Tag Archives: eating disorder recovery nutrition

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Nutrition Therapy for Eating Disorders, Substance Use Disorders, and Addiction

David Wiss Eating Disorders

Join us WEDNESDAY January 15 at 7:30 pm EST as we welcome David Wiss to the show. David is the founder of ‘Nutrition in Recovery‘ in Los Angeles and specializes in the nutritional management of food addiction, substance abuse, eating disorders, weight management, sports nutrition and general wellness. You can tune into the show HERE.

This episode is especially important if you suffer from food addiction, obesity or an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder.

Some background information about David:

“David A. Wiss, MS, RDN, CPT, grew up in Los Angeles, graduating from the University of Southern California with a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Science. He earned a Master’s Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics at California State University, Northridge, and completed training to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN). His Master’s Thesis “Nutrition and Substance Abuse” was a multisite and multidisciplinary investigation into the special needs of addicts and alcoholics within the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System. Mr. Wiss is also a Certified Personal Trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Additionally, he is a on the executive committee of the Behavioral Health Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, and is the Research and Grants Committee Chair for the Los Angeles District of the California Dietetic Association. Mr. Wiss’ private practice Nutrition In Recovery operates out of Los Angeles, CA and specializes in the nutritional management of: Food Addiction, Substance Abuse, Eating Disorders, Weight Management, Sports Nutrition, and General Wellness.”

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: Buying a Whole Hog [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Cuts of Pork

Buying a Whole Hog

There are a number of questions the processor will ask. The cut sheet below will help you anticipate these questions.

I found a couple of places that look good.

Heritage Farms:

  • Good Family Farms – Duroc Pork
  • Lazy S Farms – Red Wattle Pork
  • Metzger Family Farm – Tamworth Pork

*Call for pricing, and for information on these farms go to www.heritagefoodsusa.com

Marksbury Farm Market
Retail and Butcher’s Shop
73 Fisher Ford Road
Lancaster, Kentucky  40444

Pork Processing Costs

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: Categories of Swine [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Tamworth Hog Benefits

Tamworth Hogs are a Heritage Breed of Pig

Categories of Swine

There are two major categories of swine breeds, paternal and maternal. Their offspring result in a mix of different qualities from the boar and the sow, and these are the qualities that farmers are trying to obtain when deciding which pigs to breed together.

Paternal Breeds

Paternal breeds are used for swine that will be raised for slaughter. The paternal breeds have qualities such as meatiness, leanness, and a high growth rate. Breeds include the Duroc, which has sweet meat and marbling that produces amazing shoulders and spare ribs, and the Berkshire, which has tender, juicy meat and a higher fat content, which means that it can withstand higher cooking temperatures or longer cooking times. The Hampshire is another paternal breed that is heavily muscled and lean, as is the Poland China.

Maternal Breeds

Maternal breeds are used as sows due to their nurturing tendencies. Maternal breeds tend to produce more milk, have larger litter sizes, and have a greater mothering ability. The three main maternal breeds are the Yorkshire, Landrace, and Chester White. The Yorkshire is the most recorded type of pig in the U.S. and the Landrace produces, on average, the largest litters of piglets.

Groups of pig breeds:

Lard Types: Poland Chinas, Cheshires, Essex, Mulefoots; have compact bodies, large hams, docile, and a heavier fat layer, although recent breeding has made them more similar to bacon and meat typing

Bacon and Meat Types: Landrace, Yorkshires, Tamworth; longer bodied and legs, trim profile, higher energy, less external fat.

Dual-purpose: Berkshires, Hampshires, Large Black (especially docile because of the large flopped ears), Saddlebacks.

There are demands for each breed by the market. Many hog growers practice cross breeding to get hybrid vigor in offspring. Information about the breeds and producers is available from the American Livestock Breed Conservancy.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: What Are the Advantages of Pork Over Other Animal Protein? [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Cuts of Pork

What Are the Advantages of Pork Over Other Animal Protein?

