Category Archives: Fitness Facts + Handouts

#MotivationMonday

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Food Pollution and the Role It Plays In Our Health

Presentation3

Food Pollution is very serious and is not a topic we should take lightly. Click on the links below to learn how the pollution in our food plays a role in eating disorders, obesity, premature aging, and escalating mortality rates in the U.S.

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD POLLUTION

WELLNESS PRESENTATION OBESITY

WELLNESS PRESENTATION DISEASES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION EATING DISORDERS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION THE CAUSE

WELLNESS PRESENTATION GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOODS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION MSG AND OTHER ADDITIVES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD ADDICTION

 

About Dr. Renae Norton

A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: http://www.EatingDisorderPro.com

Talking With Kids About Weight

healthy-food-for-childre-kids-eating-healthy-food

Parents ask me all the time how to handle the binge eating of their overweight child or teen. Gently, and with kid gloves, is what I tell them.

Today, about one in three American children/teens is overweight or obese according to the American Heart Association. As a private practitioner specializing in the treatment of obesity and specific eating disorders, I see a connection between the two.

Children at a very young age know that being overweight is not a good thing. This fear may be driving the spread of Anorexia that we are seeing today among younger children, including boys. There is solid research that the desire to be thin begins with little girls as young as 3 years of age. The children in the study refused to play with the “fat” game pieces calling them “stupid and ugly”.

Children suffering from Anorexia who were formerly obese, often take longer to recover and are more likely to relapse than those who were a normal weight. Many relate that a parent’s efforts to help them with their weight issues triggered the decision to stop eating.

The general wisdom is that we should be able to eat anything in moderation. The problem is that processed foods are rarely eaten in moderation. Moms and dads may come home to find a child parked in front of the TV with a bag of potato chips that were fried in Canola Oil and a soft drink loaded with 12 teaspoons of sugar, or worse a sugar substitute. These foods are addicting and damaging to the systems that regulate healthy eating and fat storage.

If a food is addicting, and if it is there, it will find its way into the hands of the addicted.  When the parent comes home and finds the bag of cookies or container of ice cream empty, the unfortunate culprit hears about it. Of course, this reaction provokes guilt and/or defiance.  What it doesn’t do is lesson the likelihood of bingeing. It often leads to a decision to be less obvious (or “sneaky”, as many parents see it) in the future.

Now when mom or dad come home, the evidence is not as obvious. It isn’t until they look under the child’s bed, where candy wrappers, soda cans, and/or empty chip bags are found, that they discover the behavior hasn’t changed.  This is the beginning of sneaking food and eating it on the sly.  The guilt, which can also be a guilty pleasure, sets in motion a pattern of closet eating/bingeing that can last a lifetime.

So what’ s a parent to do? Get help from someone that knows about the healing impact that “clean” food has on the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight. Clean foods are organic, grass-fed, wild caught, unprocessed, and have few if any additives.

Get rid of the soft drinks. Eat at home more. Make your popcorn with coconut oil and/or grass-fed salted butter. Make homemade fudge or homemade ice cream. Go Paleo-ish!

Help your child to focus on her gifts, not her girth.​

 

About Dr. Renae Norton

A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: http://www.EatingDisorderPro.com

Maji and Mongo’s Road Journal – Maji and Mongo Bootcamp!

Dr. Renae Norton of the Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity and Ryan Gettys of GoNative Fitness held a bootcamp for 45 Boys and Girls Club of Greater Cincinnati children at Hahana Beach in Mariemont on June 8th. Rope pulls, a scavenger hunt, Hula Hoops and Frisbees kept everyone laughing or sweating and generally having a great time.

The outing was sponsored by the Norton Center, GoNative Fitness and Hahana Beach in honor of Dr. Norton’s new book release “How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch“. Here’s some photos from the event!

Maji and Mongo Scavenger Hunt

Getting ready for the Maji and Mongo Scavenger Hunt

Scavenger Hunt

Scavenger Hunt in the Sand

Maji and Mongo Hula Hoop Contest

Hula Hooping!

Maji and Mongo Hula Hoop Contest

Hula Hoop Fun!

