Tag Archives: lifestyle

News You Can Use – May 6-13

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of May 6 – May 13 2012!”

How to Be Happy Without the Perfect Body
Don’t Lose Sleep Over Weight
Major Overhaul of US Life Urged to Cure Obesity
Long Commutes Linked to Obesity
Eat Your Way to Better Brain Health|
What You Don’t Know About Organic Milk
Why Are We Eating So Much More Than We Used To?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Following Feng Shui in Your Kitchen Helps You Maintain a Healthier Lifestyle

A Feng Shui Calculator

photo used under a creative commons license

For many families, the kitchen is the heart of the home. It’s the place we gather together to receive nourishment, to share the events of the day and to celebrate. Creating an environment that is bright, clean, and cheerful influences the energy of the food as you prepare it and eat it. A healthy lifestyle begins in the kitchen. Therefore, maintaining this space is essential to you and your family’s wellness.

The best colors for the kitchen are those that support your health and nutrition. Use yellow to symbolize sunshine, green for healing, blue to calm and white or cream for a clean palette. Terracotta and rich browns will ground the space. Use dark or bright colors such as red, orange and black as accents.

A sunny kitchen filled with flora encourages happy and healthy energy to permeate the space. You can place plants in the room’s corners, on top of the refrigerator, and between the stove and sink to add harmony and healing to the eating area. Microwaves are not recommended. They emit electromagnetic fields and kill the nutrients in many foods. If you own one, place a plant near it to counteract some of these harmful effects.

The kitchen should have an abundance of natural sunlight and fresh air. A garden window will provide more light and space for plants. Also, in general mirrors are advantageous when placed in the kitchen.  They increase the light, open up the room and double the fortunate energy of the food and stove. Mirrors will expand and multiply all joyous occasions that take place in the kitchen.

The sink and the refrigerator are the water elements in the kitchen. As is true in the bathroom, you should keep the sink drains closed or covered with stoppers when not in use. Make sure the countertops are clean and cleared of color including spices, appliances, bills, containers and condiments. These impede calm cooking conditions.

An orderly kitchen promotes successful, enjoyable cooking. Knowing the exact location of each ingredient and kitchen accessory is a pleasure. Cleaning out the pantry is a great way to begin. Discard expired and unused foods and vitamins, old pots and pans, broken appliances, and tarnished utensils. Definitely get rid of those warped, lidless plastic containers! By splurging for new ones, you can avoid a lot of frustration.

Also, to relax the kitchen energy, clear your refrigerator of  photos, magnets, greeting cards, invitations, and flyers. A chaotic looking refrigerator causes excessive stimulation and a feeling of being overwhelmed. Feel free to hang a couple of colorful magnets or cards with inspiring quotes, but keep it simple. As for the inside, clean it often. Like the pantry, you should throw out spoiled goods and organize your  food in colorful bowls and plastic ware; keep fruit and vegetables in clear glass containers so the natural color shines through. The refrigerator should emanate fresh, healthy energy and be filled with nourishing food.

Finally, do not place the garbage can in a prominent corner of the kitchen. Instead, hide it inside the pantry or under the sink. Make sure it has a lid to contain the dirty energy. Take the garbage out as often as possible. In addition, cleaning supplies, mops, brooms, and chemicals should be kept in a cabinet, not in view.

Here is a Feng Shui color chart to explain the feelings and atmospheres different color’s can create:

Red……..……..Pink …..….. Orange….Green….. …. Yellow

Passion Love Enthusiasm Harmony Optimism
Courage Sweetness Joy Beginnings Focus
Power Uplift Exuberance Prosperity Communication
Wealth Happiness Interaction Nature Sunshine
Motivation Tenderness Fun Growth Inspiration
Fame Enticement Captivation Healing Fidelity

 

Gold…..….. Blue…. Violet……Brown… Black………..White

Wealth Imagination Intuition Solidity Strength Purity
Wisdom Calm Devotion Warmth Elegance Innocence
Luxury Serenity Respect Practicality Protection Faith
Abundance Relaxation Peace Diligence Sophistication Benevolence
Sparkle Compassion Spirituality Reliability Intelligence Honesty
Influence Ocean Awareness Patience Shrewdness Grace

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Barrett J, Steenburgen M. Feng Shui Your Life. New York, NY: Sterling Publishing, 2003.

 

/td

What is Glycemic Load & Why Is It Important?

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

The health benefits of  incorporating low GL foods  into your daily diet include, a lower blood glucose level, decrease in cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of heart disease and type II diabetes.  But determining which foods have a low Glycemic load can be confusing.  You have probably noticed that many foods today have listed the glycemic index (GI), but if you are like most people you may not know what it is or why it is important. Specifically it is used in developing a scale that ranks carbohydrates by how much they raise blood glucose levels compared to a reference food.  The problem with using the GI alone is that it is based on a small quantity of food, 50 grams, which is typically less than a normal serving of food.

A more accurate or relevant measure is the glycemic load (GL) which reflects both the quality and quantity of dietary carbohydrates. This is important because, to put it very simply, blood glucose levels determine whether or not and how much fat your body stores.  Understanding GL allows us to maintain a healthy weight for our size. Because most foods with a low GL are whole foods (came out of the ground or had a face) instead of processed foods, this means that we will be eating more fruits and vegetables and healthier proteins.

To calculate the glycemic load of a food, divide the GI by 100 and multiply by the grams of carbohydrate in the serving size.  GL=GI/100 x # Carb grams per serving

Examples of How to Lower A Meal’s GL:

glpic glpic2

GI = 60    GL = 48                   GI = 42    GL = 31

A cereal with fiber plus a fruit, which also has fiber lowers the GL.

pretzels peanuts

GI = 83    GL = 19                   GI = 14    GL = 1

Pretzels are made from bleached white flour, salt and a little sugar. Peanuts, even with the fat, are a much better snack because of the fiber.

So What is High, Medium and Low in Terms of the GL for a food

Low 0-10

Moderate 11-19

High 20+

What Should I Shoot for During the Course of a  Day?

Low: less than 80

Moderate: less than 100

High: greater than 100

How to Increase Consumption of Low GI Foods

*Eat high-fiber breakfast cereals, especially oats, bran and barley OR

*Add berries, nuts, flaxseed and cinnamon to high GI cereals

*Choose dense, whole grain and sourdough breads and crackers OR

*Add a heart healthy protein and/or condiment to high GI breads and crackers.

*Include 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables every day

*Replace white potatoes with yams or sweet potatoes OR

*Eat smaller portions of high GI potatoes

*Eat less refined sugars and convenience foods OR

*Combine nuts, fruits, yogurt with commercial sweets – just watch portion sizes

It is important that one does not eat only low GL foods.  The result could be a calorically dense, high fat, low fiber, low carb diet (such as the Atkin’s Diet).  It is best to aim for a well balanced diet that includes low GL carbohydrates, such as fruits and vegetables and hi fiber grains and use the glycemic load as a guide for increasing these foods and for keeping blood sugar levels stable.

Sources:

The Glycemic Index – Glycemic Index (www.glycemicindex.com/glycemic.index.ppt)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’