Tag Archives: diet

News You Can Use-Week of February 9th-15th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 9th-15th.

How much sleep do you need? New guidelines may help.

There are new recommendations for how much time people should spend snoozing. The new guidelines, released by the National Sleep Foundation, include small changes to the recommended ranges for the amount of sleep that children and teens should get. Most of the new advice recommends wider sleep ranges than before. Now, there are also specific sleep ranges for young and older adults, as well as for middle-age adults. LEARN MORE

10 Tips When Buying Olive Oil

When shopping for olive oil, consumers are faced with a wide range of options. Multiple brands vie for attention through bottle and label design, brand building, and marketing claims. Here is what you need to know. LEARN MORE

How Much Are You Willing to Spend on Healthy Food?

There is a perception that healthy food is more expensive than the regular food. This is not entirely accurate. Healthy prepared food often costs more, but if you cook your own food, you do not need to pay an arm and a leg. Healthy eating requires more time and effort, which is something many people are not willing or able to invest. LEARN MORE

10 Tips to Stop The Diet-Binge Cycle and Re-claim Your Body

Despite what all those weight loss ads tell you, being able to fit into a size zero bikini should not be your greatest life accomplishment.  Nor will it help you achieve true happiness, inner peace, self-confidence or self-worth.  Yet our culture puts such an emphasis on appearance and thinness it’s difficult to not be swayed by society’s version of beauty and how the multi-billion dollar dieting industry tells you to look.  Young girls poring over images of their favorite celebrities get the message loud and clear; if you want to be successful, rich, or in a relationship with a good looking guy, start dieting. LEARN MORE

Should You Use a Fitness Tracker?

Nike, Fitbit, Polar, Soleus, Jawbone, Garmin, even LG—it seems many manufacturers are cashing in on the fitness tracker craze. If you don’t want to purchase a device, no worries, there’s an app for that! MyFitnessPal, RunKeeper, Diet Tracker, Fitter Fitness, Map My Fitness, Fitness Buddy, the list goes on…Are they useful? Sure! They are great for those who really have no idea how many calories they are burning during an activity or how many calories are in different foods they are eating. They can also really help those in need of a motivational tool to keep them going. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of February 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 2nd-8th

Exercising May Not Be Enough to Ward Off Disease If You Sit All Day Long

Eating a healthy diet and exercising may not be enough to ward off disease if you spend most of your day sitting in a chair. This is a disheartening conclusion from a study published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine. LEARN MORE

One Simple Change to Increase Kids’ Fruit & Veggie Consumption

Here’s a hack to get schoolchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables during lunch: Schedule their meal to AFTER recess. LEARN MORE

How Words Shape Our Success (or Failure) in Weight Loss

When it comes to leading a healthy lifestyle and losing weight, psychology plays an important role. The way we relate to specific foods or to ourselves with respect to food can sometimes be painful and even harmful. LEARN MORE

8 Things You Should Never Say to Yourself About Food

Sometimes we’re our own worst enemy when it comes to food. Those little things that we say to ourselves before or after we eat may be doing more harm than we even realize. Do you need to re-language your food thoughts? LEARN MORE

Health Basics: How do MSG, artificial sweeteners and gluten cause fast weight gain?

People want that fast track to “fit,” but there’s a price to pay for tricking your body into losing weight, since tricks sometimes involve losing water weight and just postponing bad food habits. There is no fast track to losing weight, but there is a permanent way to achieve and maintain your ideal body weight. The first and most important step involves eliminating three major poisons that are commonly found in today’s “Big Food” industry — yes it’s your turn to turn the tables on Big Food and perhaps your big gut or “chunky” thighs, or maybe you’ve just got some “junk in the trunk” that you want to drop off. Let’s talk about the top three realms of FDA-approved carcinogens and why they drive so many people into obesity and compounded health misery. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Digesting Animal Protein

Digesting Steak

photo used under a creative commons license, flickr user adactio

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Anytime we ingest food, our body releases digestive enzymes to break the food down or digest the food. Because animal protein (meat) is a more complex food, our body expends a much larger amount of digestive enzymes to digest it. The process of cooking meat destroys most of the naturally-occurring enzymes that are needed to break down meats complete proteins into amino acids that the body can utilize; the more the meat is cooked, the more naturally-occurring enzymes are destroyed. This is the main reason that a well-done steak is more difficult to digest than a rare steak. It’s also important to note that as we get older, our bodies naturally start to produce fewer digestive enzymes. Some meats take longer to digest than others; pork takes the longest to digest, followed by beef and lamb. The longer the meat takes to digest, the more digestive enzymes are exhausted.