Maji and Mongo Tug of War

Tug of War with the Little Kids

Maji and Mongo Tug of War

Tug of War with the Big Kids!

 

Maji and Mongo Rope Climbing

Rope Climbing - these kids were fast!

 

Maji and Mongo Rope Climbing

Rope Climbing!

How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! Book reading.

All the kids, regardless of age, loved How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch!

Maji and Mongo Bootcamp Prizes

End of day bootcamp award ceremony!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder and Obesity Therapy Tool: Eating Organic on a Budget

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has recently published a list of conventionally-grown produce that are highest in pesticide residue, and a list of conventionally-grown produce that are lowest in pesticide residue. Foods that are highest in pesticides should either be avoided or purchased organic; foods that are lowest in pesticides are not as necessary to purchase organic.

The foods that are highest in pesticide residue include:

  • Apples
  • Celery
  • Strawberries
  • Peaches
  • Spinach
  • Nectarines – imported
  • Grapes – imported
  • Sweet bell peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Blueberries  –  domestic
  • Lettuce
  • Kale/Collard greens
The foods that are lowest in pesticide residue include:
  • Onions
  • Sweet Corn – should be purchased organic, if you are concerned with GMOs
  • Pineapples
  • Avocado
  • Asparagus
  • Sweet peas
  • Mangoes
  • Eggplant
  • Cantaloupe – domestic
  • Kiwi
  • Cabbage
  • Watermelon
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Grapefruit
  • Mushrooms
You can download the EWG’s printable shopping guide at their website.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/

Omega Fatty Acids, Explained.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Almonds are one source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

Omega Fatty Acids can be categorized as either Monounsaturated Fats or Polyunsaturated Fats. Omega-7 Fatty Acids and Omega-9 Fatty Acids are Monounsaturated, while Omega-3, Omega-5 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids are Polyunsaturated.

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids are considered to be an Essential Fatty Acid; our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of self-producing. As a result, we need to obtain Omega-3 Fatty Acids from dietary sources. In addition to supporting the heart, brain and eyes, studies show that Omega-3s have a positive impact on:

  • Asthma
  • Diabetes
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Some Cancers
  • Skin Disorders
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Attention Disorders
  • Depressive Disorders
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Digestive Difficulties

The most common Omega-3s are α-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Some good food sources of Omega-3s include:

  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • sardines
  • cod liver oil
  • nuts (walnuts, almonds, pistachios)
  • dark leafy greens
  • tuna and wild salmon

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also an Essential Fatty Acid. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with:

  • regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • managing proper kidney function
  • dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • regulating muscles and reflexes
  • positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

The most common Omega-6 is Linoleic acid (LA). LA accounts for 85-90% of dietary sources of Omega-6. Some good food sources of Omega-6s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • nuts
  • chicken
  • eggs
  • avocado
  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • acai berries

For a larger version of this chart, click HERE.

Omega-5, Omega-7, and Omega-9 – Non-Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-5, 7 and 9 Fatty Acids are Non-Essential Fatty Acids; our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. As with all supplements, if you think you aren’t getting enough of these Omegas, you should always consult with your physician before supplementing.

Omega-5 Fatty Acids are believed to have a positive effect on weight-related cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to it’s phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA). Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • tropical oils (coconut and palm)
  • saw palmetto
  • wild salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • pomegranate seeds/oil

Studies show that Omega-7 Fatty Acids have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a rold in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA). Common food sources are:

  • grassfed meat
  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • wild-caught salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • sea buckthorn berries

Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked with healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA). Natural sources of Omega-9s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • avocado
  • grassfed meat
  • nuts
  • sesame oil

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
photo used under a creative commons license
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcsums/o3asthsum.htm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616147
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7490601
http://www.ajcn.org/content/85/3/647.full
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12540506
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omega-3-000316.htm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17353568
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8339414
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15867048
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12888186
http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcsums/o3lipidsum.htm
http://www.ehow.com/about_5420758_omega-benefits.html
http://www.renewlife.com/norwegian-gold-every-omega-3-5-6-7-9.html#info-tabs
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

Dear Mark: Mysterious Omegas and a Beginner’s Exercise Routine

Grains, Explained.

