Tag Archives: exercise

News You Can Use Week of July 6th-12th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 6th-July 12th, 2015.

NEWS: Radiation In Sunlight Reduces Weight Gain, Findings Independent of Vitamin D Research

Recent research supports the potential for sunlight to reduce the risk of excessive weight gain and also questions the effectiveness of vitamin D supplements to prevent obesity. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Dads: What’s Your Impact on Your Daughter’s Body Image?

If you read my previous blog, I discussed the importance of a mother’s influence on girls’ body image development. In this blog I will now focus on the importance of a father (or father figure) in a girl’s life and how he can also impact his daughter’s body image development in a powerful way. The bottom line is this: Dads, you make a significant difference in how your daughter will feel about her body and appearance, as well as her self-esteem.Consider some of the following strategies to help your daughter maintain a positive body image throughout her girlhood and adolescence: LEARN MORE

NEWS: 5 Ways to Measure the Fitness of Your Exercise Mindset

Open a magazine, turn on the television, glance at highway billboards or Internet ads and the message about fitness is clear as day: Exercise does a body good. But as a clinician who works regularly with people struggling with negative body image, disordered eating behavior (like extreme dieting or binge eating), and weight, I am compelled to add: Exercise does a body good, except when it doesn’t. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Moms: What Will Your Body Image Legacy Be?

I recently watched the video “Legacy,” part of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. As a mother of a 10-year-old daughter (and 12-year-old son), the video provided a vivid wakeup call about the daily influence I have on my daughter’s developing body image. The truth is that, whether we realize it or not, we are all passing along a body image legacy to our daughters. Our daughters are observing us, emulating our attitudes, and for better or worse, they are following our example. LEARN MORE

NEWS: An End to Fat-Phobia in America?

Every 5 years, the USDA publishes its Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The famous food pyramid, now turned into MyPlate, are some of the iconic symbols of these guidelines.  The dietary guidelines are the oracle for health professionals, the food industry, and to some extent, the actual public. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 30th-April 5th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 30th-April 5th.

Milk, Calcium, and Bone Health

Even if you live under a rock, you know that in the US the current recommendation for most of the population is to enjoy 3 servings of dairy a day, including milk. One of the most well funded and persuasive ad campaigns of the three decades has been the Got Milk campaign led by the National Dairy Council. Parents are encouraged to provide milk for their kids’ growing bones and schools serve milk with every meal. LEARN MORE

Why Sleepy Shopping May Lead to a Bigger Waistline

Imagine you just pulled an all-nighter studying for an important exam, worked a double shift through the night, or were up all night with your child who has the flu. The next morning, you find yourself hungry and suddenly remember the lone jar of mustard sitting in your fridge so you decide to stop at your local grocery store to stock up for the week. Stop! Step away from the automatic doors, maybe grab a healthy bite out, and embark on this mission afresh after getting some rest. LEARN MORE

Anorexia Affects More Men Than Previously Thought

Zachary Haines was 16 years old when a physical examination put his 5’7”, 230-pound body within the obese range.  Soon after, Zachary began working out and watching his diet, entering his junior year at high school 45 pounds lighter. LEARN MORE

4 Steps to End Emotional Eating

When Kami waltzed in the room, I cringed. She had her head held high, and offered me a firm, confident handshake and a brilliant smile. Dressed to the nines in a size two expensive summer dress and high heels, her persona screamed, “I am the Martha Stewart of Corporate America on a Weekend Getaway.” She was stunning, and looked more put together than I’ve ever felt in my whole life. LEARN MORE

Yes, You Can Get Addicted to Exercise

People are often astonished to discover exercise isn’t always a panacea. Because physical activity confers so many benefits to our muscles, bones, liver, heart, and brain—not to mention its powerful mood-boosting effects—the notion that it could be hazardous to our well-being may seem ridiculous. Unfortunately, for approximately 3 percent of the population, striving to stay fit does them more harm than good. LEARN MORE

What to Do When Organic Isn’t an Option

Whether you’re stuck in a food desert or have a tight food budget, you don’t need to be exposed to dangerous pesticides. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of February 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 2nd-8th

Exercising May Not Be Enough to Ward Off Disease If You Sit All Day Long

Eating a healthy diet and exercising may not be enough to ward off disease if you spend most of your day sitting in a chair. This is a disheartening conclusion from a study published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine. LEARN MORE

One Simple Change to Increase Kids’ Fruit & Veggie Consumption

Here’s a hack to get schoolchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables during lunch: Schedule their meal to AFTER recess. LEARN MORE

How Words Shape Our Success (or Failure) in Weight Loss

When it comes to leading a healthy lifestyle and losing weight, psychology plays an important role. The way we relate to specific foods or to ourselves with respect to food can sometimes be painful and even harmful. LEARN MORE

8 Things You Should Never Say to Yourself About Food

Sometimes we’re our own worst enemy when it comes to food. Those little things that we say to ourselves before or after we eat may be doing more harm than we even realize. Do you need to re-language your food thoughts? LEARN MORE

Health Basics: How do MSG, artificial sweeteners and gluten cause fast weight gain?

