Tag Archives: diabulimia

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Diabulimia with Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri

Diabulimia - Dr. Goebel-Fabbri

Join us on WEDNESDAY, January 8 at 7:30 pm EST for a special encore presentation of our interview with Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri about Diabulimia!  For more information on Diabulimia be sure to read this article! You can tune in HERE.

Here’s some background information about Dr. Goebel-Fabbri from the Joslin Diabetes Center:

“Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist at Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her role at Joslin integrates teaching, research and treatment focused on disordered eating behaviors in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Her work covers the spectrum of eating problems from food and insulin restriction to binge eating and obesity.

Dr Goebel-Fabbri has lectured at local and national academic conferences and presented her work in peer-reviewed journals. She is involved in NIH-funded multi-center clinical research focused on non-surgical weight loss strategies for improved health outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

Women with type 1 diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop an eating disorder as the general public. The symptoms of eating disorders specific to this population include insulin omission and insulin underdosing (skipping or reducing necessary insulin injections to control weight).

Research indicates that insulin omission and reduction increase the risk of long-term microvascular and macrovascular medical complications of diabetes—such as nerve damage, kidney disease, cardiac disease and eye disease—and may also increase mortality rates.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the relationship between diabetes and eating disorders. In her own studies and in collaboration with others, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri seeks to better understand how eating disorders affect long-term medical complications in women with diabetes and what types of interventions might help improve health outcomes in these high-risk patients.

In collaboration with Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N., Dr. Goebel-Fabbri completed a 12-year follow-up of a cohort of 470 female Joslin patients with type 1 diabetes. This study investigates the natural course of insulin omission and underdosing as a means of weight loss over time.

The study also examines how these behaviors affect psychological and functional health, quality of life, diabetes-related distress, diagnoses of eating disorders and long-term complications of diabetes.

In the future, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri hopes to undertake a treatment outcome study to determine whether interventions specifically tailored to treat issues related to insulin omission and other eating disorders in women with type 1 diabetes can improve overall health outcomes in this population.

People with type 2 diabetes also appear to be at higher risk of developing eating disorders, particularly binge eating. It remains unclear whether the binge eating leads to weight gain and type 2 diabetes, or if events occur in another order. Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is the chief psychologist for WhyWAIT, a Joslin program created expressly to address the unique weight-management needs of people with type 2 diabetes. A multidisciplinary clinical research team is studying the effectiveness of this program for delivery in routine diabetes care.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri serves as the Behavioral Consultant to the Joslin team of the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study, a multicenterclinical trial, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), that examines the impact of weight loss and physical activity on cardiac outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes.

She is also the supervising Behavioral Psychologist to the Joslin team of the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study, a multicenter research trial funded by NIDDK. This project aims to improve medical and behavioral treatments for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.”

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: November 3-10 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 3-10 2013!”

Letting Go of the Idealized Eating Disorder Recovery – If you hear some in the eating disorder community talk about recovery, you could be forgiven for thinking that they were trying to get you to buy a timeshare at a resort. Recovery, they say, is where you love yourself. You love your body. You accept your imperfections. Your life is good, so good. You’ve gotten to the root of your disorder. And you are never, ever, NEVER going to relapse. You are IN RECOVERY and you are here to stay. Learn More.

What You Should Know About  Diabetes and Bulimia – Women with type 1 diabetes are twice as likely to develop an eating disorder than other women without diabetes. Women who struggle with both conditions typically experience the same symptoms as women who only suffer from an eating disorder. Learn More.

The Real Reason Girls are Reaching Puberty Earlier – Many girls in the U.S. may be entering puberty at younger ages now than in previous decades, and obesity appears to be the major factor contributing to this shift, a new study finds. Learn More.

Demand for Grass-Fed Beef it on the Rise –  Even though it can cost twice as much as conventional beef, demand is becoming higher than supply for meat from cows that eat a natural diet. Learn More.

Eating Disorders More Common in Males than Realized –  Parents and doctors assume eating disorders very rarely affect males. However, a study of 5,527 teenage males from across the U.S. challenges this belief. Boston Children’s Hospital researchers found 17.9 percent of adolescent boys were extremely concerned about their weight and physique. These boys were more likely to start engaging in risky behaviors, including drug use and frequent binge drinking. Learn More.

Solving Pediatric Obesity Problem in Rural Communities –  Using telemedicine to unite clinicians and provide health education for them — and by extension, their patients — is an effective way to manage childhood obesity in remote areas. For these communities, which often have limited access to pediatric subspecialists, having a HEALTH-COP can make all the difference. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: October 27-November 3 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 27 – November 3 2013!”

Largest Trial Worldwide: Psychotherapy Treats Anorexia Effectively – A large-scale study has now shown that adult women with anorexia whose disorder is not too severe can be treated successfully on an out-patient basis. Learn more.

Something “Needs Improvement,” But It’s Not Your Body – The phrase, “Needs Improvement” seems like a fair way to assess the spelling or cursive handwriting skills of an elementary school student. But the body composition of an adolescent child? Perhaps not. The parents of one 12-year-old girl in California recently received a letter from their child’s school stating that their daughter’s body composition “needs improvement.” As you can imagine, this letter came as quite a shock, especially since the young woman is muscular, athletic and does Jujitsu four times a week. However, according to the Body Mass Index grade given by the school, her body isn’t quite good enough. Learn More.

