Author Archives: Dr. J Renae Norton

Scarcity Mindset Triggers Both Weight Gain & Weight Loss During COVID

scarcity mindset during covid

The Quarantine 15, as many are calling it, or the weight gain from overeating associated with COVID-19, is not the only problem we are seeing when it comes to weighty matters.  Calorie restriction and with it, weight loss, is also becoming more of a problem.  Both may be triggered by the Scarcity Mindset that has been surging in our country for the past 7 months.  

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What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

Is Amish chicken free range? Organic?

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken.  Look for 


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


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Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

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Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Digesting Animal Protein

Digesting Steak

How Are We Digesting Animal Protein?  
Our bodies use enzymes for digesting animal protein.  Anytime we ingest food, our body releases digestive enzymes to break the food down or digest the food. Because animal protein (meat) is a more complex food, our body expends a much larger amount of digestive enzymes to digest it.

The process of cooking meat destroys most of the naturally-occurring enzymes that are needed to break down meats complete proteins into amino acids that the body can utilize; the more the meat is cooked, the more naturally-occurring enzymes are destroyed. This is the main reason that a well-done steak is more difficult to digest than a rare steak.

It’s also important to note that as we get older, our bodies naturally start to produce fewer digestive enzymes. Some meats take longer to digest than others; pork takes the longest to digest, followed by beef and lamb. The longer the meat takes to digest, the more digestive enzymes are exhausted.

Protein Digestion Times

How Can We Help Our Bodies in Digesting Animal Protein?
There are several things we can do to make the digestion process of meat easier, especially when it comes to the harder-to-digest meats like pork, beef, and lamb.

There are a few foods and supplements that naturally contain digestive enzymes including fresh, raw pineapple and fresh, raw papaya. By eating these fruits as accompaniment to meat, our bodies are less likely to be depleted of its own digestive enzymes.

Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, while fresh papaya contains an enzyme called papain; both help the body to break down protein quickly. Sometimes, it may not be possible to eat fresh pineapple or papaya with your meal, especially if you are eating away from home.  In this case, there are combination bromelain and papain supplements available. Remember to always check the labels of your supplements for unwanted ingredients such as artificial sweeteners, MSG, and other neurotoxins.

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for over 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form



Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits?   Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. 

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have!  If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Knee Replacement Recovery – Two Weeks

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement Recovery - Two Weeks Post Surgery

I am two weeks out today! Strangely, the first week was the easiest week and week two was much more difficult. The biggest issue this past week was that I couldn’t sleep. I was simply in too much pain.  It appears that the more active you are the less stiffness you have. At night we tend to be much less active, ergo more stiffness.  Stiffness and pain are not the same thing but it’s easy to get them confused, LOL. Especially at night when you simply cannot get comfortable no matter what position you are in.

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Knee Replacement Surgery – Day Three After Surgery

dr_norton_recovery

So, day three after surgery was not as easy as days one and two. Primarily because I had a splitting headache. This is apparently a common phenomenon post surgically. The swelling in the body causes pressure on the nerve endings which can result in a headache, at least that  is my understanding.

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Knee Replacement – Surgery Day

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement Surgery

The day of the surgery my Personal Assistant Alli picked me up at 5:30. We made it to the surgery center on time. I filled out a few more forms and met the physician’s assistant that would be working with the surgeon, Dr Swank.  She asked a few more questions, and the anesthesiologist came in and he asked a few questions, and then they asked me to put on the gown and take off my clothes. I had already asked if I could wear my own panties and bra. I was not able to wear my own panties, because they said you can have accidents during surgery… Yuck! So, I wore this really cute little diaper thingy. But they did let me wear my bra as it has no metal or fasteners, it’s like a skimpy sports bra only pretty. 

I had asked about a nerve block as a patient of mine who is an anesthesiologist told me to insist on one. As it turns out, my doctor does nerve blocks and the anesthesiologist assured me that I would be getting a complete nerve block. It’s supposed to make recovery much easier.

After I was properly dressed, they came back in and started an IV and to be honest I don’t remember much after that at all. The next thing I remember is being at home in the basement. I vaguely remember changing into my pajamas while Alli waited outside the door and that’s it!  🙂 I woke up hours later and my daughter-in-law Brandi texted to say she was on her way. I felt pretty good at that point, but I really couldn’t remember much if anything of the surgery. 

I used the walker when I first got home and found it to be a bit awkward. I decided to try walking without it before Brandy arrived and discovered that I was able to walk quite well without it. Brandi says when she got there I was running around, LOL!  I wouldn’t call it running around but I was doing well without the walker.

We had a nice dinner, she fixed leftover lamb leg roast that I had made the day before and Mediterranean mixed vegetables. We caught up and talked for a couple of hours. She went upstairs to study for her boards and I got some Bing cherries and watched TV for a little while, still feeling pretty good! I got a good night’s sleep and woke up feeling well rested. Little bit more pain than the day before as the nerve block had worn off completely but it was nothing I couldn’t handle.

The physical therapist arrived at 10 and she was ecstatic about how well I was doing. She called me a superstar and she asked me if I was a dancer, LOL!  So, the physical therapy session went very well. I was able to do all the exercises and according to the physical therapist was doing them at a rate that one might expect weeks after surgery. In fact, it went so well that she said I could probably go up and down steps. We tried it and she was correct I could! She also thought that I could probably drive as I already had enough strength in my right foot and enough range of motion in my leg. Not planning on doing that just yet though.  

I opted not to take the oxycodone except for the night of the surgery. I took one that night but haven’t taken any more of them.  I have a good friend that had a double knee replacement who ended up getting addicted to oxycodone after his surgery. It took him almost 2 years to overcome the addiction. I just think it’s a dangerous medication. I do have a couple of medications that are anti-inflammatories and also pain relievers. And they seem to be effective in keeping the pain manageable.

Here are some images of my area I set up in the basement and of my knee

I’ll keep you posted on how things are going!


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Knee Replacement Surgery – PART TWO

medications

Knee replacement surgery is a huge undertaking.  I have already had an MRI, an x-ay of the knee and an ECG.  I am about eleven days out from the surgery and I just had the prescriptions filled. Anyone who knows me knows I don’t take any medication. Zero. Not even aspirin. For this procedure there are seven medications!

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Knee Replacement Coming Up

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement

I am going to have a total knee replacement in 2 weeks! 

For the uninitiated, this is a big deal.  I have already spent a considerable amount of time in preparation. I also spent years debating whether or not to even have it done.  If I’m being honest, it injures my pride…. but then, so does walking with a limp, LOL.

I injured my knee as a teenager.  I started dancing ballet when I was three and by the time I was 10 I was in pointe shoes.  These days I don’t think they put children that young in pointe shoes. That’s a good thing. I did pointe along with jazz, tap and ballroom until I graduated high school.

I stopped dancing for many years partly because of the injury to my knee but also because life just got in the way. I began dancing again as an adult about 20 years ago.  I danced salsa, which is my first love, merengue, bachata, and cha cha, in other words all the Latin ballroom dances.  I also did a bit of tango, waltz and foxtrot.

I still love to dance! But about four years ago I had to face the hard fact that I could no longer do it without causing myself too much pain. It was at that point that I began to seriously consider knee replacement. I had done the research and found an excellent surgeon and I believe that taking this step, no pun intended, will allow me to regain the use of my leg and possibly even allow me to dance again… Wouldn’t that be lovely?


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Magnolia

magnolia
magnolia

I have a Magnolia grandiflora tree that I thought I killed a couple of years ago. It was, for all intents and purposes, dead and I was just getting ready to remove the stump when I realized there was a little bit of growth. Well it is back! It’s at least 20 feet tall again, if not taller and it is producing blooms for the first time in its life.

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Accept the Moment

accept the moment

I just realized something for the first time. I suffer from the U.S. version of Stoicism.  What’s that?  It is a distorted version of the original intent. Stoicism was founded by Zeno of Citium, in Athens, in the early 3rd century BC as :

“A philosophy of personal ethics. According to its teachings, as social beings, the path to salvation for humans is found in accepting the moment as it is…”

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Tricks for Peeling Hard Boiled Eggs

Tricks-Peeling-Hard-Boiled-Eggs

If anyone would like to share their secret for peeling hard boiled eggs, I would love to know. I have some theories and I’m willing to share them of course, but I really think it depends on the egg! I’ve tried using old eggs and new eggs, and sometimes the older the better, other times, not so much. 

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Tuna and Egg Salad on Romain lettuce

What is it about lettuce that makes it such a divine alternative to bread? I made myself some tuna and egg salad, which has always been a favorite of mine since I was little, but since I stopped eating bread years ago, I have found Romain lettuce to be the perfect alternative to bread.

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Korean Barbecued Ribs

OK, so I can’t get the meat that I normally get, so I’m just getting whatever they have. Last week it was OsoBuco, that was delicious! This week it was Korean ribs. I didn’t know what Korean ribs were, but I ordered them anyway. I’m glad I did.

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Quick and Easy Mushroom Soup Recipe

Mushroom Soup Recipe

I decided to make some mushroom soup with some chicken broth left over from a chicken that I baked. Since I’m doing keto and because I have all of my groceries delivered I was low on vegetables so the best I could do was cream of mushroom soup.  I didn’t even have an onion 🙁 but decided to have a go at it anyway.

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Hempseed Florets

Looking for a substitute for grains? Here you go!

I don’t think there’s a better substitute for grain than hempseed florets. I like them as a morning cereal or as a substitute for rice at dinner.  They are loaded with protein, 10 grams per 3 tablespoons. They also have 15 g of polyunsaturated fat, the good fat, and finally and best of all, they have effectively one carbohydrate.

I usually use the hempseed florets as a cold cereal in the morning. They’re perfect on a keto diet! I put berries on top, some cinnamon and heavy cream. If I’m not doing keto, I use coconut or almond milk. I like this warm as well as cold.

Another great way to use hemp seed florets is in place of rice. When I use it as a rice substitute, I heat it up in water or I sauté it with onions and celery. For the sauté, use a tablespoon of coconut oil and a half cup of diced celery and onion. Sauté celery and onion until translucent then add the hemp seed florets last. Season to taste. I use adobo seasoning on mine. Hempseed is the perfect complement to any meat or dish that you would normally serve with rice.

For more information on the health benefits of Hempseed florets be sure to check out the newsletter entitled Hemp as a Super Food.

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Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. We are located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

The Real Deal About Anorexia

Anorexia is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss.

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Diabulimia

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

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Children with Eating Disorders

bullying and eating disorders

Does Your Child Suffer From An Eating Disorder?

Children that are bullied over their size are more likely to develop psychological issues, such as depression, anxiety, panic disorders, and eating disorders. 26% of sixth graders are bullied, teased, or rejected daily based on their size. This increases to 61% by high school. Additionally, obese children are 1.6 times more likely to be bullied by non-obese children.

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Keto Vitamin C Smoothie Update

This  is an update on my Keto vitamin C smoothie.

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Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

I wasn’t able to blog yesterday because I got involved in a yard project. I wanted to expand my patio by a few feet so that I could move the table and chairs into a corner and make more room for a glider for Moli and I to sit on during  these gorgeous spring afternoons and evenings. It was tricky because I didn’t have any two by fours and it involved building up the side of the patio in order to level it out and accommodate a chair.

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One Of My Favorite Supplements

Today I’m going to talk about one of my favorite supplements, Resveratrol.  Talk about the fountain of youth! Resveratrol just may be it. 🙂 

Resveratrol
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Friday, April 22, 2020

This Is going to be a short post… Not to complain, but I’ve been working all freaking day on a new PowerPoint.   My eyes are falling out of their sockets, my butt hurts and my knees are stiff.  

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Change can be a good thing!

Hot Tea

I was devastated!  How was I going to work out? How was I going to get any research or writing done on my books? Who would make my tea? How could I start my day seeing patients without this respite that was such an important part of my morning , my life? It is literally what motivated me to get up every morning…

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The Best Vitamin C

In our newsletter this week we talked about the importance of vitamin C. 

View Newsletter Here

In this blog I want to give you some ideas about how to source the best vitamin C. The best vitamin C comes from Kakadu Plum from Australia or Camu Camu from the Amazon Rainforest.

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Keto Granola

Keto Granola

I made granola for the first time, And if I do say so myself, it is absolutely amazing! Truth be told, it is a keto granola. But I think anyone would enjoy it. It is both crunchy and chewy at the same time. Go figure! It is loaded with collagen, vitamin C, protein, and chocolate.

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Scrumptious and Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Today we are going to do a Chicken Parmesan that is scrumptious and super easy. 

I used only two chicken breasts which is enough to last me for three meals.  You could easily double the recipe. Here are the ingredients as I used them:

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Delicious Smoothie Loaded with Vitamin C

Vitamin C Smoothie

We get our best vitamin C supplements from far away, Australia and the Amazon to be exact. We haven’t talked a lot about smoothies but here’s one that I’m doing on keto that was delicious and simply loaded with vitamin C. 

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coronavirus_prevention

Something else to protect us from Coronavirus?

Today I’m going to talk about coconut oil. I had a stye in my eye and the only thing that worked to get rid of it was putting a few drops of coconut oil on it each night. No matter what else I tried, nothing was working. But the coconut oil did.

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Beef and Broccoli

One of the problems I have noticed with sheltering in place is that I don’t have nearly the appetite that I normally have. Maybe it’s because of the lack of activity, certainly there’s no going out to eat not that I do that very often anyway. 

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Learning about ourselves in crisis

I’m learning a lot of good things about myself in this crisis, that I had either lost sight of, ignored or perhaps never even knew. OK I know I sound like the quintessential Pollyanna, always trying to come up with a positive spin for every situation… I know how irritating that can be, but I just can’t help it. There actually are some positive things coming out of this terrible catastrophic situation and right now, a little positive spin goes a long way, because this is depressing overall.

