Monthly Archives: November 2013

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: The Benefits of Grass-fed Butter with Dale Stotlzfus

benefits of butter

On this week’s podcast we spoke with Dale Stoltzfus of ‘Oasis Bird-in-Hand’ about the benefits of eating grass-fed butter. This episode is especially important if you suffer from obesity, an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, bulimarexia, or if you’re interested in learning more about eating clean!

What We Covered:

7:34 – Is all organic butter created equal? The importance of knowing the source of your organic, grass-fed butter.

12:20 – How to eat organic on a budget.

17:30 – The safety of genetically modified foods. The effect of genetically modified foods on our health.

25:12 – Where to find raw milk. What areas of the United States is raw milk legal?

33:23 – What breeds of cow produce the healthiest dairy products?

43:35 – The background of the co-op name ‘Oasis Bird-in-Hand).

46:15 – The importance of getting young people back to farming.

48:50 – The increasing prevalence of Leaky Gut Syndrome.

Links we discussed:

The Norton Center’s FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Oasis at Bird-in-Hand can ship cheese, meats and butter anywhere in the USA. For pricing and shipping questions, call (717) 288-2154.

Raw Milk Laws by State

Bulletproof Coffee

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: November 24-December 1, 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 24-December 1 2013!”

Target Empty Calories in Kid’s Diet at the Source [study] – About a third of the calories kids eat at school, at fast food restaurants and from grocery stores are “empty calories” that should be targeted for reduction, according to a new study. Learn More.

Screen Time Linked to Childhood Obesity (Again) – New research finds that each extra hour of screen time can add up to extra weight gain for kids. Learn More.

Americans – Why Do You Keep Refrigerating Your Eggs? – The U.S. is one of the only countries on Earth that keeps chicken eggs in cold storage. But why? Learn More.

Decades-long Cohort Study Links Nut Consumption with Lower Mortality Rates – Nuts are already known to be a healthy, nutrient-dense food, and even the Food and Drug Administration suggests that daily nut consumption as part of a low-fat diet “may reduce the risk of heart disease.” However, few studies have investigated nut consumption in relation to total mortality, and many that have are quite limited. That is why researchers from Boston and Indianapolis teamed up to evaluate the health benefits of eating nuts. Learn More.

Extrovert, Introvert Children Not Equally Influenced by Plate Size – As dish size increases, so do portion size and the amount of food actually eaten — but could personality traits play a role in how susceptible people are to this plate-size bias? New research by the Cornell Food and Brand Lab indicates that extroverted and introverted children respond differently to environmental cues, such as plate size, when it comes to portion control. Learn More.

Unhappy Meals? Majority of Very Young Children in California Eat Fast Food at Least Once per Week – A surprisingly large percentage of very young children in California, including 70 percent of Latino children, eat fast food regularly, according to a new policy brief by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Learn More.

Obesity Associated with Higher Risk of Hearing Loss in Women –  New research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital published online in The American Journal of Medicine, finds that a higher body mass index and larger waist circumference are each associated with higher risk of hearing loss, while a higher level of physical activity is associated with lower risk of hearing loss in women. Learn More.

The Co-Villains Behind Obesity’s Rise –  Researchers have compared tissue samples from obese mice with those of normal mice to try to determine which behavioral or biological factors might cause humans to gain weight. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Treatment: Tips to Reduce Stress During the Holiday Season

Reducing Holiday Stress Eating Disorders

The holiday season is a particularly stressful time for many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder. Holiday gatherings are typically highly food-centered, which results in a lot of anxiety for those recovering from an eating disorder. I’ve created a list of useful tips on reducing holiday stress. I know this will help a lot of my patients!

