Category Archives: Nutrition, Fitness, Health

The Key to the Ketogenic Meal Plan

Recently I discovered that my blood sugar and insulin levels were elevated. After doing some research I discovered that the underlying reason my blood sugar was elevated was that I had been taking Red Rice Yeast extract. Why? It was recommended to me as a natural alternative to taking a statin. What I failed to do while taking it, was also supplement with CoQ10. This is super important for anyone considering taking statin or taking red rice yeast extract.

Determined to lower my blood sugar level, I recently embarked on a ketogenic meal plan. Ketogenic meals are typically associated with people seeking weight loss, precisely because they lower blood sugar and insulin levels. But there are actually many reasons someone might want to try this type of eating.

graphic courtesy of www.myketokitchen.com

The great thing about a ketogenic meal plan is that it is whole food based. That means there are no processed foods when eating this way, and food sources should be the highest quality that you can afford.

While eating this way, each meal consists of 70% good fats, 20-25% protein and 5% limited and low glycemic load carbohydrates. Yes, you read that right, 70% healthy fats. The key to the ketogenic meal plan is healthy fat. At first trying to determine these percentages can be a bit daunting, but once you understand the formula and the foods that fall into the categories, it becomes easy.

So what are the good fats? These include coconut oil, avocado, grassfed butter, olive oil, avocado oil, and lard. You will also enjoy full fat cheeses, yogurts, cream cheeses and crème. You will be using these fats in cooking, as well as creating delicious sauces and dressings (hello, avocado sour cream dressing!)

For protein choices, consider the following options: grass fed beef, bacon, pastured chicken and turkey, wild caught fish- really any protein in its whole form is acceptable as long as it is not processed. Again, you are looking for organic, grass fed, wild caught, pastured proteins.

What’s a low glycemic load carbohydrate? It’s a non starchy fruit or vegetable. For fruits, think berries- strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries. For vegetables, think vegetables that grow above ground- lettuces, kale, collard greens, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchinni, mushrooms, onions, tomatoes, eggplant, artichokes, cabbage, bell pepper, fennel, bok choy. Stay away from corn,carrots, beets, and potatoes of any kind.

The goal of a ketogenic diet is keeping your body in a state of ketosis. When you are in ketosis, your body burns more fat.  There are three things that prevent you from being in ketosis. 1) You are consuming more carbohydrates than you should be. You could also be consuming starchy carbohydrates. 2) You are not eating enough fat. We are so trained to think that fat is bad for us, when in fact healthy fats are critical to our health. 3) You are not eating enough protein. Satiety, the feeling of fullness, really comes from protein being consumed with healthy fat. You will be eating much more fat than you are normally accustomed to consuming.

The hardest part for me was eating less protein, as it only makes up about 20% of the calories. I knew it would be hard to stop eating all of the fruit, as I am sort of a fruitaholic as it turns out. But cutting back on the protein was trickier than I imagined because I had to keep checking to see what has protein in it and what does not. So heavy cream has no protein and coconut milk next to none. But a steak has a lot of protein and buffalo meat has even more. Fish is a very good choice, as well as chicken.

So what does a day of eating on a ketogenic meal plan look like?

Consider the following quick and easy breakfasts: an omelette with cheese on top cooked in coconut oil; An egg baked in half an avocado with cheese or bacon melted on top; Berry green smoothie made from blueberries, sour cream, spinach, and heavy whipping cream. I also throw in some of Dr. Axe’s collagen powder or some Naked Whey protein powder, but not too much.

Have I mentioned how much I love this product? Dr. Axe’s Collagen Protein.

For lunch, a meal may be something like a bacon lettuce and tomato salad; cauliflower cheddar soup; an omelette with bacon and veggies cooked in coconut oil, crab salad stuffed avocado.

Dinner are mostly protein and vegetable. For example,  lamb with pesto zucchini noodles; turkey meatloaf made with heavy cream and fresh parsley served with creamed spinach; garlic braised short ribs served with cheesy mashed cauliflower.