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

Many of my readers and patients have asked me how to choose healthy grains. As a general rule, I believe in eating foods that are as close to their natural state as possible. This makes ‘ancient grains’ a perfect choice. ‘Ancient grains’ are grains or seeds that have not been genetically modified – they are completely unaltered by plant science. They have not been bred to be easier to grow, harvest, process and refine; to increase yield; or to have favorable commercial baking characteristics.

To help you choose healthy grains, I’ve created a “grain cheat sheet” to have on hand in the kitchen or even at the grocery store, to make cooking and shopping easier. For a print-friendly version, click here.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
photo used under creative commons license by flickr user rigues
Vitality Magazine – Ancient Grains for the Modern Table
All nutrition information from’My Fitness Pal’

Mercury in Seafood. Is it Really Unsafe?

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

We’ve all seen headlines like this in the media, warning against the dangers of the mercury content of seafood. Are headlines like this completely true? Is eating a diet rich in fish truly going to lead to mercury toxicity?

Looking exclusively at the mercury content of fish is an inaccurate measure of “the dangers” of eating fish. In order to be accurate, it is essential to look at the big picture. Are there other components that play a role in the way our bodies process mercury? Let’s investigate.

Aside from mercury, what other important element does fish contain? Selenium! The USDA has released a report of the best food sources of selenium. Out of the top 25 food sources, 16 of these were fish.

Selenium is sort of a “magnet” to mercury. When we consume mercury with selenium, the mercury seeks out the selenium and binds to it. This binding makes it impossible for the mercury to bind to anything else in our body, such as brain tissue, organ tissue etc. Dr Nicholas Ralston, a top researcher in the “Selenium-Mercury” relationship in fish and seafood explains it like this:

“Think of dietary selenium as if it were your income and dietary mercury as if it were a bill that you need to pay. Just as we all need a certain amount of money to cover living expenses such as food and rent, we all need a certain amount of selenium … Only one major study has shown negative effects from exposure to mercury from seafood, and that seafood was pilot whale meat. Pilot whale meat is unusual in that it contains more mercury than selenium. When you eat pilot whale meat, it’s like getting a bill for $400 and a check for less than $100. If that happens too much, you go bankrupt. On the other hand, if you eat ocean fish, it’s like getting a check in the mail for $500 and getting a bill for $25. The more that happens, the happier you are.”

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, released a really useful chart that shows the ratio of selenium:mercury content in the most commonly eaten types of fish. Print it out, put it on your fridge, refer to it often, eat fish!

For a printable version of this chart click here.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
http://www.wpcouncil.org
http://www.nal.usda.gov

Dairy Aisle Confusion

Choosing Healthy Dairy Products

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

With all the varieties of milk available in grocery stores today, it is very difficult to know which type of milk is the healthiest. In this post, I hope to provide both my patients and readers with some insight to make the decision-making process less stressful.

Today’s milk is much different from the milk our grandparents and great-grandparents drank. Much of the milk in stores today:

  • comes from cows that produce A1 beta-casein
  • comes from grain-fed cows
  • is pasteurized (and in some cases ultra-pasteurized) and homogenized
  • contains synthetic vitamins, antibiotics and growth hormones
  • has dry milk added to improve consistency

We can avoid some of these unhealthy aspects of today’s milk by consuming milk from grass-fed cows when possible. Milk from grass-fed cows has many health benefits, including but not limited to:

  • it contains five times more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)
  • it contains the perfect ratio of essential fatty acids. This can reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, allergies, obesity, diabetes, dementia, and mental health disorders
  • it contains more beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin D than grain-fed milk

So, what kind of milk should you buy? I’ve created a handy, quick-reference guide to use when making your decision.

