Monthly Archives: July 2013

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: It’s Not About the Food with Esther Kane

Esther Kane Eating Disorders

Join us on Wednesday August 7 at 7 pm EST as we speak with Esther Kane, author of “It’s Not About Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies“. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE!

Here’s a bit of background info on our guest….

“Esther grew up in the inner city of Toronto and began her work there counselling and facilitating groups for women of all ages and backgrounds who were struggling with chemical dependencies and food/body images issues. After obtaining her Bachelor of Social Work at Ryerson in 1996 at the age of 25, she moved to British Columbia and continued her work as a therapist. In 1998, she obtained her Masters in Social Work from UBC. Her graduating research on Jewish Women and Body Image was published in the Journal of Collaborative Therapies shortly thereafter.

For over a decade, she has worked as a therapist and group facilitator with individuals and families for social service agencies and in private practice while also completing an intense 2-year training program in Multigenerational Family Systems Therapy at Pacific Coast Family Institute in Vancouver.

Esther Kane, is author of “It’s Not About the Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies”. She is currently working on her fourth book, “How to Midwife Your Midlife in a Youth-Obsessed Culture”, which will help women navigate midlife in a healthy and empowering way.”

_______

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated Fats

fats explained

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats were unhealthy, and that they were the root cause of the epidemics of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol in our society. What we know today is that saturated fats are not the problem. It is the polluted and/or processed version of saturated fats along with the overabundance of processed unsaturated fats that are causing the problems. Saturated fats such as grass-fed animal fats and coconut oil, which is mostly a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) along with unsaturated Omega 3 fats and the naturally occurring trans-fat CLA, are exceptionally good, indeed, healing for the body. Whereas man-made trans-fats and vegetable or seed fats that have been hydrogenated are literally killing us.

So in a nutshell:

Good Fat = saturated grass-fed animal fat, coconut fat (medium chain fatty acid) and unsaturated Omega 3 fats, especially those from natural sources such as flax seed, salmon, walnuts and leafy greens. (See next in series for complete list)

Bad Fat = Unsaturated trans-fats, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated vegetable and seed fats that have been heated and/or hydrogenated.  Corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oils should be avoided either because they are innately unhealthy or because of the manner in which they have been processed.

Types of Fats

There are several ways to categorize fats: Saturated or unsaturated; Mono or polyunsaturated; Trans or non-transfat; and Short chain (SCFA), Medium chain (MCFA) and Long chain (LCFA). Among the monounsaturated and the polyunsaturated fats there are the Omega fats, which are divided into Essential (Omegas 3 and 6) and Non-Essential (Omega 5, 7, and 9) fatty acids.

Saturated vs Unsaturated Fat

Most fats are either saturated or unsaturated. There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When an oil is saturated, it means that the molecule has all the hydrogen atoms it can hold.  Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem, because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals.

Free radicals damage healthy cells.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to various cancers including skin cancer. In contrast, unrefined cold-pressed coconut oil, which is primarily a saturated medium chain fatty acid, does not become rancid, and never needs refrigeration, assuming that its structure has not been damaged by processing. (Always buy unrefined, cold-pressed nut and seed oils instead of the refined version.)

Characteristics of Healthy Saturated Fats

Saturated fats from grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese) grass-fed/grass-finished beef, pastured pork and poultry (that are fed non-GMO grains and are usually organic) coconut and palm kernel oil and cacao have the following health benefits:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of cell membranes. They give cells their necessary stiffness and integrity.
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower lipoprotein – A substance in the blood that indicates proneness to heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids. Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acids are better retained in the tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

Unsaturated Fats (for the geeks)

Unlike the saturated fats that have a single bond between carbon atoms, monounsaturated fats have a single double bond between carbon atoms while polyunsaturated fats have two or more double bonds between carbon atoms. Unsaturated fats are primarily made up of the Omega fatty acids 3,5,6,7, and 9. (Trans-fats are also unsaturated. Stay tuned for our article on Trans Fats.)

Stay tuned for part 2 of this four part series.  In Part 2 we’ll talk about Omega Fatty Acids.

