Monthly Archives: October 2013

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Eating Disorder Treatment, Obesity, and The GAPS Diet

Kim Schuette - GAPs and Eating Disorder Treatment

Last night we had a great conversation with Kim Schuette about “Eating Disorders, Obesity, and The Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet”. Kim Schuette is Clinical Nutritionist and GAPS Certified Practitioner. This podcast is especially important if you are overcoming obesity or are in treatment for anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, or bulimarexia.

You can read more about Kim HERE.

Show Notes

2:42 – About Kim Schuette.

8:10 – How Kim Schuette became interested in The GAPS Diet and helping people improve their health.

14:53 – What is The GAPS Diet?

19:33 – How the The GAPS Diet different from other diets? Why does The GAPS Diet work when other diets don’t?

24:30 – Do any food groups have to be eliminated on The GAPS diet? Are grains allowed?

32:46 – The differences between The GAPS Diet and the Paleo diet.

36:13 – What books are recommended for those wanting to learn more about The GAPS Diet?

43:12 – Why is a shorter cooked bone broth initially used in The GAPS Diet?

47:40 – What symptoms would appear if someone had a breached blood-brain barrier if they consumed a long-cooked bone broth?

50:20 – What are your recommendations for safe personal care products?

52:25 – What is the most important piece of information about The GAPS Diet that your audience should know?

58:20 – How can we strengthen our immune systems and the immune systems of our children?

Links We Discussed

The Norton Center’s FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Gluten-free Quiche Recipe

Gluten-free Pizza Crust Recipe

Mashed Cauliflower Recipe

Gapalicious Phone App

Gut and Psychology Syndrome Book

www.gapsinfo.com

Biodynamic Wellness

Environmental Working Group – Skindeep – personal care items safety database

Dying to Look Good

Nourishing Traditions Cookbook

The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: October 27-November 3 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 27 – November 3 2013!”

Largest Trial Worldwide: Psychotherapy Treats Anorexia Effectively – A large-scale study has now shown that adult women with anorexia whose disorder is not too severe can be treated successfully on an out-patient basis. Learn more.

Something “Needs Improvement,” But It’s Not Your Body – The phrase, “Needs Improvement” seems like a fair way to assess the spelling or cursive handwriting skills of an elementary school student. But the body composition of an adolescent child? Perhaps not. The parents of one 12-year-old girl in California recently received a letter from their child’s school stating that their daughter’s body composition “needs improvement.” As you can imagine, this letter came as quite a shock, especially since the young woman is muscular, athletic and does Jujitsu four times a week. However, according to the Body Mass Index grade given by the school, her body isn’t quite good enough. Learn More.

Pediatricians Call for Limits on Kids’ Screen Time – Families should make a “media use plan” and set clear rules about TV, cell phones and other devices, pediatricians said today. That includes limiting kids’ screen time to one or two hours per day. Parents should also keep children’s rooms free of TV and Internet access. Learn More.

Talk Therapy May Ease Health-Related Anxiety – Talk therapy performed by nurses and other clinic staff may help people with health anxiety stop worrying about being sick when they’re not, a new study suggests. Learn More.

A Tale of Two Anorexia Genetics Studies – Over the past month, there have been two major, news-grabbing studies on the genetics of anorexia. Both of these studies carried headlines saying something like “Anorexia genes found!”. There are several problems with this. Learn More.

Women With Type-1 Diabetes Who Restrict Insulin Die an Average of 13 Years Earlier than Those Who Don’t – In a sobering study of 341 girls and women with type 1 diabetes, researchers found that nearly 30 percent skipped or reduced necessary insulin injections to lose weight. Learn More.

Health Startup ‘Noom’ Received NIH Grant to Study Smartphone Tech in Eating Disorder Treatment –  The NIH grant is funding a study on the impacts of smartphone technology in eating disorder treatment. The two-year pilot study, which looks specifically at individuals with binge eating problems, will be led by eating disorder researcher Tom Hildebrandt at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. Learn More.

Universities Urged to Help Students with Eating Disorders – Many students with eating disorders struggle to get the treatment they need at university, warns a charity. Without help, students with eating disorders risk dropping out of their studies. Learn More.