  • Eat regularly throughout the day. Don’t skip meals in anticipation of a large dinner.
  • Be prepared. Try to find out what is being served ahead of time and work some of the foods you feel comfortable with into the meal. Bring one of your favorite dishes to share with the dinner guests, that way you will know you will have something you feel good about eating.
  • Discuss any specific concerns with your treatment specialist. Try to role play situations that you suspect may arise (such as comments about your weight, about your food choices etc). Be as prepared as you can be to avoid counter-productive coping behaviors.
  • Have an “emergency plan” in case you find yourself in a stressful situation. Get some fresh air, go to another room and practice some relaxation or deep breathing exercises, arrange for a close friend to be “on-call” in case you need someone to talk to.
  • Is someone going to be at the dinner that you feel makes healthy choices? Pay attention to what they are eating, their portion sizes. Use them as your reality check.
  • Set realistic goals. Don’t set yourself up for a stressful holiday season by over-scheduling yourself. You need to be your own #1. Make sure you leave some time to focus on yourself, allow yourself to get an adequate amount of sleep, engage in activities that make you feel good (exercise, relax or meditate).
  • Don’t isolate! Spend time with family and friends. If it isn’t possible to physically be with your loved ones, have a phone conversation or use Skype! Isolating yourself won’t make you feel better, in many situations it may even make you feel worse.
  • Be in the moment! Enjoy the time with your loved ones, have great conversations, laugh, make memories!
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sources:

http://ed-bites.blogspot.com/2010/11/tip-day-surviving-thanksgiving-without.html
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/nedaDir/files/documents/handouts/Holiday.pdf

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: The Benefits of Grassfed Butter with Dale Stoltzfus

butter

Join us on WEDNESDAY November 27 at 7:30 pm EST as we welcome Dale Stoltzfus of ‘Oasis Bird in Hand‘ to the show. We’ll be discussing the benefits of eating grassfed butter. This episode is especially important if you are or your loved one suffers from obesity or and eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder. You can tune in HERE.

Some information about our guest and ‘Oasis Bird in Hand’:

Dale K. Stoltzfus became a Belgian Draft Horse Breeder in 1988 when he bought a pair of two year old Belgian work horse mares. The decision to buy those two horses has led him on a path he never could have imagined. He had made a career change in ‘88 that put him in the Real Estate industry as a Realtor for 20 some years.

Having been raised on a farm and having a keen interest in animals and soils always kept his interest in, and affinity for, all things farm related, alive. Four years ago he heard about a new Farmer’s Cooperative called ‘Oasis at Bird In Hand’ that was in the planning stages. He checked into it and found out it was a marketing effort for local, organic, nutrient dense, fresh food. He had been paying attention to the local organic food movement and he was excited about it, and still is.

The steering committee for the new Coop invited him to join them and in the spring of 2012 he became the produce manager and coordinator of operations. In that position it is his job to learn from Oasis produce farmers what they have available at any given time throughout the growing season and match it to the CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) boxes they fill for local customers in eastern PA and in Washington DC, as well as wholesale customers. At the moment, they are not requiring our produce growers to be organic certified. However, they make sure they are keenly aware of organic practices and that they grow at or beyond recognized organic standards.

Oasis at Bird In Hand carries the whole spectrum of real food as follows: all types of in season produce, year round, GMO and Soy free pastured eggs, grass fed beef and pork processed under USDA inspection, raw milk, (PA only) vat pasteurized milk and chocolate milk, organically flavored plain and drinkable yogurts, fresh cream and our own fresh salted and unsalted butter, as well as numerous kinds of artisanal local cheeses made with their own milk. All of the fluid milk and milk used for cheese comes from local, grass fed only, heritage breeds of cows. The milk Oasis uses comes from organically certified dairy farms and the plant at Oasis is organic certified as well. The purpose of Oasis is to find solid, viable markets for locally grown, nutrient dense, real food in order to provide local farmers with sustainable livelihoods and local communities and cities with the most healthy, nutritious, organically good tasting, fresh foods; coming to them as directly and in as timely a fashion as possible. They believe from our own experience and from the stories we hear that eating the kind of food we are growing has within itself nutrition that will cure many ills.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Coconut Oil, Eating Disorders, and Obesity with Dr. Bruce Fife

Coconut Oil, Eating Disorders, and Obesity

Join us on WEDNESDAY November 20 at 7:30 pm EST for an encore presentation of our interview with Dr. Bruce Fife. Dr. Fife is the founder of The Coconut Research Center and the author of several best-selling books, including The Coconut Oil Miracle. You can tune in  HERE!