Sustainably raised  pork is cheaper than chicken, lamb or beef. Also, unless you find the right grass-fed beef, such as U.S. Wellness Meats, it can taste gamey and can be tough. My experience with local beef growers is that the meat was too tough and too gamey when the cows were 100% grass-fed.  With pigs, the flavor of the meat is enhanced when they eat what they were naturally designed to eat.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Unhealthy Trans Fats

Unhealthy Trans Fats

photo used under a creative commons license

Whether you are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Unhealthy Trans-Fats

The trans fatty acids that are detrimental to our health are those that are produced when vegetable oils are heated under pressure with hydrogen and a catalyst, in a process called hydrogenation. These fats are often referred to as hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils.  In the past few decades, food manufacturers have replaced saturated fats with trans fats in the vast majority of processed foods to prolong their shelf life, and to position their products as a healthier alternative. This was possible because saturated fats were being demonized at the time. Trans fats are found in the majority of processed and fried foods but can also be found in bulk foods such as nuts and fruits, whether or not they are organic. They are so common, it is nearly impossible to buy a processed food without a trans fat.

The following list is a compilation of the adverse effects reported in humans and animals from the consumption of trans fatty acids. This information is based on decades of research done by Dr. Mary Enig and has been confirmed by others.

  • Trans fats lower “good” HDL cholesterol in a dose response manner (the higher the trans fat level in the diet, the lower the HDL cholesterol in the serum).
  • Trans fats raise the bad LDL cholesterol in a dose response manner.
  • Trans fats increase tendency towards blocked arteries.
  • Trans fats raise total serum cholesterol levels 20-30mg.
  • Trans fats lower the amount of cream (volume) in milk from lactating females in all species studied, including humans, thus lowering the overall quality available to the infant.
  • Trans fats increase blood insulin levels in humans in response to glucose load, increasing risk for diabetes.
  • Trans fats increase insulin resistance thus having an undesirable effect in diabetics.
  • Trans fats affect immune response by lowering efficiency of B cell response.
  • Trans fats decrease levels of testosterone in male animals, increase level of abnormal sperm, and interfere with gestation in females.
  • Trans fats cause alterations in cell membranes, including membrane fluidity.
  • Trans fats cause alterations in fat cell size, cell number, and fatty acid composition.
  • Trans fats escalate adverse effects of essential fatty acid deficiencies.

Earlier in the “Fats Explained” series, we discussed Healthy Trans-Fats. You can read about healthy trans fats HERE.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Conjugated Linoleic Acid – The Good Trans fat

Photo: Kabsik Park under a Creative Commons license.

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Trans fats vs. Non Trans Fats

Another way to categorize fats is whether or not a fat is a trans fat. There are two trans fatty acids.  The one that is exceptionally good for us is CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid, which is found in grass-fed animal protein such as beef, bison, venison etc. The other is man-made trans fat, which is a class unto itself. This fat is the industrially-produced, partially hydrogenated fat found in corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oil as well as that in margarine.  There really isn’t much else to say about man-made trans fats, other than that they are very damaging to the systems in the body that regulate eating and fat storage. They contribute to obesity and all of it’s complications, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, the aging process and various types of cancer. 

Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Good Trans-Fat

When we think of fats that are unhealthy, we think of trans fats.  But one of the healthiest fats, CLA, is a trans fat. Actually conjugated linoleic acid is both a trans fatty acid and a cis fatty acid. The cis bond causes a lower melting point and is apparently the reason for all of the health benefits associated with CLA. One of the reasons that CLA is so healthy, is that it allows us to absorb vitamins D, A and K. These vitamins are critical to our health and well-being, but can only be absorbed from full-fat grass-fed dairy and meat, as both contain high concentrations of CLA.  Another reason that CLA is so good for us is that it appears to convert readily to muscle instead of fat.

