Monthly Archives: September 2016

Welcome to Medicine’s Newest Lab

copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety

For anyone trying to change his or her eating habits, going to the doctor can be discouraging. Often, efforts to reverse chronic disease using nutrition is met with skepticism, condescension and a prescription when discussed with physicians.

However, there’s good news in Cincinnati!

UC’s Institute for Integrative Health and Wellness has strengthened its partnership with our areas largest organic farm.

Medical students and other health professionals will now make regular trips to Turner Hill Farm, in Indian Hill, to a new teaching kitchen, to learn how food can be used to prevent disease. This comes on the heels of a growing movement in medicine that aims to educate patients on the importance and value of nutrition.

Dr. David Eisenberg, associate professor at the Harvard University School of Public Health, recently spoke at UC to announce the partnership and highlight the contradictions that are inherent in our health care system. Hospitals still serve notoriously unhealthy foods. Physicians are more likely to write prescriptions than discuss specific healthy eating protocols for patients.

Dr. Eisenberg encouraged students to think of the kitchen at Turner Hill as a laboratory where medical students could reflect on their own eating habits while considering and developing programs for patients.

As a clinical psychologist who works very closely with patients looking to make behavioral changes in order to reach their health goals, the news of this partnership between an organic farm and the next generation of doctors, is incredibly inspiring.  To have a major medical school both acknowledge and commit to training physicians to use organic food as the first line of defense is long overdue.

Welcome to medicine’s newest lab- the kitchen.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-2

What Is Low Dose Naltrexone?

copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety

Naltrexone is commonly known as a drug that was approved by the FDA in the mid-1980s for drug addiction, and a few years later, for alcohol addiction. Naltrexone works by blocking the effects of drugs known as opioids (a class that includes morphine, heroin or codeine).  Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) is approximately 1/10th of the typical opioid addiction treatment dosage. In most published research, the daily dosage is 4.5 mg, though the dosage can vary a few milligrams below or above that common value.

Should I ask my doctor about LDN?

If you suffer from an autoimmune disorder (Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn’s, Hashimoto’s, Thyroid, Fibromyalgia, Lupus, etc.), cancer, tumors or HIV/AIDS, you want to speak to your doctor about adding LDN to your treatment plan. LDN shows incredible promise in studies as an anti-inflammatory, for conditions such as fibromyalgia. For MS patients, LDN has been studied and patients reported a significant increase in quality of life in terms of mental health. LDN has also been studied as a “primer” to traditional cancer treatment, showing increased efficacy when LDN is taken prior to chemotherapy.  Although completed studies are limited, there are long-term studies in progress, as well as plenty of anecdotal evidence that LDN makes a significant difference in peoples lives that suffer from a wide range of disorders.

So how does it work?

LDN is taken at bedtime, in very small doses. When you take LDN at bedtime — which blocks your opioid receptors for a few hours in the middle of the night — it is believed to up-regulate vital elements of your immune system by increasing your body’s production of metenkephalin and endorphins (your natural opioids), hence improving immune function. This is known as the “rebounding effect.”

Where do I get LDN?

LDN is available by prescription only, and must be filled at a compounding pharmacy.

It is important that you work closely with your physician to determine your daily dose, as patients report proper dosage can require some trial and error. Stay away from any prescription for slow release LDN, as you will not receive the same rebounding effects on your immune system of benefits of blocking the opioid receptors all at once.

Good resources where you can learn more about LDN and find doctors who use it include LowDoseNaltrexone.org and LDNScience.org. For more studies related to LDN, visit Pub Med.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/