*Raw milk is only legal for purchase in my area through cow-share programs. To find out the laws in your area, check here

The Cornucopia Institute recently did an in-depth investigation of over 100 organic dairy farms throughout the United States. They ranked each dairy based on organic farming practices and ethics. I’ve summarized some of the findings for some of the organic dairy farms that sell milk in the Cincinnati area (for readers outside of the Cincinnati area, you can find more dairy farm ratings here)

Traders Point (milk and yogurt) was the only dairy farm in my area that was rated ‘Outstanding’ (5 out of 5 cow rating) (Snowville Creamery was not included in the report)

-Dairy farms that were rated ‘Excellent’ (4 out of 5 cow rating) include:

Ben and Jerry’s Organic Ice Cream was the only locally available ice cream that was rated ‘Very Good’ (2 out of 5 cow rating)

-Dairy farms that were rated ‘some or all factory-farm milk or unknown source, but better than conventional’ (1 out of 5 cow rating)*

-Dairy farms that were rated ‘Ethically Deficient’ (0 out of 5 cow rating)* include:

  •  Horizon Organic Milk
  •  Aurora Organic Milk
  •  Back to Nature Cheese

*There were no ‘1 cow rated farms’ or ‘0 cow rated farms’ that agreed to participate in the investigation, so score was based on information that was publicly available

Although milk has changed over time, we can still make healthy decisions by becoming informed consumers. Thanks to institutes like Cornucopia, we can gain much knowledge about where our food is coming from.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources:
www.foodrenegade.com/healthy-milk-what-to-buy/
www.eatwild.com/articles/superhealthy.html
www.cornucopia.org/dairysurvey/index.html

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user kakie

 

Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin

This series is designed to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, whether it’s weight loss or weight restoration. “Appetite Hormones 101” will be made up of three articles that describe the major appetite hormones: leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY.

Leptin

Leptin, discovered by scientists in 1994, is also known as the “starvation hormone”. According to leptin expert, Dr Robert Lustig, leptin sends a signal to our brains that fat cells have enough stored energy to engage in normal metabolic processes. Every individual has an optimal level of leptin, which is thought to be determined genetically. When leptin levels are below optimal levels, the brain receives a message to conserve energy because the body is in a state of deprivation. When this occurs, the brain sends a message to the body that it is hungry (in an attempt to get the individual to eat) so that leptin levels can be restored to an optimal level.

Leptin levels are typically high in obese individuals and low in severely underweight/malnourished individuals. When leptin levels are too high, the individual experiences leptin resistance.

When an individual becomes leptin resistant, the body prevents leptin from passing through the blood brain barrier, which also prevents the brain from receiving the signal that leptin levels are at an optimal level. Instead, the brain senses that the body is in a state of starvation, and the individual becomes hungry. Leptin levels go up as a result.

High triglyceride levels also contribute to the prevention of leptin passing through the blood brain barrier. Triglyceride levels are often high in obese individuals as a result of poor dietary choices. In the individual with anorexia, triglyceride levels are often high because of liver damage and anorexia-induced hormone disruption.

If you think that you may be suffering from Leptin Resistance, there are several things that you can do.

  • Get plenty of sleep. Lack of sleep disrupts many hormonal processes, including leptin levels.
  • Avoid non-fruit sources of fructose. Studies show that fructose raises triglyceride levels, blocking leptin from crossing the blood brain barrier.
  • Avoid lectins, (carbohydrate-binding proteins that are found in most plants, particularly seeds and tubers such as cereal crops, potatoes, and beans) especially those from cereal grains (rice, wheat, barley, corn and oats) as they tend to bind to leptin receptors, preventing leptin binding. This intensifies the affect of leptin resistance.
  • Cook and supplement with healthy fats, like coconut oil. Coconut oil lowers triglyceride levels, increases metabolism, and promotes healing in the gut (and liver for those recovering from anorexia).
  • Eat a high protein, low carb diet and stay active! Diet and exercise have the greatest effect on overcoming leptin resistance.

Sources:

BMC Endocrine Disorders – “Agrarian diet and diseases of affluence – Do evolutionary novel dietary lectins cause leptin resistance?” (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/5/10)

Mark’s Daily Apple – “A Primal Primer: Leptin” (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/LEPTIN/)

The Fat Resistance Diet – “Leptin Resistance” (http://fatresistancediet.com/leptin-weight-loss/66-leptin-resistance)

Live Strong – “High Cholesterol Levels in Anorexia” (http://www.livestrong.com/article/86767-high-cholesterol-levels-anorexia/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’