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Cooking Corona Style

Eggplant Parmesan

So I made eggplant Parmesan last night. Best and Worst egg plant Parmesan I have ever tasted! Let me explain. I used some egg plant that I admit has been in the refrigerator for a while. When you see the pictures of it I think you’ll understand. Huge mistake! Huge. 

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Eventful Weekend

Made it through another weekend! My hot water heater went out Friday night. Navigating the process of figuring out whether it was really dead or just broken while still maintaining social distancing was a challenge. My handyman is also a plumber which definitely made it a little easier except that he doesn’t have a truck. Turns out the hot water heater was dead. May it rest in peace. So that meant we also had to find someone with a truck which we were able to do. In addition to which it turns out that I had a nest of squirrels, apparently for years, in one of the vents in the furnace room.There were three live squirrels that we finally got out and two dead squirrels. Eww!

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What I Have Learned So far While Sheltering In Place

Here is what I have learned so far while Sheltering in Place:  

  • My new exercise routine, the one where I walk up and down 3 flights of stairs for half and hour (ok, 20 minutes) and have little stations set up on each floor for abs, arms, and core, might be a better workout than the one I was doing at the gym.  It is significantly more difficult. Who Knew?
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Coronvirus Continued

How COVID 19 Infects Us and 
What It Does Once We Are Infected

By Dr. J. Renae Norton

Lets talk about how COVID 19 actually gets into the human body, and what it does but before we do that lets take a minute to explain the difference between a virus and a bacterial infection.  I think people are really confused about this, which makes it even harder to understand how this virus is spreading.  I always say knowledge is power, so let’s power up!

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CoVid19 Virus

There are a Few Things You Probably
Do Not Know About CoVid19 Virus

By
Dr. J. Renae Norton

First we have to understand that the COVID 19 virus can live on surfaces for up to 5 days, which is why it is so important to spray everything down, to wash your hands frequently, and to avoid public places whenever possible.  I use the hand wipes at the store to grab everything and then spray everything down when I get it home and before I put it away.  For the fruits and vegetables, I use a lemon cut in half, which I squeeze onto them.  This is a great way to disinfect them without using any chemicals.

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Perfectly Peelable Hard Boiled Eggs

(Hint: It Doesn’t Involve Boiling!)

One of my most basic go-to foods, is a hard boiled egg. For some reason, whenever I try to make them using the traditional method on the top of the stove, they are a pain to peel. It’s awful. My egg is pock marked because I cannot fully get under that membrane that runs under the shell.  Inevitably, I end up wasting part of the egg white because it is stuck to the shell.

Not anymore!

Behold, the perfectly peel-able hard BAKED egg.

Okay, here we go! Let your eggs rest on the counter for 30 minutes prior to doing this. This method will also work if you go straight from fridge to oven, but I felt they turned out better resting on the counter a bit. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Take your eggs and place them in a muffin tin. Do not add water to the bottom of the cups. It should look like this:
Carefully put the tray into the oven and let them bake for 30 minutes.  Take them out and immediately plunge them into an ice water bath.
Let them rest for 4-5 minutes. I promise, you will have a perfectly, peel-able egg!
Voila!
-Dr. Norton
#EatCleanGetSunBeWell

Looking For More Great Recipes?

Tired of the same old boring beef chili? Check out my bison chili!
Vegetarian or vegan and craving chili? Check out my cauliflower chili! 
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae
Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form
Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.
©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Bison Chili

 

Oh give me a home, where the buffalo roam… and this chili is cooking on my stove….

Seriously, if you follow me on Facebook, you know I am a chili fanatic. And you also know that my neighborhood has an annual chili cook-off. Here’s where that photo above, of a big, beautiful pot of chili comes into focus. Last year, I perfected the art of cauliflower chili. This year, I decided to make a meaty masterpiece. But I didn’t want to use beef. It’s so… expected. But I wanted all that beefy texture. That’s when bison popped into my head.

Bison is an amazing source of protein. Why? It is so good for you! Most of us hardly ever eat it. However, it definitely deserves more of a place in our weekly meal planning. Bison is always pasture raised-there’s no factory farming.  Consider the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) of bison. 100% pasture-raised buffalo meat contains 3-5 times more CLA than grain-fed animals. That itself is a reason to consider this incredibly flavorful, lean meat.

Hungry yet? Here’s the recipe!

Ingredients:

1/2 cup coconut oil

1 cup diced celery

1 cup diced onion

1 cup shredded carrots

2 lbs ground bison

2 jars of Whole Foods Organic Basil Marinara

1 jar of Jovial Foods Organic Diced Tomatoes

1 small box of red kidney beans (optional)

10 garlic cloves

1/4 cup cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper

2 teaspoons garlic salt

2 teaspoons sea salt

2 teaspoons herbs de provence (I’m kind of throwing you for a loop here, but trust me!)

1 teaspoon cacao powder

1 teaspoon korintje cinnamon

Directions:

Heat the 1/2 cup of coconut oil over a medium flame. Add the diced celery, onion and shredded carrot along with 2 pounds ground bison and 10 garlic cloves. Season with 1/4 cup of cumin, 2 teaspoons each of white pepper, garlic salt, sea salt and herbs de Provence. Add 1 teaspoon of cacao and cinnamon.

When everything is thoroughly mixed and sautéed, add two jars of Whole Foods organic basil marinara and one jar of Jovial Foods organic diced tomatoes. I added one small box of red kidney beans just to keep everyone else happy but it really didn’t need it. So feel free to add the beans or omit them.

Top with grassfed sour cream or grassfed shredded cheddar cheese, or both!

Enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

The Key to the Ketogenic Meal Plan

Recently I discovered that my blood sugar and insulin levels were elevated. After doing some research I discovered that the underlying reason my blood sugar was elevated was that I had been taking Red Rice Yeast extract. Why? It was recommended to me as a natural alternative to taking a statin. What I failed to do while taking it, was also supplement with CoQ10. This is super important for anyone considering taking statin or taking red rice yeast extract.

Determined to lower my blood sugar level, I recently embarked on a ketogenic meal plan. Ketogenic meals are typically associated with people seeking weight loss, precisely because they lower blood sugar and insulin levels. But there are actually many reasons someone might want to try this type of eating.

graphic courtesy of www.myketokitchen.com

The great thing about a ketogenic meal plan is that it is whole food based. That means there are no processed foods when eating this way, and food sources should be the highest quality that you can afford.

While eating this way, each meal consists of 70% good fats, 20-25% protein and 5% limited and low glycemic load carbohydrates. Yes, you read that right, 70% healthy fats. The key to the ketogenic meal plan is healthy fat. At first trying to determine these percentages can be a bit daunting, but once you understand the formula and the foods that fall into the categories, it becomes easy.

So what are the good fats? These include coconut oil, avocado, grassfed butter, olive oil, avocado oil, and lard. You will also enjoy full fat cheeses, yogurts, cream cheeses and crème. You will be using these fats in cooking, as well as creating delicious sauces and dressings (hello, avocado sour cream dressing!)

For protein choices, consider the following options: grass fed beef, bacon, pastured chicken and turkey, wild caught fish- really any protein in its whole form is acceptable as long as it is not processed. Again, you are looking for organic, grass fed, wild caught, pastured proteins.

What’s a low glycemic load carbohydrate? It’s a non starchy fruit or vegetable. For fruits, think berries- strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries. For vegetables, think vegetables that grow above ground- lettuces, kale, collard greens, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchinni, mushrooms, onions, tomatoes, eggplant, artichokes, cabbage, bell pepper, fennel, bok choy. Stay away from corn,carrots, beets, and potatoes of any kind.

The goal of a ketogenic diet is keeping your body in a state of ketosis. When you are in ketosis, your body burns more fat.  There are three things that prevent you from being in ketosis. 1) You are consuming more carbohydrates than you should be. You could also be consuming starchy carbohydrates. 2) You are not eating enough fat. We are so trained to think that fat is bad for us, when in fact healthy fats are critical to our health. 3) You are not eating enough protein. Satiety, the feeling of fullness, really comes from protein being consumed with healthy fat. You will be eating much more fat than you are normally accustomed to consuming.

The hardest part for me was eating less protein, as it only makes up about 20% of the calories. I knew it would be hard to stop eating all of the fruit, as I am sort of a fruitaholic as it turns out. But cutting back on the protein was trickier than I imagined because I had to keep checking to see what has protein in it and what does not. So heavy cream has no protein and coconut milk next to none. But a steak has a lot of protein and buffalo meat has even more. Fish is a very good choice, as well as chicken.

So what does a day of eating on a ketogenic meal plan look like?

Consider the following quick and easy breakfasts: an omelette with cheese on top cooked in coconut oil; An egg baked in half an avocado with cheese or bacon melted on top; Berry green smoothie made from blueberries, sour cream, spinach, and heavy whipping cream. I also throw in some of Dr. Axe’s collagen powder or some Naked Whey protein powder, but not too much.

Have I mentioned how much I love this product? Dr. Axe’s Collagen Protein.

For lunch, a meal may be something like a bacon lettuce and tomato salad; cauliflower cheddar soup; an omelette with bacon and veggies cooked in coconut oil, crab salad stuffed avocado.

Dinner are mostly protein and vegetable. For example,  lamb with pesto zucchini noodles; turkey meatloaf made with heavy cream and fresh parsley served with creamed spinach; garlic braised short ribs served with cheesy mashed cauliflower.

And don’t forget, you should be eating 2-3 snacks a day. Some of my favorites include, homemade crispy parmesan crackers; almond butter fudge; a smoothie; desserts called fat bombs and bacon and cheese deviled eggs.

Does all this sound pretty rich? Indeed! The whole idea of ketogenic meals centers around eating healthy fats. Consuming these healthy fats with proteins is what keeps the person feeling sated throughout the day. The way it works is that it resets your fat metabolism. In other words, you burn fat more efficiently. I have also found that I am building muscle much more easily. Mostly, I have no inflammation, sleep better and have thicker hair and eyelashes.  I am awaiting my blood sugar test results.

I’ve been using some of the recipes from The Complete Ketogenic Diet for Beginners by Amy Ramos, and have found it to be concise and easy to understand. I also like it because most of the recipes have only 4 or 5 ingredients.

Every recipe I’ve tried in this book is delicious, more importantly, simple. There’s a super helpful shopping list as well that is for two weeks.

So, if you are looking to increase your levels of HDL and lower triglycerides, lower your blood sugar and insulin response- or if you are seeking the neurological benefits of this meal plan because you have epilepsy, anxiety or depression- you want to try this.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery *Eclipse Edition*

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

The question is why would the American Heart Association promote a biased review of the research on lipids? The AHA relies on corporate sponsorship for funding and it’s sponsors clearly influence the organizations recommendations for having a healthy heart in ways that should give us pause.

Ok, so maybe it didn’t start out that way. In the 70’s the research pointed to fats as the problem. Ansel Keys was perhaps the most well known researcher associated with these incorrect theories followed by Nathan Pritikin, creator of the Pritikin Diet.

Both men got it wrong for various reasons—they didn’t understand the role that hydrogenation plays with saturated fats like coconut oil, and/or they didn’t control for variables that had nothing to do with fat in their research, such as the role of other pollutants.

But scientifically, their theories were proven to be incorrect decades ago. Yet, we are still being told by the AHA that the good fats are bad and the bad fats are good and that we should eat more grains. Wrong! The myth is that dietary fat, especially cholesterol, causes vascular disease. It doesn’t. High cholesterol is not the problem. Healthy saturated fat is not the problem. Inflammation is the problem. And inflammation is driven by the simple carbs found in corn-based sugar like high fructose corn syrup, in grains that have been hybridized so that they convert to sugar as soon as we start chewing, and in hydrogenated fats that cause plaque to build inside our arteries.

These three things; sugar, starchy grains and bad fats, are the primary ingredients in most processed foods and they are the problem, not healthy fats like coconut oil. In other words, the fat from a grass-fed animal, or from wild caught fish or from the coconut is so good for you, it could be considered a supplement.

Based on the AHAs recommendations, Canola Oil would be good for you and it is one of the nastiest oils on the market. It is genetically engineered from a plant called Rapeseed, which is poisonous in nature and doesn’t get any better with genetic modification. But if you follow the AHA guidelines, that is what you would be using to fry that GMO-grain-fed beef burger before you slap it on a big old whole grain bun and throw on some catsup laced with GMO high fructose sugar. YUM!

Guess who is responsible for GMO Canola oil? Monsanto, the biotech giant, which is now owned by Bayer, the pharmaceutical conglomerate. Bayer/Monsanto just happens to be one of the AHAs biggest sponsors. And therein lies the problem. In the case of coconut oil, with all of it’s new found advantages over hydrogenated vegetable oils, it may be cutting into the Canola Oil market, and that would not make Bayer/Monsanto very happy.

And we do not want to make Monsanto unhappy as the company has a reputation for viciously going after the competition. Case in point, the organic farmers that Monsanto sued for patent infringement when the crops they harvested contained the seeds from Monsanto’s patented GMO plants. Monsanto planted next door to the organic farms with the understanding that the seeds would blow onto the organic farms and grow and then they sued the farmers when it happened. The farmers eventually won but not after many were put out of business. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monsanto_legal_cases

Bottom line; the AHA recommends replacing saturated fats like coconut oil and grass-fed butter with omega-6 fats like vegetable oils and margarine. This is a very bad idea. The research on omega-6 fats is clear, we get way too much of it. The ideal ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 is 1:1. Most Americans eat a ratio of 30:1, which has repeatedly been shown to contribute to chronic inflammation, or the real cause of vascular disease.

Other current sponsors of the AHA include Subway and Cheerios. Now the AHAs dietary recommendations, which include grains, make more sense. For example, the AHA includes processed carbohydrates like cereals in their recommendations for a healthy diet. Most children’s cereals are 50% sugar and a major contributor to sugar imbalances, inflammation, obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We are now seeing type 2 diabetes in children, and metabolic syndrome in teenagers. Both of these disorders were previously only seen in middle age. Sugar and simple carbs such as those found in cereal seem to be the culprit.

