Tag Archives: recipe

Smashed Potatoes

Photo used under a Creative Commons license, by mindwhisperings

Smashed Potatoes

2 lbs small organic red-skinned potatoes, cleaned
1/2 c  coconut oil
1/2 c whole fat grass-fed organic milk
1/2 c grated fresh parmesan
4 tbsp of horseradish
salt, pepper, garlic salt, bourbon smoked paprika to taste
parsley (optional, for garnish)

Boil potatoes until fork-tender. Set aside.
Mix remaining ingredients in a sauce pan, heat until warm.
In a large mixing bowl, combine potatoes and warm ingredients.
Beat until just mixed.
Garnish with parsley and serve!

Serves 12.

Nutrition Info: 170 calories, 11 g fat, 4 g protein, 15 g carbs

Recipe – Asian Daikon Relish


In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Daikon radishes aid in the digestion of fats and carbs due to their high enzyme content. Research has also show that it helps to increase enzymes in the body that defend again cancer-causing agents. Daikon radishes are also high in vitamin c, phosphorus and potassium.

Asian Daikon Relish

Dice into small squares:
1 part organic carrot
1 part organic cucumber
1 part organic or non-organic daikon radish

Cover with:
3 parts organic rice vinegar or white vinegar
1 part macadamia nut oil
1 tsp. Himalayan Pink Salt
1 tsp. organic garlic salt
1 tsp. organic garlic pepper

Best on days two and three, but delicious anytime!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user mr and mrs stickyfingers

Food Additives + A new kid-friendly recipe

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Corndogs! A favorite of almost every child in the US. What exactly are we feeding our children when we serve them this favorite? Are there any healthier alternatives?

Check out this long list of ingredients one of the most popular brands of corn dogs:

Batter Ingredients: Water, Enriched Wheat Flour (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Enriched Corn Meal (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate), Modified Food Starch, Soybean Oil, Honey Solids (with Wheat Starch, Calcium Stearate, Hydroxylated Lecithin), Artificial Flavor, and Onion Powder, Cooked in Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Hot Dog Ingredients: Pork, Mechanically Separated Turkey, Water, Corn Syrup, Dextrose, Modified Corn Starch, Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Potassium Lactate, Flavorings, Beef, Extractives of Paprika, Sodium Diacetate, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Sodium Nitrite.

Enriched wheat flour – Enriched wheat flour is made by removing all the ‘nutrients’ out of wheat when processing it into flour but then decides to the ‘nutrients’ back in once processing is complete. Wheat normally includes fifteen ‘nutrients’, this particular company only added five (likely synthetic) nutrients back in. Same sort of scenario with the ‘enriched corn meal’, but with the addition of corn (one of the most genetically modified crops in the US).

Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate. – Inhalation of this chemical can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and bronchial asthma. Although not inhaled in this case, but I am still not a fan of ingesting this chemical. The FDA does list this on their GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list, but consuming an excessive amount of phosphate will lead to bone loss.

Soybean oil AND partially hydrogenated soybean oil. Soy is another of the most highly genetically modified crops in the US. It’s a really unstable oil, especially when heated. Soybean oil also contains polyunsaturated fats and, once hydrogenated, trans fats. Trans fats are associated with major health issues, including ADHD, mood disturbances, depression, heart attacks and strokes. It takes the body nine months to detox from trans fats. You might notice that there is no mention of ‘trans fats’ on the nutrition label of corn dogs. Why? Because the FDA does not require trans fats to be labeled for any product containing less than 0.5 g of trans fats!

 

Corn syrup, modified food starch, wheat starch, artificial flavor, dextrose, hydroxylated lecithin, flavorings. All possible sources of the neurotoxin, monosodium glutamate (MSG). MSG wreaks havoc on many body systems, including the brain. For more information on the effects of MSG, see my article here.

So, what can we serve our children as an alternative to the store-bought corn dog? How about these super fun mini corn dog muffins?


Low Carb Mini Corn Dog Muffins

2 US Wellness Sugar Free Beef Franks (sugar free, MSG free, nitrate free, nitrite free, gluten free, and grass-fed)

1 cup Almond Flour

¾ tsp baking powder

¼ tsp salt

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 tbsp coconut oil (or grass-fed butter), melted

¼ cup plain greek yogurt

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Cut the hot dogs into 15 pieces, set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix eggs, coconut oil and yogurt until well combined.

Add in almond flour, baking powder and salt. Mix again.

Pour batter into mini muffin cups or into a greased mini muffin pan.

Push down one piece of hot dog into the center of each muffin.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until edges begin to brown.

Serves 5 (3 mini muffins each)

Nutrition Info (per serving):

245 calories, 20 g fat, 14 g protein, 5 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Nutrition Info for Store-bought corn dogs (baked):
220 calories, 11 g fat, 6 g protein, 25 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Nutrition Info for fast-food corn dogs (fried):
375 calories, 21 g fat, 14 g protein, 36 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Three Minute Brownie

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

A treat that some of my patients enjoy regularly, a quick and easy brownie. Prepared in less than three minutes, it’s a dream come true during times of choco-emergency. This really satisfies a chocolate craving without any guilt. Not to mention, each brownie has 15 grams of protein!

 

 

This recipe was inspired by SmoothieGirlEatsToo. Definitely check out her blog for some delicious recipes!

I have recently discovered a line of products called Coconut Secret. In the past, we have used stevia to sweeten these brownies, but we have switched to using raw coconut crystals. It’s a completely natural sweetener that contains 17 amino acids. It’s also low glycemic and non-GMO.

This brownie is great just on it’s own, but is also great with peanut or almond butter, greek yogurt, or TruWhip….the possibilities are endless!

Three Minute Brownie

2 tablespoons peanut flour

1 tablespoon raw cocoa powder (leave this out if you want a pumpkin spice muffin)

1-2 teaspoons raw coconut crystals

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

4 tablespoons canned organic 100% pumpkin

3 tablespoons organic, pastured egg whites

cinnamon

a few drops if vanilla

Combine all the ingredients and mix til combined.

Grease a small ramekin, pour the brownie batter mixture.

Cook for 2 minutes in the microwave (might need longer depending on your microwave).

Nutritional Info: 120 calories, 1.5 g fat, 15 g protein, 10 g carbs

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’