Category Archives: Nutrition, Fitness, Health

What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

Is Amish chicken free range? Organic?

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken.  Look for 


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


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Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits?   Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. 

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have!  If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

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Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Digesting Animal Protein

Digesting Steak

How Are We Digesting Animal Protein?  
Our bodies use enzymes for digesting animal protein.  Anytime we ingest food, our body releases digestive enzymes to break the food down or digest the food. Because animal protein (meat) is a more complex food, our body expends a much larger amount of digestive enzymes to digest it.

The process of cooking meat destroys most of the naturally-occurring enzymes that are needed to break down meats complete proteins into amino acids that the body can utilize; the more the meat is cooked, the more naturally-occurring enzymes are destroyed. This is the main reason that a well-done steak is more difficult to digest than a rare steak.

It’s also important to note that as we get older, our bodies naturally start to produce fewer digestive enzymes. Some meats take longer to digest than others; pork takes the longest to digest, followed by beef and lamb. The longer the meat takes to digest, the more digestive enzymes are exhausted.

Protein Digestion Times

How Can We Help Our Bodies in Digesting Animal Protein?
There are several things we can do to make the digestion process of meat easier, especially when it comes to the harder-to-digest meats like pork, beef, and lamb.

There are a few foods and supplements that naturally contain digestive enzymes including fresh, raw pineapple and fresh, raw papaya. By eating these fruits as accompaniment to meat, our bodies are less likely to be depleted of its own digestive enzymes.

Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, while fresh papaya contains an enzyme called papain; both help the body to break down protein quickly. Sometimes, it may not be possible to eat fresh pineapple or papaya with your meal, especially if you are eating away from home.  In this case, there are combination bromelain and papain supplements available. Remember to always check the labels of your supplements for unwanted ingredients such as artificial sweeteners, MSG, and other neurotoxins.

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for over 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form



Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

The Key to the Ketogenic Meal Plan

Recently I discovered that my blood sugar and insulin levels were elevated. After doing some research I discovered that the underlying reason my blood sugar was elevated was that I had been taking Red Rice Yeast extract. Why? It was recommended to me as a natural alternative to taking a statin. What I failed to do while taking it, was also supplement with CoQ10. This is super important for anyone considering taking statin or taking red rice yeast extract.

Determined to lower my blood sugar level, I recently embarked on a ketogenic meal plan. Ketogenic meals are typically associated with people seeking weight loss, precisely because they lower blood sugar and insulin levels. But there are actually many reasons someone might want to try this type of eating.

graphic courtesy of www.myketokitchen.com

The great thing about a ketogenic meal plan is that it is whole food based. That means there are no processed foods when eating this way, and food sources should be the highest quality that you can afford.

While eating this way, each meal consists of 70% good fats, 20-25% protein and 5% limited and low glycemic load carbohydrates. Yes, you read that right, 70% healthy fats. The key to the ketogenic meal plan is healthy fat. At first trying to determine these percentages can be a bit daunting, but once you understand the formula and the foods that fall into the categories, it becomes easy.

So what are the good fats? These include coconut oil, avocado, grassfed butter, olive oil, avocado oil, and lard. You will also enjoy full fat cheeses, yogurts, cream cheeses and crème. You will be using these fats in cooking, as well as creating delicious sauces and dressings (hello, avocado sour cream dressing!)

For protein choices, consider the following options: grass fed beef, bacon, pastured chicken and turkey, wild caught fish- really any protein in its whole form is acceptable as long as it is not processed. Again, you are looking for organic, grass fed, wild caught, pastured proteins.

What’s a low glycemic load carbohydrate? It’s a non starchy fruit or vegetable. For fruits, think berries- strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries. For vegetables, think vegetables that grow above ground- lettuces, kale, collard greens, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchinni, mushrooms, onions, tomatoes, eggplant, artichokes, cabbage, bell pepper, fennel, bok choy. Stay away from corn,carrots, beets, and potatoes of any kind.

The goal of a ketogenic diet is keeping your body in a state of ketosis. When you are in ketosis, your body burns more fat.  There are three things that prevent you from being in ketosis. 1) You are consuming more carbohydrates than you should be. You could also be consuming starchy carbohydrates. 2) You are not eating enough fat. We are so trained to think that fat is bad for us, when in fact healthy fats are critical to our health. 3) You are not eating enough protein. Satiety, the feeling of fullness, really comes from protein being consumed with healthy fat. You will be eating much more fat than you are normally accustomed to consuming.

The hardest part for me was eating less protein, as it only makes up about 20% of the calories. I knew it would be hard to stop eating all of the fruit, as I am sort of a fruitaholic as it turns out. But cutting back on the protein was trickier than I imagined because I had to keep checking to see what has protein in it and what does not. So heavy cream has no protein and coconut milk next to none. But a steak has a lot of protein and buffalo meat has even more. Fish is a very good choice, as well as chicken.

So what does a day of eating on a ketogenic meal plan look like?

Consider the following quick and easy breakfasts: an omelette with cheese on top cooked in coconut oil; An egg baked in half an avocado with cheese or bacon melted on top; Berry green smoothie made from blueberries, sour cream, spinach, and heavy whipping cream. I also throw in some of Dr. Axe’s collagen powder or some Naked Whey protein powder, but not too much.

Have I mentioned how much I love this product? Dr. Axe’s Collagen Protein.

For lunch, a meal may be something like a bacon lettuce and tomato salad; cauliflower cheddar soup; an omelette with bacon and veggies cooked in coconut oil, crab salad stuffed avocado.

Dinner are mostly protein and vegetable. For example,  lamb with pesto zucchini noodles; turkey meatloaf made with heavy cream and fresh parsley served with creamed spinach; garlic braised short ribs served with cheesy mashed cauliflower.

And don’t forget, you should be eating 2-3 snacks a day. Some of my favorites include, homemade crispy parmesan crackers; almond butter fudge; a smoothie; desserts called fat bombs and bacon and cheese deviled eggs.

Does all this sound pretty rich? Indeed! The whole idea of ketogenic meals centers around eating healthy fats. Consuming these healthy fats with proteins is what keeps the person feeling sated throughout the day. The way it works is that it resets your fat metabolism. In other words, you burn fat more efficiently. I have also found that I am building muscle much more easily. Mostly, I have no inflammation, sleep better and have thicker hair and eyelashes.  I am awaiting my blood sugar test results.

I’ve been using some of the recipes from The Complete Ketogenic Diet for Beginners by Amy Ramos, and have found it to be concise and easy to understand. I also like it because most of the recipes have only 4 or 5 ingredients.

Every recipe I’ve tried in this book is delicious, more importantly, simple. There’s a super helpful shopping list as well that is for two weeks.

So, if you are looking to increase your levels of HDL and lower triglycerides, lower your blood sugar and insulin response- or if you are seeking the neurological benefits of this meal plan because you have epilepsy, anxiety or depression- you want to try this.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment and recovery of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Oh, Sugar!

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-4In my practice, I spend a lot of time trying to educate my patients about food. One of the major learning curves for my patients is sugar. It is truly astounding how much sugar is in our food. I blog about this all the time. So I thought I would address the number one myth that I encounter in my practice:

“I don’t add sugar to my foods, so I am ok, right?

WRONG.

You don’t have to add the sugar, it is already there.

Most people believe that “added sugar” means the sugar you add to your iced tea or put on your cereal. The Centers for Disease Control defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as cereals, breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table.” Examples of added sugars include:
➢ Coconut sugar
➢ Brown sugar
➢ Raw sugar
➢ Corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup
➢ Malt syrup
➢ Maple syrup
➢ Pancake syrup
➢ Fructose sweetener
➢ Liquid fructose
➢ Honey
➢ Molasses
➢ Anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin

Sugar has developed a well-deserved reputation for being dangerous. In its natural form, however, it is one of the most important sources of energy we have. For humans, sugar is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and serves as the primary energy source for the brain and the cells throughout the body. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of the species of each plant. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk.

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose  is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar.”
Glucose is one of the analytics your doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about .1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low, these mental processes may be impaired. When it is too high, we end up with insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes.

Glucose From Grains
Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The one that gives us the most trouble is the glucose from grain. The majority of the glucose found in grain is called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches and as such have a higher glycemic load, a term used to describe how fast a sugar raises blood sugar levels. This is important because, gaining weight and diabetes are more about high blood sugar levels than anything else. Keep your blood sugar levels under control and your weight will be much easier to manage and you will not be at risk for Type 2 Diabetes. Contrary to popular belief, weight gain is not nearly as much about the number of calories you eat as it is about how high your glycemic load is or how high your blood sugar levels are.
Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, (beans) for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, which lowers their blood sugar level. Whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose, which makes them two of the worst foods you can eat if you are trying to keep your blood sugars levels under control and manage your weight. (Raise your hand if you thought rice was good for you.)
U.S. grown grains have been hyper-hybridized to make them cheaper to grow. They are also starchier, more addicting and more fattening because they have a very high glycemic load. Grains in Europe, on the other hand, are still fairly simple genetically, which is one of the reasons that you can eat pasta in Italy and not worry about gaining weight. That’s how pasta got the rep for being good for you. The problem is that it doesn’t hold true here in the U.S. so if you are eating home-grown pasta, you are likely raising your blood sugar levels and gaining weight.

Glucose from Fruit – Fructose
Natural fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. It is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables. In this form it is not harmful, unless your health is already compromised, in which case, you may have to limit even these foods until your blood sugar levels stabilize. In general eating fruit is better than eating most grains, especially hyper-hybridized grains, because the fruit has more water and fiber which is why it doesn’t raise blood sugar levels as much as a starchy grain might.
Sugars to Avoid

Commercially derived fructose is “made” from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn, all of which are usually genetically engineered. This is where things get sticky. Commercially derived sugars are really just chemicals that resemble sugar. Most of the sweeteners in U.S. foods are no longer sugar, but are toxic chemicals designed to delight the glutamate receptors in the brain and basically fake them out. Unfortunately, sugar is one of the most common ingredients in processed foods. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose: crystalline, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
Crystalline Fructose
This form of commercial sugar is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can also be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of chemicals to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.

Sucrose (Table Sugar)
This commercial sugar is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer, meaning it registers in the brain in a way that makes us want to eat more of anything containing it. It is used in baked goods because it dissolves easily.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
HFCS is both a food additive and a preservative made from GMO corn that is ground into a fine powder and then broken down further with a fungus and a bacterium. It lasts longer than real sugar, tastes sweeter, and most importantly, from the food manufacturer’s perspective, it is cheaper and therefore much more profitable. Most important of all though, is that it is highly addicting and almost guarantees that the consumer will be more likely to repurchase any product containing it. This gives new meaning to the term consumer loyalty. Never mind that our bodies don’t know how to digest it and it can lead to a fatty liver (see below), Type 2 Diabetes, or obesity.

Good Choices
The best sugars on the market are:
Unrefined Coconut sugar or Coconut Sugar Syrup (coconut nectar) – They both come from the coconut, have a relatively low glycemic load and taste delicious. Both can easily be used in recipes. It is light brown in color so it looks more like brown sugar. Here are some of the main benefits:

Raw Manuka Honey – Honey has many medicinal properties. But the best is the raw Manuka honey in my humble opinion. I put a teaspoon in my sleepytime tea every night with a tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar.
➢ Anti-Bacterial
Hospitals around the world have been using bandages soaked in Manuka honey on patients in order to reduce inflammation and prevent MRSA staph infection in wounds and sores. One study found that when Manuka was used to treat infected caesarean and hysterectomy wounds, it had a success rate of 85 percent.

➢ Wound Healing
Not only is Manuka anti-bacterial, but it has also been found to help wounds heal faster.

➢ Anti-Fungal
Studies have found Manuka honey to have powerful anti-fungal properties. When used in its raw, natural form, Manuka honey is a great way to treat various types of fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

➢ Gum Disease Fighter
Studies have found that Manuka fights off three different types of mouth bacteria that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. It might seem counterintuitive to rub a sugary substance on the gums, but research has found that rubbing Manuka on the gums after brushing can reduce plaque and bacteria in the mouth.

➢ Sore Throat Treatment
Manuka fights several bacteria that cause sore throats. When sore throat rears its ugly head, take a teaspoon of Manuka several times per day, swishing it in your mouth before swallowing.

➢ Acne Treatment
Studies have been done on Manuka as an acne treatment with positive results. When applied to the skin, Manuka can fight bacteria associated with acne and when taken internally, it can help fight bacteria in the intestines that may lead to skin blemishes as well as balance intestinal flora that are thrown off by antibiotics prescribed to combat acne.

➢ Sunburn Treatment
When applied to sunburned skin, Manuka can soothe the soreness and speed healing.

➢ Anti-Inflammatory
Manuka is a natural anti-inflammatory, which explains why it helps in wound healing, soothes sunburn and sore throat, and boosts the overall health of the body.

➢ Acid Reflux
Manuka honey can help with acid reflux because it coats the esophagus and intestinal tract which prevents damage from stomach acid and relieves symptoms. Manuka may also help to heal the damage already caused by acid reflux.

➢ Digestive Support
Using Manuka honey on a regular basis can prevent and treat bowel problems such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Manuka also encourages the growth of “good” bacteria in the intestines and gets rid of unwanted bacteria.

➢ Stomach Ulcer Treatment and Prevention
Research has found that Manuka honey prevents the growth of h. pylori (helicobacter pylori), the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers while maintaining good bacteria in the stomach.

➢ Energy Booster
Studies have found Manuka to be a great source of energy thanks to its healthy carbs and has also been found to improve the performance of endurance athletes. It assists the body in post-workout muscle repair and helps the body to maintain blood sugar levels during and after exercise.

Monk Fruit Sugar – Only buy it if it is without additives unless the additive is Erythritol, as Etythritol is a sugar alcohol that has a very low glycemic load. (See section on sugar alcohols below.) Monk fruit is indigenous to China and Thailand and is said to be 500 times sweeter than sugar. It’s colloquially referred to as monk fruit because it was said to have first been used by monks in China in the 13th century for medicinal purposes. Today it is thought to help in treating a cough and sore throat. The only problem I see with it, is that the hyper-sweetness makes it harder for us to appreciate natural sweetness.

So Just How Do I Cut Out All This Added Sugar?