And don’t forget, you should be eating 2-3 snacks a day. Some of my favorites include, homemade crispy parmesan crackers; almond butter fudge; a smoothie; desserts called fat bombs and bacon and cheese deviled eggs.

Does all this sound pretty rich? Indeed! The whole idea of ketogenic meals centers around eating healthy fats. Consuming these healthy fats with proteins is what keeps the person feeling sated throughout the day. The way it works is that it resets your fat metabolism. In other words, you burn fat more efficiently. I have also found that I am building muscle much more easily. Mostly, I have no inflammation, sleep better and have thicker hair and eyelashes.  I am awaiting my blood sugar test results.

I’ve been using some of the recipes from The Complete Ketogenic Diet for Beginners by Amy Ramos, and have found it to be concise and easy to understand. I also like it because most of the recipes have only 4 or 5 ingredients.

Every recipe I’ve tried in this book is delicious, more importantly, simple. There’s a super helpful shopping list as well that is for two weeks.

So, if you are looking to increase your levels of HDL and lower triglycerides, lower your blood sugar and insulin response- or if you are seeking the neurological benefits of this meal plan because you have epilepsy, anxiety or depression- you want to try this.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment and recovery of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Oh, Sugar!

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-4In my practice, I spend a lot of time trying to educate my patients about food. One of the major learning curves for my patients is sugar. It is truly astounding how much sugar is in our food. I blog about this all the time. So I thought I would address the number one myth that I encounter in my practice:

“I don’t add sugar to my foods, so I am ok, right?

WRONG.

You don’t have to add the sugar, it is already there.

Most people believe that “added sugar” means the sugar you add to your iced tea or put on your cereal. The Centers for Disease Control defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as cereals, breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table.” Examples of added sugars include:
➢ Coconut sugar
➢ Brown sugar
➢ Raw sugar
➢ Corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup
➢ Malt syrup
➢ Maple syrup
➢ Pancake syrup
➢ Fructose sweetener
➢ Liquid fructose
➢ Honey
➢ Molasses
➢ Anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin

Sugar has developed a well-deserved reputation for being dangerous. In its natural form, however, it is one of the most important sources of energy we have. For humans, sugar is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and serves as the primary energy source for the brain and the cells throughout the body. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of the species of each plant. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk.

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose  is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar.”
Glucose is one of the analytics your doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about .1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low, these mental processes may be impaired. When it is too high, we end up with insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes.

Glucose From Grains
Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The one that gives us the most trouble is the glucose from grain. The majority of the glucose found in grain is called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches and as such have a higher glycemic load, a term used to describe how fast a sugar raises blood sugar levels. This is important because, gaining weight and diabetes are more about high blood sugar levels than anything else. Keep your blood sugar levels under control and your weight will be much easier to manage and you will not be at risk for Type 2 Diabetes. Contrary to popular belief, weight gain is not nearly as much about the number of calories you eat as it is about how high your glycemic load is or how high your blood sugar levels are.
Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, (beans) for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, which lowers their blood sugar level. Whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose, which makes them two of the worst foods you can eat if you are trying to keep your blood sugars levels under control and manage your weight. (Raise your hand if you thought rice was good for you.)
U.S. grown grains have been hyper-hybridized to make them cheaper to grow. They are also starchier, more addicting and more fattening because they have a very high glycemic load. Grains in Europe, on the other hand, are still fairly simple genetically, which is one of the reasons that you can eat pasta in Italy and not worry about gaining weight. That’s how pasta got the rep for being good for you. The problem is that it doesn’t hold true here in the U.S. so if you are eating home-grown pasta, you are likely raising your blood sugar levels and gaining weight.

