Tag Archives: EDNOS

News You Can Use – August 25-August 29 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 25 – September 1 2013!”

Eating Disorder Anorexia May Be Linked to Brain Size – Scientists have discovered that the size of our brains may indicate the risk of developing an eating disorder, according to a study published in The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Learn More.

New Mexico Adult Obesity Rate Stabilizes – Awareness and prevention efforts in the fight against obesity in New Mexico appear to be starting to yield positive results. A report released from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013, shows the number of obese adults in New Mexico is stabilizing. Learn More.

The 2013 Edition of ‘F as in Fat’ –  After three decades of increases, adult obesity rates remained level in every state except for one, Arkansas, in the past year, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013, a report from the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Learn More.

Baby Makes Four: When Mothers Have Eating Disorders – According to most mainstream media articles and more than a century of psychological research, eating disorders are the near-exclusive purview of young teenage girls. But what happens when that girl grows up? We know now that eating disorders can follow sufferers through college, young adulthood, and into partnerships, marriage, and pregnancy. As much as we assume that giving birth magically transforms a woman into a mother, the fact is that people are a package deal. Sometimes women experience a retreat of ED thoughts during pregnancy; for others, they get worse. Learn More.

Goodbye EDNOS, Hello OSFED – DSM-5 improved on upon DSM-IV by providing more detail about eating disorders that do not meet criteria for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder. These presentations were previously classified as Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) in DSM-IV, but the category was renamed OSFED (Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorders) in DSM-5.  Learn More.

‘Almost Anorexic’ Ballerina Reveals Her Struggle – Many people who struggle with their body image fall into a gray area between having no eating disorder and full-blown anorexia nervosa. Jenni Schaefer, once a budding ballerina, shares her struggle in a new book ‘Almost Anorexic,’ co-authored with psychologist Jennifer Thomas. Learn More.

Antipsychotic Drugs May Triple Kids’ Diabetes Risk, Study Says – Antipsychotic medications such as Seroquel, Abilify and Risperdal can triple a child’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the first year of usage, according to a new study. Learn More.

How the Brain Remembers Pleasure: Implications for Addiction –  Key details of the way nerve cells in the brain remember pleasure are revealed in a study by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience. The molecular events that form such “reward memories” appear to differ from those created by drug addiction, despite the popular theory that addiction hijacks normal reward pathways. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

DSM-5 Changes in the Diagnosis Eating Disorders

As of May 2013, several changes will be made to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in regards to the diagnosis of eating disorders.

Binge Eating Disorder (BED) will now be listed as a separate diagnosis. Previously, individuals with BEDs were diagnosed as Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). BED is associated with major medical complications such as high cholesterol, heart disease, and obesity. By listing BED as a diagnosis that is separate from EDNOS, individuals will now receive a proper diagnosis and more effective treatment.

Individuals will no longer need to present with amenorrhea in order to receive a diagnosis of Anorexia Nervosa. There are also changes being made to the weight requirements. Previously, an individual had to present at 85% of their ideal body weight. In the upcoming edition of the DSM, the individual will present with a significantly low body weight due to restriction of energy (food) intake.

In the current edition of the DSM, the main criteria for diagnosis of Bulimia Nervosa is based on the number of binge/purge episodes that occur per week. Currently, to be diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa, the individual must binge/purge more than two times every week for a period of three months; otherwise they are diagnosed with EDNOS. In the 2013 version of the DSM, the number of weekly binge/purge episodes has been reduced. The individual must binge/purge at least once per week for a three month period in order to be diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Yoga in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

photo used under a creative commons license

In 2010, Newman’s Own funded a pilot program at the Seattle Children’s outpatient Adolescent Medicine Department. The pilot program was implemented to evaluate the effect of yoga on eating disorder treatment outcomes among teenagers receiving outpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS).The study involved 50 girls and 4 boys between the ages of 11-21; 29 participants were diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, 9 participants were diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, 15 participants were diagnosed with EDNOS. Participants were randomly divided into two groups. One group received standard care; standard care involved appointments with a physician and dietician every other week which monitored weight/height, vital signs, body mass index, nutritional habits, and menstruation status. The second group of participants received yoga instruction plus standard care; yoga instruction involved one hour of one-to-one individualized viniyoga, semi-weekly. Participants were evaluated at the beginning of the study, at the end of the study, and one month after the study via Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), Body Mass Index (BMI), Beck Depression Inventory, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Food Preoccupation questionnaire.

Immediately after yoga sessions, participants experienced a significant decrease in their preoccupation with food; this was evaluated using the Food Preoccupation questionnaire.  Although both groups experienced a decrease in EDE scores, the group that received yoga plus standard of care exhibited greater decreases in symptoms of their eating disorders. At the 12-week follow-up, the EDE scores non-yoga group had returned to baseline; this was not the case with the yoga group. BMI remained stable for both the yoga and non-yoga group; participants with anorexia nervosa did not lose weight, participants with bulimia nervosa did not experience rapid weight fluctuations. Based upon the results of the study, the researchers concluded that individualized yoga does hold promise as adjunctive therapy to standard care. The full results of the study can be viewed HERE.

Let’s Connect!


Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’