➢ Limit processed foods as much as possible.
➢ Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
➢ Cut out artificially sweetened foods altogether. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, are the worst and have been shown to increase cravings for sugary foods and to have neurotoxic effects on the brain.
➢ Replace sugary foods with those that are naturally low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits or unsweetened cacao nibs. Jovial Foods makes a delicious ginger cookie that has a small amount of coconut sugar. Or make your own baked goods using coconut sugar, raw Manuka honey, or Xylitol sparingly as sweeteners or on hemp cereal.
➢ Avoid foods that contain any sugar made with corn, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup like the plague as these sugars are like sugar on steroids and they will make your child crave sugar all the time. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar” or “reduced sugar.” Just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
➢ Avoid processed foods that are marketed as being “low fat.” When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture. This is especially true of milk. Buy only 100% grass-fed milk.
➢ Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) fruits which also often has canola oil added as well, energy bars, apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread, etc. You can make your own versions of these foods and sweeten them naturally or find the ones that are not sweetened with harmful sweeteners. A good rule of thumb is the fewer the ingredients, the healthier the food if it is processed.

How to Eliminate Artificial Sweeteners From Your Diet
➢ Check your food labels at home and throw out everything that has in it: Aspartame, Acesulfame Potassium (K), Saccharin or Sucralose, Equal®, NutraSweet® or Splenda®
➢ Use natural sweeteners like coconut crystals, coconut nectar or organic raw honey, Monk fruit or Xylitol.
➢ Avoid products that are labeled “low calorie,” “diet,” or “sugar free,” since they all likely contain sugar additives, some of which are likely to be artificial sweeteners.
➢ Drink purified water instead of diet drinks.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

What Do You Mean “It Isn’t Really Olive Oil?”

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If my readers know anything, they know that I am on a fake food crusade. We are all tired of buying foods that appear to be one thing, when in fact they are actually something else entirely.

Take for example, olive oil. One of the basic staples of every kitchen. My guess is you have a bottle of it in your cabinet right now. If you are like me, and love to get a good deal on a quality item, you probably have a rather large container of it in your pantry. I’m guessing your bottle says it’s 100% extra virgin olive oil, that it is imported, and possibly it has some other phrases that lead you to believe it is what it says it is.

Have you ever heard of the Agromafia? Neither had I.

Now watch this.

As if it weren’t bad enough that our food supply has GMOs everywhere, now we are being told that our olive oil isn’t really olive oil, it is diluted with other unhealthy oils, like canola or sunflower, or chemicals or deodorants (who knew?!)

The truth is that no matter what your olive oil container SAYS, there is a very strong chance it isn’t really 100% extra virgin olive oil.

How do you find it?

I’m so glad you asked.

Also, be on the lookout for certifications. If it’s from California, it should say “COOC Certified Extra Virgin.” Also recommended is the Extra Virgin Alliance (EVA) and UNAPROL, the respected Italian olive growers’ association. But if you are going to purchase an imported oil with nothing to rely on except its country of origin, both Chile and Australia are considered the safest best.

So basically, buy your EVOO from a small producer, make sure it’s that unique, luminous green color, and be prepared to spend more in order to get the real thing.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

Recipe: Meatloaf

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So this past week I posted a photo of my latest greatest quick dinner recipe on Facebook and I received so many requests for the recipe, I decided to post it. It’s super simple, and you are going to love it. I served this meatloaf with mashed carrots with sour cream and some homemade kale chips (unbelievably delicious and crunchy!)

Here’s what you’ll need:

1 lb beef (grassfed, organic)

1 egg

1 cup mashed carrot

1 cup diced onion

1 cup bread crumbs made from dried out sourdough garlic toast

1 cup crushed tomatoes

1 tsp real salt

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp italian herbs

1 tsp bourbon smoked paprika

2-3 tbsp bbq sauce

Start by preheating oven to 350 degrees. Grease a baking dish with coconut oil.  Fork together the beef, eggs, carrots, onion, bread crumbs, crushed tomatoes, and herbs.  Make sure everything is mixed well.  Put into baking dish.

Bake at 350 for 40 minutes, then top with bbq sauce and bake for five minutes more.

Remove, slice and enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

Recipe: Cauliflower Chili

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For those of you who are unaware, Cincinnati is chili country. We have strong opinions about chili in the Queen City. So I decided to try out my clean chili recipe on my unsuspecting neighbors at our block party last weekend. If I may brag for a moment, I won the “Best Chili” award!

So what set my chili apart? Cauliflower.

Yes, you read that right.  It can be used to make pizza dough, rice, and mashed “potatoes.”It is an excellent substitute and incredibly versatile. But even more than that, it is so good for you

Back to the block party. Everyone was shocked that my chili was meatless, vegan, and grain free, because it had so much flavor and such a wonderful meaty texture. When I revealed that cauliflower was the secret ingredient, everyone wanted the recipe.

Here’s what you need:

4 large carrots

1 large onion

6 cloves of garlic

2 bags of frozen rinsed cauliflower

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup organic cacao

2 tbsp organic cinnamon

1 tbsp bourbon smoked paprika

2 jars of organic basil marinara

Start by prepping your vegetables. Peel your carrots, peel your onion and pull out your cauliflower.

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Is this amazing frozen cauliflower? I love that you can get heirloom organic varieties in the frozen food section!

Give that cauliflower a really good rinse.

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

 

Next you are going to pull out your food processor and pulse the carrots, onion, garlic and frozen cauliflower. Keep it chunky. We don’t want teeny tiny bits, we want this to have that wonderful mouth feel that typical chili has.

I pulse the carrots first.

I pulse the carrots first.

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Pulse the onion and garlic. I used red onion because I had it on hand. Whatever onion you have on hand will work.

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Add the cauliflower and keep pulsing.

Then take 1/2 cup of coconut oil and heat it up in large pot. Throw in the vegetables and sauté them until they start to soften. Add cumin, salt and white pepper to taste. Add cacao, cinnamon, and bourbon smoked paprika. The vegetables should be coated in the spices.

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Your kitchen should be smelling amazing right now.

I want you to add two jars of organic basil marinara.

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This is the marinara sauce I use. You can find it at Whole Foods.

Then you are going to lower the heat way down and walk away. Let this thing cook down for an hour, maybe two and let the flavors come together. Every once in a while, check it, give it a stir, make sure it isn’t burning on the bottom.

In the end, it will look like this:

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Doesn’t this look amazing?

This recipe has minimal prep time, with maximum flavor. Make it this weekend and you’ll have lunch all week long.  Try it and tell me what you think!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

 

#MotivationMonday

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

What Is An Antioxidant?

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety-2What is An Antioxidant?

Antioxidants are the nutrients found in food that neutralize free radicals by sharing an electron with the free radical, making it whole again. Thus, antioxidants stop the chain reaction of free radical formation and the oxidative stress that prematurely ages us.  As a result, antioxidants provide protection against a long list of conditions and chronic diseases.  More importantly, they keep us from aging prematurely.

Antioxidants come in several forms, including the vitamins A, C, and E, alpha lipoic acid, plant-derived polyphenols, and the element selenium. They are also found in nuts, broccoli, and colorful fruits and vegetables.  Blueberries, pomegranates, broccoli sprouts, green tea, and dark chocolate are just some of the antioxidant-rich “superfoods” found in almost any supermarket today.

The Mother of All Antioxidants: Glutathione

The mother of all antioxidants is glutathione.  Glutathione is a combination of three amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.  It is referred to as the master detoxifier because it recycles all of the other antioxidants. So, although vitamin C, E and Alpha Lipoic acid are potent antioxidants, they can become depleted.  Glutathione basically fortifies and then recycles them.  

Besides recycling other antioxidants, glutathione also defuses free radicals on its own.  The secret of glutathione’s power is the sulfur it contains. Sulfur is the sticky stuff that allows it to snatch up free radicals and other toxins in our body so that they can be excreted.  I take 2 teaspoons of organic sulfur crystals every day  to support my glutathione.  It works.  I have one patient that says if forced to choose the one thing she would take if she could only take one health aid, it would be her sulfur crystals.

You may remember reading about sulfur before on my blog.  Recall that the mother of all hormones is cholesterol sulfate and the mother of all vitamins is its metabolite, vitamin D3 sulfate. The common denominator between the big three—glutathione disulfide, cholesterol sulfate, and vitamin D3 sulfate—is sulfur.  It’s no surprise then that the longest-living and healthiest people in the world hail from places where sulfur is more abundant, such as Greece, Italy, Japan and Iceland.  Sulfur is the common denominator again and again in my research and one deserving of our attention if we want to prevent premature aging as well as disease.

It is disturbing that most of us have never heard of these three super antioxidants, given their importance in promoting overall health.  In fact, glutathione disulfide, vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate, are very poorly understood and relatively unknown to the medical community, let alone the general public.  Why is this so?  Well, probably because until very recently, pharmaceutical companies hadn’t figured out how to make a buck off of them.  You can’t take a glutathione pill, the body must produce it on its own.  Likewise, you get cholesterol and vitamin D3 sulfate from the sun, not off the shelf.  If the American public was more informed about the role of sulfur, we would be able to manage the onslaught of free radicals that we are currently subjected to on a daily basis far better and perhaps the aging process would not be accelerating as much as it is at present.

Although you can’t ingest glutathione directly, you can supplement to help your body produce more if it.  Some are saying that the ability to produce more glutathione would be like discovering the proverbial Fountain of Youth.

Getting your Glutathione Going

In order to transfer the electrons that neutralize free radicals, glutathione needs a cofactor (helper) in the form of a coenzyme called NAD+, which you can get from several different supplement companies.  Another way to support glutathione is to take organic sulfur crystals as I mentioned above.  You can purchase it online.  A good one is made by Happy Body.  

Taking melatonin is another way of supporting glutathione.  The best way to take it is in the form of organic tart cherry juice, which is loaded with Melatonin naturally.  The added benefit is that it makes you sleep better so be sure to take it at night.  All three of these strategies, organic sulfur crystals, NAD+ and melatonin, reduce free radicals.  Reducing free radicals improves skin, hearing, hair, memory, endurance, sexual function, muscle and bone health.  It would also prevent cancer, vascular disease and dementia.  Need I say more?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

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Happy #MotivationMonday!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Welcome to Medicine’s Newest Lab

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For anyone trying to change his or her eating habits, going to the doctor can be discouraging. Often, efforts to reverse chronic disease using nutrition is met with skepticism, condescension and a prescription when discussed with physicians.

However, there’s good news in Cincinnati!

UC’s Institute for Integrative Health and Wellness has strengthened its partnership with our areas largest organic farm.

Medical students and other health professionals will now make regular trips to Turner Hill Farm, in Indian Hill, to a new teaching kitchen, to learn how food can be used to prevent disease. This comes on the heels of a growing movement in medicine that aims to educate patients on the importance and value of nutrition.

Dr. David Eisenberg, associate professor at the Harvard University School of Public Health, recently spoke at UC to announce the partnership and highlight the contradictions that are inherent in our health care system. Hospitals still serve notoriously unhealthy foods. Physicians are more likely to write prescriptions than discuss specific healthy eating protocols for patients.

Dr. Eisenberg encouraged students to think of the kitchen at Turner Hill as a laboratory where medical students could reflect on their own eating habits while considering and developing programs for patients.

As a clinical psychologist who works very closely with patients looking to make behavioral changes in order to reach their health goals, the news of this partnership between an organic farm and the next generation of doctors, is incredibly inspiring.  To have a major medical school both acknowledge and commit to training physicians to use organic food as the first line of defense is long overdue.

Welcome to medicine’s newest lab- the kitchen.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

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Is it #fitspo #bdd #mdd?

SPRING

Chances are you’ve probably heard about Body Dysmorphic Disorder. BDD is characterized by an obsessive preoccupation that some aspect of one’s own appearance is severely flawed. This obsession is then partnered with the compulsion of going to extreme lengths and measures to hide or fix this “flaw.” If there is a real flaw, its importance is severly exaggerated. A person suffering from BDD spends much of their day thinking, obsessing and compulsing over this real or perceived flaw.

Have you heard of Muscle Dysmorphic Disorder? Chances are, you haven’t. Muscle Dysmorphic Disorder is a subset of Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  MDD primarily affects males, often athletes, and presents as an obsessive preoccupation with a delusional or exaggerated belief that one’s own body is too small, too skinny, or insufficiently muscular. In most cases the individual’s actual build is normal or exceptionally large and muscular already.

Men suffering from MDD are obsessed about being inadquetly muscular and lean, when in fact, they are not. Their compulsion may include spending many hours in the gym, spending inordinate amounts of money on supplements, having strange eating patterns and even substance abuse.

What drives these obsessions? Are we just talking about crazy people that are too self-focused? Or has our society run amok?

If you are an Instagram user, a Facebook user- really any social media- you see #fitspo every day. Generally there is a photo of an extremely defined body part like abs, arms, or chest, along with this caption. Sometimes faces are included and sometimes they aren’t.

So what does #fitspo stand for? “Fitsporation.” In theory, #fitspo images are supposed to inspire “healthy” bodies. And maybe some of them do. But if you just googled #fitspo, you will find image after image of an exceptionally “fit” person’s body part. Image after image after image. Most of them have received many hearts!

What does it mean that we are collectively acknowledging well-developed near perfect body parts by giving them hearts? What about the people that lost 20 pounds by eating clean healthy food and engaging in a fitness routine that brought down their cholesterol but didn’t happen to end up with a six pack? Shouldn’t they receive just as much attention and adulation?

#fitspo seems to focus directly on the appearance of body parts, the size and visual perfection of the part and that seems dangerous to me. Maybe the photo should say: #8hoursadayinthegym or #Mywifeleftmebecauseofmyobsession or #Ispendallmytimeandmoneyonthis. It’s easy to see how a person’s own expectations about what is realistic could become distorted, especially when one is bombarded with these images over and over again, and they are glorified.   They may set the standard of perfection so high that the would be health seeker just gives up. Again, I am speaking directly about the images, as opposed to someone posting something like, “Just broke my personal record for dead lifting,” or #myfirsttriathalon. Both of those are based on personal fitness goals. It is important to note the difference.

So next time you are about to hashtag a photo, or are about to heart an image on Instagram, ask yourself this question:

Is it really #fitspo? Am I helping or hurting? Maybe I am encouraging #BDD or #MDD……

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

Positive Self Talk!