Clinician Identified of Youth Abusing Over-the-Counter Products for Weight Control in Large U.S. Integrated Health System –  Abuse of over-the-counter products, such as diet pills and laxatives, for weight control by adolescents is well-documented and can lead to serious medical conditions. Yet only a small percentage of youth with disordered weight control behaviors receive treatment. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) with Kim Schuette

Kim Schuette - GAPs and Eating Disorder Treatment

Join us on WEDNESDAY October 30  at 7:30 pm EST. We’ll be speaking with Kim Schuette about “Eating Disorder Treatment and the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) Diet”. Kim Schuette is Clinical Nutritionist and GAPS Certified Practitioner. This episode will be prerecorded, but you can submit your questions through our contact form. You can tune in HERE.

Some background information about our guest:

“Kim has been in private practice in the field of nutrition since 1999. She earned her certification as a Certified Nutritionist in 2002 from the National Institute of Nutrition Education and in that same year established Biodynamic Wellness, now located in Solana Beach, California, which staffs four additional nutritionists whom she has mentored. Her love for organic gardening, gourmet cooking and healing through foods and real food-based nutritional therapies led her into a practice where she offers private consultations specializing in nutritional and biotherapeutic drainage therapy to address gut/bowel and digestive disorders, male and female hormonal imbalances, cancer support, ADD/ADHD challenges and a myriad of other health concerns. Kim introduced the GAPS Diet to clients in 2006 and in 2011 became a Certified GAPS™ Practitioner under the guidance of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. Additionally she has been trained in hair mineral analysis, salivary hormone balancing and blood chemistry assessment.

Kim teaches numerous workshops centered on the work of Drs. Weston Price, Francis Pottenger and Melvin Page. Her workshop topics range from children’s health and female hormonal concerns to transitioning to a whole foods diet. Kim is an award-winning activist for her work in children’s nutrition and preconception nutrition. Additionally, she was named “Best Alternative Health Practitioner of 2013” by Ranch & Coast Magazine in their annual “Best of San Diego” edition in March 2013. She serves on the honorary board of the Weston A. Price Foundation as well as the San Diego Chapter co-leader of the Weston A. Price Foundation. She is the mother of three healthy children (two adults and one teenager). Kim resides in Encinitas, California with her husband and their youngest son.

You can learn more at Biodynamicwellness.com and Gapsinfo.com.”

______________

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Gluten-free Pizza Crust

https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisliang82/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisliang82/

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

This recipe for pizza crust is cauliflower-based. It contains good fats and gluten free! For more delicious recipes, be sure to visit The Recipe Corner.

Gluten-free Pizza Crust

1 head (Small Head) shredded Cauliflower
¼ cups Parmesan Cheese
¼ cups Mozzarella Cheese
¼ cup grass-fed butter
¼ teaspoons Salt and pepper
½ teaspoons Italian herbs
½ teaspoons Garlic juice
1 Egg
Red Pepper Flakes (optional)
1 Tablespoon Chia Powder (optional)

  1. The easiest way to grate cauliflower is to do it in a food processor using the grating blade. If you do not have one, a cheese grater works. The idea is to use as much of the head as possible.  It should look like snow when you are done.

  2. Microwave cauliflower for 3 minutes and drain well. Do not add water! Let it cool completely.

  3. Now you have to wring it out – if you don’t, it won’t work!

  4. Mix all remaining ingredients with cauliflower to form the dough.
  5. Form into a ball.
  6. Place between two sheets of parchment paper and roll out.
  7. Transfer parchment paper to pizza stone and bake for 8 to 11 minutes.
  8. Add favorite toppings and bake until done.

Nutrition (for ¼ of pizza crust) – 110 calories, 6 g of fat, 9 g of protein, 4 g of carbs, 2 g of fiber

_______________

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Blog: Mashed Cauliflower

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rooey/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rooey/

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

For more recipes, be sure to visit my Recipe Corner!

Mashed Cauliflower

  • 8 cups bite-size cauliflower florets (about 1 head)
  • 2-4 capfuls garlic juice
  • 1/2 cup Kalona cottage cheese or any organic, grassfed cottage cheese
  • 4 teaspoons extra-virgin cold pressed organic coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon grass-fed butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • Snipped fresh chives for garnish (optional)

The easiest way to grate cauliflower is to do it in a food processor using the grating blade. If you do not have one, a cheese grater works. The idea is to use as much of the head as possible.  It should look like snow when you are done.