Glucose from Fruit – Fructose
Natural fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. It is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables. In this form it is not harmful, unless your health is already compromised, in which case, you may have to limit even these foods until your blood sugar levels stabilize. In general eating fruit is better than eating most grains, especially hyper-hybridized grains, because the fruit has more water and fiber which is why it doesn’t raise blood sugar levels as much as a starchy grain might.
Sugars to Avoid

Commercially derived fructose is “made” from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn, all of which are usually genetically engineered. This is where things get sticky. Commercially derived sugars are really just chemicals that resemble sugar. Most of the sweeteners in U.S. foods are no longer sugar, but are toxic chemicals designed to delight the glutamate receptors in the brain and basically fake them out. Unfortunately, sugar is one of the most common ingredients in processed foods. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose: crystalline, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
Crystalline Fructose
This form of commercial sugar is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can also be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of chemicals to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.

Sucrose (Table Sugar)
This commercial sugar is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer, meaning it registers in the brain in a way that makes us want to eat more of anything containing it. It is used in baked goods because it dissolves easily.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
HFCS is both a food additive and a preservative made from GMO corn that is ground into a fine powder and then broken down further with a fungus and a bacterium. It lasts longer than real sugar, tastes sweeter, and most importantly, from the food manufacturer’s perspective, it is cheaper and therefore much more profitable. Most important of all though, is that it is highly addicting and almost guarantees that the consumer will be more likely to repurchase any product containing it. This gives new meaning to the term consumer loyalty. Never mind that our bodies don’t know how to digest it and it can lead to a fatty liver (see below), Type 2 Diabetes, or obesity.

Good Choices
The best sugars on the market are:
Unrefined Coconut sugar or Coconut Sugar Syrup (coconut nectar) – They both come from the coconut, have a relatively low glycemic load and taste delicious. Both can easily be used in recipes. It is light brown in color so it looks more like brown sugar. Here are some of the main benefits:

Raw Manuka Honey – Honey has many medicinal properties. But the best is the raw Manuka honey in my humble opinion. I put a teaspoon in my sleepytime tea every night with a tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar.
➢ Anti-Bacterial
Hospitals around the world have been using bandages soaked in Manuka honey on patients in order to reduce inflammation and prevent MRSA staph infection in wounds and sores. One study found that when Manuka was used to treat infected caesarean and hysterectomy wounds, it had a success rate of 85 percent.

➢ Wound Healing
Not only is Manuka anti-bacterial, but it has also been found to help wounds heal faster.

➢ Anti-Fungal
Studies have found Manuka honey to have powerful anti-fungal properties. When used in its raw, natural form, Manuka honey is a great way to treat various types of fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

➢ Gum Disease Fighter
Studies have found that Manuka fights off three different types of mouth bacteria that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. It might seem counterintuitive to rub a sugary substance on the gums, but research has found that rubbing Manuka on the gums after brushing can reduce plaque and bacteria in the mouth.

➢ Sore Throat Treatment
Manuka fights several bacteria that cause sore throats. When sore throat rears its ugly head, take a teaspoon of Manuka several times per day, swishing it in your mouth before swallowing.

➢ Acne Treatment
Studies have been done on Manuka as an acne treatment with positive results. When applied to the skin, Manuka can fight bacteria associated with acne and when taken internally, it can help fight bacteria in the intestines that may lead to skin blemishes as well as balance intestinal flora that are thrown off by antibiotics prescribed to combat acne.

➢ Sunburn Treatment
When applied to sunburned skin, Manuka can soothe the soreness and speed healing.

➢ Anti-Inflammatory
Manuka is a natural anti-inflammatory, which explains why it helps in wound healing, soothes sunburn and sore throat, and boosts the overall health of the body.

➢ Acid Reflux
Manuka honey can help with acid reflux because it coats the esophagus and intestinal tract which prevents damage from stomach acid and relieves symptoms. Manuka may also help to heal the damage already caused by acid reflux.

➢ Digestive Support
Using Manuka honey on a regular basis can prevent and treat bowel problems such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Manuka also encourages the growth of “good” bacteria in the intestines and gets rid of unwanted bacteria.