POSITIVE SELF TALK

Everyone could use a reminder about the power of positive self talk.

Self talk is that inner voice that helps us calm our monkey minds once the hamster wheel of anxiety or depression starts spinning.

Self talk is just a part of DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) but it can be applied in any moment to help us cope with the present emotion.

For example, it is Monday morning and you are dreading going to work.  You have a project to work on that seems like it will never be finished.  You literally cannot get your butt out of bed to get ready to leave.

Here’s how to use positive self talk. As soon as you think, “I really don’t want to go to work because I am never going to finish that project.” Tell yourself (either inside your mind or quietly) “Stop- I am. I can. I will.” You should feel a literal difference in your body- your breath, your heart rate, etc.

A good sign that you could use a little positive self talk is if you find yourself saying “always” or “never” in relationship to a negative feeling your are having. For example, “I am never going to finish this project.” That should send up a little signal that you need some positive self talk to get you through this moment. Remember, as our arousal level goes up, problem solving goes out the window. So if you want to complete the project, you have got to bring the arousal level down.

“Always” and “never” represent black and white thinking and can get us into trouble.

The best thing about positive self talk is that the more we practice it, the better we become at it. It becomes second nature to have these positive thoughts as a response to our negative ones.

Here are a few of my favorites in case you need some new positive phrases to try:

POSITIVE SELF TALK-5This is a classic. Don’t you just feel simultaneously comforted, motivated and determined? I do!

POSITIVE SELF TALK-3

Definitely feeling confident thinking this.

POSITIVE SELF TALK-4

Yes! The ultimate! For when you really need to get pumped up. “Let’s Do This!”

What’s your favorite self talk phrase? Tweet me @drrenae 

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

#letsdothis #iamicaniwill #igotthis

The One-Two Punch to Knock Out Obesity

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Typically when I meet a patient for the first time who is battling obesity, I hear two things:

  • “I have no idea why I am overweight. I hardly eat anything.”
  • “I cannot stop eating certain foods once I start.”

Why is this?

Let’s tackle the first statement. The patient is working really hard to lose weight and isn’t eating very much of anything and yet, they are still overweight. Why?

When we discuss their eating habits more in depth, I find that the foods the patient is eating are full of obesogens, unnecessary food additives, insecticides and are generally genetically engineered (GE). As a result the hormones that regulate hunger and fat storage are disturbed. One such hormone is Leptin.  Research has shown that Leptin is too high among those who are obese. In order for recovery to take place, Leptin levels must be restored to their normal level. Yet the vast majority of practitioners are unaware of Leptin and its relationship to Obesity. Food additives have been shown to damage Leptin receptors and signaling mechanisms.  This results in food addictions, food cravings, excessive appetite loss, excessive central fat storage, and food allergies that cause bloating, constipation and/or diahrea.  Disturbed Leptin levels may explain the phenomenon of yoyo dieting.

This leads me to the second statement. “I cannot stop eating certain foods once I start.”  My patients look relieved when I tell them that they are not alone in the feeling and behavior that once they start eating certain foods they literally cannot stop. I’ve never had a patient tell me that can’t stop eating apples. Or that once they start eating grapes they cannot stop. Or red peppers. This is why I advocate abstinence from processed foods. When you eat clean you allow the hormones that are a part of regulating fullness to return to a normal state.  This doesn’t happen overnight though.  For a patient who bingeings every night on potato chips, we work together to find a substitution that is satisfying but not full of addictants and obesogens. This could be non-gmo popcorn that is air popped drizzled with coconut oil and herbamare. It could be super crunchy jicama sticks drizzled with coconut oil.  Substitution is really important because if the new food it isn’t better in flavor than the processed triggering food, it won’t work. You’ll still be craving that food.

The second part of my approach consists of using Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) with patients. Once a patient is skilled in lowering their arousal level, they discover that they are no longer triggering this type of eating behavior because of they are better in control of their emotions.

You see, recovering from obesity is possible. It just requires a one-two punch.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

 

 

Mark Your Calendars!

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Hey guys, I’ve got great news! If you missed the chance to ask me a question about the holidays and eating disorders, you have another chance to ask me!

Mark your calendars for Monday December 14th at 1:30 p.m. I’ll be joining Cincinnati Edition host Mark Heyne to talk about eating disorders during the holidays. We will have time to take questions.

You can tune in online!

 

“Dr. Norton, Why Is My Hair Falling Out?”

Why is my hair falling out?

If you have Hashimotos, or any of a number of autoimmune diseases, such as Alopecia, or hyper or hypothyroidism, one of the most upsetting things that can happen is that your hair falls out.

The traditional treatment for thyroid disease is Synthroid, which is a synthetic version of T4. But it doesn’t work for everyone. Several studies have shown that a subset of patients feel and do better on a combination of T4 and T3, not just T4 (i.e., levothyroxine drugs like Synthroid).

My patients report that by adding T3, they have less depression, brain fog, and fatigue. This could be huge for those individuals that don’t feel well on their current thyroid therapies. However, even with the right combination, hair loss can still be a problem. Hair loss can be so stressful that it makes it even harder for medications and supplements to work.

What is Normal for Hair Growth?

Normally, each hair grows about a half inch a month for about three years, and then it goes into a resting period. One in ten hairs is in a resting period at any one time, and after about three months of resting a new hair pushes the old one out. When too many hairs go into a resting period at the same time, or the conversion process speeds up, hair loss occurs.

One of the things that speeds this process up is the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, or DHT. DHT is very unfriendly to the hair follicle. It attacks it and shrinks it, sometimes making it disappear entirely. Hair becomes thinner and finer, and may stop growing entirely.

The conversion of testosterone to DHT seems to speed up in some patients with hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, despite what is considered sufficient thyroid treatment.

The key when it comes to hair loss is patience. That said, being open to alternative medicine in the form of supplements is also very helpful. For example, evening primrose oil (also known as EPO) is a nutritional supplement that seems to work well. In his book, “Solved: The Riddle of Illness,” Stephen Langer, M.D. points out that the symptoms of essential fatty acid deficiency are very similar to hypothyroidism. He recommends evening primrose oil – which is an excellent source of essential fatty acids — as helpful for people with hypothyroidism and hair restoration.

Kenneth Blanchard reinforces the usefulness of evening primrose oil, “For hair loss, I routinely recommend multiple vitamins, and especially evening primrose oil. If there’s any sex pattern to it — if a woman is losing hair in partly a male pattern, like the bald spot on the back of the head – -then, the problem is that there is excessive conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone at the level of the hair follicle. Evening primrose oil inhibits that conversion. So almost anybody with hair loss probably will benefit from evening primrose oil.

As an individual with hair loss and as a practitioner that sees a lot of hair loss, I can vouch for it’s effectiveness. Again patience is a virtue, as it takes a few months to a year.

Look at Other Alternatives

In one study, Dr. Hugh Rushton, a professor at Portsmouth University, also found that 90 percent of women with thinning hair were deficient in iron and the amino acid lysine. Lysine is the most difficult amino acid to get enough of via diet.

Lysine helps transport iron, which is the most important element in the body and essential for many metabolic processes. When L-lysine and iron levels are low, the body probably switches some hair follicles off to increase levels elsewhere. Meat, fish and eggs are the only food sources of lysine. There are also supplements that contain lysine. I take L-lysine every night. It also prevents fever blisters.

Some other natural ways to deal with hair loss include:

  • Arginine (be aware that L-lysine and Arginine compete and net each other out. So take one in the morning and one in the evening to get the benefit of each)
  • Cysteine
  • Organic Green Tea
  • Polysorbate 80
  • Progesterone (in a bioidentical drop form)
  • Saw Palmetto
  • Trichosaccaride
  • Vitamin B6
  • Zinc

Did I miss a protocol that you swear has resulted in hair growth? Tweet me @DrRenae and let me know!

Fastest Dinner in the West

Okay people. You went crazy for this on Facebook, so I’m officially posting my fastest clean eating dinner in the (Mid)west.

This is wild caught red Alaskan salmon that I cooked in raw butter. (don’t cook fish in coconut oil because it turns it into fish mush. Coconut oil is wonderful when you want to tenderize something but not so wonderful for fish.)
I had it with root vegetables that I get at Costco, frozen. (They offer a fabulous variety of frozen organic vegetables at around six dollars  for a five pound bag. You can’t beat them!) I spiced it all up with my Bourbon smoked paprika blend. Yummy and I really don’t care for salmon that much, but this was scrumptious.

It can’t get any easier than this. Organic frozen veg? Wild caught fish? My dinner was ready in 30 min.

And you know I had my Q ginger ale.

wild caught salmon and roasted root veg

Go forth and eat clean, my friends.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

#MotivationMonday Stage 2- Contemplation

Contemplation

Today we are continuing my seven week #MotivationMonday series on Change.

Last week we talked about precontemplation and the role that denial plays. If you recognized the role that denial played in your attempt to change, then you may already be at the second stage of change, Contemplation.

When you are contemplating change, it means that you have acknowledged a problem. It means that you consciously recognize that a behavior or situation is not serving you. It is working against you, creating psychological and/or emotional problems.

Perhaps you find yourself thinking about why you have this problem, its roots. You may find yourself thinking that if you can just understand why you are doing something then you can change your behavior.

One of the biggest roadblocks to change at this point is fear. Many patients in my practice know where they want to be, they may even know how to get there, but they are just not ready to make the change.

Why?

Well, fear of failure is powerful. What if you make a change, and then go back to your old ways? Are you really ready? What happens when it’s four o’clock and for three days, you haven’t binged on candy and then on the fourth day you find yourself sitting in the car binging on a king size chocolate bar? I mean, if you’re just going to end up binging, why stop at all? Many folks with disordered eating use this all or nothing thinking.

But it’s difficult to even consider solutions, when we are so focused on the problem. This stage is almost like a hamster running on a wheel. Around and around we go, chasing the problem, our fear keeping us from getting off that wheel.

Now, if you are thinking about the change you’d like to make in your life, and you are not worrying about how at 4 p.m. you are usually bingeing, then you are ready to go to the next step. Maybe at 4p.m. you are considering doing some lunges, or perhaps you are considering calling a friend and actually trying to decide which friend could you call, and what would that be like. If so, congrats! You are actually at the end of the contemplation stage and transitioning to the next stage of change, Preparation, which we will discuss next week.

In the meantime-  Get Sun. Eat Clean. Be Well.
Dr. Norton

“Wanna a Coke with That?”

Coca-Cola has been in the news a lot this week. They know their days are numbered and that the end of Coke is near. Now Coca-Cola is funding scientists to spend their time performing studies that confuse consumers into thinking that soda is not a primary contributor for the epidemic rise of obesity and metabolic disorders in our country.

I think that we can agree that there is more pressure than ever before, for parents to participate in the processed food insanity in the grocery store. Between the sugar laden processed foods that we know are not good for us, and the organic processed foods that are masquerading as “healthy,” the right choice isn’t always obvious.

A huge misconception in my line of work, that I am still surprised to encounter, is that people think exercise is responsible for weight loss. Exercise really expends far fewer calories than one perceives. In the New York Times Well article this week, it was pointed out that “A 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola, for example, contains 140 calories and roughly 10 teaspoons of sugar. ‘It takes three miles of walking to offset that one can of Coke.’” That’s one can. One of those small bottles of Coke, which is roughly 2.5 servings, would have 25 teaspoons of sugar.

Now, am I saying that you don’t need to exercise? No. I’m not. Exercise really has an important place in keeping our minds and bodies healthy. There are so many health benefits to exercise, that I cannot list them all here. But exercise alone will not help people lose weight. I tell my patients that weight loss is 80% food and 20% exercise.

I think that people really underestimate just how powerful clean eating can be in battling obesity. And it’s not just obesity- autoimmune disorders and chronic disease patients also can see a remarkable turn around when clean eating is applied.

So today, I thought I’d tackle the Coca-Cola issue by sharing something that I really enjoy drinking. I want you to know that you have delicious options if you are eating clean, and you can find them in the grocery store. This beverage gives me the satisfaction of drinking soda- the fizz, the flavor, the feeling of having a treat- but I’m staying within the sugar guidelines that I have set for myself.

Eating clean isn’t about deprivation. Eating clean is about the freedom to eat as much nourishing food as you need to feel satisfied, with no processed food health hangover later in life.

Get Sun. Eat Clean. Be Well.

-Dr. Norton

Want to Lose Weight? Eat Clean and Get Some Sun!

The problem is polluted food. The solution is to avoid the polluted food. But that isn’t enough. You must also get out into the sun and find  foods rich in sulfur.

Let’s start with the clean eating.

Monsanto has changed the DNA of soybeans, corn, cotton, canola, and alfalfa by putting the insecticide DDT into it.  Bugs bite into the plant and the DDT splits their abdomens open.  It should go without saying then that DDT is not safe for human consumption.  Unfortunately though, we unknowingly consume a lot of it in this country,  through this type of DDT infused crop. You can be sure, that if you are eating a processed food, it goes without saying that it is probably from a genetically modified crop with some sort of DDT insecticide. Want to lose weight 1

Although we do not immediately suffer the same fate as the bug, we apparently do pay a price as the number of gastrointestinal disorders has increased significantly over the past twenty years in the U.S. Once DDT gets into our gut, it appears to stay there for good.

Many of patients I treat for disordered eating are driven by a tendency to eat too much processed and/or polluted food in an effort to cut back on fat. This results in gastrointestinal problems that result, such as bloating, constipation, and weight gain.

According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine regarding GE foods “…. it is clear that genetically engineered foods can pose serious risks to humans, domesticated animals, wildlife and the environment.” Although the role this problem plays in the field of eating disorders such as Anorexia, Bulimia and Binge Eating is not even on the radar of researchers, the impact that GE is having on the obesity epidemic is beginning to gain some traction.

