Posts Tagged ‘eating disorder recovery’

Fats Explained: Where to Get Pastured Butter

Friday, September 6th, 2013

butter

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Where to Get Pastured Butter

Pastured butter is an excellent source of CLA. To my knowledge, there are no American farms or cooperatives that are currently selling butter from 100% grass-fed cows. Although cheese from all-grass-fed cows is available from many suppliers, grass-fed butter cannot be found. Restrictive government regulations and lack of consumer awareness keep small-scale butter operations from being profitable.

An excellent source for all-grass-fed butter can be imported from Germany by the Allgau company. The butter is made from cows that are raised on pasture or grass silage, making it five times higher in CLA and also higher in vitamin E and beta carotene than commercial butter, whether organic or non-organic. It costs about twice as much as ordinary butter and about the same as organic butter. It is yellower than butter from cows raised in confinement, melts at a lower temperature, and has a terrific taste. You can purchase it online from igourmet.com.

Other options are to make your own butter, which isn’t nearly as difficult as it sounds. I’ve posted a recipe for butter here. You may also be able to convince your local supermarket to stock it, eliminating the high cost of shipping. Check this site out for grass-fed options – www.eatwild.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Fats Explained: Non-essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013
Macadamia Nuts

photo used under a creative commons license

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Non-essential Polyunsaturated Omega-5 Fatty Acid

While Omega-5s are polyunsaturated like Omega-3 and Omega-6, they are not considered essential, i.e. our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. Omega 5s from healthy sources are believed to have a positive effect on weight, cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5’s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to their phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA).

Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • Full-fat/grass-fed dairy
  • Tropical oils (unrefined, cold-pressed coconut and palm kernel)
  • Saw palmetto
  • Wild-caught salmon
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pomegranate seeds or unrefined, cold-pressed pomegranate oil

Non-Essential Monounsaturated Fatty Acids, Omegas 7, & 9

The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. 

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-7 Fatty Acids have been shown to have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a role in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA).

Common food sources are:

  • Grass-fed/Grass-finished meat
  • Full-fat, grass-fed dairy
  • Wild caught salmon
  • Sea buckthorn berries
  • Macadamia nuts

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked to healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA).

Natural sources of good Omega-9s include:

  • Olives
  • Expeller pressed olive oil
  • Avocado
  • Grass-fed/grass-finished meat
  • Sprouted nuts

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Avocado Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 Fatty Acids

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also referred to as Essential Fatty Acids; i.e. fats that our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of producing. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with: 

  • Regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • Transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • Managing proper kidney function
  • Dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • Regulating muscles and reflexes
  • Positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

Good sources of Omega 6 Fatty Acids are:

  • Olive Oil
  • Nuts
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Avocado
  • Flaxseed & Flaxseed Oil
  • Chia Seeds
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Acai Berries

Balancing Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 and Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega-6 and omega-3 fats need to be eaten in balance. Americans consume far too many omega-6 fatty acids, and far too little omega-3 fatty acids. The ideal balance between Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty acids would be 1:1. Experts estimate that Americans eat anywhere from 15:1 to 50:1 Omega 6 to Omega 3. So it isn’t the quantity of these polyunsaturated oils which governs the harm they do, but the relationship between them.  Obesity, free radical production, the formation of age pigment, blood clotting efficiency, inflammation, immunity from disease, and level of energy are all responsive to the ratio of unsaturated fats to saturated fats. The higher this ratio is, the greater the probability of harm there is.

When they are out of balance, we are susceptible to disease, whereas when we maintain a proper balance, we maintain and even improve our health. Some research is beginning to show that omega-6s and omega-3s only have a beneficial effect if you consume balanced amounts of both, so this ratio is not something to ignore. Since the Western diet supplies plenty of omega-6, you will probably have to focus on increasing your omega-3s from the list above.

In our next blog post, we’ll be talking about Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5s, Omega-7s, Omega-9s

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: It’s Not About the Food with Esther Kane

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Esther Kane Eating Disorders

Join us on Wednesday August 7 at 7 pm EST as we speak with Esther Kane, author of “It’s Not About Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies“. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE!

Here’s a bit of background info on our guest….