This episode is especially important if you or a loved one suffers from obesity or an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder.

Dr. Bruce Fife, C.N., N.D., is an author, speaker, certified nutritionist, and naturopathic physician. He has written over 20 books. He is the publisher and editor of the Healthy Ways Newsletter and serves as the president of the Coconut Research Center, a non-profit organization whose purpose is to educate the public and medical community about the health and nutritional aspects of coconut and related foods. Dr. Fife is considered one of the world’s leading experts on dietary fats and oils. He is a popular speaker and travels throughout the world lecturing at health fairs, conferences, hospitals, and spas. He has appeared on hundreds of radio and television programs worldwide.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: November 17-24 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 17-24 2013!”

The Mysterious Link Between Antibiotics and Obesity – States where doctors prescribe more antibiotics also have the highest obesity rates. Why? Learn More.

Childhood Trauma May Contribute to Teen Weight Problems – Children who have gone through trying times are more likely to be overweight by age 15, a new study suggests. Learn More.

Why Coconut Producers are Worried – With the rising popularity of coconut-based health and beauty products, the demand for coconuts has skyrocketed — and producers might not be able to keep up. Learn More.

Food ‘Score’ Labels Could Inspire Healthier Choices – Health ratings on packages could influence consumers’ purchasing decisions and drive food companies to make healthier products. Learn More.

Dairy Industry Pushing to Hide Aspartame in New Definition of ‘Milk’ – In an effort to get more children to drink processed milk, the conventional dairy industry is pushing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to change the very definition of milk to allow for the discreet addition of toxic artificial sweeteners like aspartame. Learn More.

Six Good Reasons to Avoid Conventional Grocery Store Milk – You’ve probably heard misguided nutrition advice telling you that low-fat dairy is good for you. You might also hear “be sure it’s pasteurized, because raw dairy products are dangerous.” In fact, the truth is that the low-fat, pasteurized, homogenized, GMO grain-fed, hormone and antibiotic-laced milk is the real danger to your health. Learn More.

Gut Bacteria Might Guide the Workings of Our Minds – Could the microbes that inhabit our guts help explain that old idea of “gut feelings?” There’s growing evidence that gut bacteria really might influence our minds. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Meatloaf

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for obesity, bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at my outpatient treatment center in Cincinnati.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

For more delicious recipes, be sure to visit the recipe corner!

Meatloaf

Ingredients:
2/3 cup homemade ketchup
1/3 cup coconut crystals
1 1/2 pounds grass-fed ground beef
1 cup shelled hemp
1 cup pureed carrot cooked in bone broth (Learn more about the benefits of bone broth)
1 organic, pastured egg (why organic, pastured?)
1 cup diced onion
1 cup mushrooms
garlic juice
bourbon smoked paprika
garlic pepper
garlic salt

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a small mixing bowl, combine homemade ketchup and coconut crystals, set aside. This will be the sauce for the top of the meatloaf.

Saute onion and mushrooms in bone broth. Season carrots, onion and mushroom with garlic juice, bourbon smoked paprika, garlic pepper, garlic salt.

Lightly beat 1 egg into bowl. Add in ground beef, vegetables, hemp, garlic juice, paprika, garlic pepper, garlic salt. Toss as little as possible.

Put into coconut oil greased pan and bake for 40 minutes. After 40 minutes top with ketchup/coconut crystal sauce. Bake another 20 minutes or until knife comes out clean.

Serves 8.

Nutrition Info: 415 cal, 29 g fat, 23 g protein, 15 g carbs, 3 g fiber

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Clean Eating, Obesity, and Eating Disorder Treatment [show notes]

Paleo and Eating Disorder Treatment

On this week’s podcast we spoke with Paleo blogger and bestselling author Stacy Toth. Stacy co-authored two books with her husband (Matt McCarry) – Eat Like a Dinosaur and Beyond Bacon. Stacy and her husband are raising 3 active young boys, the paleo way.