Impact of GE Grains on Obesity and Other Eating Related Illnesses

Researcher and professor, Åshild Krogdahl, and her colleagues at the Norwegian Veterinary College, conducted a 10-year study to determine if eating genetically modified grain had any adverse effects on animals including rats, mice, fish and pigs. The work was a multi-national collaboration with researchers from Austria, Hungary, Ireland, Turkey and Australia. The results confirm the obvious:

  • According to the findings, feeding rats, mice, pigs and salmon genetically engineered feed causes obesity, along with significant changes in the digestive system and major organs, including the liver, kidneys, pancreas, genitals and more.want to lose weight 2
  • Animals fed genetically engineered Bt corn were less able to digest proteins due to alterations in the micro-structure of their intestines. This fact that “they were less able to digest proteins” has huge implications in that the biochemistry of amino acids is necessary for all life processes. It not only explains the rise in obesity, but may explain increases in many modern diseases that are currently on the rise and/or reaching epidemic proportions in the U.S. including diabetes, digestive disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, sexual dysfunction, sterility, asthma, and many more.
  • Perhaps the most important finding, from the perspective of what is and isn’t safe to eat, is the finding that the animals that ate fish that had been raised on GE grains also became obese and suffered the same gastrointestinal disturbances and immune disorders as those that werewant to lose weight 3 fed the grains directly.
  • Finally, the project did not just focus on weight gain but looked at the effects on organ changes too. Researchers found distinct changes to the intestines of animals fed GMOs compared to those fed non-GMOs. This confirms observations by other U.S. researchers. Significant changes occurred in the digestive systems of the test animals’ major organs including the liver, kidneys, pancreas, genitals and more.

The animals in this study were fed a diet of GE corn and soy, which contained toxic proteins from the bacteria Bt or Bacillus thuriengensis. As mentioned previously, Bt is an insecticide that works by killing larval insect pests which damage corn, soy, cotton, canola and other crops. By inserting and gene-stacking various Bt toxins, along with herbicide resistant gene sequences, the plants DNA is altered or genetically engineered for the specific purpose of killing the offending pests.

want to lose weight 4In essence, “The entire plant is made into a pesticide factory which is also resistant to herbicides..  Roundup, is such a product and is produced by  Monsanto…….It is the most popular herbicide used on herbicide tolerant  crops. [1]

In view of what we do know from these animal studies, there is a shocking lack of data on the effects of GE foowant to lose weight 5d on humans. There are very few studies to begin with, and as the American Academy of Environmental Medicine states,  Not a single human clinical trial on GEs has been published. A 2007 review of all published scientific literature on the “potential toxic effects/health risks of GE plants” revealed “that experimental data are very scarce” in general. The author of the review concludes his paper by asking, Where is the scientific evidence showing that GE plants/food are toxicologically safe, as purportedby the biotechnology companies?  Famed Canadian geneticist David Suzuki awant to lose weight 6nswers, “The experiments simply havent been done and we now have become the guinea pigs.”

Another researcher, Dr. David Schubert[2] agrees, “If there are problems, we will probably never know because the cause will not be traceable as many diseases take a very long time to develop.”  He postulates further,  “If GE foods caused immediate and acute symptoms, with a unique signatureperhaps then we might have a chance to trace the cause.

However, that is what happened during a US epidemic in the late 1980s with a genetically engineered brand of a food supplement, L-tryptophan. The disease was fast acting, deadly, and caused a unique and measurable change in the blood.  It still took more than four years to identify that an epidemic was occurring and what the source was. By then it had killed about 100 Americans and caused 5,000-10,000 people to fall sick or become permanently disabled.

No Data Is Data

As discussed earlier, there is almost no research being done for the express purpose of scientifically establishing the links between GE foods and the dramatic increase in the specific health problems that US citizens are experiencing in comparison to citizens in other countries where GE crops are regulated or prohibited. But what we do have to go on is the unprecedented downturn in the health of one of the wealthiest developed nations in the world and what we can predict for the future based upon studies on the effects of GE on animals. If, as the biotech and food industries would have us believe, GE is safe, why are there no studies showing this?

The Link Lack of Sun Exposure and Obesity

Our skin produces huge amounts of cholesterol sulfate, which is also water soluble and provides a healthy barrier against bacteria and other potentially disease-causing pathogens that might otherwise enter the body through the skin. Cholesterol sulfate can enter both fat cells and muscle cells with equal ease. Dr. Stephanie Seneff proposes that, because of this, cholesterol sulfate may be able to protect fat and muscle cells from glucose and oxygen damage, which is known as glycation or more commonly inflammation.

She also argues that when you’re deficient in cholesterol sulfate, your muscle and fat cells become more prone to damage, which subsequently can lead to glucose intolerance; a condition where your muscles cannot process glucose as a fuel. As a result, your fat cells have to store more fat in order to supply your muscles. The more damage, the more fat that accumulates.

Sulfur also plays an important role in glucose metabolism. She hypothesizes that if sufficient amounts of sulfur is available, it will act as a decoy to glucose, effectively diverting it to reduce the sulfur rather than glycating and causing damage. This would have the beneficial effect of reducing inflammation, as sugar (glucose) is highly inflammatory and wreaks havoc in your body.

What to Do

Dietary Sources of Sulfur

  1. Sulfur is derived almost exclusively from dietary protein, so eat fresh caught fish and organic grass-fed beef, and poultry
    1. Meat and fish are considered “complete” as they contain all the sulfur-containing amino acids you need to produce new protein. Needless to say, those who abstain from animal protein are placing themselves at far greater risk of sulfur deficiency.
  2. Coconut oil and olive oil also contain sulfur (and are ideal sources of healthful saturated fats too).
  3. Other dietary sources that contain small amounts of sulfur IF the food was grown in soil that contains adequate amounts of sulfur, include:
    1. Organic Pastured Eggs, Legumes, Garlic Onion, Brussel Sprouts, Asparagus, Kale, Wheat Germ
  1. Another reason that we gain weight is that any diet high in grains and processed foods is likely to be deficient in sulfur. It turns out that once whole foods are processed, sulfur is lost.
  2. Eating organic helps to insure that the soil is richer. Additionally, soils around the world are becoming increasingly sulfur-depleted, resulting in less sulfur-rich foods overall.
  3. Drink water, such as Fiji water, that has minerals still in it. Soft water is easier to use for cleaning, but Hard water also tends to contain more sulfur than soft water, which, according to Dr. Seneff, may be why people who drink soft water are at greater risk of developing heart disease.

In addition to making sure you’re getting high amounts of sulfur-rich foods in your diet, Dr. Seneff recommends soaking your body in magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) baths to compensate and counteract sulfur deficiency. She uses about ¼ cup in a tub of water, twice a week. It’s particularly useful if you have joint problems or arthritis.

[1]The Cornucopia Institute Obesity, Corn, GMOs July 24th, 2012 Brattleboro.com
Anthony Samsel.

[2] Dr. Schubert

Xylitol-A True Natural Sweetener

What Is Xylitol?

  1. Xylitol is a substance that is categorized as a sugar alcohol
    1. Has nothing to do with alcohol and is safe if you need to avoid alcohol
  2. Natural sweetener
    1. Small amounts found in many fruits and vegetables
    2. Humans even produce small amounts of it via normal metabolism
  3. Common ingredient in sugar free chewing gums, candies, mints, diabetes friendly foods and oral care products
  4. Xylitol has a similar sweetness as regular sugar, but contains 40% fewer calories:
    1. Table Sugar: 4 calories per gram.
    2. Xylitol:4 calories per gram.
  5. Glycemic load of xylitol is significantly less than that of sugar
    1. Will not cause weight gain
    2. Most of them do not raise blood sugar levels and therefore don’t count as “net” carbs, making them popular sweeteners in low-carb products

Health Benefits of Xylitol

  1. Numerous studies show that xylitol has powerful benefits for dental health and prevention of tooth decay.
    1. Bacteria responsible for plaque, feeds on the glucose found in food and does not like xylitol
    2. It can significantly reduce plaque and cavities
    3. Study: using xylitol-sweetened chewing gum reduced levels of the bad bacteria by 27-75%, while it had no effect on the friendly bacteria
  2. Xylitol also increases absorption of calcium in the digestive system
    1. Good for your teeth and may also protect against osteoporosis
    2. Increases production of saliva. Saliva contains calcium and phosphate, which get picked up by the teeth and aid in remineralization
    3. Reduces the acidity of saliva, which helps to fight acid-driven degradation of tooth enamel
  3. Xylitol has a very low glycemic index
    1. Doesn’t spike blood sugar or insulin.
    2. Doesn’t cause weight gain
    3. Doesn’t lead to insulin resistance like fructose does
    4. High Fructose Corn Syrup is the primary cause of diabetes today
    5. None of the harmful effects of sugar apply to xylitol
    6. In rats xylitol reduced belly fat and the symptoms of diabetes
  4. Xylitol reduces ear infections in children
    1. The mouth, ears and nose are connected and bacteria in one cavity can easily migrate to another
  5. Xylitol fights the yeast Candida albicans, reducing its ability to stick to a surface and cause infection
  6. Xylitol may increase the production of collagen
  7. Xylitol may also be protective against osteoporosis
    1. Led to increased bone volume and bone mineral content in rats
  8. Xylitol can also feed the friendly bacteria in the gut
    1. Functions kind of like soluble fiber

Side Effects of Xylitol

  1. Xylitol can be highly toxic to dogs, leading to hypoglycemia and/or liver failure
  2. Some people get digestive side effects when they consume too much
    1. Gas, Bloating, Diarrhea
    2. Introduce slowly so your body can adjust

Note: If you have Irritable Bowel Syndrome or an intolerance to FODMAPs, (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) that cause gas and bloating, then be extra careful with sugar alcohols and consider avoiding them altogether.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

In a Nutshell: What You Need to Know About Cholesterol Problems

When we think of cholesterol, we often think of it as a bad thing. The reality is we cannot survive without cholesterol. There are a number of myths when it comes to cholesterol.

Myth: LDL cholesterol is bad.

Truth: LDL cholesterol isn’t all bad.  We need a balance of HDL and LDL for optimal health. The smaller the LDL particle size the more dangerous it is. So it is important to know the type of LDL that you have. The most important thing to know about LDL cholesterol is that it is more easily damaged. This is the critical issue when it comes to blood pressure and plaque build-up.

Myth: If I have high cholesterol, taking a statin will prolong my life.

Truth: Not only do statin drugs not prolong your life, they may shorten it and/or make you more susceptible to stroke, heart attack, Alzheimer’s, cancer, diabetes, etc.

Myth: High cholesterol causes heart attacks

Truth: It may actually be a deficiency of cholesterol, in the form of cholesterol sulfate, that causes heart attacks

Myth: High cholesterol causes Alzheimer’s.

Truth: The brain needs cholesterol for proper myelination. Dementia  actually appears to be driven by glycation (inflammation brought on by too much sugar) and lack of a certain type of cholesterol called B cholesterol.

Myth: Saturated fats cause high cholesterol

Truth: Saturated fats offer protection. Sugar is the culprit along with damaged fats.

In this article, I will explain how I personally doubled the arterial flow to my heart by sitting out in the sun! It took 8 weeks to go from poor to excellent. For the doubting Tom’s, check out the before and after EndoPat results below. Note the slight decrease in blood pressure as well.  The therapeutic range for the Endopat, a test that measures the functionality of the lining of the heart and blood vessels, is as follows:

 

<1.67             High Risk

1.67-2.09     Intermediate Risk

>2.1               Healthy

 

Interpreting the scores from the Itamar company:

 

Red Zone: Score of 1.68 and lower 

You do not have proper endothelial function and this could be an important signal of an imminent cardiac problem. This EndoScore may indicate the presence of disease and that an immediate evaluation and intervention may be needed, whether it is aggressive medical therapy or a medical procedure. It’s imperative that endothelial health be restored.

 

Yellow Zone: Score between 1.69 and 2 

Your endothelium is healthy and while you don’t have any additional risk, you are still not in the well-protected Green Zone.

It’s vitally important that you now take charge of your own health and do everything you can to improve your EndoScore. Good health depends of certain lifestyle choice you make that include what you eat, how active you are, whether or not you smoke, the precautions you take to avoid injuries and accidents, and how you deal with tension and anxiety. The choice is yours. Choose health!

 

Green Zone. Score between 2.1 and 3

Your endothelium is functioning optimally, and you have maximum protection. Keep up whatever it is that you are doing, because the foods that you have been eating and the physical activity you have been performing regularly have affected a number of risk factors implicated in vascular health and longevity, particularly blood cholesterol levels, hypertension, and obesity.[1]

Notice that my initial score was 1.48 and that 8 weeks later, it was 3.04. In the words of the makers of the equipment, this was an extraordinary improvement. Read on to ee how I accomplished this in such a short period of time and with no medication

dr nortons test results 321

 

Dr Nortons  test results 2

What is Cholesterol?

 Cholesterol is an organic molecule that is critical to the structure of all animal cells. It functions within the cell to protect the cell membrane and enable the cell to change shape and move about without a wall.  This is what differentiates us from plants and bacteria as they are restricted by their cell walls.

An Aside: Did you know that humans are only 10% human cells and 90% bacteria?  So maybe it is the cholesterol that makes it possible for the human 10% to manage the bacterial 90% of the human biogenome? I find this concept strangely intriguing. Go cholesterol!

Cholesterol Does It All

  • In the brain cholesterol:
    • makes up the myelin sheath that insulates against signal loss
  • In the heart cholesterol:
    • allows heart muscle to beat
  • In the membranes of all cells cholesterol:
    • promotes cell-cell communication
    • allows cells to move, and gives them permeability
    • prevents leaks in cells
    • protects cells from pathogens (microbes)
  • In the blood cholesterol:
    • makes up part of the lipoproteins (LDL, HDL)
    • is essential for protecting contents in the blood from oxidation (free radicals) and glycation (inflammation) during transport to cells and organs
  • Cholesterol is the precursor to of all steroid hormones, beginning with Pregnenolone. These hormones regulate:
    • blood sugar – Glucocorticoids
    • mineral balance and blood pressure – mineralcorticoids
    • sex hormones – testosterone, estrogen, etc
    • Vitamin D
    • Cortisone – the stress hormone
  • Cholesterol aids in the digestion of fats

The point is that cholesterol is critical to all of our biological functions

What Are the Actual Types of Cholesterol?

Cholesterol comes in the form of lipoproteins. The lipoproteins range from largest to smallest in density compared with the surrounding water. They are different sizes, and contain different proteins, because they have different jobs, depending upon where they end up.

