Monthly Archives: November 2012

Podcast: Food Addiction [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we continued our discussion from last week about Food Addiction. We talked about the science behind food addiction, signs of food addiction, and treatment for food addiction.

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In this episode we covered:

0:00 Introduction
2:00 What is Addiction?
6:40 Why is it so hard to overcome addiction?
8:50 – Food Addiction and Bulimarexia
13:04 – Food Addiction and Diabulimia
17:20 How many people are affected by food addiction?
18:20 The Anatomy of Food Addiction
21:20 How the wrong kind of treatment for obesity and eating disorders can contribute to food addiction
25:19 Food Addiction and the Limbic System
26:50 The role of the hypothalamus
27:30 Caller Question: How can I help a morbidly obese friend that is not open to discussion about diet, exercise, nutrition?
35:45 The Role of the Hypothalamus
40:30 Fight or Flight
45:20 The treatment for food addiction

Links we discussed:

Childhood Obesity & Food Addiction
Anorexia, Addiction, and the Three Part Brain Model
Bulimarexia: Why Are We Seeing More of It?
Bulimarexia. Did You Know?

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

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View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Nov 21-27 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 21-November 27 2012!”

Caffeine-diabetes link still unresolved: study

Why Relaxing is Stressful to Some

Probiotic bacteria may burn belly fat

Artsy Teens More Likely to Be Depressed

3 Feeding Interactions and How They Influence Child Obesity

Consumer Sues Pepperidge Farm for Marketing Gold Fish Crackers as Being “Natural”

Brown adipose tissue – The fat-burning furnace you should take advantage of

Why You Still Shouldn’t Visit Fast Food Joints

‘Obese but Happy Gene’ Challenges the Common Perception of Link Between Depression and Obesity

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

New Service! Functional Diagnostic Nutrition

eating disorders functional diagnostic nutrition

I’m very excited to announce that I am going to be offering Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) to my clients. FDN gives patients the opportunity to improve their health by getting to the root cause of their symptoms. Many patients have had success using Functional Diagnostic Nutrition. In one case, for example, a patient was able to loose unwanted middle fat, regulate emotions well enough to discontinue an antidepressant and sleep without sleeping pills. This service, which we are ramping up at present, will be fully available in January 2013! If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me by email or phone at 513-205-6543 and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) is an opt-in model of self-care; i.e. you have the option of learning how to be more pro-active regarding your own health and nutritional needs. Think of FDN Practitioners as health detectives. They help patients find the underlying causes of disease instead of relying on traditional medicine which primarily focuses on symptom relief. By integrating FDN into your current treatment plan, you have the opportunity to find healing opportunities in a natural health restoring process.

Most people interested in integrating FDN into their treatment ask three questions: “Will an FDN Practitioner know what is wrong with me?”, “Can FDN help me?”, and “Has FDN helped other people like me?”.

Will an FDN Practitioner know what is wrong with me? Yes! FDN Practitioners can identify malfunctions occurring within your body that are at the root cause of your health issues. They can identify these malfunctions through the use of functional lab work. This is lab work that uses scientifically documented indexes of normal versus abnormal functioning in organs such as the liver and pancreas as well as in systems such as the endocrine system and digestive system.

Can FDN help me? Your FDN Practitioner will help you identify healing opportunities instead of just treating symptoms. For example, instead of trying to relieve a symptom such as recurring migraines, your FDN Practitioner will work with you to determine the root cause of your migraines and create a protocol that will focus on resolving the root cause. Over time, you will be rebuilding, repairing and restoring normal function within your body by following a holistic program that looks at rest, exercise, diet, supplements and stress reduction. You will come to understand the role that the Pillars of Health; Hormone, Immune, Digestion, Detoxification and Intestinal Barrier Systems play in the problems you are having presently.

Has FDN helped other people like me? Yes! Through the use of FDN, over 11,000 people have experienced their best level of health in many years. Many of these people have been able to resolve their health conditions. There are currently over 500 FDN Practitioners in 30 countries that are helping thousands of people!

Here’s a testimonial from one of my clients that has incorporated FDN into their treatment plan:

“By integrating FDN into my treatment for Anorexia, I have experienced dramatic results. Before using FDN I was functioning poorly; I was extremely obsessive, anxious, and had great difficulty eating regularly. If anything stressful happened in my life, I instantly resorted back to anorexic behaviors. My energy was drained. I was reliant on caffeine and other over-the-counter medications to get through routine activities. I also had to take psychotropic medications to deal with anxiety and depression. After a few months of following the FDN protocol these symptoms and problems improved dramatically. I no longer obsess over calories and macronutrient ratios, as I have learned how to listen to my body to determine how much I need to eat. I am no longer taking medication for anxiety, which has become more of a rarity; if I do get anxious, the feelings do not last nearly as long and aren’t nearly as intense. My energy level is incredible, I haven’t had to use any caffeine or other stimulants to have enough energy to get through the day. Using FDN is one of the best decisions I have made. I feel better now than I did even before my Eating Disorder. I truly hope your other patients will take the opportunity to incorporate FDN into their recovery!” 