How CLA Effects Muscle and Body Fat

Grass-Fed Animal Protein and CLA

Most beef sold in the United States is not grass-fed. Instead, most cattle are raised on grain and other types of feed. The majority of these animals are also treated with hormones and antibiotics, which pass through to humans, resulting in higher rates of cancer in women who began their periods prematurely and resistance to antibiotics in the population at large.

How Is CLA Made?

Cows are ruminants, which means that they have more than one stomach. Digestion in such animals begins in an organ called the rumen, where CLA is formed. The animal regurgitates and re-chews its cud and eventually digests the CLAs from the grass, where they enter the meat and milk of the animal. Common ruminant food sources include cattle, goats, sheep and deer as they all graze on grass if left to their own devices.

Organic, grass-fed cows have 300 to 500 percent more CLA than cattle raised on other feeds. This is true of the beef, butter, milk and cheese produced from grass-fed cows. Grass-fed cows are the best source of CLA in the American diet.

The highest concentration of CLA in all foods, however, is contained in kangaroo meat. Raised wild in Australia, kangaroo meat is sold in 55 countries including the United States, though it is relatively difficult to find (in Cincinnati, you can find kangaroo meat at Jungle Jim’s). The meat is typically ground and used in sausage. Kangaroo has only been legal to eat since 1980 and is still not a staple meat in any diet, even in Australia. CLAs are also found to a much lesser extent in poultry. You can read more about food sources of CLA here.

Milk from Grass-Fed Cows is Higher in Vitamin E.

Cows that get all their nutrients from grazed grass—their natural diet—produce milk with 86 percent more vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) than cows fed a standard dairy diet, according to a recent study. The standard dairy diet consists of large amounts of “concentrate,” which is typically a dry mixture of corn and soy. The concentrate does not produce much CLA  or vitamin E.  In addition, the  grains are almost always genetically modified, causing all sorts of problems for humans, not the least of which is obesity.

Some organic dairies raise their cows on pasture grass and supplement them with organic concentrate; others keep their cows indoors and feed them organic concentrate and stored grasses. It’s important to know that the more freshly grazed grass in a cow’s diet, the more vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and CLA; Organic Valley is a nation-wide organic dairy that emphasizes grazing.

The Higher the Altitude, The More CLA.

Another interesting thing about pastured cows is that the colder the climate, the better the grass, and the more CLA. New research shows that cows that graze at relatively high altitudes may produce the healthiest milk and cheese of all. Milk from cows that graze in the Alps, for example, have more omega-3 fatty acids while also having significantly less saturated fat. The reason? It has to do with plant antifreeze. Omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids stay fluid at colder temperatures unlike saturated fats, which are solid at cold temperatures. A plant that has to withstand the cold needs more of this natural antifreeze to keep its cell membranes fluid in the cold. Cows that graze on this cold climate grass ingest more omega-3s as a result, which they then convert to CLA. In a recent study, cows that grazed in alpine meadows had more than twice the amount of CLA in their milk as similar cows that grazed down in the valley.  The lesson here is eat more Alpine cheese!

Natural CLA Vs. Synthetic CLA.

A new study shows that synthetic CLA pills may cause more harm than good. After reviewing 13 randomized studies, a group of researchers concluded that the pills do not reduce body weight or body fat to a significant degree. Worse yet, the researchers found that a kind of CLA found in the pills (CLA (t10, c12) may cause serious health complications, including an enlarged liver, lower levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Meanwhile, the main type of CLA found in meat and dairy products (c9, t11 or “rumenic acid”) has been given a clean bill of health. Once again, when it comes to fat, Mother Nature knows best!

Other Articles in This Series

Fats Explained: Fatty Acids (Infographic)

Fats Explained: Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Fatty Acids [Infographic]

Omega Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Below is an infographic we’ve created that summarizes some of the information we’ve posted about fatty acids. We strongly encourage you to read all the articles that we’ve posted about Omega Fatty Acids.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Fats Explained: Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, and Omega-9 Fatty Acids

Omega Fatty Acids Chart

Click here to view a larger version of this infographic.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.