Classification of lipoproteins according to density from low to high: chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL, VHDL (picture courtesy of medscape.com)

Classification of lipoproteins according to density from low to high: chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL, VHDL (picture courtesy of medscape.com)

 

  • Chylomicron is the biggest particle. It is produced in the gut and directly provides the fuel from fats to many different cells. But it also delivers fats to the liver, where the fats are sorted out and redistributed into smaller particles called lipoproteins, as well as to the heart and the muscles.
  • VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) is produced in the liver and carries fat, cholesterol, fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants to cells.
  • IDL (intermediate density lipoprotein) is a bit smaller than VLDL and carries similar to VLDL goods in smaller amounts.
  • LDL (low density lipoprotein) is what is left over after VLDL has delivered most of its content to the cells. It is called “bad cholesterol“ because it is easy to attack. While traveling, it gets hit by microbes, free radicals, toxins, and glucose (or the pollutants in our food and environment). So LDL is in the most fragile container and as such, the container most likely to be damaged, especially if there is a lot of glucose (sugar) floating around. This is what causes “inflammation”.
  • oxLDL (oxycholesterol) is LDL after being attacked and oxidized. Turns out, this is really the dangerous form of cholesterol.
  • HDL (high density lipoprotein) is the smallest particle, which is very robust and reliable. It literally saves cholesterol from turning into the damaged oxLDL. It also destroys pathogens by getting the pathogen to ingest it and then from inside the cell of the pathogen, the HDL destroys it. (Amazing, right?) It deserves the reputation for being the “good cholesterol”.
  • HDL-A1 – is the form of HDL that brings good cholesterol to the liver so it can be further distributed. It is produced when the cells in the skin made up of cholesterol sulfate, are exposed to the sun.
  • B – HDL – is the form of cholesterol that goes specifically to the brain.

Apoliproteins

So if you think of the Lipoproteins as the method of travel, you can think of the apoliproteins as their navigational system. The apoliproteins guide the lipoproteins to their intended target. The fats are attached to apoliproteins (apo’s) A, B, C, and E. HDL attaches to ApoA, LDL attaches to ApoB, VLDL attaches to Apo’s B and C, and IDL attaches to ApoE.

Chylomicron Structure

ApoA, ApoB, ApoC, ApoE (apolipoproteins); T (triacylglycerol); C (cholesterol); green (phospholipids) Diagram by Xvazquez

ApoA, ApoB, ApoC, ApoE (apolipoproteins); T (triacylglycerol); C (cholesterol); green (phospholipids) Diagram by Xvazquez

The lipoproteins are transported from the intestines to adipose, cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue by the chylomicrons.  The chylomicrons are 85-92% triglycerides, 6-12% phospholipids (the parts of the cell membrane that form lipid bilayers), 1-3% cholesterol and 1-2% proteins.

Phospholipid

By Ties van Brussel / www.tiesworks.nl[1]

By Ties van Brussel / www.tiesworks.nl[2]

In a good assessment you should be able to identify the following:

Total Cholesterol

Total cholesterol is a combination of the LDL, VLDL and HDL that is circulating in your blood. The ranges below don’t mean as much any more as they used to mean as it is not the total cholesterol, but the type of cholesterol that appears to be more predictive of vascular disease.

Range:

Optimal – <200

Moderate – 200-239

High        – > 240

HDL – High Density Lipoproteins

HDL is the one that scavenges around in the blood basically looking for damaged LDL cholesterol to remove. The higher your HDL level, the lower your risk for heart disease. Low levels increase the risk. 

Range:

Optimal – >60

At Risk  –  <40

It appears that the total number of HDL particles is not as important as the size. In other words, the larger the HDL particles, the more protection they offer. (This is the same relationship that we see in the LDL particles, in that the larger they are the less damage they cause. [3])

The ratio of large HDL to total HDL is measured using NMR spectroscopy methods. Five subfractions of HDL have been identified, from largest (and most protective) to smallest (and least protective). The types are: 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b and 3c. [4] This information is probably more important for research purposes given that none of the HDL is “bad”.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides store energy for future use. They are a type of fat (lipid) made from any calories the body doesn’t need to use right away after eating. So when we eat more than we need in one sitting, the body converts the excess into triglycerides, which are stored in the fat cells for later energy.  This is meant to be a temporary arrangement, the assumption being that when we need energy between meals, certain hormones will release triglycerides and supply the needed energy between meals.

If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, especially “poluted” calories like simple or processed carbohydrates and unhealthy fats, you may end up with high triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia).

Triglycerides are a much better indicator that we are eating too much of the wrong foods than total cholesterol. Very simply, triglycerides tell us that we are taking in more than we are burning off.

TIP: This is a strong argument for eating 5 or 6 times during the day, as in 3 smaller meals and 2 or 3 snacks, instead of 1 or 2 big meals. It is also a strong argument for getting enough exercise to burn off excess calories on a regular basis.

Cholesterol, on the other hand, is used to build cells and generate hormones. As long as we don’t damage the cholesterol through glycation (too much sugar) or oxidation (free radicals) and we have the help we need from the sun (see below) to properly utilize the cholesterol, we don’t have to worry about how much cholesterol we have on board.

Triglyceride Range:

Optimal         –           <150

Moderate     –           150-199

High               –           >200

LDL – Low Density Lipoptoteins

LDL is called “bad” cholesterol because it is easily damaged, which drives the body to form plaque in an attempt to fix it. Plaque build-up in the arteries can reduce blood flow and increase your risk of heart disease.

Photo Credit: //www.flickr.com/photos/42045498@N05/

Photo Credit: //www.flickr.com/photos/42045498@N05/

Traditionally, the ranges have been as follows:

 Range:

Optimal      –             <100

Moderate  –             100-129

At Risk        –              >129

However, this is an overly simplistic view. As mentioned above, there are actually 3 types of LDL, very small/small (VLDL), medium, and large diameter low-density particles. It turns out that the higher the number of very small and small LDL’s you have, the more at risk you are for atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries.)  This is because the smaller particles have a better chance of embedding themselves into the lining of the arteries and becoming plaque. The medium and large particles are fluffy and don’t stick.

In a Nutshell: For LDL and for HDL larger particles are better. For LDL, fewer particles (lower total LDL) is better, for HDL, more particles (higher HDL) is better.

Ranges:                                          Optimal      Moderate    Poor

LDL Particle Number        <1260         1260-1538   >1538

LDL Small                             <162              162-217        >217

LDL Medium                       <201             201-271        >271

HDL Large                            >9386         6996-9386   <6996

Researchers have identified two patterns of LDL, Pattern A and Pattern B. Pattern B, in which the size and density is smaller, equates to a higher risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) than does a pattern with more of the larger and less-dense LDL particles (Pattern A). As mentioned earlier, the smaller the particle, the easier it is to break through the cell wall, which is how plaque begins.

The test used to measure these subtypes is expensive and I would not recommend having it done unless you find that your LDL is high. At that point, knowing the particle size and the pattern is very important in terms of knowing what to do next.

Risk Category Ranges     

 Optimal                                    Moderate                                  High

          A                                             N/A                                           B

> 222.5                                         218.2 – 222.5                             <218.2

Another interesting relationship is that there is a correlation between higher triglyceride levels and higher levels of the smaller, dense, more “sticky” LDL particles.  Conversely lower triglyceride levels are correlated with higher levels of the larger, less dense, more “buoyant” LDL particles.[5]

Mercola Cholesterol

New theories about it’s role suggest that it is not TOO MUCH CHOLESTEROL, BUT NOT ENOUGH OF THE RIGHT CHOLESTEROL THAT CAUSES HEART DISEASE, CEREBRAL VASCULAR DISEASE AND DISEASES LIKE ALZHEIMER’s. Amyloid beta in the brain, and plaque in the arteries, appear to be adaptive responses resulting from a lack of sufficient levels of a form of cholesterol called cholesterol sulfate.

Cholesterol Sulfate

Perhaps the most critical form of cholesterol is one I had never heard of, and one, which has not received nearly enough attention, given the role it plays in heart disease and in our overall health. I am referring to cholesterol sulfate, a form of cholesterol made in the skin when it is exposed to the sun. It is needed in order for the heart to beat and it is also an integral part of neural transmission in the brain. That does seem pretty important: needed for the heart to beat and for the brain to work! Without these two functions we are either brain-dead or dead all over.

According to Dr. Stephanie Seneff[6], cholesterol sulfate supplies oxygen, sulfur, cholesterol, energy and negative charge to our tissues. As I mentioned earlier, it is cholesterol that separates us from plants and bacteria because our cells can communicate whereas nonhuman cells are unable to perform this function. But to do this, there has to be a membrane and it is cholesterol that allows the membrane to do its job.

Throughout the book we have talked about Leaky Gut, or the hyper-permeability of the gut. Cholesterol defines the permeability (fluidity) of  the body’s membranes. All of them. In this sense, you could say that cholesterol determines gut permeability, skin permeability and the integrity of any other barrier. It is the glue that holds us together. To summarize:

  • Cholesterol is the chief substance in the myelin sheath that insulates the nervous system so there are no short circuits. It is directly related to thinking learning and remembering
  • Cholesterol is key for digestion – it is a precursor to bile acids, which are needed for mixing fats and water together.
  • Cholesterol is the mother of all steroid hormones, including glucocorticosteroids, mineralocorticoids and sex hormones.
  • Cholesterol helps in managing blood sugar, blood pressure, mineral balance and everything steroid hormones do.
  • Cholesterol is a powerful protector against invaders – bacteria, protozoa, fungi, worms, viruses etc. It does this by first by creating a shield in the skin, in the gut, and in membranes. Second as a part of a trojan horse system known as HDL (high density lipoprotein ), and third as an antioxidant.
  • Cholesterol handles glucose by creating a system that prevents glycation, or the damaging of proteins.

A Perfect Design

So cholesterol is what we need to move, think and live. Getting it where it needs to be, or transporting it, is vitally important. How is it going to navigate through the body, which is 70% water, when it is not water soluble?

Since cholesterol is a fat, it has to have fats to transport it.  Unless it has a sulfate.  Attaching sulfate to cholesterol creates a molecule, which is both water and fat-soluble. The addition of sulfur allows cholesterol to travel with virtually no barriers. Once it gets inside the cell, it splits – cholesterol goes to do its magic in the membranes and sulfate goes to the cytoplasm.

But all of this magic depends upon getting enough cholesterol sulfate. Without the sulfate, cholesterol has to hitch a ride with a fat. The easiest fat is the one that is damaged, or LDL cholesterol. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t just the amount of LDL, but the quality of LDL, that causes plaque build-up.

To summarize, when it comes to vascular disease, cholesterol sulfate solves the problem of getting cholesterol to all the places it needs to be without raising the LDL (bad) cholesterol.

How Do We Obtain Cholesterol Sulfate?

To really understand how this works, you have to understand the connection between cholesterol, sulfur, and vitamin D from sun exposure. We call vitamin D a vitamin because we can’t produce it on our own. It is actually a type of hormone. We need sunshine in order to activate vitamin D, which is produced in the skin when it is exposed to sunshine. We also cannot produce cholesterol sulfate without the sun. In fact, they are produced together.

The process is as follows:

  1. The skin gets sulfur dioxide from the air and converts it into sulfate
  2. The sulfate converts energy into cholesterol sulfate when the skin is exposed to the sun
  3. The cholesterol sulfate eventually gets oxidized as a means of protecting us from UVB radiation. It then transforms into vitamin D3 sulfate.

 

Vitamin D3 is considered a steroid, as it carries numerous messages and even manages gene expression and cellular behavior. Once it is formed, it is transported to the liver. From there it is transported to the kidneys where it is activated. At this point it is in the form of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Vitamin D can also be activated in the immune system, prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and skin cells.

Ah Ha! So maybe this is why vitamin D deficiency appears to be involved in so many of the diseases that are currently on the rise, many of which are affecting these organs and systems!

Although the kidneys activate and release vitamin D into the bloodstream, the rest of the cells in the body can also activate vitamin D. Apparently each cell in the body regulates it’s own sunshine, activating it and discarding it as needed, while the bloodstream keeps a base level of inactivated vitamin D on hand at all times. The designer of this system covered all the bases. Truly amazing. Pure genius…..

The implications for testing vitamin D levels are that you should not test for activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D). The better test is the circulating inactive form of 25 hydroxy D. So when you test, order serum 25 (OH) D in case your doctor doesn’t know what to do.

Vitamin 25 hydroxy D Range:

Maximum level:    100 ng/ml (toxic above 150 ng/ml)

Optimal:                   50 to 70 ng/ml

Deficient:                 less than 50 ng/ml

 

What is the Difference Between Vitamin D3 Sulfate and Vitamin D3.  

There is a world of difference relative to cholesterol levels. Vitamin D3 sulfate, which is created in the skin upon exposure to the sun is a sophisticated water soluble and fat soluble traveler, meaning that it doesn’t need the transportation services of the LDL container. The non-sulfated Vitamin D3 version coming from a supplement or food has to use LDL cholesterol. Remember we said that plaque develops when the body is forced to get cholesterol sulfate from LDL cholesterol.

This explains so many things for me as well as for many of patients. For example, I supplemented for years with mega doses of vitamin D3. At first, my D levels went up, but I believe that eventually the system down-regulated, as they eventually dropped and would not budge. The reason I started supplementing in the first place was that my vitamin D levels suddenly started going down. What I realize now is that I had also stopped getting sunshine at the insistence of a somewhat controlling though loving close friend. This is when they started declining.

As one might expect given all of the above, I also saw my LDL cholesterol slowly rise for the first time in my life. A recent Endopat showed the beginning of plaque despite my pristinely clean eating, great triglycerides, fantastic HDLs and perfect blood pressure. I am now a very moderate sun worshiper again and will repeat the Endopat with the expectation of significant improvement. (It was my doctor’s suggestion that I consider a statin that prompted the research for this article.)

Another significant distinction of vitamin D sulfate is that it does not participate in calcium metabolism until after it unloads its sulfate. In other words, sulfation happens first when sulfate connects to cholesterol and then it converts to cholecalciferol ( Vitamin D3 ). This means that none of the supplemental D3 will get sulfated! Maybe that’s why it doesn’t work to supplement with vitamin D3, other than to raise vitamin D levels. It may have no effect on the disorders associated with vitamin D deficiency according to research in which it was administered to individuals with medical conditions associated with low vitamin D[7]. This actually may be giving people a false sense of security.

