Tag Archives: protein

News You Can Use-Week of May 11th-17th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 11th-17th.

NEWS: 9 Positive Signs Big Companies Are Listening

It’s sometimes easy to feel like there’s so much wrong in the world today. Bees, bats, and birds are dying in unprecedented numbers, likely the result of harmful farming chemicals. GMOs are still not labeled, even though most Americans want that basic information letting them know what’s in the food they eat. But when you step back and look at the big picture, there really are some incredible things happening. (Go ahead, give yourself a pat on the back!) LEARN MORE

NEWS: Top Spring Superfoods to Find at Your Farmer’s Market

For many foodies and health enthusiasts, waking up early to get first dibs at the weekly local farmer’s market is more exciting than opening presents on Christmas morning. That’s because each stand is full of its own unique farm treasures, many absolutely overflowing with fresh vitamins and minerals to heal your body. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding What Clean Eating Really Is

Nobody wants to eat dirty. It just sounds gross. But if you’re not eating cleanly, that may be your only option. So you may be wondering what it takes to take the dirt out of your diet and wash it off so you can dine on the clean diet you deserve. Well, wonder no more. LEARN MORE

NEWS: GMOs, Obesity, and World Hunger

While few would argue that fast food restaurant fare is healthy, North Americans are coming to the realization that the local grocery store contains just as many nutritional pitfalls and health perils. True – even for those who steer clear of packaged items, opting to only shop in the outer aisles of their supermarket. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Can Too Much Protein Be Harmful?

The average American consumes about 100 grams of protein a day, which is much higher than actually required by the body –  55-65 grams per day if you weigh 150 lbs. Could excess consumption of protein be deleterious to one’s health? LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of February 16th-22nd

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 16th-22nd.

7 Reasons to Eat More Fiber

Upping your fiber consumption could save your life. Every 10 gram-per-day increase in fiber is associated with a 10 percent decrease in risk of death, according to research published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. LEARN MORE

What Causes Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Leaky gut syndrome has no single cause, but some of the most common contributors are chronic stress, dysbiosis, environmental contaminants, gastrointestinal disease, immune overload, overuse of alcoholic beverages, poor food choices, presence of pathogenic bacteria, parasites and yeasts, and prolonged use of NSAIDs. Let’s discuss some of these one at a time. LEARN MORE

Top 10 protein-packed plants for survival and a healthy diet

As the price of grocery store meat continues to climb and as factory farming pollutes its quality, more people will be looking for alternative sources of protein. If one has the opportunity to raise chickens or rabbits for meat, then they already have an ongoing, self-sufficient survival food plan in place. If these options aren’t feasible, there are still plenty of alternative sources of protein in the natural world that don’t include eating grasshoppers or crickets. LEARN MORE

GMOs invade fruit industry: Apples, pears, cherries and peaches to all become unlabeled GMO

Genetically modified apples have been approved by the industry-corrupted USDA, a federal regulator that accomplishes for the biotech industry the same thing the FDA achieves for Big Pharma: unlimited profits, lax regulation and a ready willingness to accept fabricated “science” as fact. LEARN MORE

11 food rules you should ignore

Whether you fancy yourself a chef or barely know your way around the kitchen, there are plenty of culinary “facts” out there that are just plain fiction. Maybe you learned them from your mom or from your favorite cooking show — but the source doesn’t change the cold hard truth. Here are 11 food and cooking myths … busted! LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Gluten-Free Organic Protein Bars

Protein-Bars-wide
In a sauce pan over very low heat stir:

4 oz. 100% Sunspire dark chocolate bar

½ cup almond butter

½ cup cold pressed coconut oil

½ cup Norbu sugar and ½ cup honey or    coconut crystals (Or you can use only Norbu for zero calories from sugar)

 

In a mixing bowl toss:

1 cup hemp florets

1 cup shredded coconut

1 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup Naked Whey (Grass Fed Naked Whey Protein Powder)

½ cup raisins

½ cup mixed dry antioxidant fruits

Pour warm mixture into mixing bowl and toss with a fork until well mixed

 

Grease a glass pan with coconut oil and spread mix.