The AHA has a healthy check mark list, which includes Subway sandwiches and Cheerios. What a coincidence!

 

The AHA has made some other very questionable recommendations over the years, such as reducing the intake of dietary sodium to such low levels that the impact ended up being dangerous and actually increased the risk of suffering a fatal heart event.

The American Heart Association would also have us believe that cholesterol is bad for us. Cholesterol has been demonized in the same way that saturated fat has been demonized, so much so that we are all sufficiently afraid of cholesterol to blindly follow our doctor’s advice to start that statin at the first sign of high cholesterol.

But according to Al Sears and other alternative medicine and aging experts, you are at no greater risk of heart disease if your total cholesterol is 350 than if it’s 150 as long as your HDL cholesterol is above 85 and your triglycerides are below 100. I would add that your LDL cholesterol needs to be pattern A and not pattern B as we saw in the Part 1 of this series.

In general we have been sold a bill of goods on the whole cholesterol issue too. We are being told that cholesterol is the problem when it isn’t and we are being told that statins are the answer when they certainly are not. Excerpt from my soon to be released book:

            Food Kills: Food Cures

         You Decide!

 

The best example of that, is Statins, which some scientists are calling the biggest pharmaceutical scam ever perpetrated on the American public. Statins are the number 1, most prescribed medicine in the U.S. It turns out that statins do not prolong your life and that, because they decrease CoQ10, may be the reason we are seeing an epidemic of heart failure today. [1] [2]

Note: Heart failure is not the same thing as a heart attack. Heart failure results from the heart not being able to pump, not from clogged arteries. It occurs because statins weaken muscles and the heart is a muscle. Statins should never be prescribed without CoQ10 supplementation. Yet, I treat many people who are overweight, suffering from high cholesterol, and taking statins when they first start treatment, and I have never had a patient whose doctor prescribed CoQ10 along with their statin.

This is important when you consider that survival rates from heart failure are very low compared to survival rates from stroke or heart attack, which is kind of a kick in the butt if you are taking the statin to prolong your life. In other words, if you are taking a statin, you have decreased the likelihood of dying from a heart attack but increased the likelihood of dying from heart failure and you have not increased your life expectancy at all. In addition, on a statin you are more likely to develop a peripheral neuropathy (shaking of the hands, loss of feeling in the feet) dementia, and type 2 diabetes.

Bottom line: If you must take a statin, be sure to supplement with CoQ10 to prevent the muscle damage. But you must also compensate for the high blood sugar that the statins may cause by taking Berberine, because if you do not, the high blood sugars can cause gout as they also raise uric acid levels. Finally you will want to supplement with coconut oil to support your brain, as statins predispose you to cognitive decline.4

Or

You could learn to eat clean which includes plenty of coconut oil and healthy saturated fats, engage in effective exercise which raises AMPK (and reduces the risk of vascular disease and cognitive decline), get sunshine and supplement with Bergomot[3], which has been shown to be as effective as a statin with none of the nasty side effects.

I learned all of this the hard way. I was prescribed a Red Rice Yeast Extract (RRYE) because I refused to take a statin for my high LDL. I was not told that the RRYE is exactly the same thing as the primary ingredient in a statin (a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor.)

It turns out that the high LDL was pattern A LDL and as described in the first article in this series, not a problem, but I did not know that at the time. My blood pressure at that point in time was low, 110 over 70. My blood sugar and insulin levels were good, 90 and 3 respectively.

What I ended up with after a year of taking the RRYE was severe joint problems, higher blood pressure, blood sugar and insulin, an inability to build muscle and gout. It was unbelievable! In attempting to “treat” these conditions, I ate lots of fermented foods, supplemented a little too much, and then ended up with histamine intolerance because everything I was eating to be as healthy as possible was high in histamines.

In other words, just taking the natural version of a statin set in motion a cascade of problems that took me a year to figure out and cost me a fortune in doctor bills and supplements not to mention the pain and mental anguish. Multiply this by 10 and that is what people who opt for statins end up dealing with for the rest of their uncomfortable and likely shortened lives! I count myself lucky. But I hope that you do not have to experience what I did and that if you are, this information is helpful. Please let me know.

In the series of articles to follow, I will be discussing inflammation, it’s causes and what you can do to prevent it.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

[1] Biofactors. 2003;18(1-4):113-24. Statins lower plasma and lymphocyte ubiquinol/ubiquinone…… It has been shown that treatinghypercholesterolemic (high cholesterol) patients with statins leads to a decrease, at least in plasma, not only in cholesterol, but also in important non-sterol compounds such as ubiquinone (CoQ10), and possibly dolichols, that derive from the same biosynthetic pathway. Plasma CoQ10 decrease might result in impaired antioxidant protection, therefore leading to oxidative stress.

2 Biofactors. 2003;18(1-4):101-11. We are currently in the midst of a congestive heart failure epidemic in the United States, the cause or causes of which are unclear. As physicians, it is our duty to be absolutely certain that we are not inadvertently doing harm to our patients by creating a wide-spread deficiency of a nutrient critically important for normal heart function.

  1. Seneff, S., Davidson, R., and Mascitelli, L. (2012). Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Medical Hypotheses, 8, 213-217
  2. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statin

[3] Made up of brutieridin and meltidin

 

What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2

The American Heart Association would have us believe that the coconut has “has no known offsetting favorable effects.” It’s interesting that in societies where coconut is a staple of the diet, vascular disease is low to non-existent, whereas in western or westernized societies, where saturated fat is demonized, vascular disease, and it’s friend obesity, are epidemic.

For example, in Tokelau and Pukapuka, where a main staple of the diet is coconut, vascular disease is rare.[1] Another example are the Kitevan of New Guinea, who consume a considerable portion of their diet in coconut, but for whom researchers found no coronary heart disease.[2]

For 100 benefits for using coconut oil go to: //thecoconutmama.com/coconut-oil-uses/

[1] Am J Clin Nutr 1981 Aug;34(8):1552-61

[2]J Intern Med: 1993 March; 233(3):269-75

Here are 10 reasons coconut oil is good for you: Coconut oil is good for your heart – it has been shown to raise HDL (the good cholesterol) and improve the type of LDL cholesterol by making it more pattern A than pattern B which is a good thing as we saw in last weeks article.[1] 

  1. Coconut oil is good for your brain – it is the only thing that has been shown to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s when combined with exercise. It contains medium-chain triglycerides that have been shown to have therapeutic value for people with certain brain disorders, ADHD and epilepsy.[2] I use ¼ cup of coconut oil in my tea every morning. I notice a significant difference in brain fog if I do not use it.
  2. Coconut oil is good for your thyroid – Unlike soy oil and other vegetable oils, coconut oil does not interfere with thyroid function. It also has anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation that may lead to hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.[3]
  3. Coconut oil is good for weight loss – As a medium chain fatty acid coconut oil is the perfect “fuel” as it goes straight to the liver and is used as almost pure energy. Because it gives us this instant energy, we are less likely to snack on sugary items to get that jolt of energy that we need sometimes. It also suppresses your appetite. Coconut oil does not spike insulin. It has also been shown to help rid the body of excess fat.
  4. Coconut oil is good for the immune system – Lauric acid, which makes up about half of it’s fatty acids, can eliminate harmful pathogens such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. It has been shown to prevent cold/and the flu and to alleviate the symptoms of hepatitis C, Herpes and Epstein-barr. [4] I have had the flu once in my life and cannot remember the last time I had a cold.
  5. Coconut oil is good for getting rid of candida – In a mouse study comparing coconut oil with soybean or beef tallow, coconut fed mice had a 10-fold drop in gut candida. Candida infestation wreaks havoc in the body and is very difficult to treat ordinarily.
  6. Coconut oil is good for your teeth and gums- Swishing with coconut oil for 15 minutes every morning eliminates bad breath and has been shown to prevent plaque.7 It may also prevent encephalitis which is more likely if you have gingivitis (gum disease.) I put a teaspoon in my mouth while I am standing in front of my near infrared sauna every morning. My dentist is always raving about how healthy my gums are.
  7. Coconut oil is good for your hair and scalp– Making your own shampoo with coconut oil can help with dandruff as well as with other scalp conditions.
  8. Coconut oil is awesome for your dog’s coat – Coconut oil makes a great dog shampoo as it helps to eliminate odor. Just add a little though or you get a greasy doggie.
  9. Coconut oil is a natural meat tenderizer – but don’t use it for fish as you will end up with fish mush. I think the tenderizing quality is what makes it a good cellulite remedy. No research though to back that up, just my anecdotal observations.

[1] Lipids: 2009 July; 44(7):593-601

[2] BMC Neurosci. 2008; 9(Suppl 2): S16.

[3] Positive Med, September 16, 2015

[4] Organic Facts, Health Benefits of Coconut Oil

7 J Indian Soc Peridontol. 2014 Jul:18(4):441-6

A Word About Saturated Fats in General

There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When a fat is saturated, it means that the molecule has all of the hydrogen atoms it can hold.

 

Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals. Notice that this is the opposite of the way we are taught to think of fats.

Free radicals can damage healthy cells and cause a whole host of health issues.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to a variety of the illnesses that are currently plaguing Americans.

Saturated fats have many benefits if they meet the following criteria: Grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese); Grass-fed/grass-finished beef; Pastured sustainably grown pork and poultry (that are fed Non-GMO, organic grains only when absolutely necessary); Coconut and palm kernel oil; and Cacao have the following health benefits:[1]

The benefits that saturated fats offer us are:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of our cell membranes. They give our cells their necessary stiffness and integrity, and they prevent cell damage
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower the substances in the blood that increase the likelihood of heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids.
  • Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acid, which are critical to cardiovascular health, are better retained in body tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

 

[1] “The Skinny on Fats,”

Stay tuned for the last article in this series on why the AHA might be promoting the lipid theory of heart disease and what you can do about it to ensure that you are heart healthy.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

[1] BMC Neurosci. 2008; 9(Suppl 2): S16.

[2] Positive Med, September 16, 2015

[3] Organic Facts, Health Benefits of Coconut Oil

7 J Indian Soc Peridontol. 2014 Jul:18(4):441-6

[4] “The Skinny on Fats,”

[1] Am J Clin Nutr 1981 Aug;34(8):1552-61

[2]J Intern Med: 1993 March; 233(3):269-75

[3] Lipids: 2009 July; 44(7):593-601

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?

The American Heart Association (AHA) just keeps getting it wrong. In an article in USA today in mid-June, the organization is quoted as saying that coconut oil is bad for you. Really? Coconut oil may be one of nature’s most perfect foods. But the AHA has a long history of mistaking saturated fats as dangerous foods while touting grains and vegetable oils as good substitutes. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is thanks to the AHA’s Low Fat Guidelines in the 1970’s that we took the fat out of milk and put sugar in its place. Ever since then, Americans have been getting fatter and fatter.

Think I am exaggerating? Consider these facts:

  • US children, 30% of whom are currently obese, are projected to have shorter life expectancies than their parents. This is unheard of historically unless the country experienced a nuclear attack or the plague.
  • The US has the distinction of being the Wealthiest/Unhealthiest country in the world. That’s right. Among the 16 wealthiest nations in the world, we are dead last for health.
  • But for those of you who tend to be competitive, never fear because we are #1 for obesity, top of the list, fattest country in the world! We literally have every other country in the world beat when it comes to being fat.

Clearly the AHA’s recommendations are not working!

First the AHA told us to that all of the delicious nutrition that comes in whole fat milk was bad for us and now they are saying that coconut oil is bad for us! I smell a rat. They base this finding upon a report from the Dietary Fats and Cardiovascular Disease Advisory, which reviewed existing data on saturated fat, showing coconut oil increased LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in seven out of seven controlled trials. “Because coconut oil increases LDL cholesterol, a cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and has no known offsetting favorable effects, we advise against the use of coconut oil,” the American Heart Association said in their advisory.

There are several things wrong with this “finding” (and I use the term loosely.) First, just because coconut oil increases LDL cholesterol, doesn’t mean that the result is bad for us since not all LDL cholesterol is bad. Secondly, coconut oil has been shown to have incredible health benefits. Thirdly, it would appear that the AHA is funded by organizations with a special interest in promoting the lipid theory of heart disease, or a theory that blames saturated fats, when most of the cutting edge science has shown that saturated fats are not the problem.

Let’s start with whether or not LDL cholesterol is the problem. It isn’t clear from the article in USA Today which type of LDL cholesterol the AHA is talking about and this is important because there are different types of LDL. The researchers at the AHA seem to be saying that LDL cholesterol causes CVD, but the scientific data on the role of LDL has changed and much of the research today actually points in the opposite direction. In other words, not all LDL cholesterol is bad.

In the 1970s, when LDLs were first discovered, they were found to be higher in people with cardiovascular disease, so the assumption (a key word here, assumption) was that they were bad and lowering them became the focus for most practitioners. What wasn’t understood at that time was that there are two types of LDL: Pattern A and Pattern B. One is dangerous, the other is not dangerous and may even be beneficial. It depends upon the particle size of the cholesterol.

  • Pattern A: The particles are large, light, and more or less buoyant, just floating through the blood. As such, they do not cause plaque to build up which is what clogs the arteries, so they are harmless. Guess what contributes to the big fluffy particles? Coconut oil and other healthy saturated fats.
  • Pattern B: The particles are small to very small in size. The smaller the particle size the more likely it is to wedge itself under the epithelial cells that line the walls of our arteries and damage the surfaces. This is what stimulates plaque formation. This type of LDL is dangerous. Guess what contributes to the small particles? Hydrogenated vegetable fats.

 

.

Bottom line: LDL cholesterol gets a bad rap because it is correlated with CVD. But correlation is not causation.