What is the difference between D2 and D3?

Vitamin D2 is the plant form and it works in a way that is similar to that of D3 with respect of calcium metabolism, as it cannot be sulfated either. D2 is what they use to “fortify’ the milk from which they removed the natural vitamin D. If you drink raw grass-fed milk you can get vitamin D3 sulfate naturally.  This appears to be the only food source.

But with complete disrespect to mother nature, we ruin the raw milk by pasteurizing it, killing the vitamin D3 sulfate. Then adding insult to injury we add fake vitamin D. Not only does the synthetic version not help, it actually  seems to confuse the vitamin D receptors (VDR)  which prevents us from absorbing vitamin D3 sulfate when it is available! This is consistent with the some of the observations of Trevor Marshall, in which he points out that supplementing with vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 down-regulates and interferes with the VDR receptor. Unfortunately, he loses me after that as he recommends avoiding all sources of vitamin D, including the sun.

The Solution

To cut to the chase, you can protect yourself from cerebral and cardio vascular disease, as well as many other illnesses, by spending a half-hour in the sun (or a few minutes with a UVB sunlamp) several times a week. It’s that simple.

We get cholesterol sulfate when the skin is exposed to sunlight, or a UVB light. Recall that vitamin D is not really a vitamin but a hormone that has become deficient in most Americans. Not coincidentally, for the past 25 years, people have avoided the sun like the plague, ergo less sun, less cholesterol sulfate, less vitamin D3 sulfate and more chronic illness. The chart below shows the % of increase in illnesses on the rise over the past decade. This time period coincides with the removal of the good fat and supplementation of the fake vitamin D in dairy foods.

Health Problems that have increased – The percentage of people with low vitamin D3 has also DOUBLED in a decade. % increase over  past 10 years
Diabetes 66 %
Overweight kids 150 %
Parkinson’s 110 %
Thyroid Cancer 80 %
Breast Cancer 110 %
Tuberculosis 100 %
Multiple Sclerosis 70 %
Autism 250 %
Ulcerative Colitis 210 %
Concussions 80 %
Traumatic Brain Injury 170 %
Pulminary Hypertension 88 %
Alzheimer’s 48 %
Hospitalizations – Food Allergy 260 %
C-Section 40 %
Peanut Allergy 40 %
ALS deaths 60 %
Knee injury (teen) 400 %
Chronic Disease in Children 70 %
Metabolic Syndrome 250 %
Bipolar Disorder – youth 4,400 %
Celliac 100 %
ADHD (LA schools) 230 %
Rickets-(UK 600 %) 500 %
IBD 200 %
Lyme Disease 300 %
Clostridium difficile (age > 85) 400 %
Sleep Apnea 200 %

Looking at it another way, Michael F. Holick, Ph. D., M.D.[8] points out that optimizing vitamin D levels to 50 ng/ml will lead to significant health benefits and disease prevention as follows:

  • Rickets, reduced by 100%
  • Osteomalacia, reduced by 100%
  • Cancers, all combined, reduced by 75%
  • Breast Cancer, reduced by 50%
  • Ovarian Cancer, reduced by 25%
  • Colon Cancer, reduced by 67%
  • Non-Hodgkins, reduced by 30%
  • Kidney Cancer, reduced by 67%
  • Endometrial Cancer, reduced by 35%
  • Type 1 Diabetes, reduced by 80%
  • Type 2 Diabetes, reduced by 50%
  • Fractures, all combined, reduced by 50%
  • Falls, women reduced by 72%
  • Multiple Sclerosis, reduced by 50%
  • Heart Attack, men, reduced by 50%
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease, reduced by 80%
  • preeclampsia reduced by 50%
  • Cesarean Section, reduced by 75%

What if all of the problems associated with Vitamin D3 deficiency are actually caused by a cholesterol sulfate deficiency? Whether or not this is the actual problem the solution is the same: Get exposure to the sun for a sufficient amount of time to activate cholesterol sulfate without damaging the skin. (It is just as effective to use a UVB  lamp for a few minutes.)

The Role of Cholesterol Sulfate in Plaque Formation

Throughout the book, we have talked about the role that damaged or polluted foods play in the declining health of Americans. It turns out that the lack of cholesterol sulfate combined with the body’s attempt to manage the damage from microbes, free radicals, toxins, and excess glucose may be what actually causes plaque to build up in the arteries, not an excess of cholesterol or the foods that contain cholesterol.

According to Dr. Stephanie Seneff, Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the plaque is an attempt by the immune system to save damaged lipoproteins, refurbish them and send them to the heart. Remember, the heart does not beat without cholesterol sulfate.

HDL has been dubbed the good guy because it brings cholesterol back to the liver. But according to Dr. Seneff, the real reason that HDL is so good for us is that it delivers cholesterol sulfate to the heart. And as long as there is enough sulfate in the system, HDL’s will turn the cholesterol into cholesterol sulfate.

But what happens when there is not enough cholesterol sulfate? When it is not available, the body employs another mechanism to increase it. By taking damaged LDL, and turning it into plaque, the beneficial HDL cholesterol can be separated out through a process involving homocysteine, since homocysteine is a source of sulfate. Thus the cholesterol sulfate needed by the heart and brain is made available. However, there is a side effect for this cure: homocysteine oxidizes cholesterol and the process itself causes plaque to build up over time.

Why does this happen? It’s kind of like leaky gut. When blood becomes deficient in sulfates, it loses its negative charge. The negative charge is important because it keeps cells in suspension. Without the negative charge, the sticky protective part of the cell, called the glycocalyx, becomes more permeable, and gaps develop that allow blood to seep into tissues. Blood clots form to plug the holes. Eventually, however, the clots block the artery and lead to cerebral and coronary vascular disease.

Statins to the Rescue, Right? Wrong!

Conventional medicine dictates the use of Statins to lower LDL cholesterol. Indeed, statins are the number 1 prescribed medicine in the U.S. But the chart below demonstrates what has happened since people started taking statins.

Congestive Heart Failure Rate Is Rising

statin chart

Clearly statins are not working. There is actually no research that shows statins prolong life. What they do is lower LDL cholesterol. In the short term, they can even prevent minor heart attacks. Over time, however, they deplete the heart muscle, brain, liver, and joints of needed cholesterol. What does work is more sulfur in the blood. The only individuals who should consider statins are those with a genetic predisposition to high HDL who do not produce cholesterol sulfate.

Let the Sun Shine

This is such an elegant and simple solution, just get more sun.

According to Dr. Seneff, there is “a complete inverse relationship between sunlight and cardiovascular disease – the more sunlight, the less cardiovascular disease.”  In a study involving 16,500 people, researchers looked at weather statistics and found a 60% increased risk of stroke for those with the lowest sun exposure.[9] In another study, 38,472 women selected in 1991-1992, aged 30-49 were monitored for 15 years. Looking at the frequency of sunbathing vacations and sunburn, the researchers found that increased sunburn frequency was associated with reduced all-cause mortality! Sunbathing vacations more than once a year also reduced risk to cardiovascular disease and mortality. [10]   Interestingly, this corresponds with the 30-fold increase in the use of sunscreen over the same time period. [11]

Food Sources of Sulfur

It turns out that the foods highest in cholesterol are often highest in sulfur. What a coincidence! I have said it once, and I will say it again. We are designed perfectly, if only we could resist the urge to improve upon the design.  (Of course, many of these so-called “improvements” are driven by the desire to take short cuts, while many others are driven by pure greed.)

All animal proteins contain plenty of methionine and cysteine, which are the two sulfur-containing amino acids. The best sources are:

  • Pastured organic eggs
  • Liver from grass-fed beef
  • Wild caught fish & shellfish
  • Inner organs of grass-fed animals

 

As mentioned earlier, the only food that contains cholesterol sulfate naturally, is raw milk. The only sulfonated amino acid is taurine.  Fish and shellfish contain the most taurine, which the body uses extensively in times of stress and intoxication. It stores huge amounts of taurine in the heart, the brain and the liver. (If you are a vegan, your best choice is garlic, onion, cabbage and sauerkraut. But you are still not getting the badly needed cholesterol and the CLA – conjugated linoleic acid.)

My favorite source of sulfur is of course bone broth. When the bones simmer for days the way I make bone broth, it is rich in various forms of sulfate, including chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate. And it tastes so much better than a vitamin supplement!

But one of my favorite ways of getting sulfate is being in the sun for a few minutes every day. How much sun you get depends upon many factors: skin color (genetics), time of day, and where you are in relation to the equator. If you are light- complexioned, especially if you are fair, less is more. Stay in the sun only enough for your skin to turn pink. If you are dark skinned, higher levels of melanin protect you better from skin damage. However, you may have to spend more time in the sun to convert the necessary vitamin D into cholesterol sulfate.

Another Ah ha: We all started out at the equator and had dark skin. The farther away we got from the equator, the lighter our skin became and the less melanin we needed to protect against UVB. Today, in the U.S. people of color have significantly higher rates of cancer (although the rates dropped for cancer in 2013 among African Americans) and heart disease.

“In a startling 2009 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that African-Americans have a much higher incidence of heart failure than other races, and it develops at younger ages. Before age 50, African-Americans’ heart failure rate is 20 times higher than that of whites, according to the study. Four risk factors are the strongest predictors of heart failure: high blood pressure (also called hypertension), chronic kidney disease, being overweight, and having low levels of HDL, the “good” cholesterol. Three-fourths of African-Americans who develop heart failure have high blood pressure by age 40.”[12]

When it comes to cancer, the picture is not much better.

“Despite……. declines….. death rates for all cancers combined remain 33% higher in black men and 16% higher in black women, compared to white men and women. African American men also have higher death rates for most of the major cancer sites (including lung, prostate, colon/rectum, liver, pancreas, and others). Notably, the higher overall cancer death rate in African American women compared to white women occurs despite lower incidence rates for all cancers combined and for breast and lung cancer.

Given the role that the sun plays, it may be even more important for the person of color to be in the sun, given that their skin naturally “screens” out the UVB rays. I cannot find good information on how much sun we should get other than that it varies for each of us and a general rule of thumb is enough for the skin to become “pink”. Obviously this will not be very helpful for the person of color. “Darkening” or checking for a ”tan” line might be a better indicator, but even those don’t sound right.

In general, too much sun ages the skin and burning can cause skin cancer. So proceed cautiously regardless of the color of your skin. Start slow and increase the amount of sun you get slowly over time. But get sun! In the meantime, monitor your vitamin D3 sulfate levels to be sure that sun exposure is working.

Another way to get limited amounts of sulfer through the skin is to use Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate). I use it frequently as an ex-foliant, after sitting in front of my near-infrared sauna or my UVB lamp. (The sauna fights gut bacteria and the UVB provides D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate.) Be careful with the Epsom salts, as you can over do it and end up drying out your skin.

Dr. Ron’s Ultra Pure makes an MSM line of body products including shampoos and conditioners that are awesome and a good source of sulfate. I use his MSM toner all over my body before putting on an organic body lotion from Intelligent Nutrients.

Glyphosate  

Throughout the book, we have talked about the dangers of foods that are not organic. One of the most dangerous herbicides is glyphosate—which is used on most conventional and genetically engineered food crops.  There is a great deal of data on the dangers of glyphosate. But according to Dr. Stenanie Seneff,  glyphosate is also a major problem  because it interferes with the enzymes responsible for activating vitamin D in the  liver and kidneys. She explains: “Glyphosate disrupts cytochrome p450 enzymes, which activate vitamin D. In addition, according to Dr. Seneff, the formation of cholesterol sulfate is also disrupted by glyphosate.

Without getting too technical, if you ingest too much glyphosate the red blood cells fall apart because they have lost their cholesterol sulfate. Remember, we said that cholesterol sulfate basically holds our cells together. The mechanism is called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which means that the red blood cells coagulate your blood because they have lost their form and function.

Solution: Eat Clean, Go Organic!

Homocysteine

High homocysteine levels is another phenomenon that is seldom discussed, but one that has been implicated in coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease and more. It is another example of a protective mechanism gone awry and it is becoming increasingly common.

Given the amount of damage that it does, it is surprising that it is rarely a topic of discussion. There is a very good reason: there is no medication that lowers homocysteine levels.  Consequently, the drug companies are not interested in educating the public of it’s dangers as they will not profit from doing so. We are left to our own devices on this one, which is probably a good thing.

Homocysteine Level Health Status
Below 6 units 10 percent of populationExtremely low risk for disease
6 to 8.9 units 35 percent of populationLow risk for disease, could be better
9 to 11.9 units 20 percent of populationSignificant risk for premature death from degenerative diseases
12 to 14.9 units 20 percent of populationHigh risk for premature death from degenerative diseases
15 to 19.9 units 10 percent of populationExtremely high risk category, at risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, cancer, or Alzheimer’s disease in the next ten to thirty years
Greater than 20 units Extremely high risk, right now, of heart attack and stroke.

Lowering Your Homocysteine Levels

There are several important supplements that can lower your homocysteine levels:

  • Folate
  • B2
  • B12
  • B6
  • Zinc
  • Trimethyglycine or TMG

It is also important to eat the following:

  1. Healthy fats like coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter, and olive oil
  2. Organic vegetables, especially dark green leafy vegetables – 50% of your diet if possible
  3. High quality protein – organic eggs, wild caught fish, grass-fed red meat, pastured pork, nuts and seeds in moderate amounts (1/2 cup per day)

Sound familiar?

Cut way back on:

  • Caffeinated drinks
  • Alcohol
  • Processed foods
  • Salt (use sea salt)
  • Sugar (consider Xylitol)

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Something that a lot of people are not aware of is that the liver turns fructose into fat. The live’s job is to make cholesterol. This is a complex process involving some 25 to 30-steps. When it has to stop to turn the fructose into fat, it severely hampers its ability to make cholesterol. This is an important issue in view of the excessive amount of HFCS consumed in the U.S.

There are two things you can do: First, avoid processed foods, which are loaded with HFCS; Second, substitute Xylitol as a sweetener. It has many health benefits and a low glycemic load.

Summary

To review: It is the microbes, toxins, free radicals, and high levels of glucose that damage the LDL, along with high levels of homocysteine that damage the arteries, and herbicides like Glyphosate that block vitamin D3 and cholesterol sulfate from activating, combined with a lack of cholesterol sulfate, and lack of vitamin D3 sulfate that leads to illness, especially vascular disease.

