What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

Is Amish chicken free range? Organic?

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken.  Look for 


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

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Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Digesting Animal Protein

Digesting Steak

How Are We Digesting Animal Protein?  
Our bodies use enzymes for digesting animal protein.  Anytime we ingest food, our body releases digestive enzymes to break the food down or digest the food. Because animal protein (meat) is a more complex food, our body expends a much larger amount of digestive enzymes to digest it.

The process of cooking meat destroys most of the naturally-occurring enzymes that are needed to break down meats complete proteins into amino acids that the body can utilize; the more the meat is cooked, the more naturally-occurring enzymes are destroyed. This is the main reason that a well-done steak is more difficult to digest than a rare steak.

It’s also important to note that as we get older, our bodies naturally start to produce fewer digestive enzymes. Some meats take longer to digest than others; pork takes the longest to digest, followed by beef and lamb. The longer the meat takes to digest, the more digestive enzymes are exhausted.

Protein Digestion Times

How Can We Help Our Bodies in Digesting Animal Protein?
There are several things we can do to make the digestion process of meat easier, especially when it comes to the harder-to-digest meats like pork, beef, and lamb.

There are a few foods and supplements that naturally contain digestive enzymes including fresh, raw pineapple and fresh, raw papaya. By eating these fruits as accompaniment to meat, our bodies are less likely to be depleted of its own digestive enzymes.

Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, while fresh papaya contains an enzyme called papain; both help the body to break down protein quickly. Sometimes, it may not be possible to eat fresh pineapple or papaya with your meal, especially if you are eating away from home.  In this case, there are combination bromelain and papain supplements available. Remember to always check the labels of your supplements for unwanted ingredients such as artificial sweeteners, MSG, and other neurotoxins.

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for over 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form



Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits?   Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. 

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have!  If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Knee Replacement Recovery – Two Weeks

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement Recovery - Two Weeks Post Surgery

I am two weeks out today! Strangely, the first week was the easiest week and week two was much more difficult. The biggest issue this past week was that I couldn’t sleep. I was simply in too much pain.  It appears that the more active you are the less stiffness you have. At night we tend to be much less active, ergo more stiffness.  Stiffness and pain are not the same thing but it’s easy to get them confused, LOL. Especially at night when you simply cannot get comfortable no matter what position you are in.

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