“Esther grew up in the inner city of Toronto and began her work there counselling and facilitating groups for women of all ages and backgrounds who were struggling with chemical dependencies and food/body images issues. After obtaining her Bachelor of Social Work at Ryerson in 1996 at the age of 25, she moved to British Columbia and continued her work as a therapist. In 1998, she obtained her Masters in Social Work from UBC. Her graduating research on Jewish Women and Body Image was published in the Journal of Collaborative Therapies shortly thereafter.

For over a decade, she has worked as a therapist and group facilitator with individuals and families for social service agencies and in private practice while also completing an intense 2-year training program in Multigenerational Family Systems Therapy at Pacific Coast Family Institute in Vancouver.

Esther Kane, is author of “It’s Not About the Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies”. She is currently working on her fourth book, “How to Midwife Your Midlife in a Youth-Obsessed Culture”, which will help women navigate midlife in a healthy and empowering way.”

_______

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated Fats

Thursday, July 25th, 2013

fats explained

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats were unhealthy, and that they were the root cause of the epidemics of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol in our society. What we know today is that saturated fats are not the problem. It is the polluted and/or processed version of saturated fats along with the overabundance of processed unsaturated fats that are causing the problems. Saturated fats such as grass-fed animal fats and coconut oil, which is mostly a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) along with unsaturated Omega 3 fats and the naturally occurring trans-fat CLA, are exceptionally good, indeed, healing for the body. Whereas man-made trans-fats and vegetable or seed fats that have been hydrogenated are literally killing us.

So in a nutshell:

Good Fat = saturated grass-fed animal fat, coconut fat (medium chain fatty acid) and unsaturated Omega 3 fats, especially those from natural sources such as flax seed, salmon, walnuts and leafy greens. (See next in series for complete list)

Bad Fat = Unsaturated trans-fats, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated vegetable and seed fats that have been heated and/or hydrogenated.  Corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oils should be avoided either because they are innately unhealthy or because of the manner in which they have been processed.

Types of Fats

There are several ways to categorize fats: Saturated or unsaturated; Mono or polyunsaturated; Trans or non-transfat; and Short chain (SCFA), Medium chain (MCFA) and Long chain (LCFA). Among the monounsaturated and the polyunsaturated fats there are the Omega fats, which are divided into Essential (Omegas 3 and 6) and Non-Essential (Omega 5, 7, and 9) fatty acids.

Saturated vs Unsaturated Fat

Most fats are either saturated or unsaturated. There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When an oil is saturated, it means that the molecule has all the hydrogen atoms it can hold.  Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem, because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals.

Free radicals damage healthy cells.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to various cancers including skin cancer. In contrast, unrefined cold-pressed coconut oil, which is primarily a saturated medium chain fatty acid, does not become rancid, and never needs refrigeration, assuming that its structure has not been damaged by processing. (Always buy unrefined, cold-pressed nut and seed oils instead of the refined version.)

Characteristics of Healthy Saturated Fats

Saturated fats from grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese) grass-fed/grass-finished beef, pastured pork and poultry (that are fed non-GMO grains and are usually organic) coconut and palm kernel oil and cacao have the following health benefits:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of cell membranes. They give cells their necessary stiffness and integrity.
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower lipoprotein – A substance in the blood that indicates proneness to heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids. Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acids are better retained in the tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

Unsaturated Fats (for the geeks)

Unlike the saturated fats that have a single bond between carbon atoms, monounsaturated fats have a single double bond between carbon atoms while polyunsaturated fats have two or more double bonds between carbon atoms. Unsaturated fats are primarily made up of the Omega fatty acids 3,5,6,7, and 9. (Trans-fats are also unsaturated. Stay tuned for our article on Trans Fats.)

Stay tuned for part 2 of this four part series.  In Part 2 we’ll talk about Omega Fatty Acids.

Updated on Aug 5 2013.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Source: The Skinny on Fats

Show Notes – Why Do You Overeat? When All You Want to Be is Slim.

Thursday, May 30th, 2013
Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License

On this week’s episode we spoke with Zoë Harcombe, author of Why Do You Overeat? When All You Want to be it SlimWe talked about a variety of topics including food addiction and we shared tips to help people overcome overeating!

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on BlogTalkRadio

In this episode we covered:

6:13  - About Zoë Harcombe
9:00 – How Zoë Harcombe become interested in the obesity epidemic.
10:00 - Zoë Harcombe’s position on food addiction.
11:10 – The Four Stages of Food Addiction.
16:40 – The Minnesota Starvation Experiment.
18:40 - Zoë’s Story.
23:15 – Bulimarexia.
28:30 – Characteristics/Attributions of Food Pollution
33:50 – The Paleo Diet.
36:40 – What do you recommend for those that don’t tolerate milk?
40:20 – Do you change dietary recommendations for a patient with leaky gut?
44:12 – What type of exercise do you recommend?
48:50 – Are GMOs labelled in the UK? Why isn’t the government protecting us from GMOs?
52:45 – Which of your books should my listeners read first?

Links we discussed:

www.zoeharcombe.com

www.theharcombediet.com

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – The Benefits of Bone Broth with Chef Lance Roll

Friday, May 10th, 2013

lanceroll

Join us on Tuesday, May 14 at 7 pm EST as we talk with Chef Lance Roll about the many health benefits of bone broth! We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE.

“Chef Lance Roll is founder of The Flavor Chef.™(2007).  Chef  Lance has been cooking professionally for 25 years.  His career centered in high-end restaurants, conference centers, Professional Chef Instructor at San Diego Culinary Institute and his current job as the owner and operator of the Flavor Chef.

His cooking was transformed upon meeting Paul Chek (in 2006) and being introduced to The Weston A Price Foundation.  Chef Lance excels in making food taste incredibly good.  

Lance puts his God given intuitive ability with food together with his diverse culinary career to create healthy imaginative cuisine.  By using organic ingredients, locally grown organic produce, free range humanely raised meats and poultry, and his incredible Genuine (ORGANIC) Chicken Broth. The Flavor Chef is able to bring extremely well balanced nutrient dense food to your table.

Chef Lance uses the concept of Whole Food Nutrition  to create weekly menus for his Organic Meal Delivery clients.

Chef Lance offers Catering, Weekly Organic Meal Delivery, cooking classes, and his signature Genuine Chicken Bone Broth.

When not cooking Chef Lance is busy with his 2.5 year old son Dylan and his wife Suzanna.   

His trademark “Love is the Ultimate Spice”™  says it all.” 

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’.

Characteristics of The Traditional Diet (as discovered by Dr. Weston A Price)

Thursday, April 5th, 2012
Dr Weston A Price

Dr Weston A Price

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Born in 1870, Weston A. Price was a dentist that was known for his discoveries in the relationship between nutrition, dental health, and physical health. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Price traveled to remote parts of the word that were virtually unaffected by western civilization to determine what type of diet was necessary to attain optimal health. Price found fourteen groups of people ranging from inhabitants of remote Swiss Valleys, South Sea Islanders and Eskimos that had perfect dental health, beautiful facial structure, excellent physical development, and virtually no degenerative diseases.

Price analyzed the diets of all fourteen groups of people and made a great discovery: although each groups varied greatly, dependent on geographic location, all the diets had some definite commonalities. All of their diets were the exact opposite of the “politically correct” nutrition standards, and of the guidelines set out in the food pyramid that is published by the USDA. Specifically, all of their diets:

  • Contained no refined or denatured foods or ingredients (refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, white flour, canned foods, pasteurized/homogenized lowfat milk products, refined/hydrogenated vegetable oils, protein powders, artificial vitamins, food additives and colorings.)
  • Contained some sort of animal product, typically the entire animal was consumed (muscle meat, organs, bones, fats). Bones were consumed in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths
  • Had 4 times more minerals and water-soluble vitamins then that of that found in the Standard American Diet (SAD), and 10 times more fat-soluble vitamins from animal sources (Vitamin A, D and K2)
  • Contained some cooked foods, but all traditional cultures ate at least a portion of their animal foods raw (raw dairy, etc)
  • Incorporated foods that were high in food enzymes and beneficial bacteria from lacto-fermented foods.
  • Included grains, seeds and nuts that were prepared by soaking, sprouting, fermenting or naturally leavening to neutralize anti-nutrients
  • Contained between 30%-80% fat calories, only about 4% of these coming from naturally occurring polyunsaturated oils. The remaining fats were in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Had an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids
  • Contained some salt
  • Made provisions for the health of generations to come. Pregnant women and children were provided with additional nutrient-rich animal foods

So, how can we integrate some of Weston A. Price’s findings into our diets? Here are some things that the Weston A. Price Foundation suggests you can do – keep in mind that while it may be difficult and in some cases unrealistic to follow all these guidelines 100% of the time, anything that you can integrate into your diet will offer health benefits.

  • Eat whole, unprocessed foods
  • Eat meat and animal products from grass-fed animals, which are rich in CLA
  • Eat wild-caught fish and shellfish from unpolluted water
  • Eat full fat dairy products (raw or fermented when available) from grass-fed cows
  • Use animal fats, specifically butter liberally
  • Use traditional vegetable oils only. This includes extra virgin olive oil, expeller-expressed sesame oil, small amounts of expeller-expressed flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil
  • Supplement with Cod Liver Oil
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, when possible)
  • Use properly prepared whole grains, legumes and nuts (soaked, sprouted or sour leavened)
  • Make fermented foods a regular part of your diet (examples include – kefir, miso, kimchee, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, sour cream – Bubbie’s brand of sauerkraut and pickles are properly fermented)
  • Incorporate bone broth into your diet on a regular basis
  • Use filtered water for cooking and drinking
  • Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and a small amount of expeller-expressed flax oil.
  • Use natural sweeteners in moderation (raw honey, maple syrup, maple sugar, date sugar, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder)
  • Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals
  • Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel
  • Use only natural, food-based supplements
  • Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light
  • Think positive thoughts and practice forgiveness

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Sources: The Weston A Price Foundation www.westonaprice.org

Recipe: Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

If you want a meal in 8 minutes that is mouth watering and really good for you, all you need is a chicken breast (Organic and free range), organic frozen green beans, some coconut fat and the right spices!  Just look at that au jus and the fat glistening off of the beans. Yum!

1 heaping tbsp + 1 tsp extra virgin, unrefined coconut fat
1 organic, free-range chicken breast
Bourbon Barrel Bourbon-Smoked Paprika
garlic salt
garlic pepper
himalayan salt or sea salt
any other MSG-free seasonings that you love

1. In a cast iron (or stainless steel) frying pan, heat up coconut fat.
2. Wash and dry the chicken breast and place it in the hot coconut fat.
3. Coat both sides of the chicken breast with the fat.
4. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken with Bourbon Smoked Paprika, Garlic Salt, Garlic Pepper, Himalayan Salt or Sea Salt and any other seasonings that you love.
5. Brown on both sides and reduce heat. Put lid on pan.
DO NOT OVERCOOK THE CHICKEN - It only needs 7 or 8 minutes and just barely done to be the most mouthwatering
6. While the chicken is finishing: Microwave for 3 minutes organic frozen green beans.
7. Drain the beans and salt them and put a teaspoon of coconut fat on them and microwave them for 30 more seconds.
8. You can either throw the green beans into the frying pan to coat them with the delicious juices from the fried chicken or leave them in a ceramic bowl and throw the chicken and the juice on top of them like I did.

It is the smoked paprika that makes this dish so delicious!


Nutrition Information (using an 8 oz chicken breast, 2 cups of green beans)
Calories – 459
Fat – 23 g (all coconut fat)
Protein – 48 g
Carbs – 10 g
Fiber – 4 g

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

News You Can Use – March 11 – 18 2012

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 11 – 18 2012!”

Dr Blaylock Reveals Secrets of MSG (Excitotoxin) Toxicity [Article]

Campbell’s Soup to Phase Out BPA

USDA “Compass” Points Towards Strengthening Local Food Systems

Paper or Plastic? Both are Illegal in Austin, Texas

Bye-Bye BPA? It Could Happen Within Weeks

How to Build Healthier Habits

Shame, Blame and Eating Disorders

New Antibiotic Could Make Food Safer and Cows Healthier

Circadian Rhythms Have Profound Influence on Metabolic Output

Why Legalizing Raw Milk Will Significantly Boost Local, Rural Economies

How to Fight the Epidemic of ‘Picky Eating’ Among Your Children

Just a Few Minutes of Daily Exercise Alters DNA to Help Prevent Chronic Disease

Parents are Key Partners in Treating Kids with Eating Disorders

5 Things Not to Say to Someone With an Eating Disorder

Feeding Preferences Shaped by Taste Receptors

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’