In a nutshell: The alleged benefits of vitamin D3 sulfate are also benefits of cholesterol sulfate, i.e. protection against cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and improved immune function.

To stay healthy: Get plenty of dietary sulfur, get regulated sun exposure, eat good fats, reduce your homocysteine levels by supplementing and avoiding foods that raise homocysteine levels, avoid herbicides like glyphosate by eating clean, and get plenty of rest.

[1] (6) Bonetti PO, Pumper GM, Higano ST, Holmes DR Jr., Kuvin JT,‫ Lerman A. Noninvasive Identification of Patients with Early Atherosclerosis by Assessment of Digital ReactiveHyperemia. 44: 2137-2141

[2] The copyright holder of this work allows anyone to use it for any purpose including unrestricted redistribution, commercial use, and modification.

[3] //www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35058896/ns/health-heart_health/t/bad-cholesterol-its-not-what-you-think/#.T4Gkub_Owrg

[4] “Small LDL and its clinical importance as a new CAD risk factor: a female case study”. Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing 17 (4): 167–73

[5] Warnick GR, Knopp RH, Fitzpatrick V, Branson L (January 1990). “Estimating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by the Friedewald equation is adequate for classifying patients on the basis of nationally recommended cutpoints”. Clinical Chemistry 36 (1): 15–9. PMID

[6] Seneff, S., Davidson, R., and Mascitelli, L. (2012). Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Medical Hypotheses, 8, 213-217.

[7]In studies where vitamin D was given as an intervention (treatment) to help prevent a particular ailment, it had no effect. The one exception was a decreased death risk in older adults, particularly older women, who were given vitamin D supplements. Gordon, S. (2013). Vitamin D supplements won’t help prevent disease: Review. Health Day. Retrieved from //consumer.healthday.com/

[8] Holick, M.F. (2010). The Vitamin D solution: A 3-step strategy to cure our most common health problems. New York: Hudson Street Press.

[9] Mozes,A. (2012). Health Day. RSS Feed.

[10] Yang et al. (2011). Ultraviolet exposure and mortality among women in Sweden. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 20(4):683-690.

[11] Schneider, A. (2010).  Study: many sunscreens may be accelerating cancer. Aol News. Retrieved from //www.aolnews.com/2010/05/24/study-many-sunscreens-may-be-accelerating-cancer

[12] DeSantis, C. (2013). Cancer statistics about African Americans released. American Cancer Society. Retrieved from //www.cancer.org/cancer/news/expertvoices/post/2013/02/04/cancer-statistics-about-african-americans-released.aspx

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. J Renae Norton
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Cold Pressed Coconut Oil-How It’s Made

Coconut Oil has many uses and benefits. Whether you use it to cook with or in skin care products, you won’t go wrong! For a full list of benefits and ways to use coconut oil visit //www.making-healthy-choices.com. Watch the video below to see how cold pressed coconut oil is made!

How Cold Pressed Coconut Oil Is Made

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com.

Canola Oil-How It’s Made

How can an oil be organic and still be so dangerous? Below is an interesting video on canola oil and how it’s made. Did you know the FDA identified it as a pesticide?

How Canola Oil Is Made

 

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-212-8799 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com.

Food Pollution and the Role It Plays In Our Health

Presentation3

Food Pollution is very serious and is not a topic we should take lightly. Click on the links below to learn how the pollution in our food plays a role in eating disorders, obesity, premature aging, and escalating mortality rates in the U.S.

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD POLLUTION

WELLNESS PRESENTATION OBESITY

WELLNESS PRESENTATION DISEASES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION EATING DISORDERS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION THE CAUSE

WELLNESS PRESENTATION GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOODS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION MSG AND OTHER ADDITIVES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD ADDICTION

 

About Dr. Renae Norton

A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //www.EatingDisorderPro.com

Half The Time, Double The Benefits

While fitness is about 80% nutrition and 20% exercise, we cannot forget that 20%. It is important to complement good eating habits with good exercise habits as well, in order to strengthen muscles, bones, anaerobic and aerobic systems.  For a long time, running has been a “go-to” for people attempting to lose weight and “get in shape.”  It burns a good amount of calories. But as you get more accustomed to it, the natural inclination is to add time to the run in order to continue reaping the benefits. The question is: Are we maximizing our efficiency AND GETTING THE HEALTH BENEFITS WE WANT?  If we are, you have to wonder why there so many runners, even marathoners, who are overweight?

Trying to choose the best exercise is difficult, because everybody has a different theory. But there are some exercises that are more beneficial than others according the most recent information from exercise physiologists.  Most experts agree that sticking to it, even if you do not spend hours working out, is the best thing you can do.  In fact, contrary to the myth that the longer your workout the better it is for you, researchers today are saying the opposite. According to Timothy Church, M.D. at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA, “The majority of…the benefits from exercising are due to the first 30 minutes of exercise” (Reynolds).  In other word, the easier it is for you to stick with it, the better it is for you.

Michael Joyner, M.D. and professor of anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., believes that brisk walking is the single best exercise. There have been many studies that indicate that walking has been shown to aid substantially in weight control.  For those who are new to exercise or just want to fit some exercise into their daily routine, walking could be your answer. Please be sure to check out our blog talk radio show with Ed Forteau, who has taken walking to a new dimension and avoided having a leg amputated in the process! LISTEN HERE

For those people who already exercise, however, walking may not hold much excitement.  Stuart Phillips, Ph.D. and professor of kinesiology at McMaster University, talks about the benefits of squatting.  “The squat ‘activates the body’s biggest muscles, those in the buttocks, back and legs. [. . .] It’s a very potent exercise’” (Reynolds).  Weight training in general is good at combating the loss of muscle mass that each of us experiences as we age.  But according to Phillips, if you are relying on endurance training, doing anything for long periods of time such as running or biking, you are still losing muscle. .  Resistance training is also good for weight control.  Despite these benefits, however, there is a lack of evidence that resistance training is an effective, all-purpose exercise approach. So what is the best way to workout?

Let me introduce you to the benefits of H.I.I.T., or high-intensity interval training.  It typically consists of a series of very intense spurts of effort, followed by less intense or no exertion periods. It aids in increasing aerobic capacity, much more so than endurance training. That’s right, much more than long distance running or other endurance training! It also has been shown in research to reduce blood-sugar levels and the risk of diabetes, as well as aid in weight control.

The best thing other than the positive impact is that it takes significantly less time. Most people do not have hours to spend exercising during the week, making this approach perfect for our lifestyle.  According to Martin Gibala, the chairman of the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, “there’s no particular reason why H.I.I.T. cannot be adaptable to almost any sport” (Reynolds).  The only criticism of H.I.I.T. is that it builds muscular strength less efficiently than the squat or other resistance training methods. But there are remedies for this. Incorporating hill sprints or stair sprints give you the benefit of a power workout plus interval training.

But, you say, what about upper body strength? Got you covered there too. Another option is an H.I.I.T. weight training circuit for upper and lower body that involves a series of dynamic, body-weighted exercises with limited rest in between. This could be the perfect complement to any H.I.I.T. cardio circuit to reap the full benefits of exercise, with measurable results, again without wasting your time.

The thing to keep in mind is that these types of exercises are supposed to hurt; you will not get the desired results from giving only 60% effort as you may be accustomed to with traditional training. You must give 100% effort in order to push your body and get maximum results.  This is really a no pain, no gain approach 🙂 The upside is a lot less time in the gym and a lot more time to live your life in good health.

Always remember: Eat clean, Commit to be fit, and Live your life wisely!

Dr. J. Renae Norton

For a complete article on “The Single Best Exercise,” see:

//www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17exercise-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

Weight Management Supplements

Weight Management Supplements

photo used under creative commons license

These are the supplements/foods that make my list for valuable and safe ways to enhance weight loss and weight management. Unless otherwise stated, I source them from Dr. Ron’s Ultrapure as he has one of the purest and best researched product lines that I have found to date.

Coconut Oil

Supplement with organic extra virgin, cold pressed unrefined coconut oil whenever possible. It is a medium chain fatty acid which means that it does not store as fat in the body, but is used almost entirely as energy. It is also good for the brain and eyes. When combined with exercise, coconut oil is the only thing that has been shown to stop the course of Alzheimer’s.

It is delicious on vegetables, is a great tenderizer for meats and poultry, and is great for baking. It actually may help to reduce cellulite. For the same reason, don’t use it to fry fish……it creates fish mush as it breaks down the fat in fish. Since fish is mostly fat, it over tenderizes it. For everything else, it is delicious. It does not cause the foods you cook in it to taste like coconut oil. Find excuses to use it whenever possible.

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

Alpha lipoic acid enhances our ability to convert food into energy and is therefore a benefit to those trying to lose weight.

It is often referred to as ‘the universal antioxidant,” It is also a potent anti-inflammatory. For the obese individual, this is vitally important, as they often suffer from chronic inflammation, which makes fitness training painful.

ALA is a unique antioxidant because it is both fat and water soluble. This means it can go to all parts of the cell, including the lipid (fat) portions, where unwanted chemicals may reside. Most supplements are water-soluble and cannot help with the chemicals that reside in the fat portions of our cells. Again, this is particularly important for the obese individual.

Carnitine

Carnitine and its derivative, acetyl L-carnitine, are two of the most important nutrients for weight loss. Carnitine is critical for energy formation and an active metabolism. Carnitine takes fatty acids from our blood and transports them into the cell for energy. For carnitine to have optimum effect, we must have adequate essential fatty acids, such as the omega 3’s, present in the diet. The best sources of Omega 3s are Krill oil, walnuts, and flax seed. The recommended “dose” of nuts per day is ¼ cup. Be sure to get Antarctic Krill Oil. Dr. Ron’s is a good source. Learn more HERE.

Acetyl L-carnitine

Acetyl L-carnitine acts as an antioxidant and a natural anti-inflammatory that enhances the affects of the other antioxidant systems within the body. These anti-inflammatory properties protect the cell membrane. Although exercise will naturally increase our levels of acetyl L-carnitine, it will not help enough if we are obese, over thirty years of age or have other health problems, such as a leaky gut. This makes supplementation a necessity.

Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10)

Coenzyme Q-10, also called ubiquinone, is a powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory with many benefits for treating and preventing obesity. It acts like acetyl L-carnitine in that it assists in energy production within the cell. CoQ10 also enhances the metabolism, giving us greater energy and endurance, a greater ability to lose body fat, preventing the energy decline seen in aging cells. CoQ10 also maximizes the burning of foods for fuel, helping to normalize fats in our blood. Many of Dr. Ron’s facial and body care products contain CoQ10, such that it can also be used topically.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)

Conjugated linoleic acid is a fatty acid found in many of the foods we eat. At one time, beef and lamb were exceptional sources; however when their diet was changed from grass to grain, levels of CLA dramatically decreased in our meat and dairy products.

CLA decreases body fat, especially in the area of the abdomen and helps block the absorption of fat and sugar into fat cells (adipocytes) in general. It also helps the insulin receptors remain intact, thus increasing insulin sensitivity. This is important in terms of Type 2 Diabetes, in as much as such individuals have become insulin resistant because their blood sugar levels are chronically elevated.

CLA is a medium chain omega 3 fatty acid, with some of the same benefits as coconut oil, one of which is that it converts to muscle and not fat. CLA has the added benefit of being a powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory. NEVER BUY CLA IN SUPPLEMENT FORM, IT IS DANGEROUS. Obtain your CLA from grass-fed animal protein and raw dairy. (Raw dairy should be from Jersey 100% grass-fed cows)

Chromium

Because Chromium is an essential nutrient for normal sugar and fat metabolism, it is critical for anyone trying to control and reduce excess body fat. Chromium supplementation effectively lowers blood sugar and insulin levels and can also increase levels of the ‘good’ HDL cholesterol. This lowers total cholesterol and triglycerides, playing a key role in regulating appetite, reducing sugar cravings, and lowering body fat.

Maitake Mushroom Extract

Studies show that maitake mushroom extract enhances insulin sensitivity, which helps to control blood sugar levels and may serve as a safe and reliable weight loss supplement. High blood sugar levels cause weight gain. It is a powerful tool for preventing a condition that leads to cardiovascular disease and diabetes called Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome consists of high blood pressure, elevated levels of insulin, excess weight (especially around the abdomen), and dyslipidemia or low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, high levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol, and high levels of triglycerides.

Beta Glucan

A concentrated soluble fiber derived from yeasts, mushrooms, and algae, beta-glucans come in many forms but all have the effect of lowering cholesterol with the additional benefits of weight loss and helping control diabetes. They are long chain polysaccharides that also have very positive effects on the immune system.

One of the best sources of Beta glucans are mushrooms. There are three mushrooms that are good sources and are also renowned for their wonderful flavors. They are: Maitake, Agaricus and Cordyceps. A powder made from these mushrooms can be purchased from Dr. Ron’s, who recommends making a paste to baste on steaks and fish. Yum!

Maca

Maca is truly a super food and one that aids in weight management. Just one teaspoon in your smoothie once or twice a day can do amazing things. Here are just a few of the things you can expect maca to help with:

  • Blood Sugar: Maca boosts the work your pancreas does in keeping your blood sugar levels even. This is important from a weight management perspective, because blood sugar levels play an important role in fat storage, i.e. when they are high, the body stores more fat. Maca also helps to prevent pancreatic cancer.
  • Energy: Most people feel their mood and energy level lift almost instantly when they use Maca. Users report their energy, stamina and endurance improve, which helps with weight management.
  • Maca helps balance the body’s production of estrogen and progesterone, which is important for weight management. Maca also helps restore balance to the hypothalamus and pituitary glands – the body’s master gland system. These hormones can impact nutrient utilization, eating behaviors, fat storage, food cravings, and food addictions.
  • Immune Booster: Maca’s 22 fatty acids function both as a fungicide and as a local antiseptic. These actions, along with the natural Vitamin C and zinc are believed to help aid in overall immunity enhancement. This means that Maca helps with a leaky gut.
  • Stress Reduction: For people with adrenal stress from work, disease, exercise or PTSD, maca can reduce the effects of cortisol on the adrenal glands and other organs so impacted by a “Type A”, high pressure lifestyle or job. High cortisol lead to increased fat storage. In other words, stress is fattening.
  • Thyroid Support : The Thyroid gland controls the rate at which the body produces energy from nutrients. The more efficient it is, the less tendency we have to gain unwanted weight. Maca aids the thyroid in this metabolic process, giving us healthier intestines, better functioning kidneys and stronger bones

Mango Seed Fiber


Mango seed extract increases the production of certain enzymes that help lower body fat. It also removes dangerous toxins from the body. Indeed, it’s most common use in Africa is as a natural antibiotic and pain reliever. It is currently being studied for weight loss, diabetes and cholesterol reduction.