 

The following is an excerpt from my soon to be released book:

                  

                 Food Kills: Food Cures

                  You Decide!

Cholesterol travels in “containers” that are made up of protein, cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides that are referred to as lipoproteins. The lipoproteins range from largest to smallest in density compared with the surrounding water. Think of little suitcases and the smaller the suitcase the more tightly it is packed. The smallest suitcase, High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) is the most densely packed and the largest suitcase, Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL), is the least densely packed. They are different sizes, and have different compositions, because they have different jobs, depending upon where they end up. (Chylomicrons are in a class by themselves and are mostly triglycerides.)

 

  • Chylomicron is the biggest carrier. It is produced in the gut and directly provides the fuel from fats that the body needs to fuel its cells. It also delivers fats to the liver, where the fats are then sorted out and redistributed into lipoproteins. It mostly contains triglycerides.
  • VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) carries fat, cholesterol, fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants to cells. So we depend upon it for the absorption of vitamins and antioxidants. Good stuff!
  • IDL (intermediate density lipoprotein) which is a bit smaller than VLDL, carries something similar to VLDLs, just in smaller packages. More good stuff.
  • LDL (low density lipoprotein) is what is left over after VLDL has delivered most of its healthy content to the cells. It is called “bad cholesterol“ because it is easy to attack. Using the suitcase analogy, it is like that old battered suitcase you have that no longer zips or stays closed. You have to tape it together and even then, it may fall apart at the most inopportune time.     

 While traveling, this LDL gets hit by microbes, free radicals, toxins, and glucose (or the pollutants and excessive sugar from our           food and environment). It is in the most fragile container and as such, it is the most likely to be damaged, especially if there is a lot of glucose (sugar) floating around. Sugar causes glycation or “inflammation.” Inflammation is the reason for most of what ails us today in America.

  • oxLDL (oxycholesterol) is LDL after it has been attacked and oxidized. So now the suitcase is a filthy mesh bag, leaking gunk that clogs our arteries. Turns out, this is the really dangerous form of cholesterol and the most likely cholesterol to cause vascular disease.
  • HDL (high density lipoprotein) is the smallest suitcase with the highest density. This is the “good” cholesterol as it is very robust and reliable. It is like a Tumi (very expensive sturdy luggage) with James Bond technology built into it. HDL not only resists attack just like Bond would do, it actually saves cholesterol (the damsel in distress?) from turning into the damaged oxLDL. Finally, in a totally James Bond move, it destroys pathogens by infiltrating the pathogen and then from inside the cell of the pathogen, destroying it! It deserves the reputation for being the “good cholesterol”.
  • HDL-A1 – is the form of HDL that brings good cholesterol to the liver so it can be further distributed. It is produced when the cells in the skin are exposed to the sun and produce cholesterol sulfate.
  • B – HDL – is the form of cholesterol that goes specifically to the brain and again, requires sun exposure.

(Notice that the last two require sunshine in order to produce these incredibly beneficial forms of cholesterol? Stay tuned for a preview of my Sunshine Chapter.)

 

Contrary to what the AHA keeps saying, saturated fat is not the problem. Carbs are the problem, particularly hyper-hybridized grains and chemical versions of sugar, along with the hydrogenated fats in processed foods. These are the things clogging our arteries and causing inflammation. The AHA would have us believe that eating carbs and unsaturated vegetable fats is a good thing, when it is not. Low carb diets work, low fat diets do not.

Notice that in this study on the markers of metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, middle fat and type 2 diabetes) that on a low carb/high fat diet, glucose went down nearly 13%, insulin went down almost 50%, blood pressure went down nearly 20%, triglycerides went down more than 50% and HDL cholesterol went up almost 10%. High fat/low carb works.

The other problem with the “findings” of the AHA is the statement that coconut oil has “no known offsetting favorable effects”! Are you kidding? It may be one of the most perfect foods on the planet. It contains all of the amino acids, making coconut water the perfect hydrator when you are trying to restore electrolytes. In terms of its’ impact on weight management, coconut oil is metabolized by the liver and converts to energy instead of body fat. It has a high smoke point making it ideal for frying foods.

In the next article, we will explore the embarrassment of riches that we find in the coconut. In the article to follow and our conclusion for this series, we will look at why the AHA and it’s backers, Big Pharma and Big Food, might be promoting the lipid theory of heart disease and dissing coconut oil.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MondayMotivation for Eating Disorder Recovery

These Are A Few Of My Favorite Sweets!

This post is for my sweets lovers. It’s that certain time of day, when you have a hankering for something sweet. But you want to eat the best quality sweets that are available to you- so plan ahead and make sure you have some of my favorites in stock.

Strawberries Dipped in Dark Chocolate

Yeah, this never gets old. It just doesn’t. And now that we are in strawberry season you can get those amazing strawberries with the old fashioned flavor- it’s like a little slice (or bite) of heaven.

Is there anything more beautiful and delicious than a strawberry off the vine in season?

Make sure you are using organic strawberries and organic dark chocolate. Don’t know how to easily melt the chocolate? Make a double boiler by doing the following. Bring a small pan of water to boil. Remove from heat. Place a smaller bowl inside or on top that pan so that they are nesting. Place the dark chocolate chips or pieces in the top bowl and let the heat work its magic. As the chocolate melts, stir it. Voila! Dip your strawberries and enjoy!

“Don’t hate me because I’m beautiful.”

Coconut Bliss Dark Chocolate Ice Cream Topped with Fresh Blueberries

Dairy free, soy free, gluten free, low glycemic, certified organic ice cream- Hallelujah! I’m there! In fact, I’m there with organic, fresh blueberries. Need I say anything more?

Top with blueberries. (Trust me.)

Gluten Free Fudge Brownies

Yes, you can have gluten free brownies that are amazing. I promise you these brownies are delicious. I swap traditional sugar for coconut crystals and honey and wheat flour for either sorghum or coconut flour and almond meal. But don’t let the batter trick you as you are making it! At first the consistency will seems like cake batter, but keep beating it!

“You’re gonna love me…” (my fabulous gluten free brownies channeling their inner Jennifer Holliday in Dreamgirls.)

My Recipe

(Use all organic ingredients)

20 ounces high quality 100% dark chocolate (Sunspire)

2 cups expeller-pressed unrefined coconut oil

3 cups coconut crystals sugar

¼ cup raw local honey

1/2 cup almond meal

1/4 cup sorghum flour (or coconut flour)

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

8 organic free-range eggs, beaten

4 tablespoon bourbon vanilla

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line an 8×8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper.

Melt the dark chocolate and coconut oil, sugar and honey in a saucepan over low heat, gently stirring. (Or melt in a microwave safe measuring cup and stir together to combine.)

Beat the eggs

In a mixing bowl whisk together the almond meal, sorghum flour, fine sea salt and baking soda. Make a well in the center and add the beaten eggs, and vanilla extract. Slowly add the melted dark chocolate mixture. Beat on low-medium for two minutes, until the batter begins to come together.

At first it will seem thin, like cake batter, but keep beating until it thickens and becomes smooth and glossy. If you are adding nuts, stir in the nuts by hand and spread the batter into the prepared baking pan. Even out the batter with a silicone spatula. Stud the top with some dark chocolate chips and press in slightly.

Bake in the center of a preheated 350ºF oven for 32 to 35 minutes, or until the brownies are set. Cool on a wire rack; and remove the cooled brownies from the pan by gripping the parchment edges and lifting the brownies out as a whole. Chill for an hour before cutting. (They are good warm and gooey.) Yield: 16 servings

Fresh Fruit

Everyone has their favorite fresh fruit. Depending on the season, the sweetness and quality of the fruit can really be hit or miss.  Strawberries out of season, from across the country, can sometimes be really disappointing. The same goes for stone fruits like peaches or plums. My most beloved fruits to snack on when I really want something sweet and juicy are grapes and rainier cherries.

Behold, my beloved rainier cherries!

So, the next time you have a taste for something sweet, step away from the high fructose corn syrup whatever it is, and dig into one of these real food sweet treats!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MondayMotivation for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

These Are A Few Of My Favorite Snacks!

It’s 11 a.m. and you are so hungry but lunch isn’t for another 90 minutes, or worse, 2 hours. What do you eat?

It’s 3 p.m. and you are really dragging but you still have miles to go before you are done for the day and able to head home for dinner. What do you eat?

It’s 7 p.m. and you had dinner, but suddenly you are hungry.  What do you eat?

I’m so glad you asked!

So many of us are on the go from the time we get up in the morning until we finally return home at the end of the day. Whether we are at work, or school, or running kids around from activity to activity, the best option is to plan ahead (like I always advise my patients about meals) and bring along some snacks. Even if you are at home, it can hard to choose foods to fill in the gap between meals.  So to make it easy, I’m introducing you to some of my favorite snacks.

Homemade Kale Chips

Store bought kale chips can be one of those items that has stuff in it that you wouldn’t necessarily want. So after much experimenting in my lab- my kitchen-  I’ve come up with a way to make kale chips at home. And they are so much better than store bought kale chips.  I use organic lacinato kale.

Lacinato kale can sometimes be referred to as dinosaur kale, or tuscan kale. It’s texture and size is different than traditional kale, and it is the best choice for making these chips.

Lacinato kale ready to be harvested. Isn’t it beautiful? I just had to share this photo.

Wash it really well and then let it dry completely. If I know I am going to be making these chips ahead of time, I just let it air dry for the day after washing it. If I’m in a hurry and want to make them right away, then I use a blow dryer to completely remove any moisture from the leaves. These will not become “chips” if there is any water on the kale when you add the oil, so remember, dry kale is the key. Once my kale is dry, I separate the leaves from the stem. This could be time consuming, but I’ve mastered the art of quickly separating the leaves from the stem by making two small slits at the bottom and running my two fingers down the stem on either side. Cut your kale leaves to the chip size that is ideal for you. (I like my kale chips medium sized.) Melt some coconut oil and add whatever spices you desire. It could coconut aminos and cayenne. It could be salt and herbs de provence. It really depends on your taste. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Add the kale chips to the spiced coconut oil mixture and make sure they are well coated. Place the kale chips in a single layer on the parchment paper. I bake these in a preheated 300 degree oven for 20-30 minutes to achieve that crispy, crunchy texture that I love about kale chips. I store them in a paper bag sealed tight if there are any leftovers.

Brown Bag Popcorn with Coconut Oil

We all love popcorn. Love it! Love the crunch! Love the salty, buttery flavor! What I don’t love is all the terrible ingredients in microwave popcorn. Have you ever flipped one of those bags over and read the ingredients? Half of them don’t even sound like food.  Instead, you should try my brown bag microwave popcorn with coconut oil. It’s delicious. Okay, here’s the key. You have to stand at the microwave and listen to your popcorn. Otherwise a) you will burn the popcorn and the bag or b) it won’t all get popped and you’ll have a bunch of seeds. First I melt the coconut oil, or grassfed butter, or a blend of both. I put my salt and spices in the melted fat and put it to the side.  Next, take your brown bag and fill the bottom with one layer of popcorn kernels. The amount of popcorn you put in the bag, depends on the bag size. So again, we just want a single layer of kernels. Don’t add anything else to the bag. Fold it over a few times so that it is sealed tight. Put it in the microwave and turn it on for five minutes. IT WILL NOT TAKE FIVE MINUTES. Now, I want you to listen as the popcorn is popping. When it gets to the point where it is 2-3 seconds between pops, pull that bag out. Open it up, pour the spiced, melted coconut oil or 100% grass fed butter into the bag. Shake it up really good, and enjoy! I swear this is the best popcorn you’ll have ever had.

Hummus and Vegetables

This is super easy. I make my own hummus, but you can use store bought as long as all the ingredients are real and it is organic (no citric acid, we are looking for lemon juice.) I love hummus with carrots and celery. It’s so fast and easy. If you love raw veggies, try green beans, tomatoes and peppers, zucchini and cucumber sticks- the list can go on and on.

Fresh Fruit

Seriously, it doesn’t get any easier than this. We all have our favorite fruits.   My favorite fruits include bing cherries, grapes, and bananas.

Hummus with Almond or Rice/Seed Crackers

This is also super easy. If you can find a real ingredient hummus (remember, organic with no citric acid, we are looking for lemon juice) try adding one of these two crackers to your snack. I’m including the pictures because it helps when you are looking for them in the grocery.

Note: These particular rosemary crackers are made with real ingredients. For some reason, some of the other varieties of the simple mills crackers have different ingredients. But these rosemary ones are amazing. The almond meal makes them super satisfying.

 

 

 

 

 

Guys, these are my favorite snacks! I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. Do you have a favorite snack? Tweet me @drrenae.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017 Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

“But Dr. Norton, What Do You Eat?

 

I get this question a lot. In fact, I’m sharing some guidelines with you that I myself use.  Most of us have some guidelines that we use to help guide our menu planning and daily eating. My guidelines extend beyond food, because although we are what we eat, our wellbeing is about more than just food.  So why these guidelines?

I follow these guidelines in order to balance:

  • Hormones
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Gut Health
    • Food allergies
    • Infections
    • Heavy metals
  • Organs and Systems

You may want to follow my guidelines in order to restore the balance in your body.