Freeze for 1 hour, long enough to be able to cut into bars

Refreeze and keep frozen until a few minutes before enjoying!

 

Per Serving:  Fat- 19    Calories- 195       Carbs- 35      Protein- 22     Fiber- 5    Net Carb- 30

 

 

 

Recipe: Tunegg Salad

Tunegg Salad Ingredients
“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”
Ingredients
6 oz white albacore or fresh tuna steamed (try to avoid canned tuna)
3 chopped hard boiled eggs (grass fed Omega 3 organic)
1/2 cup diced organic onion
1/2 cup diced organic dill pickle
1/2 cup diced organic celery
Salt & pepper to taste

Toss with:
1/2 cup Wilderness Family Naturals mayonnaise blended with 1 tblsp hot mustard (or make your own Coconut Oil Mayonnaise or Coconut-Macadamia Nut Oil Mayonnaise)
Serve on organic Romaine lettuce leafs (makes a wrap for Tunegg mix)

Nutrition (Entire Recipe)
1240 calories
35 g fat
71 g protein
24 g carbs
9 g fiber

Mercury in Seafood. Is it Really Unsafe?

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

We’ve all seen headlines like this in the media, warning against the dangers of the mercury content of seafood. Are headlines like this completely true? Is eating a diet rich in fish truly going to lead to mercury toxicity?

Looking exclusively at the mercury content of fish is an inaccurate measure of “the dangers” of eating fish. In order to be accurate, it is essential to look at the big picture. Are there other components that play a role in the way our bodies process mercury? Let’s investigate.

Aside from mercury, what other important element does fish contain? Selenium! The USDA has released a report of the best food sources of selenium. Out of the top 25 food sources, 16 of these were fish.

Selenium is sort of a “magnet” to mercury. When we consume mercury with selenium, the mercury seeks out the selenium and binds to it. This binding makes it impossible for the mercury to bind to anything else in our body, such as brain tissue, organ tissue etc. Dr Nicholas Ralston, a top researcher in the “Selenium-Mercury” relationship in fish and seafood explains it like this:

“Think of dietary selenium as if it were your income and dietary mercury as if it were a bill that you need to pay. Just as we all need a certain amount of money to cover living expenses such as food and rent, we all need a certain amount of selenium … Only one major study has shown negative effects from exposure to mercury from seafood, and that seafood was pilot whale meat. Pilot whale meat is unusual in that it contains more mercury than selenium. When you eat pilot whale meat, it’s like getting a bill for $400 and a check for less than $100. If that happens too much, you go bankrupt. On the other hand, if you eat ocean fish, it’s like getting a check in the mail for $500 and getting a bill for $25. The more that happens, the happier you are.”

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, released a really useful chart that shows the ratio of selenium:mercury content in the most commonly eaten types of fish. Print it out, put it on your fridge, refer to it often, eat fish!

For a printable version of this chart click here.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
http://www.wpcouncil.org
http://www.nal.usda.gov

Health Benefits of Chick Peas + A Recipe for Mediterranean “Rice” Salad

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

This dish is great served hot, but also makes a fabulous cold salad. Garlic, zucchini, red onion, chick peas, goat cheese and oregano make a really satisfying dish.

Chickpeas are a great source of protein. They also contain folic acid, iron, copper, zinc and magnesium.

I used cauliflower rice, instead of white rice to cut back on the carbohydrates. This recipe can be made with quinoa, rice or orzo, if you prefer. I grated a medium head of cauliflower in my food processor with the grater attachment. This can also be done with a regular grater. Microwave it in a covered dish for six minutes, no need to add any water.

Based on a recipe by Rachael Ray, this is a quick + easy weeknight dinner. I served this with shrimp cocktail. My favorite shrimp and cocktail sauce are both Trader Joe’s brand. Absolutely delicious!