➢ Stomach Ulcer Treatment and Prevention
Research has found that Manuka honey prevents the growth of h. pylori (helicobacter pylori), the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers while maintaining good bacteria in the stomach.

➢ Energy Booster
Studies have found Manuka to be a great source of energy thanks to its healthy carbs and has also been found to improve the performance of endurance athletes. It assists the body in post-workout muscle repair and helps the body to maintain blood sugar levels during and after exercise.

Monk Fruit Sugar – Only buy it if it is without additives unless the additive is Erythritol, as Etythritol is a sugar alcohol that has a very low glycemic load. (See section on sugar alcohols below.) Monk fruit is indigenous to China and Thailand and is said to be 500 times sweeter than sugar. It’s colloquially referred to as monk fruit because it was said to have first been used by monks in China in the 13th century for medicinal purposes. Today it is thought to help in treating a cough and sore throat. The only problem I see with it, is that the hyper-sweetness makes it harder for us to appreciate natural sweetness.

So Just How Do I Cut Out All This Added Sugar?

➢ Limit processed foods as much as possible.
➢ Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
➢ Cut out artificially sweetened foods altogether. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, are the worst and have been shown to increase cravings for sugary foods and to have neurotoxic effects on the brain.
➢ Replace sugary foods with those that are naturally low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits or unsweetened cacao nibs. Jovial Foods makes a delicious ginger cookie that has a small amount of coconut sugar. Or make your own baked goods using coconut sugar, raw Manuka honey, or Xylitol sparingly as sweeteners or on hemp cereal.
➢ Avoid foods that contain any sugar made with corn, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup like the plague as these sugars are like sugar on steroids and they will make your child crave sugar all the time. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar” or “reduced sugar.” Just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
➢ Avoid processed foods that are marketed as being “low fat.” When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture. This is especially true of milk. Buy only 100% grass-fed milk.
➢ Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) fruits which also often has canola oil added as well, energy bars, apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread, etc. You can make your own versions of these foods and sweeten them naturally or find the ones that are not sweetened with harmful sweeteners. A good rule of thumb is the fewer the ingredients, the healthier the food if it is processed.

How to Eliminate Artificial Sweeteners From Your Diet
➢ Check your food labels at home and throw out everything that has in it: Aspartame, Acesulfame Potassium (K), Saccharin or Sucralose, Equal®, NutraSweet® or Splenda®
➢ Use natural sweeteners like coconut crystals, coconut nectar or organic raw honey, Monk fruit or Xylitol.
➢ Avoid products that are labeled “low calorie,” “diet,” or “sugar free,” since they all likely contain sugar additives, some of which are likely to be artificial sweeteners.
➢ Drink purified water instead of diet drinks.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

What Do You Mean “It Isn’t Really Olive Oil?”

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY (2)

If my readers know anything, they know that I am on a fake food crusade. We are all tired of buying foods that appear to be one thing, when in fact they are actually something else entirely.

Take for example, olive oil. One of the basic staples of every kitchen. My guess is you have a bottle of it in your cabinet right now. If you are like me, and love to get a good deal on a quality item, you probably have a rather large container of it in your pantry. I’m guessing your bottle says it’s 100% extra virgin olive oil, that it is imported, and possibly it has some other phrases that lead you to believe it is what it says it is.

Have you ever heard of the Agromafia? Neither had I.

Now watch this.

As if it weren’t bad enough that our food supply has GMOs everywhere, now we are being told that our olive oil isn’t really olive oil, it is diluted with other unhealthy oils, like canola or sunflower, or chemicals or deodorants (who knew?!)

The truth is that no matter what your olive oil container SAYS, there is a very strong chance it isn’t really 100% extra virgin olive oil.

How do you find it?

I’m so glad you asked.