 My Guidelines

 

  1. Eat 100% organic, Non-GMO, sustainably grown fruits and vegetables whenever possible, preferably 7-9 servings a day
  2. Eat wild-caught, low mercury, high selenium, non-endangered fish such as Coho, Salmon or Slipjack (avoid whale, shark, swordfish) at least 3 times a week to increase Omega 3 fat.
  3. Eat 100% grass-fed, Non-GMO unprocessed beef, pork, bison and game in order to increase conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) which help build muscle and reduces fat. Avoid processed meats.
  4. When eating red meat, have a green vegetable with it to mitigate the potentially toxic effects of heme (part of the extra iron in meat that is mostly good but can predispose us to cancer depending upon how it is metabolized in the gut*)
  5. Eat pastured poultry no more than 2 times a week (in order to cut down on Omega 6 fat).
  6. Cook with organic, cold-pressed extra virgin coconut oil, ghee, duck fat, lard from grass-fed beef and grass-fed butter (preferably raw) as much as possible. Raw grass-fed butter has the perfect 1:1 ration of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids. Use organic olive oil on a limited basis (to cut down on Omega 6)
  7. Drink or use in a recipe at least a cup of bone broth daily.
  8. Drink 3 liters of spring water per day
  9. Avoid grains and pseudo-grains. Grains contain toxic lectins that are associated with many diseases, not just autoimmune diseases, because they cause leaky gut. When it comes to healing a leaky gut, avoiding gluten is key.
    1. Grains to Avoid: Barley, corn, fonio, job, joborn, kamut, millet oats, rice, rye, sorghum, spelt, teff, triticale, wheat (all varieties including einkorn, durum, and semolina) and wild rice
    2. Pseudo-grains to Avoid: Amaranth, buckwheat, chia, quinoa
  10. In addition to avoiding these grains and pseudo-grains, there are a number of other foods to avoid:
    1. High glycemic or simple carbs
    2. Sugar and artificial sweeteners (except Xylitol, coconut crystals/sugar or Norbu sugar)
    3. Mass-produced vegetable oils
    4. Processed proteins including deli meats and overheated products such as pasteurized dairy
    5. Lactose
    6. Unsafe additives and chemicals
    7. Alcohol
    8. Foods for which you have developed sensitivity or an allergy
    9. Soy based products
  11. Get regular exercise that combines
  12. Weight-bearing activities for muscle development, bone health and raising metabolic rate, 3 to 4 times/week
  13. Low Intensity Sustained Training (LIST) if you want to improve cognitive functioning (no more than 30 minutes) 1 to 2 times/week
  14. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) to lose or maintain ideal weight. No more than 20 minutes, 3 to 4 times/week.
  15. Get plenty of rest. Do not use electronics in bed. Charge your phone in another room. Do not work in your bed. The bed should be for resting and sleeping. Sleep in a dark room. Cover any LED lights or get them out of your bedroom. Try to go to bed as much before midnight as possible (8 or 9 p.m.) and rise with the sun (5 or 6 a.m.)   As soon as you get up, expose yourself to bright light. It will help you fall asleep that night.
  16. Relax
  17. Practice some form of meditation or attend a religious service regularly
  18. Take yoga classes or long leisurely walks
  19. Laugh, a lot. If you need help, watch funny movies, go see a comedian or hang out with a little kid and do the things that they like to do.
  20. Avoid Heavy metals:
    1. Mercury – Amalgams used by dentists and vaccinations are the most common sources
    2. Aluminum has been shown to be a neurotoxin leading to Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s—sources include aluminum cookware, deodorants, antacids, and baking powder
    3. Cadmium can cause kidney damage. The main source is Teflon, some seafood, and cigarette smoke.


Finally, keep your teeth clean!  
It is amazing how important clean teeth are to our overall health. Poor dental hygiene has been associated with heart attack, meningitis and many other seemingly unrelated conditions. I recommend flossing with a water pik and adding hydrogen peroxide to the water (do not use mouth wash, most of them have crap in them), using an electric toothbrush twice a day and swishing with coconut oil at least once a weak.

Happy Eating!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment and recovery of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Oh, Sugar!

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-4In my practice, I spend a lot of time trying to educate my patients about food. One of the major learning curves for my patients is sugar. It is truly astounding how much sugar is in our food. I blog about this all the time. So I thought I would address the number one myth that I encounter in my practice:

“I don’t add sugar to my foods, so I am ok, right?

WRONG.

You don’t have to add the sugar, it is already there.

Most people believe that “added sugar” means the sugar you add to your iced tea or put on your cereal. The Centers for Disease Control defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as cereals, breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table.” Examples of added sugars include:
➢ Coconut sugar
➢ Brown sugar
➢ Raw sugar
➢ Corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup
➢ Malt syrup
➢ Maple syrup
➢ Pancake syrup
➢ Fructose sweetener
➢ Liquid fructose
➢ Honey
➢ Molasses
➢ Anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin

Sugar has developed a well-deserved reputation for being dangerous. In its natural form, however, it is one of the most important sources of energy we have. For humans, sugar is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and serves as the primary energy source for the brain and the cells throughout the body. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of the species of each plant. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk.

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose  is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar.”
Glucose is one of the analytics your doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about .1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low, these mental processes may be impaired. When it is too high, we end up with insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes.

Glucose From Grains
Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The one that gives us the most trouble is the glucose from grain. The majority of the glucose found in grain is called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches and as such have a higher glycemic load, a term used to describe how fast a sugar raises blood sugar levels. This is important because, gaining weight and diabetes are more about high blood sugar levels than anything else. Keep your blood sugar levels under control and your weight will be much easier to manage and you will not be at risk for Type 2 Diabetes. Contrary to popular belief, weight gain is not nearly as much about the number of calories you eat as it is about how high your glycemic load is or how high your blood sugar levels are.
Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, (beans) for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, which lowers their blood sugar level. Whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose, which makes them two of the worst foods you can eat if you are trying to keep your blood sugars levels under control and manage your weight. (Raise your hand if you thought rice was good for you.)
U.S. grown grains have been hyper-hybridized to make them cheaper to grow. They are also starchier, more addicting and more fattening because they have a very high glycemic load. Grains in Europe, on the other hand, are still fairly simple genetically, which is one of the reasons that you can eat pasta in Italy and not worry about gaining weight. That’s how pasta got the rep for being good for you. The problem is that it doesn’t hold true here in the U.S. so if you are eating home-grown pasta, you are likely raising your blood sugar levels and gaining weight.

Glucose from Fruit – Fructose
Natural fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. It is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables. In this form it is not harmful, unless your health is already compromised, in which case, you may have to limit even these foods until your blood sugar levels stabilize. In general eating fruit is better than eating most grains, especially hyper-hybridized grains, because the fruit has more water and fiber which is why it doesn’t raise blood sugar levels as much as a starchy grain might.
Sugars to Avoid

Commercially derived fructose is “made” from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn, all of which are usually genetically engineered. This is where things get sticky. Commercially derived sugars are really just chemicals that resemble sugar. Most of the sweeteners in U.S. foods are no longer sugar, but are toxic chemicals designed to delight the glutamate receptors in the brain and basically fake them out. Unfortunately, sugar is one of the most common ingredients in processed foods. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose: crystalline, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
Crystalline Fructose
This form of commercial sugar is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can also be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of chemicals to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.

Sucrose (Table Sugar)
This commercial sugar is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer, meaning it registers in the brain in a way that makes us want to eat more of anything containing it. It is used in baked goods because it dissolves easily.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
HFCS is both a food additive and a preservative made from GMO corn that is ground into a fine powder and then broken down further with a fungus and a bacterium. It lasts longer than real sugar, tastes sweeter, and most importantly, from the food manufacturer’s perspective, it is cheaper and therefore much more profitable. Most important of all though, is that it is highly addicting and almost guarantees that the consumer will be more likely to repurchase any product containing it. This gives new meaning to the term consumer loyalty. Never mind that our bodies don’t know how to digest it and it can lead to a fatty liver (see below), Type 2 Diabetes, or obesity.

Good Choices
The best sugars on the market are:
Unrefined Coconut sugar or Coconut Sugar Syrup (coconut nectar) – They both come from the coconut, have a relatively low glycemic load and taste delicious. Both can easily be used in recipes. It is light brown in color so it looks more like brown sugar. Here are some of the main benefits:

Raw Manuka Honey – Honey has many medicinal properties. But the best is the raw Manuka honey in my humble opinion. I put a teaspoon in my sleepytime tea every night with a tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar.
➢ Anti-Bacterial
Hospitals around the world have been using bandages soaked in Manuka honey on patients in order to reduce inflammation and prevent MRSA staph infection in wounds and sores. One study found that when Manuka was used to treat infected caesarean and hysterectomy wounds, it had a success rate of 85 percent.

➢ Wound Healing
Not only is Manuka anti-bacterial, but it has also been found to help wounds heal faster.

➢ Anti-Fungal
Studies have found Manuka honey to have powerful anti-fungal properties. When used in its raw, natural form, Manuka honey is a great way to treat various types of fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

➢ Gum Disease Fighter
Studies have found that Manuka fights off three different types of mouth bacteria that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. It might seem counterintuitive to rub a sugary substance on the gums, but research has found that rubbing Manuka on the gums after brushing can reduce plaque and bacteria in the mouth.

➢ Sore Throat Treatment
Manuka fights several bacteria that cause sore throats. When sore throat rears its ugly head, take a teaspoon of Manuka several times per day, swishing it in your mouth before swallowing.

➢ Acne Treatment
Studies have been done on Manuka as an acne treatment with positive results. When applied to the skin, Manuka can fight bacteria associated with acne and when taken internally, it can help fight bacteria in the intestines that may lead to skin blemishes as well as balance intestinal flora that are thrown off by antibiotics prescribed to combat acne.

➢ Sunburn Treatment
When applied to sunburned skin, Manuka can soothe the soreness and speed healing.

➢ Anti-Inflammatory
Manuka is a natural anti-inflammatory, which explains why it helps in wound healing, soothes sunburn and sore throat, and boosts the overall health of the body.

➢ Acid Reflux
Manuka honey can help with acid reflux because it coats the esophagus and intestinal tract which prevents damage from stomach acid and relieves symptoms. Manuka may also help to heal the damage already caused by acid reflux.

➢ Digestive Support
Using Manuka honey on a regular basis can prevent and treat bowel problems such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Manuka also encourages the growth of “good” bacteria in the intestines and gets rid of unwanted bacteria.

➢ Stomach Ulcer Treatment and Prevention
Research has found that Manuka honey prevents the growth of h. pylori (helicobacter pylori), the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers while maintaining good bacteria in the stomach.

➢ Energy Booster
Studies have found Manuka to be a great source of energy thanks to its healthy carbs and has also been found to improve the performance of endurance athletes. It assists the body in post-workout muscle repair and helps the body to maintain blood sugar levels during and after exercise.

Monk Fruit Sugar – Only buy it if it is without additives unless the additive is Erythritol, as Etythritol is a sugar alcohol that has a very low glycemic load. (See section on sugar alcohols below.) Monk fruit is indigenous to China and Thailand and is said to be 500 times sweeter than sugar. It’s colloquially referred to as monk fruit because it was said to have first been used by monks in China in the 13th century for medicinal purposes. Today it is thought to help in treating a cough and sore throat. The only problem I see with it, is that the hyper-sweetness makes it harder for us to appreciate natural sweetness.

So Just How Do I Cut Out All This Added Sugar?

➢ Limit processed foods as much as possible.
➢ Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
➢ Cut out artificially sweetened foods altogether. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, are the worst and have been shown to increase cravings for sugary foods and to have neurotoxic effects on the brain.
➢ Replace sugary foods with those that are naturally low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits or unsweetened cacao nibs. Jovial Foods makes a delicious ginger cookie that has a small amount of coconut sugar. Or make your own baked goods using coconut sugar, raw Manuka honey, or Xylitol sparingly as sweeteners or on hemp cereal.
➢ Avoid foods that contain any sugar made with corn, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup like the plague as these sugars are like sugar on steroids and they will make your child crave sugar all the time. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar” or “reduced sugar.” Just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
➢ Avoid processed foods that are marketed as being “low fat.” When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture. This is especially true of milk. Buy only 100% grass-fed milk.
➢ Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) fruits which also often has canola oil added as well, energy bars, apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread, etc. You can make your own versions of these foods and sweeten them naturally or find the ones that are not sweetened with harmful sweeteners. A good rule of thumb is the fewer the ingredients, the healthier the food if it is processed.

How to Eliminate Artificial Sweeteners From Your Diet
➢ Check your food labels at home and throw out everything that has in it: Aspartame, Acesulfame Potassium (K), Saccharin or Sucralose, Equal®, NutraSweet® or Splenda®
➢ Use natural sweeteners like coconut crystals, coconut nectar or organic raw honey, Monk fruit or Xylitol.
➢ Avoid products that are labeled “low calorie,” “diet,” or “sugar free,” since they all likely contain sugar additives, some of which are likely to be artificial sweeteners.
➢ Drink purified water instead of diet drinks.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery- Reds Opening Day Edition!

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What Do You Mean “It Isn’t Really Olive Oil?”

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If my readers know anything, they know that I am on a fake food crusade. We are all tired of buying foods that appear to be one thing, when in fact they are actually something else entirely.

Take for example, olive oil. One of the basic staples of every kitchen. My guess is you have a bottle of it in your cabinet right now. If you are like me, and love to get a good deal on a quality item, you probably have a rather large container of it in your pantry. I’m guessing your bottle says it’s 100% extra virgin olive oil, that it is imported, and possibly it has some other phrases that lead you to believe it is what it says it is.

Have you ever heard of the Agromafia? Neither had I.

Now watch this.

As if it weren’t bad enough that our food supply has GMOs everywhere, now we are being told that our olive oil isn’t really olive oil, it is diluted with other unhealthy oils, like canola or sunflower, or chemicals or deodorants (who knew?!)

The truth is that no matter what your olive oil container SAYS, there is a very strong chance it isn’t really 100% extra virgin olive oil.

How do you find it?

I’m so glad you asked.

Also, be on the lookout for certifications. If it’s from California, it should say “COOC Certified Extra Virgin.” Also recommended is the Extra Virgin Alliance (EVA) and UNAPROL, the respected Italian olive growers’ association. But if you are going to purchase an imported oil with nothing to rely on except its country of origin, both Chile and Australia are considered the safest best.