Updated on Aug 5 2013.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Source: The Skinny on Fats

Show Notes: How Eating Disorders are Changing With Maria Rago

Dr. Maria Rago

On this week’s episode, we talked with Dr. Maria Rago about How Eating Disorders Are Changing. Dr. Maria Rago is the Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) and clinical director and founder of Rago and Associates Counseling Services.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on BlogTalkRadio

In this episode we covered:

2:42 – About Dr. Maria Rago
6:12 –  How Dr. Rago became interested in the treatment of eating disorders.
7:10 – Anorexia Nervosa and Discrimination
9:45 – Eating Disorders and Food Pollution
12:40 – Abercrombie & Fitch – Obesity Discrimination and the Anti-Bullying Campaign
15:15 – Caller Question – What is your view on the problems caused by obesity? Should people that are addicted to certain foods or food additives include those foods in their diet in moderation?
27:40 – How are eating disorders changing? What is orthorexia?
34:25 – Why are we seeing changes in eating disorders?
35:49 – The psychological effect of the Boy Scouts banning obese children from the Jamboree.
40:40 – How ANAD has changes as eating disorders have changed.

Links we discussed:

Maji and Mongo – “Let’s Eat!” Book Review
Updated Online Survey
Dr. Norton’s Interview with Prevent Obesity
Dr. Rago’s Website – Rago Therapy
The Official Website of ANAD

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – July 21-28 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 21- July 28 2013!”

Ethnicity and Eating Disorders – Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are more common in white than in black women, a US study has reported. Previous studies on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have mainly focused on young white women. As a result the prevalence of these eating disorders and others in ethnic minorities is not known. Learn More.

Boy Scouts Ban Obese Kids from Outing – Hiking! Zip-lining! Rock climbing! About 30,000 Boy Scouts and 7,000 adults are out in the mountains of southern West Virginia for the National Scouts Jamboree — and they all had to meet a body mass index cut-off. The Boy Scouts of America mandated that no one — adult or child — with a BMI of 40 or above could be accepted into the Jamboree, which is taking place July 15-24. Learn More.

Don’t Settle for ‘Almost Recovered’ – In their eminently practical and reassuring Almost Anorexic: Is My (or My Loved One’s) Relationship with Food a Problem? authors Jennifer J. Thomas, PhD and Jenni Schaefer describe that broad range of people who do not have a full-blown eating disorder but who exhibit some symptoms of one. Despite the lack of dramatic and obvious symptoms, those who inhabit this gray zone on the health/illness continuum can nevertheless experience a great deal of anguish. Learn More.

Bipolar Disorder Tied to Risk of Disease, Early Death – In a large new study, people with bipolar disorder were more likely than those without the mental illness to die from a number of causes, and to die almost a decade younger. Learn More.

Scientists Find How ‘Obesity Gene’ Makes People Fat – Scientists have unraveled how a gene long associated with obesity makes people fat by triggering increased hunger, opening up potential new ways to fight a growing global health problem. Learn More.

Chobani Caught in Crosshairs of GMO Debate – The non-GMO movement is making Chobani its latest target as activists begin to pressure dairy brands that had until now largely escaped scrutiny. An organization called GMO Inside is calling on the Greek yogurt maker to stop marketing its products as “real” and “natural” until it stops using milk from cows that are fed with genetically modified feed. Learn More.

Calorie and Nutritional Labeling for Alcohol, Coming Soon – More information is always better, especially when it comes to knowing what you’re eating and drinking. Learn More.

100 Percent of Children  are Found to be Exposed to Excessive Arsenic, Dioxins, and Pesticides in Latest Study –  A new study on dietary toxin exposure found that all the participating children exceeded the cancer benchmark levels for arsenic, dioxins, dieldrin, and DDE, while 95 percent of preschoolers exceeded the non-cancer benchmark for acrylamide. More worrying was that the cancer risk ratios were exceeded 100-fold for arsenic and dioxins. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Ugly

Sugar: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly


Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This is the third installment of my three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Ugly

When naturally derived glucose is consumed, a set of reactions occurs in the body, which allows it to be used as energy. When fructose is consumed, however, it apparently behaves more like fat with respect to the hormones involved in body weight regulation. Most of the carbohydrates we eat are made up of chains of glucose. When glucose enters the bloodstream, the body releases insulin to help regulate it. Fructose, on the other hand, is processed in the liver. If the liver cannot handle all of the fructose coming its way, it starts making fats from the fructose and sending them off into the bloodstream as triglycerides. This leads to all manner of problems, including increased:

  • Risk of abnormal blood clotting ailments and hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Total blood cholesterol levels (it serves in part as the raw material for the synthesis of cholesterol within the body)
  • LDL -“bad” cholesterol levels, and
  • Blood triglyceride levels, especially in diabetics (fructose has a greater propensity to increase serum triglycerides than glucose).