Place grated cauliflower into a microwaveable, covered dish. Do not add water. Microwave cauliflower for 3 minutes and drain well.

Place the grated microwaved cauliflower and the above ingredients in a food processor. Pulse several times, then process until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a serving bowl. Drizzle with butter and garnish with chives, if desired. Serve hot.

Serves 6.

Nutrition Info: Per serving – 100 calories, 6 g of fat, 3 g of protein, 6 g of carbs, 1 g of fiber

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Gluten-free Quiche

Gluten Free Quiche

Photo courtesy of www.laurawendlingFDN.com

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

This recipe for quiche has a cauliflower crust that is awesome, and it is loaded with good fat and gluten free!

Gluten-free Bacon (or Mushroom) Quiche Crust

Ingredients:
2 cups grated cauliflower* (Use stems of florets, but not green parts The easiest way to grate cauliflower is to do it in a food processor using the grating blade. If you do not have one, a cheese grater works. The idea is to use as much of the head as possible.  It should look like snow when you are done.)
2 eggs
1 cup organic coconut flour
a pinch of salt, pepper, italian herbs
1/2 c shredded organic, grassfed mozzarella or provolone cheese (grate your own please)
1/2 c grassfed butter
1/2 Trader’s Point Whole Milk, or any raw/lightly pasteurized, organic, grassfed milk
1 cap of garlic juice

  1. Microwave cauliflower for 3 minutes and drain well. Do not add water! Let it cool completely.
  2. Now you have to wring it out – if you don’t,  it won’t work! Just put it in a clean dish towel and squeeze out the excess liquid.
  3. Mix all remaining ingredients with cauliflower to form the dough.
  4. Form into a ball and roll out or simply press it into a 9″ glass pie dish.

Bacon (or Mushroom) Filling

8 ounces bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (or 1 cup diced mushroom caps plus butter for sautéing)
1/2 onion, diced
Salt, pepper, Bourbon-smoked Paprika
1 cap garlic juice
6 large eggs
1 cup Trader’s Point full-fat milk (or Snowville heavy cream), or raw/lightly-pasteurized organic grass-fed milk/cream
1 cup shredded cheese

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Bake pie shell for 8 minutes. Remove from the oven; lower the temperature to 325 degrees.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook the bacon (or mushroom in grass-fed butter) over medium heat, stirring often, until crisp, about 5 minutes; using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.
  3. Add the onion and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper as well garlic juice to the bacon fat in the skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 3 or 4 minutes. Transfer the onion to the baked pie shell.
  4. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with the cream using a mixer; stir in the cheese (sautéed mushroom) and the cooked bacon.
  5. Pour the mixture into the pie shell. Bake until set, about 40 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes before slicing.

Makes 8 servings.

Nutrition Info

Bacon Quiche – one serving – (made with full fat milk) – 495 calories, 40 g of fat, 18 g of protein, 15 g of carbs, 6 g of fiber

Mushroom Quiche – one serving – (made with full fat milk) – 410 calories, 32 g of fat, 15 g of protein, 14 g of carbs, 6 g of fiber

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
 

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: October 20-27 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 20 – October 27 2013!”

Eating Disorders on the Rise: What You Need to Know – More kids than ever before are dealing with eating disorders in the United States, and the problem is showing up much earlier, too. According to a study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, children under 12 who were hospitalized for an eating disorder increased by 119 percent between 1999 and 2006. Learn More.

Researchers Identify First Gene Mutations Linked to Eating Disorders – Eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia have long been known to run in families, but scientists haven’t been able to identify specific gene mutations linked to them—until now. In a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers studied the genes of two families severely affected by eating disorders and found two mutations associated with the mental conditions. Learn More.

Mexico Tries Taxes to Combat Obesity – Congress’s lower house of Congress passed late Thursday a special tax on junk food that is seen as potentially the broadest of its kind, part of an ambitious Mexican government effort to contain runaway rates of obesity and diabetes. The House passed the proposed measure to charge a 5% tax on packaged food that contains 275 calories or more per 100 grams, on grounds that such high-calorie items typically contain large amounts of salt and sugar and few essential nutrients. Learn More.