So basically, buy your EVOO from a small producer, make sure it’s that unique, luminous green color, and be prepared to spend more in order to get the real thing.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game (1)

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2017.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

How to Balance Your Hormones

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Common hormonal imbalances include:

  • Estrogen dominance: changes in sleep patterns, changes in weight and appetite, higher perceived stress, slowed metabolism
  • Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS): infertility, weight gain, higher risk for diabetes, acne, abnormal hair growth
  • Low estrogen: low sex drive, reproductive problems, menstrual irregularity, changes in mood
  • Hypothyroidism: slowed metabolism, weight gain, fatigue, anxiety, irritability, digestive issues, irregular periods
  • Low testosterone: erectile dysfunction, muscle loss, weight gain, fatigue, mood-related problems
  • Hyperthyroidism & Graves Disease: anxiety, thinning hair, weight loss, IBS, trouble sleeping, irregular heartbeats
  • Diabetes: weight gain, nerve damage (neuropathy), higher risk for vision loss, fatigue, trouble breathing, dry mouth, skin problems
  • Adrenal fatigue: fatigue, muscle aches and pains, anxiety and depression, trouble sleeping, brain fog, reproductive problems

Risk Factors & Causes of Hormonal Imbalances

 Hormonal imbalances are caused by a combination of factors such as diet, medical history, genetics, stress levels and exposure to toxins from the environment. The most common contributors are:

  • Leaky gut from food allergies and a lack of beneficial probiotic gut bacteria in the lining of the intestinal wall, makes us more susceptible to hormonal problems. Believe it or not, inflammation usually starts in the gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health
  • Toxicity (exposure to pesticides, toxins, viruses, cigarettes, excessive alcohol and harmful chemicals)
  • High amount of stress, and a lack of enough sleep and rest
  • Being overweight or obese
  • High levels of inflammation caused by a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle
  • Genetic susceptibility

10 Ways to Balance Hormones Naturally

  1. Eat Healthy Fats

Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. (Yes, cholesterol is a hormone, in fact cholesterol sulfate is the mother or all hormones and is absolutely essential for good heart health. The body produces it when skin is exposed to the sun. The by-product is vitamin D3.) Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss.

The best anti-inflammatory super healthy fats include: coconut oil, ghee or butter from 100% grass fed cows, avocados and wild-caught salmon.

I led with coconut oil, because it is far and away the most beneficial. Coconut oil has natural anti-bacterial and fat-burning effects. It is the only thing ever shown to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s, it does not store as a fat but is metabolized in the liver as almost pure energy. I cook everything but fish in coconut oil. I add a third of a cup to my coffee or tea every day. I also use it as a carrier oil for essential oil treatments.

(I sustained a very bad burn of the tongue, lips, and gums and I immediately went for the coconut oil. It offered instant relief, was moisturing and I believe prevented me from having to deal with infection. My tongue was so badly burned that it was lacerated. But the coconut oil started the healing process immediately.)

Avocado also has impressive benefits that include improving heart health, lowering inflammation, controlling your appetite and contributing to your daily intake of fiber and nutrients such as potassium.

Salmon is also impressive: it’s one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to lower inflammation and help with cognitive functions.

In terms of supplements, I use fermented cod liver oil, and Krill oil.

  1. Supplement with Adaptogen Herbs 

Adaptogens are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protect the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:

  • Improve thyroid function
  • Reduce anxiety and depression
  • Lower cholesterol naturally
  • Reduce brain cell degeneration
  • Stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels
  • Support adrenal gland functions
  1. Balance Your Intake of Omega-3 to Omega-6 Fats

The ideal ratio of Omega3 to Omega 6 fats is 1:1. Since the early 20th century, the use of refined vegetable oils and intake of omega-6 fatty acids in our diets have skyrocketed, going from 1:1 to 1:20-30. This appears to be one of the primary dietary factors causing degenerative and chronic disease in America.

So, stay away from safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut oils, and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead like wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products.

  1. Get More GLA

There is a type of omega-6 fat called GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) that can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, or by eating hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels which is important for males as well as females.

  1. Improve Gut Health & Heal Leaky Gut Syndrome

To date every patient I have seen in the last 4 years that was tested, had a leaky gut. Many doctors still do not know what a leaky gut is. In a study of critical care patients, researchers found that 100% of the patients in the ICU, all of whom were there for a variety of reasons, did in fact have a leaky gut. None had ever been diagnosed with a leaky gut.

Why is this so important? In a nutshell, it is a condition that not only affects your digestive tract, but also drives hormone issues. Gut problems have been found to trigger autoimmune reactions, including arthritis and thyroid disorders.

In my practice, it appears to have the greatest impact on patients trying to lose weight. They do everything right and still do not lose the weight. You might imagine how frustrating this is. It puts them at risk for giving up and assuming that clean eating is not helping them so why bother. It takes a long time to create a leaky gut and it takes a year or so of clean eating to clear it up. Once it is cleared up, hormones stabilize and achieving a healthy weight is very doable.

So what exactly is leaky gut syndrome?

When undigested food particles, like gluten for example, leak through your gut into your bloodstream, the inflammation that results impacts the entire body — especially glands like the thyroid, which is very susceptible to heightened inflammation.

Most people with leaky gut have a deficiency of probiotics in their guts. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin. (For more information, see my Leaky Gut Chapter.)

To heal the gut: Steer clear of the foods that damage your digestive system including: almost all processed foods unless they are non-GMO and organic, gluten, hydrogenated oils and added sugar.

The best foods to eat to heal a leaky gut are bone broth, goats milk kefir, fermented vegetables, and high-fiber foods like vegetables and sprouted seeds. In addition, supplements like digestive enzyme and probiotics can aid in repairing your gut lining, which in turn can balance your hormones.

  1. Eliminate Toxic Kitchen, Beauty and Body Care Products

 Another way to eliminate toxins in your body is to avoid conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate.

A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil. I make a lot of my own ointments and buy organic cosmetics online. They are actually less expensive than what I used to buy in department stores and have far fewer ingredients and almost nothing questionable. The only tricky thing is getting the right color, but these companies go the extra mile to accommodate you. Juice Beauty is one of my favorites. I also found an organic beauty parlor two blocks from my house that uses awesome hair and nail products and is a local family-owned business, called Alba Beauty Studio.

For more information on products that are endocrine disruptors and/or toxic, go to The Environmental Working Group evaluated over 72,000 products and ranked them in an easy-to-understand guide to make sure you have a resource to keep your family safe. Check out EWG’s “Skin Deep Cosmetic Database” today for recommendations for which products to use and avoid.

  1. Switch to Glass and Stainless Steal

Getting rid of plastic bottles, aluminum cans and containers is essential. It’s best to replace plastic and aluminum with glass and stainless steel because of the toxic effects of BPA. I think a lot of people think that they are harder to store, but they aren’t really. Costco has really good deals on stackable glass container sets.   I also strongly recommend switching from teflon pans to stainless steel, or even better, ceramic or cast iron. A relatively good source for cast iron in the Cincinnati area that is fairly inexpensive is Jungle Jims. When I changed, I just did it slowly, a pan at a time. TJMax has amazing deals on such things. This is where I got most of my pans which were 1/3 the cost of regular retail. I bought the same pan for $30 that sold for $90 at Sur La Tab.

  1. Exercise (Especially Interval Training)

 Probably the best thing you can do is invest the time in exercise. This is where you really get the biggest bang for your buck. My new favorite form is something called Optimal Prime, or Burst training. Another version is high intensity interval training (HIIT) − including one of my favorite types called burst training.

Exercise in general is great for balancing hormones because it reduces inflammation, can help you maintain a healthy weight, lowers stress, helps regulate your appetite, and aids in getting better sleep, all of which are critical for balancing hormones.

Whether we’re talking about endorphins from a “runner’s high”, testosterone, growth hormone or insulin, HIIT/burst/optimum prime training can help your body regulate the production and use of these important hormones.

For people with hormonal imbalances, the key with exercise is to be careful not to overdo it. Training for a shorter period of time (about 20 minutes three times a week) but with higher intensity works better for people who can’t afford to add any extra stress to their system. Keep in mind that optimal exercise can differ a lot from person to person however, so it’s a good idea to seek advise from a processional if you’re ever unsure.

  1. Get More/Better Sleep

We need 7 to 8 hours of good sleep every night to keep hormones in balance. The circadian rhythm is hard-wired into us for a reason. Sleep is a potent antioxidant. When we don’t get enough of it, we cannot fight free radicals as effectively. For example, our hormones work on a schedule that is tied to the circadian rhythm: Cortisol, which is the primary “stress hormone”, is regulated at midnight, which means that the best sleep you get is the sleep you get before midnight. Once midnight comes, cortisol levels start going back up. Therefore, people who go to bed after midnight never truly get a break from their sympathetic flight/fight stress response.

Sleep disturbances have been linked to higher levels of morning cortisol (the stress hormone) decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. I try to be asleep by 9:00 ish and get up before 6:00. I usually wake between 4 and lay in bed looking at emails, or texts from the day before or doing some social media. These are the things that keep many people up late. I just do them in the morning.

  1. Watch Your Caffeine

Caffeine in moderate amounts might be okay for some people, but drinking too much caffeine is almost as bad as not getting enough sleep. Caffeine, which can stay in your system for up to six hours, is a chemical that affects the central nervous system (CNS) and raises your heart rate, increases alertness, and changes the way your brain produces hormones.

If you drink too much coffee or drink it too late, it can elevate cortisol levels by interfering with your normal sleep cycle. It might also have an impact on other stress hormones, such as adrenaline production. You’re probably aware that caffeine is addictive by nature, increases nervousness and anxiety in many people, and is linked with insomnia.

I drink about 4 ounces with 4 to 6 ounces of coconut milk, cacao, cinnamon oil and coconut oil added.

If you need a little boost during the day, you could try matcha green tea or tulsi tea which are much lower in caffeine. The good news is that once you’re health is back on track, small amounts of caffeine are actually beneficial.

  1. Avoid Alcohol

Chronic alcohol consumption contributes to estrogen dominance and has been found to interfere with pancreatic functioning, increase liver disease risk, lowering testosterone and contributes to anxiety and malnutrition. To be clear, you can be malnourished and still be overweight.

The fact that alcohol damages the liver is not insignificant when you consider that the liver is very important for hormonal balance and has over 500 different functions in the body!

  1. Quit Smoking

Of course it’s extremely important to quit smoking too. Studies have found that smoking interferes with normal immunological and reproductive processes. Compared with nonsmokers, moderate to heavy smokers (≥ 10 cigarettes/day) have abnormal levels of steroid metabolites and reproductive hormones that can be up to 35 percent higher than usual.

  1. Supplement with Vitamin D3

According to an article from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vitamin D3’s role in promoting health is more profound than previously suspected. Researchers found that vitamin D has an impact in the following ways: It affects the adaptive immune system, the innate immune system, insulin secretion by the pancreatic β cell, and vascular health (heart and blood pressure regulation.) It also plays a significant role in brain and fetal development.

Vitamin D acts like a hormone inside the body. Sunshine is really the best way to optimize vitamin D levels because your bare skin actually makes vitamin D as a metabolite of cholesterol sulfate (yes, cholesterol which we need to be healthy and to have a healthy cardiovascular system) when exposed to even small amounts of direct sunlight. Most people should supplement with around 2,000 IU to 5,000 IU daily of vitamin D3 if they live in dark areas, during the winter, and on days when they’re not in the sun.

  1. Back Off Birth Control Pills

In simplest terms, “the pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. It is so hard to convince women not to use the pill. There are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy.

Here are just some of the risks:

  • Breakthrough bleeding between cycles
  • Increased risk of breast cancer
  • Increased risk of uterine bleeding, blood clotting, heart attack and stroke
  • Migraines
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Weight gain
  • Back pains
  • Mood changes
  • Nausea
  • Benign liver tumors
  • Breast tenderness

Precautions When Treating Hormonal Imbalances

For people with diagnosed hormonal disorders− including type 1 or type 2 diabetes, Adrenal Insufficiency, Addison’s Disease, Graves’s Disease and Cushing’s Syndrome for example− it’s always important to speak with your doctor before discontinuing medication use. The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision.

Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What Is Insulin Resistance?

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Insulin Resistance

One in every three adults in the U.S. now has elevated blood sugar levels according to the American Diabetes Association. Millions of Americans suffer from some form of insulin resisance from prediabetes, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome. In a culture where catchup has sugar in it, maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging.

The effects of insulin resistance range from fatigue to stroke, amputation, blindness and even death. That is the bad news; the good news is that insulin resistance is preventable and treatable. My AwesomeEight group (all of whom lost over 200 pounds) were able to ditch their insulin, cholesterol and blood pressure medications by following the following recommendations and you can too.

Blood sugar goes up because of glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating carbohydrates. But other things can also impact blood sugar. Stress plays a significant role as it raises cortisol, which interferes with how insulin is used. Even how often you eat and how much you eat at one time impacts blood sugar.

What to Do

In general, eating a clean low-processed diet, getting HitFit, getting sunshine and plenty of good rest are the keys.