This episode is especially important if you suffer from obesity, an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, bulimarexia, or if you’re interested in learning more about eating clean!

What We Covered:

3:15 – About Stacy Toth.

10:13 – Is it possible for a vegetarian to eat lead a Paleo lifestyle?

14:23 – What’s the difference, nutritionally, between a pastured pig and a conventionally raised pig? Is pastured pork healthier than conventionally raised pork?

18:40 – Where can you find a good source of pasture pork?

19:00 – Is pork a good source of CLA? Does it matter what breed of pig we eat?

21:00 – What is the vitamin D content of pork?

22:00 – How does CLA relate to whether your body stores dietary fat as body fat?

29:50 – How do your children respond to eating paleo? What advice do you have for parents that are introducing their children to a paleo lifestyle?

41:10 – What’s the most important advice you have for people wanting to start eating Paleo?

43:00 – How much of a role did polluted food contribute to your eating disorder.

Links we discussed:

The Norton Center’s FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

The Paleo View Podcast

How to Properly Prepare Legumes

Heritage Hollow Farms

Eat Wild – Find Pastured Pork in Your Area

US Wellness Meats Pork

Matt Lelonde – Micronutrient Content of Pork

Paleo Parents Blog

Eat Like a Dinosaur

Beyond Bacon

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – November 10-17 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 10-17 2013!”

Abercrombie & Fitch, In Reversal of Exclusionary Policy, Now Selling Larger Sizes –  Turns out that old adage, “All press is good press” has proven untrue, yet again. Following a media thrashing in the spring (some of that from me) for their proud refusal to sell clothing in larger sizes, especially for women, Abercrombie & Fitch has reversed that long-standing decision. Since shares in the company’s stock have lost about 30% of their value in 2013, it seems that the company is looking to expand their customer base beyond the “cool kids,” which were previously only minted in certain sizes, according to their CEO. Learn more.

Soft Drink and Sugar Consumption Can Negatively Impact Kidney Health, New Studies Reveal – Two recently published studies show the negative effects that soft drink and sugar consumption can have on kidney health. Learn more.

Research Shows Less Than One Percent of Fast Food Kids’ Meals are Healthy – Researchers from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity recently analyzed the foods served by 18 fast food restaurant chains. They took into account every possible combination of menu items for a total of 5,427 meals. Out of the 12 restaurants that offered kid’s meals, 11 included a side dish, such as apples, bananas, corn and other fruits and vegetables, that the researchers considered healthy. Also, more than three-quarters of the restaurants offered healthy drink choices, generally milk, juice or bottled water. Learn more.

FDA Declares Trans Fats Not Safe in Foods for the First Time –  According to the Wall Street Journal, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday decided that trans fats should not be considered safe for use in foods, a drastic change in policy that could lead to a ban on the artery-clogging ingredient. Learn more.

5 GMO-Free Thanksgiving Dessert Ideas – The food writer Michael Pollan once wrote, “Don’t eat anything your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” Sadly, most of the food that now adorns Thanksgiving tables, particularly the dessert table, wouldn’t meet that basic requirement: pumpkin from cans, “whipped topping” that contains more genetically modified corn- and soy-based ingredients than actual cream, artificially dyed pie filling, high-fructose-corn-syrup (aka “pecan”) pie. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Food Pollution and the Treatment of Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder and Emotional Eating

Food Addiction Treatment

Roberta Foss* says that Americans suffer from “Overconsumptive Undernutrition.” I wish I had come up with this phrase as I think it is very apt. There are three conditions on the rise in the U.S. that can be shown to be directly related to Food Pollution (FP) that are good examples of this researchers work:

Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS), Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disorder (GERD), and Metabolic Syndrome. Of the three conditions, Leaky Gut is the most difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and often goes undetected until it causes other more serious conditions. All three begin with dis-ruption, (for example high blood sugar levels due to too much High Fructose Corn Syrup) progress to dys-regulation (of the endocrine system in many cases) and end in dis-ease (such as Type 2 Diabetes). But most importantly, all three may be driving eating disorders. Certainly, they drive obesity, but they may also be driving bulimia, binge and emotional eating disorders.