Protein Digestion Times

There are several things we can do to make the digestion process of meat easier, especially when it comes to the harder-to-digest meats like pork, beef, and lamb. There are a few foods and supplements that naturally contain digestive enzymes including fresh, raw pineapple and fresh, raw papaya. By eating these fruits as accompaniment to meat, our bodies are less likely to be depleted of its own digestive enzymes. Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, while fresh papaya contains an enzyme called papain; both help the body to break down protein quickly. Sometimes, it may not be possible to eat fresh pineapple or papaya with your meal, especially if you are eating away from home.  In this case, there are combination bromelain and papain supplements available. Remember to always check the labels of your supplements for unwanted ingredients such as artificial sweeteners, MSG, and other neurotoxins.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
http://www.elitefitness.com/forum/diet-bodybuilding/common-digestion-times-449044.html
http://www.drheise.com/beef.htm
http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/14432/1/How-to-Help-Digestion.html

Sugar Consumption Among US Children and Teenagers

Sugar Consumption in the US

photo used under creative common license

“For the past 10 years, I have noticed a connection between childhood obesity, eating disorders, and the increasing complications of both in my clinical work as well as in my research.  As part of my mission to shed light on these problems, particularly as they relate to US children, I find it important to provide both by readers and clients with relevant informative articles.”

Recently, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) released a data brief which examined the consumption of “added sugar” among American children and teenagers. On average, today’s children and teens obtain 16% of their daily calories from added sugar; the USDA recommends that no more than 5-15% of daily calories come from a combination of added sugar AND solid fats. CDC defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table”. Examples of added sugars include white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, maple syrup, pancake syrup, fructose sweetener, liquid fructose, honey, molasses, anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin.  Other key findings from the study include:

  • Non-Hispanic white children and teenagers consume more added sugar than Mexican-American children and teenagers
  • There was no difference in consumption by income among children and teenagers
  • More added sugar calories are coming from foods than beverages
  • More added sugar is consumed at home rather than away from home

Although it is unrealistic to remove all added sugar from our children’s diets, there are several dietary changes that can be made that will greatly reduce sugar consumption:

  • Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
  • Cut out artificially sweetened foods. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, tend to increase cravings for sugary foods.
  • Replace sugary foods with foods that are low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits and unsweetened cacao nibs.
  • Avoid foods that contain sugar, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar”, “reduced sugar, or that are “low in sugar”, just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
  • Avoid processed foods that are marketing as being “low fat”. When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture.
  • Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as, flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) cranberries, energy bars, fruit snacks, sweetened apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread.

Diets high in added sugar reduces the production of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Reduced levels of BDNF has been linked to reduced memory function, learning disabilities, depression, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s Disease (HD), dementia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder (BED). Decreased levels of BDNF negatively affect leptin and insulin signals in the brain, resulting in an increased tendency to overeat.

There are several simple lifestyle changes that can be made to increase and maintain brain levels of BDNF:

  • The most effective way to increase BDNF levels in the brain is through aerobic exercise. After exercising, levels of BDNF surge. Exercise regularly and BDNF levels remain increased.
  • BDNF can also be increased through dietary changes. Acetyl-L-Carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids (such as those found in fish oil), pantethine (found in foods like dairy, eggs, sweet potatoes, peas, spinach, and mushrooms), blueberries, and the curry spice curcumin have all been shown in increase or maintain BDNF levels.
  • Anti-depressants are proven to increase BDNF levels in the brain, so if prescribed anti-depressants be sure to take them as directed.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

BDNF Prevents and Reverses Alzheimer’s Disease
Consumption of Added Sugar Among US Children and Adolescents
What Eating Too Much Sugar Does to Your Brain

Chronic Sugar Intake Dampens Feeding-Related Activity of Neurons Synthesizing a Satiety Mediator, Oxytocin
Tips for Reducing Your Child’s Sugar Intake

Mercury in Seafood. Is it Really Unsafe?

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

We’ve all seen headlines like this in the media, warning against the dangers of the mercury content of seafood. Are headlines like this completely true? Is eating a diet rich in fish truly going to lead to mercury toxicity?

Looking exclusively at the mercury content of fish is an inaccurate measure of “the dangers” of eating fish. In order to be accurate, it is essential to look at the big picture. Are there other components that play a role in the way our bodies process mercury? Let’s investigate.

Aside from mercury, what other important element does fish contain? Selenium! The USDA has released a report of the best food sources of selenium. Out of the top 25 food sources, 16 of these were fish.