Pediatricians Call for Limits on Kids’ Screen Time – Families should make a “media use plan” and set clear rules about TV, cell phones and other devices, pediatricians said today. That includes limiting kids’ screen time to one or two hours per day. Parents should also keep children’s rooms free of TV and Internet access. Learn More.

Talk Therapy May Ease Health-Related Anxiety – Talk therapy performed by nurses and other clinic staff may help people with health anxiety stop worrying about being sick when they’re not, a new study suggests. Learn More.

A Tale of Two Anorexia Genetics Studies – Over the past month, there have been two major, news-grabbing studies on the genetics of anorexia. Both of these studies carried headlines saying something like “Anorexia genes found!”. There are several problems with this. Learn More.

Women With Type-1 Diabetes Who Restrict Insulin Die an Average of 13 Years Earlier than Those Who Don’t – In a sobering study of 341 girls and women with type 1 diabetes, researchers found that nearly 30 percent skipped or reduced necessary insulin injections to lose weight. Learn More.

Health Startup ‘Noom’ Received NIH Grant to Study Smartphone Tech in Eating Disorder Treatment –  The NIH grant is funding a study on the impacts of smartphone technology in eating disorder treatment. The two-year pilot study, which looks specifically at individuals with binge eating problems, will be led by eating disorder researcher Tom Hildebrandt at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. Learn More.

Universities Urged to Help Students with Eating Disorders – Many students with eating disorders struggle to get the treatment they need at university, warns a charity. Without help, students with eating disorders risk dropping out of their studies. Learn More.

Clinician Identified of Youth Abusing Over-the-Counter Products for Weight Control in Large U.S. Integrated Health System –  Abuse of over-the-counter products, such as diet pills and laxatives, for weight control by adolescents is well-documented and can lead to serious medical conditions. Yet only a small percentage of youth with disordered weight control behaviors receive treatment. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes: Diabulimia – Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License

In this weeks episode we talked with we talked about Diabulimia with Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri, a clinical psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

5:18 – About Dr. Goebel-Fabbri
6:17 – What is Diabulimia?
8:36 – Are we seeing an increase in Diabulimia?
9:37 – Can you describe the diabetic in terms of weight and eating habits?
11:58 – Does the push to gain weight very quickly cause food addiction or unnecessary weight gain?
16:12 – Bulimics tend to be normal or slightly overweight, is that also true of the Diabulimic?
17:08 – Is there such thing as Diarexic?
17:25 – What are the complications of a disorder that involves restricting food and restricting insulin?
22:05 –  What are the long-term and short-term risks of Diabulimia?
28:03 – Type III Diabetes
29:20 – Caller Question: Is there such thing as a Type II Diabulimic? What would this complication be for older populations?
34:45 – What other things can people be on the lookout for, in terms of comorbidity?
36:27 – What treatment options are most successful in treating Diabulimia?
46:15 – What advice would you give to parents of children that are struggling with Diabulimia?

Links We Discussed

The Joslin Diabetes Center
ORDER A PERSONALIZED, SIGNED COPY of How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! and/or Let’s Eat: Maji Teaches Mongo What it Means to Eat Clean for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Diabulimia – Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri


Diabulimia - Dr. Goebel-Fabbri

Join us tomorrow March 5 at 7 pm as we talk to Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri about Diabulimia! We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494 or by email (drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com). For more information on Diabulimia be sure to read this article we posted last week! Here’s some background information about Dr. Goebel-Fabbri from the Joslin Diabetes Center:

Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist at Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her role at Joslin integrates teaching, research and treatment focused on disordered eating behaviors in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Her work covers the spectrum of eating problems from food and insulin restriction to binge eating and obesity.

Dr Goebel-Fabbri has lectured at local and national academic conferences and presented her work in peer-reviewed journals. She is involved in NIH-funded multi-center clinical research focused on non-surgical weight loss strategies for improved health outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

Women with type 1 diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop an eating disorder as the general public. The symptoms of eating disorders specific to this population include insulin omission and insulin underdosing (skipping or reducing necessary insulin injections to control weight).

Research indicates that insulin omission and reduction increase the risk of long-term microvascular and macrovascular medical complications of diabetes—such as nerve damage, kidney disease, cardiac disease and eye disease—and may also increase mortality rates.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the relationship between diabetes and eating disorders. In her own studies and in collaboration with others, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri seeks to better understand how eating disorders affect long-term medical complications in women with diabetes and what types of interventions might help improve health outcomes in these high-risk patients.

In collaboration with Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N., Dr. Goebel-Fabbri completed a 12-year follow-up of a cohort of 470 female Joslin patients with type 1 diabetes. This study investigates the natural course of insulin omission and underdosing as a means of weight loss over time.

The study also examines how these behaviors affect psychological and functional health, quality of life, diabetes-related distress, diagnoses of eating disorders and long-term complications of diabetes.