At-Home ‘Tasting Game’ Helps Kids to Accept Vegetables –  Using a game at home, parents can help their children learn to like vegetables, a new study shows. Learn More.

Washington State Sues Lobbyists Over Campaign Against GMO Labeling – A lobbying group for major U.S. food manufacturers has violated campaign finance laws in its attempt to block a measure that would require labeling of genetically modified foods in Washington state, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by the state’s attorney general. Learn More.

Roundup is an Endocrine-Disrupting, Cancer-Causing Toxin at Parts per Trillion Levels; GM Soybeans also Link to Causing Cancer – The journal Food and Chemical Toxicology has accepted for publication a new study that links exposure to Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, the active ingredient of which is glyphosate, to severe endocrine disruption and breast cancer. Learn More.

An Alternative to Leaving College for Eating Disorder Treatment – For those of you who are college students now, or have family members or loved ones who are, here’s a promising new form of eating disorders treatment. In response to the large number of students with severe eating disorders seen at the Duke University student counseling center, Duke Health System and the School of Medicine at Duke have just launched an intensive evening treatment program. The idea is to try to help students get their disorder under control without having to leave school. Learn More.

FDA FINALLY Agrees to Kick Carcinogens Out of Your Poultry – Arsenic-containing feed additives given to chicken and turkeys are on their way out, thanks to a recent agency ruling. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – October 15-22 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 15 – October 22 2013!”

Binge Eating Disorder is Different from Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa – Food addiction is not yet recognised as a mental disorder but certain obese individuals clearly display addictive-like behaviour towards food. To achieve a formal diagnostic status, ‘food addiction’ requires a stronger evidence base to support the claim that certain ingredients have addictive properties identical to addictive drugs of abuse. This topic is up for debate in the session, ‘Binge eating obesity is a food addiction’. Learn More.

Animals are Having an Obesity Crisis Too – Americans aren’t the only ones getting fatter — our animals are also growing overweight, reports Pro Publica. And it isn’t just pets and lab animals piling on the pounds (though they are; the likelihood of chimps living with or near humans being obese increased tenfold between 1985 and 2005): one study found feral rats in Baltimore are also getting plumper. Learn More.

Therapy Helps Relieve Stomach Aches for Some Kids – Talk therapy may help some children with frequent and unexplained stomach pain, a new study suggests. More than half of kids and teenagers who met weekly with a therapist had their stomach aches lessen or go away within a year. A similar proportion improved after regular appointments with a pediatrician, researchers found. Learn More.

Non-Regular Bedtimes Tied to Kids’ Behavior Problems – Kids without a regular bedtime tend to have more behavior problems at home and at school, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when children started going to sleep at a more consistent time, their behavior improved as well. Learn More.

Puberty and Eating Disorders – The Perfect Storm – In a recent paper in Hormones and Behavior, Kelly Klump reviewed what we know about puberty, eating disorders, and disordered eating. Especially in females, the surge of sex hormones seems to activate underlying genetic risk factors and alter neurochemistry. Although researchers still aren’t sure exactly what is going on, they are collecting a vast body of evidence that puberty is a particularly high risk period for Eating Disorders. Learn More.

New USDA Rules Further Degrade Integrity of Organic Certification – USDA ruling sidesteps the law, makes it easier for Big Food to continue adding junk ingredients to organic foods. Learn More.

Bottled Water: Your New Hormone Disruptor –  German researchers have just published a study finding nearly 25,000 chemicals in bottled water. And some of those chemicals act like potent pharmaceuticals in your body. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Amazing Benefits of Bone Broth

Besides the exquisite flavor that bone broth imparts into any savory dish, bone broth:

▪    Is full of minerals.

▪    Fortifies the immune system.

▪    Enhances digestion.

▪    Nourishes all body parts related to collagen. This means joints, tendons, ligaments, skin, mucus membranes, and bone.

This is especially important for patients in treatment for obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder as malnutrition, weakened immune systems, leaky gut and other digestive issues are very common in these individuals.