The CDC defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table”. Examples of added sugars include white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, maple syrup, pancake syrup, fructose sweetener, liquid fructose, honey, molasses, anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Sign up to receive my FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: How Eating Disorders are Changing with Maria Rago

Dr. Maria Rago

Join us on TUESDAY July 23 at 7 pm EST as we talk with Dr. Maria Rago, Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) and clinical director and founder of Rago and Associates Counseling Services. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE.

“Dr. Maria Rago is a licensed clinical psychologist for the last 20 years working as a specialist in eating disorders.  She was clinical director of the Eating Disorders Program at Linden Oaks hospital at Edwards in Naperville IL for over 10 years, helping to make the program a national leader, including the creation of the innovative Arabella House, a residential group home for eating disorders treatment.  Dr. Rago is also the founder of Rago & Associates Counseling Services, specializing in eating disorders and other important issues that people need help with.  Dr. Rago loves to travel across the country to speak to college students and other groups about loving their body and eating without fear, and she is the author of, a book that speaks out against the literature that promotes restrictive eating and acceptance for only the thin.  Dr. Rago is also proud to be the Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) the nation’s first eating disorders foundation, created in 1976.”

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Sign up to receive my FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: July 14-21 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 14- July 21 2013!”

Why Intuitive Eating Can Be Difficult – Several studies have linked impaired interoception to the development and maintenance eating disorders. A new study, published in the journal Appetite, found that interoception is linked to a person’s ability to be successful at intuitive eating. The better your interoception, the better you are at intuitive eating. Learn More.

What If Everything We Think About Obesity is Wrong? – What if some of our fundamental ideas about obesity are just wrong? This is the question asked by Peter Attia, a surgeon and researcher who has dedicated his medical career to investigating the relationship between nutrition, obesity and diabetes. Learn More.

Scientific Evidence: Diet Drinks Lead to Obesity, Disease – Earlier this week, a paper published in Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism pointed out something that the beverage industry would like you to ignore: accumulating evidence suggests that frequent consumers of sugar substitutes may be at increased risk of excessive weight gain, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Learn More.

Eating Disorders in LA Teens Equally Common in Men and Women –  Surprising new results are coming in from a study of Los Angeles area high school students and their relationship towards eating disorders. As it turns out, the stereotypical image of the anorexic 16-year-old cheerleader is no longer very accurate at all, especially in Los Angeles. Learn More.

Mid-life Eating Disorders: The Divorcees and Exercise Junkies Flying Under the Radar – Eating disorders are typically associated with adolescent women with anorexia and bulimia. But new research shows many victims of eating disorders are in their 30s and 40s—men and women struggling with discontent about ageing and taking drastic measures to achieve thin, ‘ripped’ bodies, or binge eating to try and ward of shame and guilt. Learn More.

Study Links Weight Talks with Eating Disorders in Teens  – A new finding reveals a strong association between the manner in which parents discuss weight with children and the likelihood of developing eating disorders. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Bad

high fructose corn syrup

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Bad

Commercially, fructose is derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn. This is where things get sticky. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose:
  1. Crystalline fructose is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of enzymes to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.
  2. High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a mixture of glucose and fructose. It is made up of any of a group of corn syrups that have undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce the desired sweetness.
  3.  Sucrose, the third form, is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer.
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Sign up to receive my FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Prevent Obesity Interview

PreventObesity.net

Prevent Obesity
is the only online national network of people solely dedicated to reversing the childhood obesity epidemic. They connect Leaders across the movement with hundreds of thousands of supporters in advocacy efforts to implement policies that will help reduce childhood obesity nationwide.

A project of the American Heart Association, Prevent Obesity offers free tools, services and support to the people and organizations who are working to ensure children everywhere can eat healthier and become more physically active. Recently, I was honored to be featured on their website. Be sure to check it out HERE.


Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Sign up to receive my FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Good

sugar - the good, the bad, the ugly

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Good

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) that plays a critical role in providing energy for humans. It is found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar”. Glucose is one of the analytics the doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about 0.1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in Hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low these processes are impaired. So it is vital to our physiological as well as psychological well-being.

Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The majority of glucose in grain is combined into long chains of molecules called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches. Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose. The latter produces a higher blood sugar level.

Fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. Like glucose, it is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Pure, dry fructose is a very sweet, white, odorless, crystalline solid and is the most water-soluble of all the sugars, making it ideal as a sweetener. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

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