In general, the medical community sees these conditions as the result of eating too much. So they get the overconsumption piece, but they are generally missing the part about the deadly undernutrition caused by food pollution. With Leaky Gut, for example, the body is often unable to use the nutrients in the food, and the individual feels “hungry” all of the time. Some patients report feeling as if they are starving. What do we eat when we are starving? Carbs, something processed because it is quick, or worst of all, we go for the fast food. Of course, these are the same foods that cause the Leaky Gut in the first place. This is why I recommend abstaining from “polluted” foods and relying upon 100% grass-fed protein sources, organic fruits and vegetables and healthy fats such as coconut oil. No lo-fat, lo-cal anything! It should have come off of a tree, not out of a bag or it should have had a mama 🙂

The hunger one experiences with Leaky Gut drives disordered eating, in as much as the polluted ingredients that abound in the U.S. food supply are often highly addicting as well as fattening. I believe that this is what is driving the complications that are on the rise in my patient population. Polluted foods directly impact the endocrine system, which in turn results in damage to the liver, pancreas, gall bladder, and adrenal glands. In addition the endocrine system also regulates mood, which means that damage can lead to anxiety and depression.

The_endocrine_system.jpeg

diagram used under a creative commons license

How does food pollution lead to disordered eating? Well if you are eating food you assume to be safe, and it isn’t, you will continue to eat it even when you develop symptoms as you will not associate the symptoms with the safety of your food. You will likely assume that you are eating too much, and that the negative consequences are your fault. Because you are blaming yourself, you will feel bad and eat more!

I believe that many people suffering from eating disorders such as binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia, bulimarexia and emotional eating** are individuals who find themselves eating too much and panic. Because they are unaware of the impact that food pollution is having on the way they eat, they use unhealthy ways of managing their calorie intake, i.e. they restrict, binge and purge or yo-yo diet. This increases the three syndromes mentioned above and leads to more disordered eating. A very vicious cycle.

In the eating disorder treatment field, it is considered anathema to suggest that an Anorexic or Bulimic patient abstain from eating anything, no matter how bad it is for you. Refeeding strategies, which are designed to restore the patient to a “normal” weight as quickly as possible, espouse that we should be able to eat anything as long as we eat it in moderation. I could not disagree more. We should absolutely not eat polluted food. There are over 2000 food additives on the market today and more all the time. Many of them are genetically engineered from the DNA of aborted fetuses.

Instead, we need to seek out the “clean” alternative, whenever and wherever possible, and we should encourage those we love to do the same. Treatment outcomes in the eating disorder treatment field are abysmal, often as low as 30% success.  Eating clean works much better. The recovery rates I see with my patients are a testament to the success of this approach.  However, it is not for everyone. As with any treatment, there are potential side-effects. It is possible to get triggered while trying to eat clean.  I make that clear from the get-go and work with my patients, whether they need to lose weight, gain weight or stop bingeing and purging, to build that expectation into their treatment and manage it proactively.
Food Addiction
How Do We Become Addicted?

One of the drivers of disordered eating is food addiction. Humans are hard-wired to become addicted to processed free glutamate (MSG), damaged proteins, sweeteners and hyper-hybridized (HH) grains.  The biotech, agribusiness and food industries leverage this part of our neurochemistry to sell more product. What scientists and watchdog groups have known for many years, i.e. our food supply contains ingredients that are neurotoxic, autogenic, carcinogenic, obesogenic and most importantly, addictive, is only now breaking into the American consciousness.

Although Leaky Gut Syndrome, Metabolic Syndrome and GERD are more common among obese individuals, one does not have to be obese to have any of them. The disorders are also rising at alarming rates among those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and  “emotional eating”**. They are driven in many cases by food addictions, which in turn are the result of the excitatory neurotoxins that abound in processed (polluted) foods.


Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
 


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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sources:
*Roberta Foss-Morgan, D.O. – September 5, 2010
** I do not accept the diagnosis emotional eating, and see it as a symptom of food addiction.