If you are interested in incorporating FDN into your treatment plan, contact me at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com or discuss it with me at your next session! If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area or are not suffering from obesity or an eating disorder but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com

Avoiding Neurotoxins

photo used under a creative commons license

“A neurotoxin is a substance which inhibits the functions of neurons. Neurons are found throughout the brain and nervous system, and the function of these unique cells is critical for a variety of tasks, ranging from autonomic nervous system jobs like swallowing to higher-level brain function. Neurotoxins can work in a variety of ways, with the danger of exposure varying, depending on the neurotoxin involved and the dosage.”

Neurotoxins can be found in nearly every processed food and beverage on grocery store shelves. This includes processed organic foods! The consumption of processed foods in the American diet are skyrocketing and shows no sign of slowing down. In 2010, Americans spent 90% of their food budget on processed foods! 1 out of every 4 Americans are sensitive to neurotoxic food additives, but only 1 out of 250 Americans know that their symptoms are a reaction to these additives. The most common neurotoxic food additives in processed foods in the United States include:

  • aspartame
  • autolyzed anything
  • barley malt
  • beef base
  • beef flavoring
  • beef stock
  • bouillon
  • broth of any kind
  • calcium caseinate
  • carrageenan
  • caseinate
  • chicken base
  • chicken broth
  • chicken flavoring
  • chicken stock
  • disodium anything
  • dough conditioner
  • flavoring
  • gelatin
  • gelatinized anything
  • glutamate
  • guar gum
  • hydrolyzed anything
  • kombu extract
  • l-cysteine
  • malt anything
  • malted anything
  • milk solids
  • monosodium glutamate
  • natural flavor
  • nutrasweet
  • pork base
  • pork flavoring
  • protein concentrate
  • protein extract
  • seasoned salt
  • seasoning
  • smoke flavoring
  • sodium caseinate
  • solids of any kind
  • soup base
  • soy extract
  • soy protein anything
  • soy sauce
  • spice
  • stock
  • textured protein
  • textured vegetable protein
  • umami
  • vegetable gum
  • whey anything
  • yeast extract
How can we best protect ourselves from neurotoxic food additives? The best way is to eat a clean diet which minimizes the consumption of processed foods. If you must eat processed foods, it is important to become educated on what food additives to avoid. Overwhelmed by the idea of eliminating processed foods from your diet? You don’t need to eliminate all processed foods at once. Just make it a goal to gradually eliminate more processed foods every time you go grocery shopping. Many of my patients find the website “100 Days of Real Food” to be an excellent source for recipes and tips on how to ditch the processed foods and switch to clean eating! Dallas and Melissa Hartwig, authors of “It Starts with Food” offer several free must-read resources. You can view them all HERE!
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Smashed Potatoes

Photo used under a Creative Commons license, by mindwhisperings

Smashed Potatoes

2 lbs small organic red-skinned potatoes, cleaned
1/2 c  coconut oil
1/2 c whole fat grass-fed organic milk
1/2 c grated fresh parmesan
4 tbsp of horseradish
salt, pepper, garlic salt, bourbon smoked paprika to taste
parsley (optional, for garnish)

Boil potatoes until fork-tender. Set aside.
Mix remaining ingredients in a sauce pan, heat until warm.
In a large mixing bowl, combine potatoes and warm ingredients.
Beat until just mixed.
Garnish with parsley and serve!

Serves 12.

Nutrition Info: 170 calories, 11 g fat, 4 g protein, 15 g carbs

News You Can Use – Nov 12-21

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 12-November 21 2012!”