Bone Broth Is Mineral Rich

Clearly, long-cooked broth made from bones will be rich in a dynamic array of minerals. Bone is, after all, highly mineralized. A well-made bone broth will give your body calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, sodium, potassium, sulfate, and fluoride. All delivered in a form that your body understands. In order to pull these precious minerals from the bone during cooking, add an acid, like apple cider vinegar, to the filtered water for cooking the bones.

The vegetables such as carrots, celery, onion, garlic cloves and spices add flavor to your bone broth. I use Himalayan organic salts and Bourbon or alder smoked peppers.

How the Collagen in Bone Broth Heals the Gut

Bones, marrow, skin, tendons, ligaments, and the cartilage that sometimes accompanies a bone are all made of a protein molecule called collagen. Collagen contains two very special amino acids: proline and glycine.

Collagen has been found to help heal the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the stomach and the intestines. This means that heartburn or GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) and many of the conditions associated with intestinal inflammation can be helped with bone broth.

  • Collagen and gelatin have been shown to benefit gastric ulcers.
  • Proline is necessary for the formation of collagen.
  • Glycine improves digestion by increasing gastric acid secretion.
  • Glutamine, also found in bone broth, is an important metabolic fuel for cells in the small intestine.

Bone broth is also good for you if you have Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis. People with these disorders often have a deficiency in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Bone broth is a source of GAGs.

My Favorite Reason to Drink Bone Broth? It Helps with Wrinkles, Stretch Marks, and Cellulite!

Drinking bone broth makes skin supple. Cellulite does not arise from carrying excess fat. Haven’t you ever seen a thin person with cellulite? It is common. Most people are taught to choose skinless and boneless meat and to fear animal fats. This is why even those who are slender will not be able to shake cellulite until they change their diet.

▪    Cellulite results from a lack of connective tissue.

▪    The smoothness of skin is from an abundance of connective tissue.

▪    Collagen-rich bone broth will supply your skin with the tools that it needs to support itself.

▪    Adding chicken feet, animal joints, and knuckles to a bone broth will increase the amount of collagen available.

MAKING A GOOD BONE BROTH

Eating Disorder Treatment Recipe: Bone Broth

When collecting bones, go for variety.

This is because the marrow found in bones is either yellow marrow or red marrow. Yellow marrow is found in the central portion of long bones. It is where fats are stored.

Red marrow, on the other hand, is found in flat bones. These are:

  • Hip bone
  • Sternum
  • Skull
  • Ribs
  • Vertebrae
  • Scapula
  • The ends of long bones

Red marrow is valuable because it is where blood stem cells are found. When you drink a broth made with a good source of red marrow, you are drinking all those stem cell factors that ultimately build your body’s strength and support your own immune function.

Not Sure What Kind of Animal Bone to Use?

Any kind will do. You can even use an assortment of different animals. Just make sure that all bones are sourced from animals that are organic and grass-fed or pastured and free-range. Remember, everything that the animal ate, how it lived, and where it lived all factor into the health benefits of your broth.

You can purchase bones ready to cook, or you can collect bones from meals and store them in your freezer until you have enough to build a good stock. Remember to only use bones and feet from animals that are grass-fed or free-range.

Make sure the bones, especially large bones, are cut into small pieces. This reduces cooking time and allows more material to become a part of the broth.

Cooking Suggestions

  1. Bake rinsed bones in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes
  2. Place cooled bones into a large stock pot and cover with 2/3 gallon of filtered water.
  3. Add 1/4 of apple cider vinegar or wine to water prior to cooking. This helps to pull out important nutrients from the bones.
  4. Add 1 or 2 quartered onions, 6 to 8 cut up carrots, ½ head of celery stalks, 10 to 15 garlic cloves, Himalayen salt, pepper, and your favorite spices. Leave plenty of room for water to boil.
  5. Heat slowly. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to simmer for at least 6 hours. Remove scum as it arises.
  6. Cook long and slow. Chicken bones can cook for 6-48 hours. Beef bones can cook for 12-72 hours. A long and slow cook time is necessary in order to fully extract the nutrients in and around bone.

After cooking, the broth will cool and a layer of fat will harden on top. This layer protects the broth beneath. Strain the broth, mashing up the vegetables so that the juice ends up in the broth. Discard the rest (unless you have a meat eating pet).