In the future, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri hopes to undertake a treatment outcome study to determine whether interventions specifically tailored to treat issues related to insulin omission and other eating disorders in women with type 1 diabetes can improve overall health outcomes in this population.

People with type 2 diabetes also appear to be at higher risk of developing eating disorders, particularly binge eating. It remains unclear whether the binge eating leads to weight gain and type 2 diabetes, or if events occur in another order. Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is the chief psychologist for WhyWAIT, a Joslin program created expressly to address the unique weight-management needs of people with type 2 diabetes. A multidisciplinary clinical research team is studying the effectiveness of this program for delivery in routine diabetes care.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri serves as the Behavioral Consultant to the Joslin team of the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study, a multicenterclinical trial, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), that examines the impact of weight loss and physical activity on cardiac outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes.

She is also the supervising Behavioral Psychologist to the Joslin team of the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study, a multicenter research trial funded by NIDDK. This project aims to improve medical and behavioral treatments for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Diabulimia

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

There are many serious short-term and long-term consequences associated with diabulimia:

According to Diabulimia Helpline, there are several telltale signs that an individual is suffering from diabulimia:

  • A1c of 9.0 or higher on a continuous basis.
  • Unexplained weight loss.
  • Persistent thirst/frequent urination.
  • Preoccupation with body image.
  • Blood sugar records that do not match HbA1c results.
  • Depression, mood swings and/or fatigue.
  • Secrecy about blood sugars, shots and or eating.
  • Repeated bladder and yeast infections.
  • Low sodium/potassium.
  • Increased appetite especially in sugary foods.
  • Cancelled doctors’ appointments.

Treatment for Diabulimia

The first step in Diabulimia is to break through the denial the individual may have that s/he is abusing insulin to manage weight.  Unlike many eating disorders, this one may start as an attempt to control the diabetes but end up as a way of controlling weight.   Those with Type I diabetes are at risk for addiction to empty carbs early in their disease as the first symptom is significant weight loss. Efforts to help the child regain the weight usually do not include clean eating, such that s/he may develop bad habits or even an addiction to carbs, fat and/or salt.

Treatment for Diabulimia resembles treatment for Bulimarexia, the combination of Anorexia and Bulimia, in as much as it often contains elements of each disorder.  To the degree that the individual uses insulin to “binge” on empty carbs, the first step is to teach him or her to eat clean foods that have a healing impact on the endocrine system rather than a damaging effect.

The other essential ingredient in the treatment of the individual suffering from Diabulimia is to help the individual deal with the fear of gaining weight.  As with many individual’s suffering from Anorexia, an excessively low weight seems like an accomplishment. The Diabetic is particularly at risk for having control issues, as so many things seem beyond his or her control, especially when it comes to the body’s reaction to food.

Interested in learning more about Diabulimia? We’ll be talking with Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri on next week’s podcast! We’ll be taking your questions live at 646-378-0494 or you can submit your questions HERE.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Podcast: Food Addiction [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we continued our discussion from last week about Food Addiction. We talked about the science behind food addiction, signs of food addiction, and treatment for food addiction.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:00 Introduction
2:00 What is Addiction?
6:40 Why is it so hard to overcome addiction?
8:50 – Food Addiction and Bulimarexia
13:04 – Food Addiction and Diabulimia
17:20 How many people are affected by food addiction?
18:20 The Anatomy of Food Addiction
21:20 How the wrong kind of treatment for obesity and eating disorders can contribute to food addiction
25:19 Food Addiction and the Limbic System
26:50 The role of the hypothalamus
27:30 Caller Question: How can I help a morbidly obese friend that is not open to discussion about diet, exercise, nutrition?
35:45 The Role of the Hypothalamus
40:30 Fight or Flight
45:20 The treatment for food addiction

Links we discussed:

Childhood Obesity & Food Addiction
Anorexia, Addiction, and the Three Part Brain Model
Bulimarexia: Why Are We Seeing More of It?
Bulimarexia. Did You Know?

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Thanksgiving + An Intro to Food Addiction

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we talked about Food Addiction, we also had a special segment where we talked about how to eat healthier on Thanksgiving.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:00 – Introduction
5:15 – How much weight do we gain over the holidays?
6:30 – What is the real cause of “food coma”?
7:35 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part I)
12:47 – Caller Question – What is the Difference Between Food Cravings and Food Addiction?
23:30 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part II)
38:18 – Food Addiction – What is Addiction?
39:45 – Caller Question – Can you talk a bit more about spiritual addiction?
41:25 – Caller Question – How does Passive-Aggressive Behavior Relate to Food Addiction?
43:40 – Caller Question – How do you define passive-aggressive behavior? What kinds of things lead to passive-aggressive behavior?
48:05 – Characteristics of Addiction
53:18 – Food Addiction and Bulimarexia
55:56 – Food Addiction and Diabulimia

Links we discussed:

A Healthier Pumpkin Pie
Healthified Corn Bread Stuffing
Grassfed Whipped Cream
Grassfed, Organic Egg Nog
Smashed Potatoes

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’