Rising obesity strains Europe’s shrinking health budgets

“Exposure” to U.S. may raise immigrants’ obesity risk

Big rise in Americans with diabetes, especially in South

Pepsi Launches Fat Blocking Soft Drink in Japan

GMO Giant Finally Found Guilty!- French Court Rules Against Monsanto in groundbreaking, chemical poisoning case

New Bulimia Treatment Developed

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Thanksgiving + An Intro to Food Addiction

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we talked about Food Addiction, we also had a special segment where we talked about how to eat healthier on Thanksgiving.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:00 – Introduction
5:15 – How much weight do we gain over the holidays?
6:30 – What is the real cause of “food coma”?
7:35 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part I)
12:47 – Caller Question – What is the Difference Between Food Cravings and Food Addiction?
23:30 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part II)
38:18 – Food Addiction – What is Addiction?
39:45 – Caller Question – Can you talk a bit more about spiritual addiction?
41:25 – Caller Question – How does Passive-Aggressive Behavior Relate to Food Addiction?
43:40 – Caller Question – How do you define passive-aggressive behavior? What kinds of things lead to passive-aggressive behavior?
48:05 – Characteristics of Addiction
53:18 – Food Addiction and Bulimarexia
55:56 – Food Addiction and Diabulimia

Links we discussed:

A Healthier Pumpkin Pie
Healthified Corn Bread Stuffing
Grassfed Whipped Cream
Grassfed, Organic Egg Nog
Smashed Potatoes

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Skinny on Fat [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we talked about dietary fat. Is a low-fat diet really as healthy as we are led to believe? Are all fats bad? What types of fats should we avoid? What types of fats are the healthiest?

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:00 – Introduction
3:40 – Saturated Fat: Coconut Oil
5:28 – What are Saturated Fatty Acids?
5:45 – What are Unsaturated Fatty Acids?
6:05 – Is Saturated Fat Unhealthy?
6:45 – Short-chain, Medium-chain, Long-chain, and Very long-chain Fatty Acids
7:40 – Caller Question – What is healthier butter or margarine?
12:40 – Short-chain, Medium-chain, Long-chain, and Very long-chain Fatty Acids
17:54 – Sources of Saturated Fat
18:54 – What oils are the healthiest?
19:20 – What is the role of fatty acids?
19:55 – What are Trans-Fats, Partially Hydrogenated Oils?
20:52 – Caller Question – What is healthier skim milk or whole milk?
27:40 – What are some sources of trans-fats?
28:25 – What are some other names for trans-fats?
29:17 – Why are trans-fats used?
30:05 – Food labelling – Low Fat, Fat Free, Reduced Fat, Light, Lean, Extra Lean
33:30 – How to choose healthy milk
36:40 – What are the best cooking oils?

Links we discussed:

The Benefits of Butter
CLA and Trans-fats
Cooking Oils, Explained.
The Disadvantages of Low Fat Milk.
How to Choose Healthy Milk.
Free Lifestyle Handbook.
The Best Source for Fermented Cod Liver Oil.

Show Summary

Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. (A triglyceride is a combination of a glycerol and 3 fatty acids) Saturated fatty acids are chains of carbon atoms that are fully “saturated” with hydrogen. They have no double bonds. Unsaturated fat consists of fatty acids that do have double bonds.

So, Fatty acids that have double bonds are known as unsaturated. Fatty acids without double bonds are known as saturated. For many years we were told that saturated fats were dangerous and that fats like canola oil were good for us….wrong!

Fatty Acids also differ in length.

Fatty acid chains differ by length as well as in saturation.  This is important because most of us have been told that saturated fat is bad and that unsaturated fat is good.  In fact, the length of the fat may be even more important.

Length is categorized as short to very long

  • Short Chain fatty acids (SCFA) are (always saturated) fatty acids tails of fewer than six carbons. Found mostly in butter fat from cows or goats. (microbes good for immune systems)
  • (MCFA) are fatty acids tails of 6–12 carbons, which can form medium-chain triglycerides. Found in coconut fat
     
  • Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) (Saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated) are fatty acids with tails 13 to 21carbons.  Found in beef, olive oil, black current oil
  • Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) (Highly unsaturated) are fatty acids with tails longer than 22 carbons. Found in Fish oil (EPA, DHA) very important in the functioning of the nervous system.

Short and Medium chain fatty acids do not store as fat in human beings, whereas, long and very long chain fatty acids do.

Unlike other fatty acids, MCFA are absorbed directly from the intestines into the portal vein and sent straight to the liver where they are, for the most part, burned as fuel much like a carbohydrate. In this respect they act more like carbohydrates than like fats.2

Other fats require pancreatic enzymes to break them into smaller units. They are then absorbed into the intestinal wall and packaged into bundles of fat and protein called lipoproteins. These lipoproteins are carried by the lymphatic system, bypassing the liver, and then dumped into the bloodstream, where they are circulated throughout the body. As they circulate in the blood, their fatty components are distributed to all the tissues of the body. The lipoproteins get smaller and smaller, until there is little left of them. At this time they are picked up by the liver, broken apart, and used to produce energy or, if needed, repackaged into other lipoproteins and sent back into the bloodstream to be distributed throughout the body. Cholesterol, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and polyunsaturated fat are all packaged together into lipoproteins and carried throughout the body in this way.