When the broth is cold, it should have fat in it. Do not discard the fat if you used grass-fed animals.

Discard this layer only when you are about to eat the broth.

Consume broth within 3 days or freeze for later use. Sip on the broth or use as the base in a nutrient-dense soup.

Eating Disorder Treatment Recipes - Bone Broth

Use Bone Broth with Your Next Fast

During a fast, the body receives little nourishment from food. Because of this, sometimes muscle tissue can break down.

  • When glycine is consumed, this limits or prevents the breakdown of protein tissue, like muscle.
  • Glycine is used for gluconeogenesis, which is when the liver makes sugar fuel for the body to burn in the absence of glucose.
  • Glycine is also necessary to detoxify the body of chemicals. This is because glycine is a precursor amino acid for glutathione, which is a major antioxidant and detoxifying agent in the body.
  • Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. It has been shown to improve sleep, as well as boost memory and performance.

What to Remember Most About This Article…

Bone broth is rich in minerals to strengthen the immune system, especially the part found in the gut, by supporting healthy digestion. Bone broth also contains collagen to strengthen tendons, joints, ligaments, bone, and skin. On top of that, collagen will support healthy skin to make it supple and strong to reduce the appearance of cellulite.

The collagen in bone broth will help heal the lining of the gut and relieve heartburn, GERD, Leaky Gut and other types of intestinal inflammation.

You can make bone broth at home and even use it in your next fast to give your body ample nourishment. The glycine in bone broth will detoxify the body of harmful chemicals, improve sleep, and boost memory and performance.

To learn more about the benefits of bone broth, be sure to listen to my interview with Chef Lance Roll!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: October 7-14 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 7 – October 14 2013!”

For Boys with Eating Disorders, Finding Treatment Can Be Hard – Eating disorders are commonly thought to be a problem for girls and women, but an estimated 10 million American men have an eating disorder at some point in their lives, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. Psychologists and psychiatrists who treat eating disorders say those numbers are on the rise. The condition can be life-threatening. Learn More.

Expanded Clinical Definition of Anorexia May Help More Teens – A change in the way anorexia is diagnosed may make it easier to help more teens, not just thin ones, with the illness. Previously, overweight or obese teens were more likely to fall through the cracks when they developed anorexic behaviors. Now, the release of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) has broadened the disorder criteria by taking away the weight requirement. The change shifts the focus of the diagnosis from “being thin” to the behaviors of those with the illness. Learn More.

Study: Dieting Demands from Parents Can Create Teen Eating Disorders – Parents’ attitudes about dinnertime, and about food in general, can have a large impact on their children’s eating habits. A new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that many teenagers have a negative attitude, psychopathology about food consumption learned from their parents. And eating disorders are often something found to develop during the teenage years. Learn More.

Research Find Measurable Predictors of Eating Disorder Recovery –  New research from Stanford has begun to pin down more concrete barometers of long-term recovery, physical and mental signs that could indicate whether a patient is ready to end treatment or perhaps might require more. Learn More.

Reduced Fat Milk Contributing to Obesity?!? – One of the standard recommendations offered by health professionals to consumers is to consume 3 servings a day of low fat / non fat dairy. The USDA MyPlate recommendations show a glass of milk as part the infographic depicting what people should eat. But what if skim milk was actually not doing anything to help our waistline? This seemingly strange conclusion has been reached by two well respected researchers – David Ludwig, of Boston’s Children Hospital, and Dr. Walter Willett, of the Harvard School of Public Health. Learn More.

Link Found Between ADHD and Obesity – A 33-year study has found that men with a childhood history of ADHD had double the incidence of obesity compared to non-ADHD men. Learn More.

Identical Twins with Significant Weight Differences Shed Light on the Phenomenon of Metabolically Healthy Obesity – A unique study of 16 pairs of identical twins in which one twin is obese and the other lean has yielded some surprising results. In 8 of the pairs of twins, the obese twin was as ‘metabolically healthy’ as his or her lean co-twin, while in the other 8 pairs, the obese twin had a poorer blood fat profile, higher liver fat and increased insulin production and resistance, and higher blood pressure — all hallmarks of unhealthy obesity that can lead to diabetes, heart problems and other complications. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.