  1. Eat Clean
  • An anti-inflammatory diet is key. I’m talking about lots of good fats, healthy proteins, and good fiber from non-starchy vegies, a bit of fruit (especially berries)
  • Protein: The bestproteins for managing blood sugar include: wild fish such as salmon, pastured eggs and poultry, 100% grass-fed beef or lamb, raw dairy products (including yogurt, kefir or raw cheeses)
  • Fats: The best fats are extra virgin coconut oil, MCT oil, extra virgin olive oil, nuts and seeds (like almonds, chia, hemp and flax), and avocado. These fats are delicious besides being very good for you.
  • High fiber foods: fresh veggies, whole pieces of fruit (not juice), sprouted beans or peas, and hemp. The highest fiber foods are artichokes, green leafy vegetables, chia seeds, flaxseeds, apples, pumpkin seeds, almonds, avocado and sweet potatoes.
  1. Blood-sugar stabilizers
  • Cinammon – has been found to have 18 percent phenol content in dry weight. For type-2 diabetics or those who suffer from insulin resistance, studies have shown that improved insulin sensitivity and blood glucose control can be had for as little as 1 teaspoon per day. Improved insulin resistance helps in weight control and lessens the risk of heart disease.
  • Cloves – contain 30 percent levels of the antioxidant phenol in dry weight. It also contains the antioxidants anthocyanins and quercetin. This herb has antiseptic as well as germicidal properties. It also offers anti-inflammatory, analgesic and digestive health benefits. Clove oil can be used to for something as uncomplicated as toothaches, headaches, cough and even indigestion.
  • Oregano – is popularly found in Spanish and Mediterranean cooking and is sometimes known as marjoram. It adds depth and flavor to any dish and goes well with tomatoes, eggplant and meat. It has been thought to treat bacteria and parasitic infection and its oil has been used to treat head lice. In a recent study, oregano was found to treat giardia – an infection of the intestines brought about by microscopic parasites – effectively. Herbalists even recommend it as a treatment for E-coli.
  • Sage – contains phytosterols reputed to have a cooling action. Herbal medicine practitioners use it to treat uterine bleeding and cramps. A German study on this herb shows that diabetics who drank infusions of sage on an empty stomach reduced their blood sugar levels. It is popularly used to flavor meat and soup dishes and can even be drunk as tea.
  • Garlic – Garlic contains sulfur compounds – specifically hydrogen sulfide gas – which dilate blood vessels. It is this effect that reduces blood pressure. This same compound helps in the metabolism of iron and protects against oxidative damage and even high cholesterol. Garlic can be found in different types of vegetable and meat recipes and adds a characteristic flavor in soups and sauces.
  • Other blood sugar stabilizers are: apple cider vinegar, green tea, and herbal teas.
  1. Stay Away from Sweeteners

Use natural/unrefined, organic sugar sources such as coconut crystals, stevia, pure maple syrup, blackstrap molasses or raw honey. The really dangerous sugars contain high fructose corn syrup, fructose or dextrose.

  1. Avoid Grains

If you must use flour, choose those made with 100 percent whole grains, or else try coconut flour/meal, or almond flour for a healthier option.

  1. Beverages

Stick with water, seltzer, green, herbal tea or black tea, and coffee in moderation (1 or 2 cups early in the day). Limit alcoholic beverages as they can also raise blood sugar, especially if you consume sweetened alcoholic drinks. NO SOFT DRINKS! ESPECIALLY NO DIET DRINKS

  1. Get Regular Exercise

High Intensity Interval Training or Burst training is the best. Doing about 30–60 minutes of exercise 3 days of the week (such as running, cycling, swimming and lifting weights) and doing weight bearing on the opposite days is ideal. 4. Manage Stress

  1. Essential Oils For Stress

 Lavender, rose and frankincense) are all helpful for diabetics and those with insulin resistance.

  1. De-stress

Yoga, massage and acupuncture are great. Other ways to wind down include spending more time outdoors, joining groups in your community, and connecting with family and friends more.

  1. Get Enough Rest

The best sleep you can get is the sleep you get before midnight. A lack of sleep raises stress and appetite hormones (like cortisol and ghrelin, which make you hungry), making it harder to avoid snacks that are high in sugar.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017 Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/.

 

Why Is Diet Soda Dangerous for Anorexics?

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Why is diet soda dangerous for anorexics? One word: Cholesterol.

Inflammatory Toxins

I talk a lot about inflammation. There are a number of additives that have been shown to be inflammatory. Here are a few of the most common ones.

  • Aspartame – H.J. Roberts, M.D., coined the term “aspartame disease” in a book filled with over 1,000 pages of information about the negative health consequences of ingesting aspartame, which included headache, dizziness, vomiting, memory loss, and fibromyalgia among other disorders. Aspartame is composed of Aspartic Acid, Phenylalanine, and Methanol, all of which have serious side effects.
  • Aspartic Acid. Aspartic acid, or aspartate, makes up about 40 percent of aspartame. In the brain, aspartate acts as a neurotransmitter, helping information get from one neuron to another. An excess amount of aspartate in the brain releases free radicals and, in turn, kills the neurons by allowing an excess of calcium to be absorbed. Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dementia and Parkinson’s disease are only a few of the chronic illnesses linked to excessive amounts of aspartate over an extended period of time. The FDA has also reported nausea, vision, sleeping problems, migraines and more as side the effects of excessive aspartate consumption too.
  • Phenylalanine, an amino acid, makes up about 50 percent of aspartame. Phenylalanine raises blood phenylalanine levels, which can decrease serotonin and lead to depression, seizures and even schizophrenia.
  • Methanol. Methanol, also known as wood alcohol makes up the remaining 10 percent of aspartame. This is where things get especially dangerous. Methanol breaks down into formic acid, which is harmless for all animals except humans. In humans, the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme converts methanol into formaldehyde, which wreaks havoc with sensitive proteins and DNA. The formaldehyde, or methanol poisoning, is a neurotoxin causing such conditions as:
  • Headaches
  • Ear buzzing
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Gastrointestinal disturbances
  • Weakness
  • Vertigo
  • Chills
  • Memory lapses
  • Numbness and shooting pains in the extremities
  • Behavioral disturbances
  • Neuritis

The most well-known problems from methanol poisoning are vision problems, including misty vision, progressive contraction of visual fields, blurring of vision, obscuration of vision, retinal damage, and blindness. Formaldehyde is also a known carcinogen that causes retinal damage, interferes with DNA replication and may cause birth defects. The Environmental Protection Agency recommends a daily limit of 7.8 mg a day of methanol, which equals half of an 8 oz. aspartame-sweetened beverage.[1]

If you don’t believe that there is formaldehyde in your Coke just smell it when it is warm.

By-Products of Aspartame

Diketopiperazine (DKP) is produced by the body when aspartame is metabolized. Uterine polyps and increased cholesterol levels have been linked to DKP.

Many of us in the eating disorders field are seeing anorexic patients with high cholesterol levels, especially among those who also binge and purge. Perhaps this is due in part to the fact that most patients suffering from anorexia live on diet soft drinks, thus influencing DKP levels. DKP may also help to explain this paradox of high cholesterol and low body fat among the bulimarexic population . [2]

Are you drinking diet soda?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

[1] Documentary: Sweet Misery

June 29, 2013 | 230,764 views

[2] Rigaud D. Diabete Metab. 2009;35:57-63.

Ohwada R. Int J Eat Disord. 2006;39:598-601.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Remember, it is the action that counts.

Remember, it is the action that counts.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Happy New Year!

copy-of-happy-new-year

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

#WednesdayWisdom

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#TestimonialTuesday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia,  and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Or by form 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Self Care Strategies For The Holidays

self-care-strategies-2It’s the most (adjective) time of year.

How would you fill in that sentence? Joyful? Exciting? Peaceful? Stressful? Exhausting? Depressing?

The holidays are not easy for anyone. Even people who love the holidays can admit to moments of exhaustion and stress.

Here we are, 10 days before Christmas Eve, and I can honestly say that I have no idea where the time went. Wasn’t it just Thanksgiving? How can we actually enjoy the holiday when we just want it to be over by the time it arrives.

This is why self care is so essential for those of us who tend to get burned out during the lead up to the holidays.

What does self care look like?

Here’s my top ten list of self care strategies:

  1. Take a nap.  Yes, you! Lay down and take a nap. Everyone could use extra rest. If you can’t sleep, even just laying down for 20 minutes with your eyes closed may help reduce the feelings of anxiety or stress you are feeling.
  2. Color.  I’ve been posting a lot of articles about how coloring in those adult coloring books is scientifically proven to be as effective as meditation. So go grab your crayons or colored pencils, your fancy coloring book and zen out. In a pinch, I suggest a pen and a piece of paper. Doodling should have the same effect. There is a whole art form devoted to doodling called Zentangle. Check out this article from Psychology Today.
  3. Go listen to some music. You can do this while coloring, or while napping/resting. Or you can just do it on its own. Think about the last time you just sat and listened to music. It was probably a really long time ago.
  4. Call a friend. This is an excellent time to phone a friend. You can commiserate about how nothing is wrapped, or how your mother in law is driving you insane or whatever. Trust me, you’ll feel better.
  5. Take a walk. Just going outside, especially if the sun is shining (which it isn’t today in Cincinnati) and feeling that sunshine on your face and hands while you walk can really help you relax.
  6. Spend some time with a pet. Pets just make us feel better and more relaxed. So take your dog with you while you walk, or spend five minutes playing with your cat.
  7. Cut a corner. If you feel yourself getting worked up about something on your list of to-do’s ask yourself if you can cut a corner. Does everyone really need homemade bath salts? Or can a jar from the store work just as well? Sometimes what we plan doesn’t match reality in terms of time or ability. And that’s okay.  There were  good intentions, but reality has constraints. Cut a corner.
  8.  Nourish yourself. Make sure you are eating foods that are nourishing you- not draining you. There’s a lot of sweets floating around this time of year and quite frankly, most of us don’t feel great after we overindulge.
  9. Gratitude check in. Sit down with a piece of paper and spend two minutes writing down things you are grateful for. You might be surprised at what comes to mind, but go with it. Gratitude in even the smallest things can help us bear the anxiety of the holiday.
  10. Call your therapist.  If you can get an appointment with your therapist during christmas week, take it and don’t give it up! That is gold!  A conversation with your therapist during christmas week can help reinforce all the good things you’ve been doing for yourself and bring perspective to whatever your worries. Truly.
  11. Finally, give yourself permission to laugh Do my Mad Lib! Remember silly mad libs? You choose the adjectives, nouns, adverbs, etc.  I created a silly mad lib to give you a laugh! If you do it, send me your mad lib(drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com with the subject line Mad Lib) and I will share it in my special holiday newsletter! It’s great to be able to have a laugh at the holidays!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Want to hear more about navigating the holidays when you have an eating disorder? Check out my interview with Mark Heyne of Cincinnati Edition on 91.7 WVXU Cincinnati.

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#TestimonialTuesday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia,  and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Your Thanksgiving Questions. My Thanksgiving Answers!

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You asked. I have answers. The always fun Thanksgiving Question and Answer blog post.

Before we get into the nitty gritty, I want to take a moment to let you know that I am infusing some humor into this special post because, quite frankly, this is the most difficult holiday for folks with eating disorders and their families. Humor is a special kind balm in every sticky and uncomfortable situation that gives us perspective.

Here we go!

Thanksgiving stands firm as my favorite holiday – cooking/baking, Macy’s parade, family, time off work and of course, Charlie Brown Thanksgiving! But, each year poses another struggle to overcome in this journey called recovery. I am 12 years going strong (on December 18th) in recovery to an eating disorder. The path has not been smooth travel; but, every hardship created strength within. This year, God presented before me the one struggle I cannot release. . .eating in front of others. I have always been criticized, critiqued and condemned for what’s on my plate. When knee deep in eating disorder behavior, it was condemnation over lack of food and combinations created to fill my cravings with least calories possible. Travelling through recovery, I continue to get criticized and critiqued over foods chosen (now much healthier portions and recipes made from scratch). I hear comments like, “Well, we know you wouldn’t eat that,” “You eat so healthy (in a condemning voice),” “What are you eating? (in a disapproving connotation)” There are other comments made about my lifestyle, which is now very healthy emotionally and physically. It gets old hearing others comment about my looks or eating habits when I know I continue each day to choose what is best for my health. Others do not realize that staying healthy and choosing recovery every day is not easy. Their comments do not help. It makes me fill with anxiety when eating with others and so I often avoid it. I am presented with the challenge to kindly stick up for myself and become a bit more transparent. With God’s help, I will enjoy every part of this Thanksgiving and respond to any comment accordingly.  

Everyone with an eating disorder struggles with these issues as you so eloquently describe them. Sometimes people are genuinely trying to say and do the right thing and it comes out wrong. And sometimes they are just being intrusive. In any case your responsibility starts and ends with being kind while taking care of yourself. You said it, stick up for yourself graciously. What does this look like?

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Don’t be petty.

Kidding! That’s what you say INSIDE. Outside you smile and say, “Yes, it’s just so delicious,” or “I’m truly enjoying this moment.” And then you transition to something else. “Did you see the Bengals game last Sunday?” (I’ll talk about transitions a little later.)

Most importantly, enjoy the parts of this Thanksgiving that have the most meaning for you. It might not be the food.  THAT IS TOTALLY OKAY. If you need someone to give you permission to acknowledge that your favorite part of Thanksgiving has nothing to do with food or eating in front of people- I grant you permission. Sometimes just releasing yourself from that expectation is helpful.

Thank you so much for addressing Thanksgiving for those of us who cannot get happy about it due to our eating disorders and food allergies. Some of my issues concern becoming like amnesia when asked to bring “a dish” to a dinner.   I mentally freak out and can’t think of anything I can make to bring. Then there is the comparison issue going on at the event – who made the best dish and so on. I can’t do that anymore. There is the issue of timing of the meal. My son and daughter in law eat around 7 pm. That is too late for me to eat that much food and I’m starving – not a good thing. Also food allergies – mine are gluten, dairy, turkey, soy. After many mistakes and problem issues I now prepare my gf dressing, sugar free cranberries, roasted chicken and gf pumpkin pie. They can eat the cranberries I bring and I take a regular pumpkin pie for them and whip cream.

Want to mention that one of the best Thanksgivings I ever had was with my former partner we were in Nassau and had the most wonderful, fresh caught that day seafood with a French cream sauce and capers and Caesar Salad. Unforgettable!

So this letter went on a little longer, and I cut it short so that parts that might identify this person were omitted. But let me say this. This is all very common. Food allergies, the comparing of the dishes, the time of the meal-  so many people share these frustrations. Here’s what I think. Or rather, what I’d bring. You say, you had this amazing Thanksgiving in Nassau. I would bring Caesar salad. Because a) it’s something you love. b) who doesn’t love caesar salad? c) it’s easy.

