Tag Archives: chicken

News You Can Use Week of May 4th-10th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 4th-10th.

NEWS: Tyson Chickens, Soon with (Almost) No Antibiotics

Tyson, one of the largest suppliers of chicken products to consumers and restaurants, has announced that it is phasing out the use of human antibiotics. By 2017, all its birds will be free of human antibiotics (but not other animal antibiotics). LEARN MORE

NEWS: Chipotle Goes 100% Non-GMO

Starting this week, Chipotle is serving only non-GMO food in all 1700 of its locations. The Mexican fast food chain has been a trailblazer when it comes to ethical sourcing of its meat ingredients, and ran a memorable Food with Integrity campaign a few years ago.  Earlier this year, Chipotle stopped serving pork in some locations after it discovered one of its suppliers were not up to standard. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Learning to Decline the Call to Sugar

There are some issues that can remain a struggle well into recovery. Though I have been clean from drugs and alcohol for nearly 17 years, staying off the sugar – or at least trying to consume it in reasonable amounts – is an ongoing challenge. Sugar abuse, misuse, and addiction are common; recent research suggests that one reason we crave sugar is because it provides stress relief. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Don’t Let Your Genetics or Your Past Hold You Hostage

Genetics plays an important role in the development of eating styles in children.  If you have the genetic predisposition to obesity, as a child you may have had a bigger appetite than your friends or family members.  You may also have engaged in eating when not hungry or had difficulty recognizing when you were full.  These genetic traits would have made it more difficult for you, even in childhood, to maintain a healthy weight despite your desire to do so.  The genetic predisposition to obesity is also made worse by the easy availability of poor quality foods that promote obesity (foods high in calories but low in nutrients) (Carnell 2008).  The interplay between genetics and the environmental causes of obesity are a vicious cycle. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Panera Bread Plans to Drop a Long List of Ingredients

Acesulfame K. Ethoxyquin. Artificial smoke flavor.

The first, an artificial sweetener; the second, a preservative; and the third, a flavor enhancer, are just a few of the ingredients that Panera Bread wants to banish from its kitchens by the end of 2016. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Fructose May Increase Cravings for High-Calorie Foods

The type of sugar you eat may affect your cravings for high-calorie foods, researchers report. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use – Jan 3-10 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 3-10 2013!”


Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Eggs: Free-Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free or Pastured?

Eggs; Free Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free or Pastured?
“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.Free-Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free, Pastured…..just a few of the labels you may come see when you are shopping for eggs at your local grocery store. It can be quite overwhelming to decipher all these labels to determine which type of egg is healthiest. Let’s take a look at some of these labels and figure out what type of eggs are the best choice.The terms “free-range”, “free-roaming”, and “cage-free” are not currently regulated by the government. “Free-roaming” and “cage-free” chickens live a cage-free life and are allowed to roam freely, as long as it is within the four walls of their barn. “Free-range” chickens live in slightly better conditions; they are allowed to leave the barn, but many times the areas they have access to usually are dirt-surfaced or concrete-surfaced areas.The term “pastured” means that the eggs came from chickens that are cage-free in a grassy pasture. Eggs from pastured chickens are generally more nutritious since the diet of the chickens includes bugs and earthworms. In comparison, non-pastured chickens are fed a processed feed. Check out the ingredients of one popular feed that is made specifically for chickens living in confined areas:

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain Byproducts, Roughage Products, Forage, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline Chloride, Folic Acid, Manadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex, Methionine Supplement, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Manganous Oxide, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Chloride, Zinc Oxide, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Sodium Selenite.

How does the nutritional value of eggs from chickens that are raised in confined areas compare to eggs from pastured chickens? Eggs from pastured chickens contain:

  • 1/3 less cholesterol
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 3 times more vitamin E
  • 7 times more beta carotene

I found these statistics on the Mother Earth News Website:

  • In 1974, the British Journal of Nutrition found that pastured eggs had 50 percent more folic acid and 70 percent more vitamin B12 than eggs from factory farm hens.
  • In 1988, Artemis Simopoulos, co-author of The Omega Diet, found pastured eggs in Greece contained 13 times more omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids than U.S. commercial eggs.
  • A 1998 study in Animal Feed Science and Technology found that pastured eggs had higher omega-3s and vitamin E than eggs from caged hens.
  • A 1999 study by Barb Gorski at Pennsylvania State University found that eggs from pastured birds had 10 percent less fat, 34 percent less cholesterol, 40 percent more vitamin A, and four times the omega-3s compared to the standard USDA data. Her study also tested pastured chicken meat, and found it to have 21 percent less fat, 30 percent less saturated fat and 50 percent more vitamin A than the USDA standard.
  • In 2003, Heather Karsten at Pennsylvania State University compared eggs from two groups of Hy-Line variety hens, with one kept in standard crowded factory farm conditions and the other on mixed grass and legume pasture. The eggs had similar levels of fat and cholesterol, but the pastured eggs had three times more omega-3s, 220 percent more vitamin E and 62 percent more vitamin A than eggs from caged hens.
  • The 2005 study Mother Earth News conducted of four heritage-breed pastured flocks in Kansas found that pastured eggs had roughly half the cholesterol, 50 percent more vitamin E, and three times more beta carotene.
The verdict? Definitely go with pasture-raised eggs when at all possible. They may be more expensive than other eggs, but the benefits are well worth it. The owner of the Cheeseslave blog posted a great comparison that is a really good example of just how economical pastured eggs really are:“Let’s say you pay $5 for a dozen pastured eggs. That means each egg costs about 42 cents. A “large” egg is about 2 ounces, so you’re paying 20 cents per ounce.
  • Twenty cents, people. How does that compare to other foods of a similar nutrient density?
  • Raw grass fed organic butter ($8 per pound): 50 cents per ounce
  • Raw grass fed organic cream ($7 per pint): 44 cents per ounce
  • Pasteurized grass fed butter – ($5 per pound): 31 cents per ounce
  • Grass fed organic ground beef ($4 per pound): 25 cents per ounce
  • Grass fed organic beef liver ($3 per pound): 19 cents per ounce
  • Raw grass fed organic milk ($10.50 per gallon): 8 cents per ounce”
If you live in the Cincinnati area, you can get organic, pastured eggs for $3 per dozen at Red Sun Farm in Loveland. Look at these beauties!
Red Sun Farms Pastured Eggs
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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

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What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken.

Let’s Connect!

» Like me on Facebook
» Follow me on twitter @drrenae
» Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form
» Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement
» Read About Dr Norton
» View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
What is Amish Chicken?