and the Institute of Ecological and Evolutional Problems discovered that animals fed GMOs as part of their normal diet eventually develop the inability to reproduce.” READ MORE

Splenda soon to unleash ‘Nectresse’ – Here’s what you need to know about this new ‘natural’ sweetener
“McNeil Nutritionals, LLC, maker of the artificial sweetener Splenda, is gearing up to introduce a new “natural” sweetener known as Nectresse that will cater specifically to those looking for a healthy alternative to artificial sweeteners and sugar. But is Nectresse really as natural as McNeil claims it is, or is the product just another example of tricky marketing hype aimed at health-conscious consumers?” READ MORE

Alzheimer’s is really just ‘type-3’ diabetes, new research shows
“Emerging research on the widespread degenerative brain disease known as Alzheimer’s suggests that this prevalent form of dementia is actually a type of diabetes. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, a recent study out of Rhode Island Hospital (RIH) confirms that Alzheimer’s is marked by brain insulin resistance and corresponding inflammation, a condition that some researchers are now referring to as type-3 diabetes.” READ MORE.

The Food Companies Spending the Most to Hide the Facts
“Surveys repeatedly show that more than 90 percent of Americans want genetically modified (GM) foods labeled. That overwhelming majority of the public wants to know if it’s eating ingredients derived from lab-created plants that have been genetically modified to resist (and sometime even create their own) toxic pesticides, withstand drought, or produce higher yields.” READ MORE

7 Crazy Things Pesticides Are Doing to Your Body
“Agrochemicals, home bug sprays, and lawn treatments could be causing chronic illness in your family.” READ MORE

Are GMOs Making You Fat?
“Genetically modified foods may be playing a bigger role in America’s obesity epidemic than we previously believed.” READ MORE
Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’