Also, be on the lookout for certifications. If it’s from California, it should say “COOC Certified Extra Virgin.” Also recommended is the Extra Virgin Alliance (EVA) and UNAPROL, the respected Italian olive growers’ association. But if you are going to purchase an imported oil with nothing to rely on except its country of origin, both Chile and Australia are considered the safest best.

So basically, buy your EVOO from a small producer, make sure it’s that unique, luminous green color, and be prepared to spend more in order to get the real thing.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

Recipe: Meatloaf

recipe-1

So this past week I posted a photo of my latest greatest quick dinner recipe on Facebook and I received so many requests for the recipe, I decided to post it. It’s super simple, and you are going to love it. I served this meatloaf with mashed carrots with sour cream and some homemade kale chips (unbelievably delicious and crunchy!)

Here’s what you’ll need:

1 lb beef (grassfed, organic)

1 egg

1 cup mashed carrot

1 cup diced onion

1 cup bread crumbs made from dried out sourdough garlic toast

1 cup crushed tomatoes

1 tsp real salt

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp italian herbs

1 tsp bourbon smoked paprika

2-3 tbsp bbq sauce

Start by preheating oven to 350 degrees. Grease a baking dish with coconut oil.  Fork together the beef, eggs, carrots, onion, bread crumbs, crushed tomatoes, and herbs.  Make sure everything is mixed well.  Put into baking dish.

Bake at 350 for 40 minutes, then top with bbq sauce and bake for five minutes more.

Remove, slice and enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

Recipe: Cauliflower Chili

recipe

For those of you who are unaware, Cincinnati is chili country. We have strong opinions about chili in the Queen City. So I decided to try out my clean chili recipe on my unsuspecting neighbors at our block party last weekend. If I may brag for a moment, I won the “Best Chili” award!

So what set my chili apart? Cauliflower.

Yes, you read that right.  It can be used to make pizza dough, rice, and mashed “potatoes.”It is an excellent substitute and incredibly versatile. But even more than that, it is so good for you

Back to the block party. Everyone was shocked that my chili was meatless, vegan, and grain free, because it had so much flavor and such a wonderful meaty texture. When I revealed that cauliflower was the secret ingredient, everyone wanted the recipe.

Here’s what you need:

4 large carrots

1 large onion

6 cloves of garlic

2 bags of frozen rinsed cauliflower

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup organic cacao

2 tbsp organic cinnamon

1 tbsp bourbon smoked paprika

2 jars of organic basil marinara

Start by prepping your vegetables. Peel your carrots, peel your onion and pull out your cauliflower.

img_0243

Is this amazing frozen cauliflower? I love that you can get heirloom organic varieties in the frozen food section!

Give that cauliflower a really good rinse.

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

 

Next you are going to pull out your food processor and pulse the carrots, onion, garlic and frozen cauliflower. Keep it chunky. We don’t want teeny tiny bits, we want this to have that wonderful mouth feel that typical chili has.

I pulse the carrots first.

I pulse the carrots first.

img_0246

Pulse the onion and garlic. I used red onion because I had it on hand. Whatever onion you have on hand will work.

img_0244

Add the cauliflower and keep pulsing.

Then take 1/2 cup of coconut oil and heat it up in large pot. Throw in the vegetables and sauté them until they start to soften. Add cumin, salt and white pepper to taste. Add cacao, cinnamon, and bourbon smoked paprika. The vegetables should be coated in the spices.

img_0252

Your kitchen should be smelling amazing right now.

I want you to add two jars of organic basil marinara.

img_0253

This is the marinara sauce I use. You can find it at Whole Foods.

Then you are going to lower the heat way down and walk away. Let this thing cook down for an hour, maybe two and let the flavors come together. Every once in a while, check it, give it a stir, make sure it isn’t burning on the bottom.

In the end, it will look like this:

img_0254

Doesn’t this look amazing?

This recipe has minimal prep time, with maximum flavor. Make it this weekend and you’ll have lunch all week long.  Try it and tell me what you think!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-4

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

What Is An Antioxidant?