To address the other issues that were in this question (both public and omitted), I say this: Come when you can. Leave when you have to. It is what it is. You can’t control people, places, things. No is a complete sentence.

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Do I approach the subject of food to my daughter or just avoid the topic?

I am assuming that she has an eating disorder. DO NOT APPROACH IT. SAY NOTHING! That being said, here is what you should say: “We’re so glad you are here!” Talk about anything but anything related to food.

How do I protect my child’s privacy and still appropriately answer questions from relatives about a) Why is she not at Thanksgiving (if she chooses not to attend) or b) How is she? or c) Comments about what she is eating or how she is looking.

Make sure you are within kicking distance of the people asking the above questions. A good kick to the shins under the table should solve the problem. Kidding! In all seriousness, you can’t really warn them ahead of time, that actually makes it worse, but you need to practice and master the art of transitions. What are transitions? I’ll give you a few examples.

Well meaning family member (let’s give them the benefit of the doubt):  Where is your daughter? Why isn’t she at Thanksgiving? 

You: She wanted to do something else this year. What are your children doing for thanksgiving? or She wanted to do something else this year. Can you help me get people drinks? Can you go ask Aunt Shirley what she’d like to drink? or She wanted to do something else this year. Boy, Judy sure looks busy in the kitchen, I’m going to ask her what I can do to help. 

Well meaning family member: How is she? (concerned furrowed eyebrows)

You: She’s good. How are you? or She’s good. Did you see this new recipe I’m trying? or She’s good. Did you see I made grandma’s green beans? or She’s good. Did I tell you i just started watching this new television series on Netflix that I love? Do you have Netflix? It’s so much better than cable. 

Well meaning family member: God, she looks so thin. 

You: (Saying nothing.) Did I tell you I’m going full out black friday shopping tomorrow? I’m literally lining up at 6am to buy a television for $5. (or whatever). or (Say nothing and ignore the comment) Hey I’m thinking about going to see Second City’s Holidazed and Confused at Playhouse in the Park for the holidays. I saw them on TV and it looks so funny.  When you directly ignore the comment it sends a very strong message.

In all these examples, you are appropriately answering their questions, while also protecting her privacy. Anyone looking to get into a deep conversation on Thanksgiving about how your daughter is doing needs to examine their own reasons for essentially starting an inappropriate conversation at an inappropriate time.

What is the best way to convey how loved and wanted she is at these family events?

Just say it, lots.

Guys, just remember, stay away from the politics. Stay away from the food talk. Express your sincere gratitude at having loved ones with you. And if you don’t have it, you don’t have to say anything. And make sure you have a good thanksgiving soundtrack, it helps with the lulls at the table.

Just remember:

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Happy Thanksgiving!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

Thanksgiving! Final Call for Questions!

Last Call! It is the last day to send in your questions/concerns related to Thanksgiving.

Every year I receive questions and concerns that so many of us can relate to.  I’d love to hear from you.

Maybe your concerns relate to an eating disorder. Maybe the family dynamics make Thanksgiving a dreaded holiday. Maybe you have a politically divided table (a problem a lot of families are facing this year.)

My goal is provide some tools to manage the holiday. I’ll include my answers in my blog and newsletter on Tuesday November 22nd.

So, please tweet me your questions @drrenae, send me an email at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com with the subject Turkey Time, or message me on Facebook. All questions and concerns will remain anonymous.

I promise, with a little courage from you asking the questions, and me giving you the tools, this Thanksgiving will be different. Because you’ll be prepared. Let’s face the fear before we sit down at the table.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia,  and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Thanksgiving. You Have Questions. I Have Answers.

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Thanksgiving is a really hard holiday for a lot of people.

For people who are newly recovering from an eating disorder it can be tough. For obese patients, the thought of having to face all that food is enough to make them want to skip the holiday altogether. For binge eaters, who are in an already stressful situation, they just want to hide out in the kitchen eating. For a patient with an eating disorder who is not in treatment, it can be an incredibly uncomfortable situation. For parents of a child with an eating disorder, the thought of having all that food on the table and the person not eating can make them livid. I could go on and on. But I won’t.

Instead, I want to hear from you. What is your concern about Thanksgiving? Do you have a specific question? I’d love to hear from you. I’m compiling questions to answer in a blog post right before Thanksgiving. My goal is provide some tools to manage the holiday. I’ll also include my answers in my newsletter on Tuesday November 22nd.

So, please tweet me your questions @drrenae, send me an email at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com with the subject Turkey Time, or message me on Facebook. All questions will remain anonymous.

I promise, with a little courage from you asking the questions, and me giving you the tools, this Thanksgiving will be different. Because you’ll be prepared. Let’s face the fear before we sit down at the table.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Post Election Depression and Anxiety? Here’s What to Do.

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Listless? Sad? Anxious?

Many Americans are feeling depressed and anxious as a result of the election outcome. This has been an incredibly stressful election cycle. Approximately half of the country is walking around in shock.

This is one of those moments, when self care is so important. I’ve talked about it before, and I usually talk about it during the holidays, but for many, this is really a good time to practice self care.

Here’s what to do:

Feel free to cry and be upset. It won’t help to push those feelings away, you need to accept them. This is when it can be very helpful to get together with others who are feeling the same way and spend some time talking about it. This election was very triggering for many people, across a broad range of issues, which brings me to my next point.

Be with other people. Don’t isolate yourself. If you spent all day yesterday in bed under a blanket, it’s time to get up and get dressed and get together with someone. And when I say get together with someone, I mean spend time face to face with someone.

Stay off social media and turn off the tv. The 24 hour news cycle dominates Facebook, twitter and television. It can be very hard to escape the constant barrage of coverage. There is a time to be tuned in, but right now I recomennd tuning out.

Find comfort in your daily routine. This can be difficult but it is worth it. Making your coffee, packing lunches, eating regular meals, all these daily routines and rituals can be very comforting during a time like this.

Distract yourself with something fun and/or something inspiring. Read something inspiring. Watch a movie that inspires you. Go see a play. Inspiration has healing power.

Laughter is important. Laughter releases endorphins and it’s contagious. So if you are in a group, make a commitment to keep it light once you get past the heavy stuff.

Finally, give yourself time. If you are experiencing anxiety and depression as a result of the election, you need to give yourself time. Yes, officials have to come out the day after the election and tell everyone to get along. But that doesn’t mean that you are supposed to be over your feelings. Grief doesn’t have a time table.
However, if you are unable to put any of the above recommendations into action and you find yourself unable to get out of bed or continue to isolate despite your desire to be with others, it’s time to reach out to a professional who can help you.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

 

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

Recipe: Meatloaf

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So this past week I posted a photo of my latest greatest quick dinner recipe on Facebook and I received so many requests for the recipe, I decided to post it. It’s super simple, and you are going to love it. I served this meatloaf with mashed carrots with sour cream and some homemade kale chips (unbelievably delicious and crunchy!)

Here’s what you’ll need:

1 lb beef (grassfed, organic)

1 egg

1 cup mashed carrot

1 cup diced onion

1 cup bread crumbs made from dried out sourdough garlic toast

1 cup crushed tomatoes

1 tsp real salt

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp italian herbs

1 tsp bourbon smoked paprika

2-3 tbsp bbq sauce

Start by preheating oven to 350 degrees. Grease a baking dish with coconut oil.  Fork together the beef, eggs, carrots, onion, bread crumbs, crushed tomatoes, and herbs.  Make sure everything is mixed well.  Put into baking dish.

Bake at 350 for 40 minutes, then top with bbq sauce and bake for five minutes more.

Remove, slice and enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

#TestimonialTuesday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr. Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#TestimonialTuesday

recipe-3

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Recipe: Cauliflower Chili

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For those of you who are unaware, Cincinnati is chili country. We have strong opinions about chili in the Queen City. So I decided to try out my clean chili recipe on my unsuspecting neighbors at our block party last weekend. If I may brag for a moment, I won the “Best Chili” award!

So what set my chili apart? Cauliflower.

Yes, you read that right.  It can be used to make pizza dough, rice, and mashed “potatoes.”It is an excellent substitute and incredibly versatile. But even more than that, it is so good for you

Back to the block party. Everyone was shocked that my chili was meatless, vegan, and grain free, because it had so much flavor and such a wonderful meaty texture. When I revealed that cauliflower was the secret ingredient, everyone wanted the recipe.

Here’s what you need:

4 large carrots

1 large onion

6 cloves of garlic

2 bags of frozen rinsed cauliflower

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup organic cacao

2 tbsp organic cinnamon

1 tbsp bourbon smoked paprika

2 jars of organic basil marinara

Start by prepping your vegetables. Peel your carrots, peel your onion and pull out your cauliflower.

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Is this amazing frozen cauliflower? I love that you can get heirloom organic varieties in the frozen food section!

Give that cauliflower a really good rinse.

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

 

Next you are going to pull out your food processor and pulse the carrots, onion, garlic and frozen cauliflower. Keep it chunky. We don’t want teeny tiny bits, we want this to have that wonderful mouth feel that typical chili has.

I pulse the carrots first.

I pulse the carrots first.

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Pulse the onion and garlic. I used red onion because I had it on hand. Whatever onion you have on hand will work.

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Add the cauliflower and keep pulsing.

Then take 1/2 cup of coconut oil and heat it up in large pot. Throw in the vegetables and sauté them until they start to soften. Add cumin, salt and white pepper to taste. Add cacao, cinnamon, and bourbon smoked paprika. The vegetables should be coated in the spices.

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Your kitchen should be smelling amazing right now.

I want you to add two jars of organic basil marinara.

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This is the marinara sauce I use. You can find it at Whole Foods.

Then you are going to lower the heat way down and walk away. Let this thing cook down for an hour, maybe two and let the flavors come together. Every once in a while, check it, give it a stir, make sure it isn’t burning on the bottom.

In the end, it will look like this:

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Doesn’t this look amazing?

This recipe has minimal prep time, with maximum flavor. Make it this weekend and you’ll have lunch all week long.  Try it and tell me what you think!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-4

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

What Is An Antioxidant?

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety-2What is An Antioxidant?

Antioxidants are the nutrients found in food that neutralize free radicals by sharing an electron with the free radical, making it whole again. Thus, antioxidants stop the chain reaction of free radical formation and the oxidative stress that prematurely ages us.  As a result, antioxidants provide protection against a long list of conditions and chronic diseases.  More importantly, they keep us from aging prematurely.

Antioxidants come in several forms, including the vitamins A, C, and E, alpha lipoic acid, plant-derived polyphenols, and the element selenium. They are also found in nuts, broccoli, and colorful fruits and vegetables.  Blueberries, pomegranates, broccoli sprouts, green tea, and dark chocolate are just some of the antioxidant-rich “superfoods” found in almost any supermarket today.

The Mother of All Antioxidants: Glutathione

The mother of all antioxidants is glutathione.  Glutathione is a combination of three amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.  It is referred to as the master detoxifier because it recycles all of the other antioxidants. So, although vitamin C, E and Alpha Lipoic acid are potent antioxidants, they can become depleted.  Glutathione basically fortifies and then recycles them.  

Besides recycling other antioxidants, glutathione also defuses free radicals on its own.  The secret of glutathione’s power is the sulfur it contains. Sulfur is the sticky stuff that allows it to snatch up free radicals and other toxins in our body so that they can be excreted.  I take 2 teaspoons of organic sulfur crystals every day  to support my glutathione.  It works.  I have one patient that says if forced to choose the one thing she would take if she could only take one health aid, it would be her sulfur crystals.

You may remember reading about sulfur before on my blog.  Recall that the mother of all hormones is cholesterol sulfate and the mother of all vitamins is its metabolite, vitamin D3 sulfate. The common denominator between the big three—glutathione disulfide, cholesterol sulfate, and vitamin D3 sulfate—is sulfur.  It’s no surprise then that the longest-living and healthiest people in the world hail from places where sulfur is more abundant, such as Greece, Italy, Japan and Iceland.  Sulfur is the common denominator again and again in my research and one deserving of our attention if we want to prevent premature aging as well as disease.

It is disturbing that most of us have never heard of these three super antioxidants, given their importance in promoting overall health.  In fact, glutathione disulfide, vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate, are very poorly understood and relatively unknown to the medical community, let alone the general public.  Why is this so?  Well, probably because until very recently, pharmaceutical companies hadn’t figured out how to make a buck off of them.  You can’t take a glutathione pill, the body must produce it on its own.  Likewise, you get cholesterol and vitamin D3 sulfate from the sun, not off the shelf.  If the American public was more informed about the role of sulfur, we would be able to manage the onslaught of free radicals that we are currently subjected to on a daily basis far better and perhaps the aging process would not be accelerating as much as it is at present.

Although you can’t ingest glutathione directly, you can supplement to help your body produce more if it.  Some are saying that the ability to produce more glutathione would be like discovering the proverbial Fountain of Youth.

Getting your Glutathione Going

In order to transfer the electrons that neutralize free radicals, glutathione needs a cofactor (helper) in the form of a coenzyme called NAD+, which you can get from several different supplement companies.  Another way to support glutathione is to take organic sulfur crystals as I mentioned above.  You can purchase it online.  A good one is made by Happy Body.  

Taking melatonin is another way of supporting glutathione.  The best way to take it is in the form of organic tart cherry juice, which is loaded with Melatonin naturally.  The added benefit is that it makes you sleep better so be sure to take it at night.  All three of these strategies, organic sulfur crystals, NAD+ and melatonin, reduce free radicals.  Reducing free radicals improves skin, hearing, hair, memory, endurance, sexual function, muscle and bone health.  It would also prevent cancer, vascular disease and dementia.  Need I say more?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

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Happy #MotivationMonday!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/