Monthly Archives: February 2016

How to Dine Out and Eat Clean

How to Dine Out and Eat Clean

Not a day goes by that a patient doesn’t ask me, “What about going out to eat? How can I eat clean when I am in a restaurant?”

My answer is always the same. It is not easy and you have to do your homework. You may also have to go with your own food or beverage. Yup, that is what I do. I take my own Ginger Ale. This is not ideal, but it is better than drinking their tap water or wishing I had a vodka tonic. (Q Ginger Ale is made with organic agave and has only 15 grams of sugar per bottle and lots of real ginger.) I have also been known to take my own salad dressing.

Most of us believe that we just have to avoid fast food restaurants in order to remain healthy. It turns out that it isn’t just fast food that is the problem. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics shows 92% of all restaurants, big and small, mom and pop or national chains, exceed the calorie requirements for a single meal.  That burrito bowl at Chipotle? That’s actually 2 portions. You should split that with someone.

Researchers measured meals from 364 different restaurants across the U.S. They found that 123 of them had a single meal—without beverages, appetizers, or desserts—that exceeded a person’s caloric requirements for a whole day!

A patient of mine lamented recently that she does fine all week eating clean at home but that when she goes out to eat, she almost always overeats. It makes sense according to the senior author of the study, Dr. Susan B. Roberts of Tufts University, “These findings make it clear that making healthy choices while eating out is difficult because the combination of tempting options and excessive portions often overwhelm our self-control . . .” She goes on to say “Although fast food restaurants are often the easiest targets for criticism . . . Small restaurants typically provide just as many calories. And sometimes more.”

One very interesting finding was that five of the restaurants in the study provided side dishes at no extra cost. The average energy provided by these items was 471 kcal, which was greater than the 443 kcal for the entrées they accompanied. No wonder you can gain a couple of pounds going out to dinner once or twice a week.

Which ones are the worst? The study showed that American, Chinese, and Italian restaurants had the highest calorie counts, averaging 1,500 calories per meal.

So what can you do? Start by choosing the healthiest restaurants. Always pick the ones that offer grass-fed and wild caught. If you are lucky enough to have any organic restaurants, choose those. Stick to the items on the menu with the fewest ingredients. Pass on the bread and do consider bringing your own dressing. Order the veggies not the pastas, pastries or pancakes.  In Cincinnati, I dine at the Capital Grille. I always order the lamp chops and a side of asparagus.

Do you have any favorite restaurants in Cincinnati where eating clean is easy? I’d love to know! I’m compiling a list. Send me a Facebook message or Tweet me @drrenae.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Errors of Thinking- #6 Comparative Thinking

Copy of Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-3

A good friend of mine won’t look at Facebook. When I ask her why, her response is “Compare and despair.”

Well, isn’t that the truth!

Comparing yourself negatively to others is not only harmful to your self esteem, it is harmful to your spirit. It makes you feel hopeless.  Context is important when observing our thinking. The playing field is rarely level, which is why it is so crucial to stop yourself from negative comparing. Even if Susan lost 55 pounds last year and Ted lost 50 pounds, maybe they both weighed more to begin with? Maybe they each had more weight to lose? The most important question is, why does it matter?

It doesn’t.

What matters is the amazing fact that this person lost 30 pounds. If you’ve ever had 30 pounds to lose, then you know that is an accomplishment. Comparative thinking diminishes our successes and robs us of our accomplishments.

Further, this kind of thinking doesn’t take into account the goals you set.  After all, what is the point of feeling bad about goals that you didn’t reach when you didn’t set them? Realistically, how could your actions have added up to an accomplishment if you weren’t effectively taking steps in that direction?

You are closing the door on opportunity when you think this way.

So the next time you find yourself comparing and despairing, stop.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016.
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

Errors of Thinking- #5 Global Labeling


Really? Every day? 365 days a year? I’m pretty sure a lot of things worked out for you today.  What happened?

What happened is Global Labeling.

Global Labeling is an error of thinking characterized by generalizing one or two negative qualities and applying them without any consideration to context.  When something bad happens once, a person who has this error of thinking will ignore all evidence to the contrary and have a very one dimensional view of themselves or others. There’s no complexity to their thoughts. In fact, they are having judgements. Expect language to be very colorful and emotionally loaded.  This error of thinking is the ultimate kind of generalization. Instead of providing context for an error, a person will attach unhealthy labels to themselves and/or others.