People want that fast track to “fit,” but there’s a price to pay for tricking your body into losing weight, since tricks sometimes involve losing water weight and just postponing bad food habits. There is no fast track to losing weight, but there is a permanent way to achieve and maintain your ideal body weight. The first and most important step involves eliminating three major poisons that are commonly found in today’s “Big Food” industry — yes it’s your turn to turn the tables on Big Food and perhaps your big gut or “chunky” thighs, or maybe you’ve just got some “junk in the trunk” that you want to drop off. Let’s talk about the top three realms of FDA-approved carcinogens and why they drive so many people into obesity and compounded health misery. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of October 13th-19th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 13th-19th!”

How Exercise May Protect Against Depression

Exercise may help to safeguard the mind against depression through previously unknown effects on working muscles, according to a new study involving mice. The findings may have broad implications for anyone whose stress levels threaten to become emotionally overwhelming. LEARN MORE

 

GMOs Are Old Hat. Synthetically Modified Food Is The New Frontier

Genetically modified organisms are ancient, technologically speaking. Though some consumers may just be discovering that they’re in the food system (and getting riled up about labeling them), farmers have had access to them since 1996. But there’s a new technology on the scene, adding a twist to the already complicated conversation about GMOs in our food: synthetic biology. LEARN MORE

 

How Exercise Can Boost Young Brains

Encourage young boys and girls to run, jump, squeal, hop and chase after each other or after erratically kicked balls, and you substantially improve their ability to think, according to the most ambitious study ever conducted of physical activity and cognitive performance in children. LEARN MORE

 

Are Organic Vegetables More Nutritious After All?

There may never be an end to arguments over whether organic food is more nutritious. But a new study is the most ambitious attempt so far to resolve the issue — and it concludes that organic fruit and vegetables offer a key benefit. LEARN MORE

 

Is Obesity an Addiction?

Would a rat risk dying just to satisfy its desire for chocolate? I recently found out. In my laboratory, we gave rats unlimited access to their standard fare as well as to a mini cafeteria full of appetizing, high-calorie foods: sausage, cheesecake, chocolate. The rats decreased their intake of the healthy but bland items and switched to eating the cafeteria food almost exclusively. They gained weight. They became obese. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Half The Time, Double The Benefits

While fitness is about 80% nutrition and 20% exercise, we cannot forget that 20%. It is important to complement good eating habits with good exercise habits as well, in order to strengthen muscles, bones, anaerobic and aerobic systems.  For a long time, running has been a “go-to” for people attempting to lose weight and “get in shape.”  It burns a good amount of calories. But as you get more accustomed to it, the natural inclination is to add time to the run in order to continue reaping the benefits. The question is: Are we maximizing our efficiency AND GETTING THE HEALTH BENEFITS WE WANT?  If we are, you have to wonder why there so many runners, even marathoners, who are overweight?

Trying to choose the best exercise is difficult, because everybody has a different theory. But there are some exercises that are more beneficial than others according the most recent information from exercise physiologists.  Most experts agree that sticking to it, even if you do not spend hours working out, is the best thing you can do.  In fact, contrary to the myth that the longer your workout the better it is for you, researchers today are saying the opposite. According to Timothy Church, M.D. at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA, “The majority of…the benefits from exercising are due to the first 30 minutes of exercise” (Reynolds).  In other word, the easier it is for you to stick with it, the better it is for you.

Michael Joyner, M.D. and professor of anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., believes that brisk walking is the single best exercise. There have been many studies that indicate that walking has been shown to aid substantially in weight control.  For those who are new to exercise or just want to fit some exercise into their daily routine, walking could be your answer. Please be sure to check out our blog talk radio show with Ed Forteau, who has taken walking to a new dimension and avoided having a leg amputated in the process! LISTEN HERE

For those people who already exercise, however, walking may not hold much excitement.  Stuart Phillips, Ph.D. and professor of kinesiology at McMaster University, talks about the benefits of squatting.  “The squat ‘activates the body’s biggest muscles, those in the buttocks, back and legs. [. . .] It’s a very potent exercise’” (Reynolds).  Weight training in general is good at combating the loss of muscle mass that each of us experiences as we age.  But according to Phillips, if you are relying on endurance training, doing anything for long periods of time such as running or biking, you are still losing muscle. .  Resistance training is also good for weight control.  Despite these benefits, however, there is a lack of evidence that resistance training is an effective, all-purpose exercise approach. So what is the best way to workout?

Let me introduce you to the benefits of H.I.I.T., or high-intensity interval training.  It typically consists of a series of very intense spurts of effort, followed by less intense or no exertion periods. It aids in increasing aerobic capacity, much more so than endurance training. That’s right, much more than long distance running or other endurance training! It also has been shown in research to reduce blood-sugar levels and the risk of diabetes, as well as aid in weight control.