Selenium is sort of a “magnet” to mercury. When we consume mercury with selenium, the mercury seeks out the selenium and binds to it. This binding makes it impossible for the mercury to bind to anything else in our body, such as brain tissue, organ tissue etc. Dr Nicholas Ralston, a top researcher in the “Selenium-Mercury” relationship in fish and seafood explains it like this:

“Think of dietary selenium as if it were your income and dietary mercury as if it were a bill that you need to pay. Just as we all need a certain amount of money to cover living expenses such as food and rent, we all need a certain amount of selenium … Only one major study has shown negative effects from exposure to mercury from seafood, and that seafood was pilot whale meat. Pilot whale meat is unusual in that it contains more mercury than selenium. When you eat pilot whale meat, it’s like getting a bill for $400 and a check for less than $100. If that happens too much, you go bankrupt. On the other hand, if you eat ocean fish, it’s like getting a check in the mail for $500 and getting a bill for $25. The more that happens, the happier you are.”

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, released a really useful chart that shows the ratio of selenium:mercury content in the most commonly eaten types of fish. Print it out, put it on your fridge, refer to it often, eat fish!

For a printable version of this chart click here.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
http://www.wpcouncil.org
http://www.nal.usda.gov

News You Can Use – Jan 22 – 29 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 22-29 2012”

Deception Diet: How Optical Illusions Can Trick Your Appetite
Why McDonald’s In France Doesn’t Feel Like Fast Food

Think Positive (Seriously, it could lead to healthier behavior!)
One More Reason Not to Eat Microwave Popcorn: Vaccine Effectiveness
Prisoners Lawsuit Against Soy Products Given Green Light by Judge
Raw Milk Vending Machines Growing in Popularity Across Europe
Obesity Tops List of “Winnable” Health Battles

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

What is Glycemic Load & Why Is It Important?

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

The health benefits of  incorporating low GL foods  into your daily diet include, a lower blood glucose level, decrease in cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of heart disease and type II diabetes.  But determining which foods have a low Glycemic load can be confusing.  You have probably noticed that many foods today have listed the glycemic index (GI), but if you are like most people you may not know what it is or why it is important. Specifically it is used in developing a scale that ranks carbohydrates by how much they raise blood glucose levels compared to a reference food.  The problem with using the GI alone is that it is based on a small quantity of food, 50 grams, which is typically less than a normal serving of food.

A more accurate or relevant measure is the glycemic load (GL) which reflects both the quality and quantity of dietary carbohydrates. This is important because, to put it very simply, blood glucose levels determine whether or not and how much fat your body stores.  Understanding GL allows us to maintain a healthy weight for our size. Because most foods with a low GL are whole foods (came out of the ground or had a face) instead of processed foods, this means that we will be eating more fruits and vegetables and healthier proteins.

To calculate the glycemic load of a food, divide the GI by 100 and multiply by the grams of carbohydrate in the serving size.  GL=GI/100 x # Carb grams per serving

Examples of How to Lower A Meal’s GL:

glpic glpic2

GI = 60    GL = 48                   GI = 42    GL = 31

A cereal with fiber plus a fruit, which also has fiber lowers the GL.

pretzels peanuts

GI = 83    GL = 19                   GI = 14    GL = 1

Pretzels are made from bleached white flour, salt and a little sugar. Peanuts, even with the fat, are a much better snack because of the fiber.

So What is High, Medium and Low in Terms of the GL for a food

Low 0-10

Moderate 11-19

High 20+

What Should I Shoot for During the Course of a  Day?

Low: less than 80

Moderate: less than 100

High: greater than 100

How to Increase Consumption of Low GI Foods

*Eat high-fiber breakfast cereals, especially oats, bran and barley OR

*Add berries, nuts, flaxseed and cinnamon to high GI cereals

*Choose dense, whole grain and sourdough breads and crackers OR

*Add a heart healthy protein and/or condiment to high GI breads and crackers.

*Include 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables every day

*Replace white potatoes with yams or sweet potatoes OR

*Eat smaller portions of high GI potatoes

*Eat less refined sugars and convenience foods OR

*Combine nuts, fruits, yogurt with commercial sweets – just watch portion sizes

It is important that one does not eat only low GL foods.  The result could be a calorically dense, high fat, low fiber, low carb diet (such as the Atkin’s Diet).  It is best to aim for a well balanced diet that includes low GL carbohydrates, such as fruits and vegetables and hi fiber grains and use the glycemic load as a guide for increasing these foods and for keeping blood sugar levels stable.

Sources:

The Glycemic Index – Glycemic Index (www.glycemicindex.com/glycemic.index.ppt)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

You are what you eat!

eating disorder treament quotes

“Food is medicine. It’s powerful,We eat every single day, several times a day, so we have the opportunity to take medicine that’s good for us or medicine that’s not so good for us. I can only provide the information; people themselves are in charge of creating the right mindset to want to do this.” – Bauer

Source:

Bauer J, Svec C. Food Cures: Treat Common Health Concerns, Look Younger & Live Longer. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Books; 2007.