Tag Archives: healthy thanksgiving recipes

News You Can Use – November 10-17 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 10-17 2013!”

Abercrombie & Fitch, In Reversal of Exclusionary Policy, Now Selling Larger Sizes –  Turns out that old adage, “All press is good press” has proven untrue, yet again. Following a media thrashing in the spring (some of that from me) for their proud refusal to sell clothing in larger sizes, especially for women, Abercrombie & Fitch has reversed that long-standing decision. Since shares in the company’s stock have lost about 30% of their value in 2013, it seems that the company is looking to expand their customer base beyond the “cool kids,” which were previously only minted in certain sizes, according to their CEO. Learn more.

Soft Drink and Sugar Consumption Can Negatively Impact Kidney Health, New Studies Reveal – Two recently published studies show the negative effects that soft drink and sugar consumption can have on kidney health. Learn more.

Research Shows Less Than One Percent of Fast Food Kids’ Meals are Healthy – Researchers from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity recently analyzed the foods served by 18 fast food restaurant chains. They took into account every possible combination of menu items for a total of 5,427 meals. Out of the 12 restaurants that offered kid’s meals, 11 included a side dish, such as apples, bananas, corn and other fruits and vegetables, that the researchers considered healthy. Also, more than three-quarters of the restaurants offered healthy drink choices, generally milk, juice or bottled water. Learn more.

FDA Declares Trans Fats Not Safe in Foods for the First Time –  According to the Wall Street Journal, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday decided that trans fats should not be considered safe for use in foods, a drastic change in policy that could lead to a ban on the artery-clogging ingredient. Learn more.

5 GMO-Free Thanksgiving Dessert Ideas – The food writer Michael Pollan once wrote, “Don’t eat anything your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” Sadly, most of the food that now adorns Thanksgiving tables, particularly the dessert table, wouldn’t meet that basic requirement: pumpkin from cans, “whipped topping” that contains more genetically modified corn- and soy-based ingredients than actual cream, artificially dyed pie filling, high-fructose-corn-syrup (aka “pecan”) pie. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Baked Sweet Potato Rounds

Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe - Baked Sweet Potato Rounds

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

For more recipes, be sure to visit the Recipe Corner

BAKED SWEET POTATO ROUNDS

4 large organic sweet potatoes or yams

1 cup coconut oil

Organic cinnamon, nutmeg and sea salt

Cooking Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Peel sweet potatoes.
  3. Place sweet potatoes into a pot.
  4. Cover with water and bring to a boil on top of stove and immediately remove. Let cool.
  5. Slice sweet potatoes into 1 inch thick slices and place on cookie sheet or in an oven-proof dish. For easy clean-up, you can line the cookie sheet or oven-proof dish with parchment paper.
  6. Melt coconut oil and baste slices on both sides lavishly with the coconut oil.
  7. Sprinkle cinnamon, nutmeg  and sea salt on top.
  8. Place in oven and bake for 15 minutes.
  9. Turn, reapply coconut oil.
  10. Sprinkle spices on this side and bake for 15 minutes more.
  11. Serve straight from oven.

Serves 8.

Nutritional Info

320 calories, 28 g of fat, 2 g of protein, 24 g of carbs, 3 g of fiber

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Apple Crisp

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

Eating Disorder Recovery: Apple Crisp

BAKED APPLE CRISP

Filling Ingredients*

  • 5 granny smith apples – peeled, cored, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch slices.  Toss sliced apples with lemon juice from ½ lemon to prevent browning.
  • 1/2 cup grassfed butter
  • 2/3 cup coconut crystals sugar
  • 1 tsp. each cinnamon, nutmeg
  • ½ tsp. ginger (optional)
  • 1 Tbsps. Water

Directions for Filling

Melt butter in a large skillet over low heat.

Stir in sugar and spices until sugar begins to dissolve, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add apples and enough water to prevent sticking; continue cooking and stirring until apples soften and are coated with sauce, 4 to 5 minutes.

Topping Ingredients*

  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1 cup organic rolled oats or 1/2 cup hulled hemp seeds
  • ½ cup coconut crystals sugar
  • 1 tsp. each cinnamon, nutmeg
  • ½ tsp. ginger (optional)
  • 1 beaten egg
  • ½ cup grass-fed butter

Directions for topping:

Mix dry ingredients (flour, rolled oats, or hemp, sugar and spices) together in a large bowl. Toss in beaten egg and melted butter. Toss until well blended.

Pour apples and sugar mixture into a 2 quart baking dish. Sprinkle topping evenly over the apple filling.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Bake in the preheated oven until the top is browned and the filling is bubbling up around the edges, 25 to 30 minutes. Cool for 10 to 15 minutes and serve with full fat cream, milk, whipped cream or a scoop of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, which is made with grass-fed cream.

Serves 8.

*All ingredients should be organic when possible.

Nutrition Info (without Ice Cream)

Using Hemp Seeds – 450 calories, 32 g of fat, 6 g of protein, 36 g of carbs, 7 g of fiber

Using Oats – 435 calories, 28 g of fat, 4 g of protein, 44 g of carbs, 8 g of fiber

Substitutes

You can substitute Jovial Foods Ginger Spice Cookies for the flour and oats, by either putting them into a food processor (which makes this a very quick recipe) or rolling them out between two sheets of waxed paper or parchment paper.  If you use the food processor, throw the rest of the ingredients in to finish blending the topping.

To make this even more of a Thanksgiving dish, you can add cranberries.  I like to buy them fresh and cook them into a compote,  using a cup of the coconut sugar and enough water to cover the cranberries. Then just substitute 1 cup of the cooked cranberries for 2 of the apples.

Apple Cranberry Crisp

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.