The best thing other than the positive impact is that it takes significantly less time. Most people do not have hours to spend exercising during the week, making this approach perfect for our lifestyle.  According to Martin Gibala, the chairman of the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, “there’s no particular reason why H.I.I.T. cannot be adaptable to almost any sport” (Reynolds).  The only criticism of H.I.I.T. is that it builds muscular strength less efficiently than the squat or other resistance training methods. But there are remedies for this. Incorporating hill sprints or stair sprints give you the benefit of a power workout plus interval training.

But, you say, what about upper body strength? Got you covered there too. Another option is an H.I.I.T. weight training circuit for upper and lower body that involves a series of dynamic, body-weighted exercises with limited rest in between. This could be the perfect complement to any H.I.I.T. cardio circuit to reap the full benefits of exercise, with measurable results, again without wasting your time.

The thing to keep in mind is that these types of exercises are supposed to hurt; you will not get the desired results from giving only 60% effort as you may be accustomed to with traditional training. You must give 100% effort in order to push your body and get maximum results.  This is really a no pain, no gain approach 🙂 The upside is a lot less time in the gym and a lot more time to live your life in good health.

Always remember: Eat clean, Commit to be fit, and Live your life wisely!

Dr. J. Renae Norton

For a complete article on “The Single Best Exercise,” see:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17exercise-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

News You Can Use: March 10-17 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 10 – March 17 2013!”

Five powerful ways coconut oil boosts brain function and protects against disease

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – March 3-10 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 3 – March 10 2013!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – Jan 16-23 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 16-23 2013!”

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – October 8-15 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 8-October 15 2012!”

Exclusive: Nestle to cut sugar and salt in breakfast cereals 

Labeling Works! Trans Fat Consumption Down 75% in 10 Years

Don’t celebrate yet, but a grassroots victory against GMO deception is now inevitable

When you peel an orange, don’t throw away the white part under the skin: Bioflavonoids help fight cancer and obesity

Anorexia Nervosa: Not Just For Women!

Why You Shouldn’t Buy the iPhone 5

Exercise May Lead to Better School Performance for Kids With ADHD

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

The Potential Effects of Yoga on Overall Health

Adiponectin, leptin, and yoga practice

photo used under a creative commons license

A recent study published by Ohio State University investigated the mechanisms of hatha yoga’s potential stress-reduction benefits. To do so, researchers compared adiponectin and leptin levels in yoga novices and yoga experts; a novice was defined as an individual that participated in 6-12 yoga sessions in the past year, an expert was defined as an individual that had participated in 1-2 yoga weekly yoga session for at least two years AND at least 2 weekly sessions in the past year.

Leptin is also known as the “starvation hormone”.Leptin sends a signal to our brains that fat cells have enough stored energy to engage in normal metabolic processes. Every individual has an optimal level of leptin, which is thought to be determined genetically. When leptin levels are below optimal levels, the brain receives a message to conserve energy because the body is in a state of deprivation. When this occurs, the brain sends a message to the body that it is hungry (in an attempt to get the individual to eat) so that leptin levels can be restored to an optimal level. Leptin has pro-inflammatory properties. Leptin levels are typically high in obese individuals and low in underweight, malnourished individuals. Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) typically have high leptin levels.

Adiponectin is a hormone that is produced in fat cells; it is released from adipose tissue. Adiponectin has an impact on the regulation of glucose and a role in the processing of fatty acids. Adiponectin has anti-inflammatory properties. Adiponectin levels are typically low in obese individuals, low in individuals with Binge-Eating Disorder (BED), and high in individuals with anorexia or bulimia. Individuals with MDD typically have low adiponectin levels. Adiponectin and leptin counter-regulate each other to regulate body weight; when leptin levels increase, adiponectin levels decrease, and when leptin levels decrease, adoponectin levels increase.

Fifty well-matched women between the ages of 30-65 participated in the research study; 25 were yoga novices, 25 were yoga experts. Three fasting leptin and adiponectin blood samples were taken from each woman on three separate occasions. Leptin was 36% higher in yoga novices in comparison to yoga experts, adiponectin was 28% higher in yoga experts in comparison to yoga novices. Additionally, adiponectin/leptin ratios were nearly twice as high in yoga experts in comparison to yoga novices. Among the expert group, leptin levels were lower in those experts with the most yoga experience.

There have been several studies completed that have highlighted the importance of leptin and adiponectin in the prevention of type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. This study raises the possibility that long-term or more intensive yoga could possibly have a positive effect on overall health through the alteration of leptin and adiponectin production. These hormones are especially of importance in the recovery process for eating disorders and obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on facebook.

Twitter @drrenae.

Contact Dr. Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Inquire about booking Dr. Norton for a speaking engagement.

Read about Dr. Norton.

View a video about Dr. Norton and the Norton Center.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: Kiecolt-Glaser JK, et al, Adiponectin, leptin, and yoga practice, Physiol Behav (2012), doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2012.01.016