Mediterranean “Rice” Salad

4 cups organic cauliflower rice

1 medium organic zucchini, diced

salt + pepper

1/2 cup organic red onion, chopped

3 cloves thinly sliced organic garlic

1 can of organic chickpeas (15 oz)

1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped

1/4 cup fresh oregano

3 oz organic  goat cheese cheese, crumbled

In a medium skillet, saute zucchini, onion, garlic, salt and pepper in coconut oil. Cook til tender (about 6 minutes).

Add chickpeas, cook til warm.

Next, add cauliflower rice, parsley, oregano and crumbled goat cheese. Gently stir to combine.

Prior to serving, top with additional goat cheese, if desired.

Makes 4 servings.

Enjoy!
Nutritional Breakdown (per serving)

146 calories

5 g of fat

8 g protein

17 g carbs

7 g fiber

The Morning Rush + A Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipe

The Morning Rush to Work

photo used under a creative commons license

 

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

Many of my patients experience a lot of stress first thing in the morning. Getting ready for work or school, making breakfast, getting kids ready to go to daycare, facing rush hour traffic can all inflict stress on even the most healthy individual. In order to ease the stress of my patients, I have discovered a breakfast recipe for Overnight Oats that is nutritious, delicious and convenient.

Overnight Oats provide a delicious blast of protein in the morning. You can make a few days worth in advance, put them in individual serving size containers, and grab it as you head out the door in the morning. I have created a few variations on this recipe that you can rotate between, just to switch things up a bit. This is definitely not your granny’s hot bowl of oatmeal! No cooking involved on this one, it’s eaten chilled.

This recipe contains two types of protein; casein (from the cottage cheese) and whey (from greek yogurt). Whey protein is a naturally complete protein; it contains all essential amino acids. It is easy to digest, our bodies absorb it quickly. Our bodies absorb casein protein more slowly, so the amino acids in the protein are released into the bloodstream at a more steady pace.

Photo courtesy of lwphotographics.com

Overnight Oats

1 cup organic old-fashioned oats (not instant oats, minute oats, or flavored oatmeal)

2 cups grassfed cottage cheese (my favorite is Kalona Supernatural)

12 oz plain grassfed greek yogurt

2 tbsp Coconut Crystals (more if you like it sweeter)

cinnamon (to taste, I like lots)

Combine everything in a medium sized bowl and mix away! Store in the fridge overnight, and you will wake up to a delish breakfast.

Makes 4 servings

Approximately (depending on which brands of ingredients used) – 235 cal, 6 g fat, 24 g protein, 20 g carbs

Variations:

-add 4 tablespoons of coconut flour and organic dark chocolate chips or organic raisins for Overnight Oats that taste like cookie dough

-top with cashew nut butter, raw honey or coconut nectar

-put a layer of frozen fruit in the bottom of each portion, or a layer of nuts on top (walnuts are best because they have such a high orac -oxidative radical absorption capacity- value)


Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

 

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
http://www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
http://www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Your Health in the News – Dec 12 – 19

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of December 12-19 2011.” 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Scrambled Eggs with Onions + Peppers

eating disorder recovery recipes

This recipe serves: 4
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes

INGREDIENTS
1 teaspoon coconut oil
1/2 cup diced organic red bell pepper
4 tablespoons diced organic Vidalia onion
4 large organic, pastured, eggs
salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons chopped parsley

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat the oil in an 8″ non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat.
2. Add the peppers and onions to the pan and cook for about 2 minutes. Remove the vegetables and set aside. Wipe the pan clean so that it can be reused for the eggs.
3. Whisk the eggs with the salt and pepper until well blended.
4. Pour the eggs and vegetables into the frying pan and stir constantly over low heat with a rubber spatula. When the eggs begin to get firm, add the parsley and continue stirring.
5. When the eggs have reached the desired degree of doneness, put them on warm plates and serve immediately.

NUTRITION INFO (per serving)
Calories 84
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Protein 7 g
Total Carbohydrate 3 g
Dietary Fiber 1 g
Sodium 113 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 54%
Percent Calories from Protein 33%
Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 14%