In contrast, medium and short-chain fatty acids are not packaged into lipoproteins but go straight to the liver where they are converted into energy. Ordinarily they are not stored to any significant degree as body fat.

Short and Medium-chain fatty acids produce energy. Other dietary fats produce body fat.

Various fats contain different proportions of saturated and unsaturated fat. Examples of foods containing a high proportion of saturated fat include animal fats such as cream, cheese, butter, and ghee; suet, tallow, lard, and fatty meats; as well as certain vegetable products such as coconut oil, cottonseed oil, palm kernel oil, chocolate, and many prepared foods. Although cottonseed oil is high in saturated fat, it should be avoided due to the fact that it is genetically modified.

In particular, heart and skeletal muscle prefer fatty acids. The brain cannot use fatty acids as a source of fuel; it relies on glucose or ketone bodies.

Trans fats

Trans fats (or trans fatty acids) are created in an industrial process that adds hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid.  Another name for trans fats is “partially hydrogenated oils.”  Look for them on the ingredient list on food packages.

Trans fats raise your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels and lower your good (HDL) cholesterol levels.  Eating trans fats increases your risk of developing heart disease and stroke.  It’s also associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Trans fats can be found in many foods – but especially in fried foods like French fries and doughnuts, and baked goods including pastries, pie crusts, biscuits, pizza dough, cookies, crackers, and stick margarines and shortenings.  You can determine the amount of trans fats in a particular packaged food by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel.  You can also spot trans fats by reading ingredient lists and looking for the ingredients referred to as “partially hydrogenated oils.”

Small amounts of trans fats occur naturally in some meat and dairy products, including beef, lamb and butterfat.  It isn’t clear; though, whether these naturally occurring trans fats have the same bad effects on cholesterol levels as trans fats that have been industrially manufactured.

Companies like using trans fats in their foods because they’re easy to use, inexpensive to produce and last a long time.  Trans fats give foods a desirable taste and texture.  Many restaurants and fast-food outlets use trans fats to deep-fry foods because oils with trans fats can be used many times in commercial fryers.

What exactly does Low Fat Mean?

Fat Free –  Less than 0.5g of fat per serving

XX% Fat Free – Must also meet the low fat claim (below)

Low Fat – 3g or less per serving; or 3g per 100g for a meal or main dish, and 30% of total calories or less

Reduced Fat  – 25% less fat than food it is being compared to

Low Saturated Fat – 1g or less and 15% or less of calories from saturated fat

Light/Lite – 50% less fat or one-third fewer calories than the regular product

Lean – Less than 10g of fat, 4.5g of saturated fat and 95mg of cholesterol per 100g of meat, poultry or seafood

Extra Lean – Less than 5g of fat, 2g of saturated fat and 95mg of cholesterol per serving and per 100g of meat, poultry or seafood.

Low Cholesterol – 20mg or less per serving and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Cholesterol Free – Less than 2mg per serving and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Less Cholesterol – 25% or less than the food it is being compared to, and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Low Calorie – 40 calories or less per serving

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – November 5-12 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 5-November 12 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

GMOs, Eating Disorders & Obesity [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, Obesity

This week we talked about the dangers of Genetically Modified Foods, and trends we are seeing in patients in treatment for obesity or eating disorders. We’ll also shared some shopping tips and some of our favorite resources!

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

1:55 – Food Pollution
3:35 – The Risks of GMOs
5:29 – The US Food Supply
5:50 – The Health Effects of GMOs
9:22 – The Institute for Responsible Technology – Cited Research Studies
11:33 – Caller Questions – How do you know if you are buying GM foods? What is the difference between GM foods and hybrid foods?
29:24 – Wheat – The Impact on Obesity and Eating Disorders
33:15 – Gluten-Free Products – Buyer Beware
34:50 – Ancient Grains
35:30 – Wheat – The Impact on Obesity
39:05 – Wheat – The Impact on Eating Disorders
40:34 – Einkorn
42:48 – The Effects of GMOs on the Immune System
44:57 – GMOs – The Effects on Infants
47:43 – Allergens in GM Foods
50:00 – The Effects of GMOs on the Immune System
50:50 – Celiac Disease
51:34 – GMOs and Gastrointestinal Health

Links We Discussed:
Ancient Grains
The Difference Between Heirloom, Hybrid, GM Seeds
Genetically Modified Foods. Are They Really Safe?
Genetically Modified Foods, Eating Disorders, and Obesity

Let’s Connect!
  • Like me on Facebook
  • Follow me on twitter @drrenae
  • Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form
  • Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement
  • Read About Dr Norton
  • View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’