When projected outward towards others, global labeling can really represent some of the worst kind of thinking, like stereotypes and prejudice.  Expect snap judgements and relationship problems when someone is thinking this way.

If you are global labeling yourself, you are damaging your self esteem and you owe it to yourself to shake this error of thinking.

So how do you do that?

Suspend judgement.

Ask yourself, am I giving an accurate account of what happened? Am I providing context? Or am I just negatively labeling myself?

When considering your thoughts about others, ask yourself, am I considering this person as an individual? Or am I lumping them into group based on only one or two experiences I’ve had?

-Dr. Norton
#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Errors of Thinking- #4 Catastrophizing

Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-2

Stop right there. Is that really true? We all have job pressures, but if it is something small, you should know that you are catastrophizing. It is also sometimes referred to as magnifying.
We all can remember a time that we have thought this way. Thanksgiving is ruined because someone brought the wrong brand of cranberry sauce. The wedding is ruined because the wrong color napkins were ordered. But this kind of thinking should happen rarely, if at all. But what if it is happening all the time?
A really good clue that you may be catastrophizing is if you find yourself using the words “what if” in conjunction with an expectation that disaster will strike, no matter what. If a friend challenges your thought with another possible outcome like “maybe you can ask for an extension,” you will still have an answer that is catastrophic. “I can’t ask for an extension! I’ll lose my job.” When a true catastrophe does strike, you think it’s the end of everything. “I’ve lost my job, I’ll never find another one.”
 You can see how this error of thinking causes panic.
 So how do you get off the hamster wheel of anxiety when you sense disaster looming?
 Ask yourself the following questions:
 Is it really as bad as it seems?
 Has it been this bad before and it’s gotten better?
 Have I lost perspective? (This is key.)
 These questions should help ground you and challenge your perception of the situation.
-Dr. Norton
#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Errors of Thinking- #3 Overgeneralization

Copy of Never make an exception of yourself
“Since I overate at the last party I went to, I know I will overeat at every party I go to.”
Huh. Really?
Just because one event happened, does not necessarily mean that you will repeat the behavior.  In fact, your ability to recognize the error in your behavior is actually a really good sign that you will be able to prepare and have a strategy to prevent the behavior from repeating.
When you overgeneralize you see a single event as a never ending pattern of defeat. It’s… well, discouraging and depressing.
So how can you beat this error of thinking?
Next time you catch yourself overgeneralizing, stop and remind yourself, “Just because I overate at this party, does not necessarily mean that I will overeat at the next party.”  You will feel less anxiety, less defeat, and more likely to map out strategies of how to handle eating at the next party.
Remember: You got this!
-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Errors of Thinking- #2 Perfectionsim

Never make an exception of yourself-4

Here is a major error of thinking- Perfectionism.

Here’s why perfectionism is so dangerous: it is focused on avoiding failure, so we are actively tracking our failure as opposed to actively seeking our success.  It’s a very different thing to say, “I like to exercise every day.”  In the thought above, the person has already decided that if they don’t exercise seven days a week for at least one hour, they’ve failed. There’s no room for success in the thought above. It is negatively oriented. There is a lot of room for anxiety and depression.

Perfectionism is often accompanied by depression and anxiety. Doesn’t the statement above make you anxious just reading it?

The next time you feel your thought ending in an unrealistic, conditional way- stop and ask yourself if you are thinking like a perfectionist.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

15 Errors of Thinking Series- #1 All or Nothing Thinking

ERRORS

I thought I’d start a series on the 15 Errors of Thinking, AKA Dealing More Realistically with Mistakes.

This is actually a favorite topic of mine, because whenever I find myself stuck, I find I’m having an error in my thinking.

We’re going to tackle them one at time so that we can really contemplate why this kind of thinking is an error and how we can help ourselves by identifying this error and correcting it.

Today we are looking at a personal favorite of mine:

 

Never make an exception of yourself-2

Oh man. Have you ever thought this way? Might as well just give up and forget it. The whole week is ruined. All that progress made, and it’s over, right?

Wrong.

After a week of doing really good at changing a behavior, clearly this person is feeling like a failure. But they aren’t a failure and it certainly isn’t reason to give up on changing your behavior. If they had 3 meals a day, for a week, that’s 21 meals. That means 1 meal out of 21 was a “failure.” So for 95% of the week, this person followed their meal plan. Is that a failure? Not in my book!

In fact, this person has done amazing for most of the week. Don’t let an error in thinking rob you of your success!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell