Posts Tagged ‘Eating Disorders Cincinnati’

News You Can Use – March 26 – April 1 2012

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 26 – April 1 2012!”

FDA will not ban BPA in Food Packaging

What’s Inside the 26-ingredient School Lunch Burgers?

Hunger Games: 20 Tips to Teach Healthy Eating to Kids (and Ourselves)

How to Give Your 7-Year-Old Daughter an Eating Disorder

What are the Real Differences Between EPA and DHA?

Anxiety and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

One Million Americans Demand Labeling for GMOs

What is a ‘Hormone Disruptor’ Anyways?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

The Norton Center: News You Can Use – March 18-26

Monday, March 26th, 2012

News to help in your recovery from anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disroder and obesity

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 18 – 26 2012!”

Into the Wild Science of Sourdough Bread-Making

Intense Aromas Lead to Smaller Bites

Popcorn: The Snack with Even Higher Antioxidant Levels than Fruits and Vegetables

How to Feel Good When Things Go Bad

Gluten Sensitivity: Nonsense or New Disease?

Body Image: What Do Girls Need From Their Moms

When Teenage Dieting Does and Does Not Lead to Adult Overeating – The Latest Research on Binge-Eating

How Your Nose May Help with Portion Control

Food and the Brain: Antioxidants

5 Tips for Surviving the Supermarket with Your Children

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Why Does CLA Cause an Increase in Lean Skeletal Muscle Mass and a Decrease in Stored Body Fat?

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012
Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Upon posting the article on ‘CLA + Trans-Fat’, I received a few inquiries about how CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue, and decrease in stored body fat. In order to understand the process involved, we first need to examine the process involved in gaining lean skeletal muscle mass and the process involved in accumulating body fat.

How Do We Gain Lean Muscle Mass?

Every muscle cell has a protein-transporter which exists in a dormant cell in the center of the cell. This protein-transporter is known as ‘Glucose Transporter 4′ or simply ‘GLUT4′.

GLUT4 becomes activated in muscle cells when the cells experience tension and vibration, such as that which occurs during strength-training.

When GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose. The muscle cell uses this glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, resulting in an increase in lean muscle mass.


How Do We Accumulate Body Fat?

Much like muscle cells, every fat cell in the body also contains a dormant protein-transporter known as GLUT4.

GLUT4 becomes activated in fat cells when they experience an increase in insulin, most commonly occurring when we eat.

When we take in nutrients, some of those nutrients are converted into glucose, resulting in increased blood sugar levels. In response, our bodies begin to produce insulin. This insulin travels through our blood stream, activating the GLUT4 within our fat cells.

When the GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose, resulting in an increase in the size of our fat cells.

How does CLA Effect the Growth of Muscle + Fat Cells?

Studies clearly show that CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue and a decrease in stored body fat. What causes this?

When we eat a food that contains CLA, our muscle cells experience an increased concentration of GLUT4. Conversely, our fat cells experience a decreased concentration of GLUT4. This change in concentration allows our muscle cells to take in more glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, while forcing our fat cells to taking in less glucose after eating. The result? Increased growth in muscle tissue, decreased growth in fat tissue.

And that’s why we can enjoy foods like grass-fed whipped cream, grass-fed cheeses and grass-fed butter without worrying about gaining body fat!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Sources

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/​content/meeting_abstract/24/1_​MeetingAbstracts/541.22

News You Can Use – March 11 – 18 2012

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 11 – 18 2012!”

Dr Blaylock Reveals Secrets of MSG (Excitotoxin) Toxicity [Article]

Campbell’s Soup to Phase Out BPA

USDA “Compass” Points Towards Strengthening Local Food Systems

Paper or Plastic? Both are Illegal in Austin, Texas

Bye-Bye BPA? It Could Happen Within Weeks

How to Build Healthier Habits

Shame, Blame and Eating Disorders

New Antibiotic Could Make Food Safer and Cows Healthier

Circadian Rhythms Have Profound Influence on Metabolic Output

Why Legalizing Raw Milk Will Significantly Boost Local, Rural Economies

How to Fight the Epidemic of ‘Picky Eating’ Among Your Children

Just a Few Minutes of Daily Exercise Alters DNA to Help Prevent Chronic Disease

Parents are Key Partners in Treating Kids with Eating Disorders

5 Things Not to Say to Someone With an Eating Disorder

Feeding Preferences Shaped by Taste Receptors

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

The Benefits of Butter

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

 

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats are unhealthy, the root cause of the epidemic of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol that is plaguing our society. I can’t help but to wonder where this theory originated from and if there is really any truth to it? Can something my own grandparents regularly incorporated into their diet really be the cause of many of the health issues that are afflicting our nation?

When it was first announced that saturated fats were unhealthy, the soybean industry saw an opportunity for profit. They spent millions of dollars on an anti-saturated fat campaign, which resulted in butter and other saturated fats being viewed as “evil villains” that had no place in our diet. We were convinced that in order to attain optimal health, we should stop consuming butter and start consuming (often soy-based) margarine. The soybean industry wasn’t the only industry to profit off of this campaign, producers of America’s other main crops (cotton and corn) also benefited, as the majority of margarine is primarily composed of cottonseed, corn and soy oil.

The Weston A Price Foundation has done extensive research about these claims that saturated fats, like butter, have a negative effect on our health. Their research demonstrated that butter actually contains ingredients that PREVENT heart disease. They found that margarine INCREASES the risk of heart disease, due to the free-radicals that are generated during the process of producing margarine. Research by the Medical Research Council demonstrated that men who incorporate butter into their diets ran half the risk of developing heart disease than those who used margarine. Their research also demonstrated that butter does not cause weight gain. To the contrary, margarine is much more likely to result in weight gain because it lacks so many important nutrients, resulting in “cravings and bingeing.”

Butter, especially grassfed butter, is an excellent source of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K2. It is also somewhat unique in the fact that it contains all of these vitamins co-factors that are required for our bodies to experience optimal benefit. Depending on the source of the butter, the concentration of these vitamins will vary. As a general rule, the more yellow the butter, the more concentrated the nutrients. Also, grassfed butter will typically be higher in nutrient content in the Spring and Autumn when the grass is greenest.

Vitamin A (or retinol) from butter is more easily absorbed by the body than from any other dietary source. Vitamin A is a ‘catalyst’, in that it helps our body to absorb other minerals. Since it is a fairly stable vitamin, little to no damage is done during the pasteurization of butter. Some of the main health benefits of vitamin A include:

  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it promotes good eye health
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents urinary stones
  • it reduces the risk of developing cancer
  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it improves reproductive health

Vitamin D is essential to obtaining maximum health. Much like Vitamin A, it serves as a catalyst in the absorption of minerals. Some of the health benefits of Vitamin D include:

  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents osteomalacia and rickets
  • it improves cardiovascular health
  • it protects against osteoporosis and arthritis
  • it improves mental health
  • assists many bodily processes, such as regulating blood pressure, reducing muscle spasms, helps in cell formation, regulating insulin secretion

‘Activator X’, which is now known to be vitamin K2 was discovered by Dr Weston A Price in 1945. Grainfed butter is only a moderate source of this vitamin, grassfed butter contains up to 50 times more vitamin K2. This is because grass and other leafy greens contain vitamin K1, which is converted into vitamin K2 during the fermentation process that occurs in the cows stomach. Corn-based feed contains little vitamin K1 (0.3 µg/100 grams, some leafy greens contain more than 800µg/100 grams). Vitamins A, D and K all work together in our bodies. When we ingest foods containing vitamin A and vitamin D, a signal is sent to our cells to create certain proteins, vitamin K then activates these proteins. Vitamin K2 also plays a major role in:

  • the prevention of tooth decay
  • growth and development
  • reproduction
  • protection against heart disease
  • brain function

Vitamin E has many biological functions, it’s anti-oxidant function is the most well-known. In addition to it’s anti-oxidant content, vitamin e:

  • Promotes heart health
  • Promotes respiratory health
  • Helps with normal PMS symptoms
  • Supports circulation
  • Supports prostate and breast health
  • Is good for your brain
  • May help hot flashes in menopausal women

Butter possesses many other health benefits beyond it’s content of vitamins A, D, E and K2.

  • Butter is a good sources of short and medium chain triglycerides (these are the types of fat that cannot be stored in adipose tissue)
  • Butter contains the medium chain triglyceride, lauric acid. There are only two dietary choices when it comes to lauric acid: small amounts of butter or large amounts of coconut oil
  • Butter contains the short chain triglyceride, butyric acid. This short chain triglyceride is only found in butter
  • Grassfed butter contains a perfect balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids
  • Grassfed butter is an excellent source of CLA. It contains 300-500 times more CLA than grainfed butter
  • Butter contains lecithin, which helps the body utilize cholesterol and other components of fat
  • It is an excellent source of many trace minerals, including manganese, zinc, chromium and iodine.

I often make my own butter, using whipping cream from Snowville Creamery. The Snowville Creamery website provides directions on how to make it:

It is best to start with cream at about 55-60 F.

There are many ways to churn butter, but any form of agitation will cause the butter to form. The easiest way is to pour cream into a food processor up to the liquid fill line and run the processor beyond whipped cream until the butter separates from the buttermilk. You can also use a mixer, a hand whisk, or put cream in a jar and shake it.

Once the butter has separated from the buttermilk, pour the butter and milk into a strainer or colander. The milk that pours off of the butter is good to drink or use for cooking.

The butter that is retained in the strainer should be rinsed with cool water and repeatedly kneaded with a wooden spoon until all the milk is expelled and the water runs clear.

The butter can then be placed into a butter mold or bowl. For salted butter, add salt before pressing. Enjoy!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

 

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Sources:

Why Butter is Better – Weston A Price
The Skinny on Fats – Weston A Price
Why Butter is Better – Mercola
Grass Fed Butter – Choosing a Better Butter
On the Trail of the Elusive X-Factor – Weston A Price
7 Health Benefits of Vitamin A
Benefits of Vitamin E
Health Benefits of Vitamin D

News You Can Use – March 4 – 11 2012

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012


“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 4- March 11 2012!”

The Most (and Least) Obese Metro Areas in the US

Groups Push for FDA to Require Specific Labeling of Added Sugar in Foods

Diabetics Should Lift Weights Before Cardio

Want Healthy, Safe Seafood? Consult the Superfish List

New Study on Diet-induced Obesity Expands Omega-3 Health Benefits

Give the Healthiest Vegetable on the Planet Some Love

Eating, Seen Through Your Child’s Eyes

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!


Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Dairy: Raw vs. Pasteurized

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Choosing Healthy Dairy Products

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In support of the raw dairy community and the education of dairy consumers, Natural News has just released an infographic about organic raw (fresh) dairy products versus conventional (pasteurized) dairy products.

This infographic is an excellent resource as it explains the differences between the nutritional properties, animal compassion and health implications of raw dairy versus pasteurized dairy.

For more information on choosing health dairy products see my article ‘Dairy Aisle Confusion

Copyright (c) 2012 by Mike Adams. All rights reserved. Posted with permission from Natural News.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

CLA + Trans-Fat

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012
Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is both a trans-fatty and cis-fatty acid that is naturally produced in the stomachs of ruminant animals (like cattle, sheep and goats). Wait. I know what you’re thinking, “You said CLA is a trans-fat. Aren’t trans-fats bad?”.

There are some trans-fats that have no place in our foods today. The trans-fats that are detrimental to our health are of the “industrially-produced” variety. Indeed,  80% of the trans-fats consumed in the Standard American Diet are industrially-produced. Maria Emmerich gives a good description of how our bodies process these types of trans-fats:

“Trans-fats in foods are like BIG SUV’s trying to park into ‘compact’ parking spaces of our cells that are reserved for healthy Omega-3 fats (DHA). When this happens, our neurotransmitters responsible for focus, mood and memory have a hard time finding and recognizing their receptors due to  the inflammation of the membranes on the brain cells caused by the consumption of trans-fats.”

Naturally-occurring trans-fats, like CLA, are thought to be beneficial to our overall health. Studies show that individuals that include CLA in their diets may:

  • reduce their risks of developing certain cancers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure and heart disease
  • experience an increase in metabolism
  • lower their cholesterol and triglycerides
  • lower their insulin resistance (a Penn State study found that CLA mimicked synthetic diabetes medication)
  • experience a reduction in belly fat, especially in the overweight and obese
  • experience an increase in lean muscle

Although CLA can increase metabolism, including it in one’s diet is less likely to produce weight loss and more likely result in a change in body composition; i.e. a reduction in body fat and an increase lean muscle. CLA appears to reduce body fat because of it’s ability to regulate fat metabolism. In other words,  CLA may not reduce the number of fat cells in our bodies, but it does keep small fat cells from getting larger.

So what are the best sources of CLA? I typically use beef, full-fat milk (raw, if available in your area), full-fat raw cheese and butter. I always get organic, grass-fed meat and dairy, it contains 300%-500% more CLA (for more information on choosing healthy dairy products, read this article). There are also CLA supplements available, but these are rarely beneficial. CLA supplements are typically a synthetic form of CLA that is derived from plant oils. I always recommend getting all nutrients in their natural form, when possible.


Currently, the FDA does not require trans-fats to be listed on nutrition labels, if the product contains less than 0.5 g of trans-fats per serving.

If you are really serious about keeping all unhealthy trans-fats out of your diet, be sure to check the ingredients list for “hydrogenated oils” and/or “partially hydrogenated oils”. These ingredients are actually trans-fats. Just because some of your favorite foods contain trans-fats, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy these foods. Here are some popular grocery store items that contain trans-fats, with healthy alternatives*….

Not so good choice – Girl Scout Samoa Cookies
Better choice – Homemade “Samoa Cookies

Not so good choice – Pay Day Candy Bar
Better choice – Homemade “Pay Day” Bar

Not so good choice – Premium Plus Crackers
Better choice – Homemade “Premium Plus” Crackers

Not so good choice – Aunt Jemima Buttermilk Pancakes
Better Choice – My Quinoa Pancakes or my Protein Pancakes

Not so good choice – Taquitos
Better Choice – Homemade “Taquitos”

*I prefer using Jay Robb protein powder for recipes that incorporate Whey Protein

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Sources:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/04/26/natural-trans-fats-actually-have-health-benefits.aspx

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/10/18/dairies-unite-to-set-safety-standards-for-raw-milk-cheese.aspx

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/130/12/2943.full
http://www.adsa.org/jointabs/iaafs108.pdf
http://www.springerlink.com/content/jx34483r3888840n/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20463040
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820159

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/grass-fed-butter/#axzz1oNBeORhM

Omega Fatty Acids, Explained.

Friday, March 2nd, 2012
Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Almonds are one source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

Omega Fatty Acids can be categorized as either Monounsaturated Fats or Polyunsaturated Fats. Omega-7 Fatty Acids and Omega-9 Fatty Acids are Monounsaturated, while Omega-3, Omega-5 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids are Polyunsaturated.

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids are considered to be an Essential Fatty Acid; our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of self-producing. As a result, we need to obtain Omega-3 Fatty Acids from dietary sources. In addition to supporting the heart, brain and eyes, studies show that Omega-3s have a positive impact on:

  • Asthma
  • Diabetes
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Some Cancers
  • Skin Disorders
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Attention Disorders
  • Depressive Disorders
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Digestive Difficulties

The most common Omega-3s are α-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Some good food sources of Omega-3s include:

  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • sardines
  • cod liver oil
  • nuts (walnuts, almonds, pistachios)
  • dark leafy greens
  • tuna and wild salmon

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also an Essential Fatty Acid. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with:

  • regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • managing proper kidney function
  • dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • regulating muscles and reflexes
  • positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

The most common Omega-6 is Linoleic acid (LA). LA accounts for 85-90% of dietary sources of Omega-6. Some good food sources of Omega-6s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • nuts
  • chicken
  • eggs
  • avocado
  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • acai berries

For a larger version of this chart, click HERE.

Omega-5, Omega-7, and Omega-9 – Non-Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-5, 7 and 9 Fatty Acids are Non-Essential Fatty Acids; our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. As with all supplements, if you think you aren’t getting enough of these Omegas, you should always consult with your physician before supplementing.

Omega-5 Fatty Acids are believed to have a positive effect on weight-related cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to it’s phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA). Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • tropical oils (coconut and palm)
  • saw palmetto
  • wild salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • pomegranate seeds/oil

Studies show that Omega-7 Fatty Acids have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a rold in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA). Common food sources are:

  • grassfed meat
  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • wild-caught salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • sea buckthorn berries

Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked with healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA). Natural sources of Omega-9s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • avocado
  • grassfed meat
  • nuts
  • sesame oil

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com’

Sources:
photo used under a creative commons license

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