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety-2What is An Antioxidant?

Antioxidants are the nutrients found in food that neutralize free radicals by sharing an electron with the free radical, making it whole again. Thus, antioxidants stop the chain reaction of free radical formation and the oxidative stress that prematurely ages us.  As a result, antioxidants provide protection against a long list of conditions and chronic diseases.  More importantly, they keep us from aging prematurely.

Antioxidants come in several forms, including the vitamins A, C, and E, alpha lipoic acid, plant-derived polyphenols, and the element selenium. They are also found in nuts, broccoli, and colorful fruits and vegetables.  Blueberries, pomegranates, broccoli sprouts, green tea, and dark chocolate are just some of the antioxidant-rich “superfoods” found in almost any supermarket today.

The Mother of All Antioxidants: Glutathione

The mother of all antioxidants is glutathione.  Glutathione is a combination of three amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.  It is referred to as the master detoxifier because it recycles all of the other antioxidants. So, although vitamin C, E and Alpha Lipoic acid are potent antioxidants, they can become depleted.  Glutathione basically fortifies and then recycles them.  

Besides recycling other antioxidants, glutathione also defuses free radicals on its own.  The secret of glutathione’s power is the sulfur it contains. Sulfur is the sticky stuff that allows it to snatch up free radicals and other toxins in our body so that they can be excreted.  I take 2 teaspoons of organic sulfur crystals every day  to support my glutathione.  It works.  I have one patient that says if forced to choose the one thing she would take if she could only take one health aid, it would be her sulfur crystals.

You may remember reading about sulfur before on my blog.  Recall that the mother of all hormones is cholesterol sulfate and the mother of all vitamins is its metabolite, vitamin D3 sulfate. The common denominator between the big three—glutathione disulfide, cholesterol sulfate, and vitamin D3 sulfate—is sulfur.  It’s no surprise then that the longest-living and healthiest people in the world hail from places where sulfur is more abundant, such as Greece, Italy, Japan and Iceland.  Sulfur is the common denominator again and again in my research and one deserving of our attention if we want to prevent premature aging as well as disease.

It is disturbing that most of us have never heard of these three super antioxidants, given their importance in promoting overall health.  In fact, glutathione disulfide, vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate, are very poorly understood and relatively unknown to the medical community, let alone the general public.  Why is this so?  Well, probably because until very recently, pharmaceutical companies hadn’t figured out how to make a buck off of them.  You can’t take a glutathione pill, the body must produce it on its own.  Likewise, you get cholesterol and vitamin D3 sulfate from the sun, not off the shelf.  If the American public was more informed about the role of sulfur, we would be able to manage the onslaught of free radicals that we are currently subjected to on a daily basis far better and perhaps the aging process would not be accelerating as much as it is at present.

Although you can’t ingest glutathione directly, you can supplement to help your body produce more if it.  Some are saying that the ability to produce more glutathione would be like discovering the proverbial Fountain of Youth.

Getting your Glutathione Going

In order to transfer the electrons that neutralize free radicals, glutathione needs a cofactor (helper) in the form of a coenzyme called NAD+, which you can get from several different supplement companies.  Another way to support glutathione is to take organic sulfur crystals as I mentioned above.  You can purchase it online.  A good one is made by Happy Body.  

Taking melatonin is another way of supporting glutathione.  The best way to take it is in the form of organic tart cherry juice, which is loaded with Melatonin naturally.  The added benefit is that it makes you sleep better so be sure to take it at night.  All three of these strategies, organic sulfur crystals, NAD+ and melatonin, reduce free radicals.  Reducing free radicals improves skin, hearing, hair, memory, endurance, sexual function, muscle and bone health.  It would also prevent cancer, vascular disease and dementia.  Need I say more?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

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Happy #MotivationMonday!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. http://www.eatingdisorderpro.com/