Disclaimer: This patient guide is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice and treatment from your personal physicians. Readers are advised to consult their own doctors or other qualified health professionals regarding the treatment of medical conditions. The authors shall not be held liable or responsible for any misunderstanding or misuse of the information contained in this manual or for any loss, damage, or injury caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by any treatment, action, or application of any food or food source discussed in this patient guide. The statements in this guide have not been evaluation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery: Holiday Recipe Roundup

Eating Disorders and the Holidays

I’ve had several requests from my readers and patients in treatment for obesity, anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder for recipes that they can enjoy over the holidays. Here’s a list of some of my favorites!

Glazed Baked Ham

Prime Rib Roast with Bacon and Mushroom Saute

Macaroni and Cheese

Mashed Cauliflower

Baked Sweet Potato Rounds [

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Chocolate Pots de Creme

Ginger Bread House

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: Buying a Whole Hog [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Cuts of Pork

Buying a Whole Hog

There are a number of questions the processor will ask. The cut sheet below will help you anticipate these questions.

I found a couple of places that look good.

Heritage Farms:

  • Good Family Farms – Duroc Pork
  • Lazy S Farms – Red Wattle Pork
  • Metzger Family Farm – Tamworth Pork

*Call for pricing, and for information on these farms go to www.heritagefoodsusa.com

Marksbury Farm Market
Retail and Butcher’s Shop
73 Fisher Ford Road
Lancaster, Kentucky  40444

Pork Processing Costs

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: What Should Hogs be Fed? [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Pastured Pork

What Should Hogs be Fed?

Preferably, the animal is outdoors eating grass, roots and whatever it can forage. Even when the pig is pastured it must be supplemented.  What those supplements are will determine how healthy the pig is to eat and how it tastes. Ideally it would be “slopped” with kitchen waste. Or, it might eat the rotten fruit from an orchard, which I understand makes a delicious pork.

But even if it is fed corn or soy feed, as long as it is not GMO, it will be far better for you than if it is fed GMO grains.  The way to ensure as much as possible that it is not eating GMO grains, is to buy organic. If you do not buy organic pork, find out if the grain is GMO or not. One of the questions to ask a local farmer is what kind of feed they use.  Of course it goes without saying that you do not want meat that has hormones or unnecessary antibiotics.  Be aware that “natural” is not necessarily natural.

Organic vs Natural Meat

Healthy pigs result when they have plenty of fresh air, sun- shine, freedom for natural behavior, shelter as needed, healthy feed, PASTURE, variety in the diet, clean water, good sanitation and manure management. The major concern for most small-scale hog growers is intestinal parasites. These can be managed with proper pasture rotation.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: Categories of Swine [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Tamworth Hog Benefits

Tamworth Hogs are a Heritage Breed of Pig

Categories of Swine

There are two major categories of swine breeds, paternal and maternal. Their offspring result in a mix of different qualities from the boar and the sow, and these are the qualities that farmers are trying to obtain when deciding which pigs to breed together.

Paternal Breeds

Paternal breeds are used for swine that will be raised for slaughter. The paternal breeds have qualities such as meatiness, leanness, and a high growth rate. Breeds include the Duroc, which has sweet meat and marbling that produces amazing shoulders and spare ribs, and the Berkshire, which has tender, juicy meat and a higher fat content, which means that it can withstand higher cooking temperatures or longer cooking times. The Hampshire is another paternal breed that is heavily muscled and lean, as is the Poland China.

Maternal Breeds

Maternal breeds are used as sows due to their nurturing tendencies. Maternal breeds tend to produce more milk, have larger litter sizes, and have a greater mothering ability. The three main maternal breeds are the Yorkshire, Landrace, and Chester White. The Yorkshire is the most recorded type of pig in the U.S. and the Landrace produces, on average, the largest litters of piglets.

Groups of pig breeds:

Lard Types: Poland Chinas, Cheshires, Essex, Mulefoots; have compact bodies, large hams, docile, and a heavier fat layer, although recent breeding has made them more similar to bacon and meat typing

Bacon and Meat Types: Landrace, Yorkshires, Tamworth; longer bodied and legs, trim profile, higher energy, less external fat.

Dual-purpose: Berkshires, Hampshires, Large Black (especially docile because of the large flopped ears), Saddlebacks.

There are demands for each breed by the market. Many hog growers practice cross breeding to get hybrid vigor in offspring. Information about the breeds and producers is available from the American Livestock Breed Conservancy.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Whole Hog: What Are the Advantages of Pork Over Other Animal Protein? [Series]

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder. During the classes, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressing, marinades, desserts and soups.

In our most recent class we had a great discussion about pork. We talked about everything from the health benefits of pork to how to find a reputable source for purchasing the healthiest pork. This series of blog articles will provide you with all the information we covered in class!

Cuts of Pork

What Are the Advantages of Pork Over Other Animal Protein?

Sustainably raised  pork is cheaper than chicken, lamb or beef. Also, unless you find the right grass-fed beef, such as U.S. Wellness Meats, it can taste gamey and can be tough. My experience with local beef growers is that the meat was too tough and too gamey when the cows were 100% grass-fed.  With pigs, the flavor of the meat is enhanced when they eat what they were naturally designed to eat.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder & Obesity Therapy Tool: Cooking Oils

Healthiest Cooking Oils

With all the cooking oils on the grocery store shelves, it’s no wonder they cause so much confusion! I’ve created this “cooking oil cheat sheet” to have on hand  in the kitchen or even at the grocery store, to make cooking and shopping easier.

oilchart_rev

Last Revised:  December 5, 2013

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Food Pollution and the Treatment of Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder and Emotional Eating

Food Addiction Treatment

Roberta Foss* says that Americans suffer from “Overconsumptive Undernutrition.” I wish I had come up with this phrase as I think it is very apt. There are three conditions on the rise in the U.S. that can be shown to be directly related to Food Pollution (FP) that are good examples of this researchers work:

Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS), Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disorder (GERD), and Metabolic Syndrome. Of the three conditions, Leaky Gut is the most difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and often goes undetected until it causes other more serious conditions. All three begin with dis-ruption, (for example high blood sugar levels due to too much High Fructose Corn Syrup) progress to dys-regulation (of the endocrine system in many cases) and end in dis-ease (such as Type 2 Diabetes). But most importantly, all three may be driving eating disorders. Certainly, they drive obesity, but they may also be driving bulimia, binge and emotional eating disorders.

In general, the medical community sees these conditions as the result of eating too much. So they get the overconsumption piece, but they are generally missing the part about the deadly undernutrition caused by food pollution. With Leaky Gut, for example, the body is often unable to use the nutrients in the food, and the individual feels “hungry” all of the time. Some patients report feeling as if they are starving. What do we eat when we are starving? Carbs, something processed because it is quick, or worst of all, we go for the fast food. Of course, these are the same foods that cause the Leaky Gut in the first place. This is why I recommend abstaining from “polluted” foods and relying upon 100% grass-fed protein sources, organic fruits and vegetables and healthy fats such as coconut oil. No lo-fat, lo-cal anything! It should have come off of a tree, not out of a bag or it should have had a mama 🙂

The hunger one experiences with Leaky Gut drives disordered eating, in as much as the polluted ingredients that abound in the U.S. food supply are often highly addicting as well as fattening. I believe that this is what is driving the complications that are on the rise in my patient population. Polluted foods directly impact the endocrine system, which in turn results in damage to the liver, pancreas, gall bladder, and adrenal glands. In addition the endocrine system also regulates mood, which means that damage can lead to anxiety and depression.

The_endocrine_system.jpeg

diagram used under a creative commons license

How does food pollution lead to disordered eating? Well if you are eating food you assume to be safe, and it isn’t, you will continue to eat it even when you develop symptoms as you will not associate the symptoms with the safety of your food. You will likely assume that you are eating too much, and that the negative consequences are your fault. Because you are blaming yourself, you will feel bad and eat more!

I believe that many people suffering from eating disorders such as binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia, bulimarexia and emotional eating** are individuals who find themselves eating too much and panic. Because they are unaware of the impact that food pollution is having on the way they eat, they use unhealthy ways of managing their calorie intake, i.e. they restrict, binge and purge or yo-yo diet. This increases the three syndromes mentioned above and leads to more disordered eating. A very vicious cycle.

In the eating disorder treatment field, it is considered anathema to suggest that an Anorexic or Bulimic patient abstain from eating anything, no matter how bad it is for you. Refeeding strategies, which are designed to restore the patient to a “normal” weight as quickly as possible, espouse that we should be able to eat anything as long as we eat it in moderation. I could not disagree more. We should absolutely not eat polluted food. There are over 2000 food additives on the market today and more all the time. Many of them are genetically engineered from the DNA of aborted fetuses.

Instead, we need to seek out the “clean” alternative, whenever and wherever possible, and we should encourage those we love to do the same. Treatment outcomes in the eating disorder treatment field are abysmal, often as low as 30% success.  Eating clean works much better. The recovery rates I see with my patients are a testament to the success of this approach.  However, it is not for everyone. As with any treatment, there are potential side-effects. It is possible to get triggered while trying to eat clean.  I make that clear from the get-go and work with my patients, whether they need to lose weight, gain weight or stop bingeing and purging, to build that expectation into their treatment and manage it proactively.
Food Addiction
How Do We Become Addicted?

One of the drivers of disordered eating is food addiction. Humans are hard-wired to become addicted to processed free glutamate (MSG), damaged proteins, sweeteners and hyper-hybridized (HH) grains.  The biotech, agribusiness and food industries leverage this part of our neurochemistry to sell more product. What scientists and watchdog groups have known for many years, i.e. our food supply contains ingredients that are neurotoxic, autogenic, carcinogenic, obesogenic and most importantly, addictive, is only now breaking into the American consciousness.

Although Leaky Gut Syndrome, Metabolic Syndrome and GERD are more common among obese individuals, one does not have to be obese to have any of them. The disorders are also rising at alarming rates among those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and  “emotional eating”**. They are driven in many cases by food addictions, which in turn are the result of the excitatory neurotoxins that abound in processed (polluted) foods.


Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
 


Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sources:
*Roberta Foss-Morgan, D.O. – September 5, 2010
** I do not accept the diagnosis emotional eating, and see it as a symptom of food addiction.

Gluten-free Bacon (or Mushroom) Quiche [Video]

Eating Disorder Treament Recipe: Gluten-free Quiche

 We recently started offering cooking classes to patients that are in treatment for obesity, anorexia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder. During the class, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressings, marinades, and soups.  A few weeks ago we made Gluten-free Bacon (or Mushroom) Quiche. Check out the video below to see how we made it!

 For more delicious recipes, be sure to visit The Recipe Corner!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Amazing Benefits of Bone Broth

Besides the exquisite flavor that bone broth imparts into any savory dish, bone broth:

▪    Is full of minerals.

▪    Fortifies the immune system.

▪    Enhances digestion.

▪    Nourishes all body parts related to collagen. This means joints, tendons, ligaments, skin, mucus membranes, and bone.

This is especially important for patients in treatment for obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder as malnutrition, weakened immune systems, leaky gut and other digestive issues are very common in these individuals.

Bone Broth Is Mineral Rich

Clearly, long-cooked broth made from bones will be rich in a dynamic array of minerals. Bone is, after all, highly mineralized. A well-made bone broth will give your body calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, sodium, potassium, sulfate, and fluoride. All delivered in a form that your body understands. In order to pull these precious minerals from the bone during cooking, add an acid, like apple cider vinegar, to the filtered water for cooking the bones.

The vegetables such as carrots, celery, onion, garlic cloves and spices add flavor to your bone broth. I use Himalayan organic salts and Bourbon or alder smoked peppers.

How the Collagen in Bone Broth Heals the Gut

Bones, marrow, skin, tendons, ligaments, and the cartilage that sometimes accompanies a bone are all made of a protein molecule called collagen. Collagen contains two very special amino acids: proline and glycine.

Collagen has been found to help heal the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the stomach and the intestines. This means that heartburn or GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) and many of the conditions associated with intestinal inflammation can be helped with bone broth.

  • Collagen and gelatin have been shown to benefit gastric ulcers.
  • Proline is necessary for the formation of collagen.
  • Glycine improves digestion by increasing gastric acid secretion.
  • Glutamine, also found in bone broth, is an important metabolic fuel for cells in the small intestine.

Bone broth is also good for you if you have Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis. People with these disorders often have a deficiency in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Bone broth is a source of GAGs.

My Favorite Reason to Drink Bone Broth? It Helps with Wrinkles, Stretch Marks, and Cellulite!

Drinking bone broth makes skin supple. Cellulite does not arise from carrying excess fat. Haven’t you ever seen a thin person with cellulite? It is common. Most people are taught to choose skinless and boneless meat and to fear animal fats. This is why even those who are slender will not be able to shake cellulite until they change their diet.

▪    Cellulite results from a lack of connective tissue.

▪    The smoothness of skin is from an abundance of connective tissue.

▪    Collagen-rich bone broth will supply your skin with the tools that it needs to support itself.

▪    Adding chicken feet, animal joints, and knuckles to a bone broth will increase the amount of collagen available.

MAKING A GOOD BONE BROTH

Eating Disorder Treatment Recipe: Bone Broth

When collecting bones, go for variety.

This is because the marrow found in bones is either yellow marrow or red marrow. Yellow marrow is found in the central portion of long bones. It is where fats are stored.

Red marrow, on the other hand, is found in flat bones. These are:

  • Hip bone
  • Sternum
  • Skull
  • Ribs
  • Vertebrae
  • Scapula
  • The ends of long bones

Red marrow is valuable because it is where blood stem cells are found. When you drink a broth made with a good source of red marrow, you are drinking all those stem cell factors that ultimately build your body’s strength and support your own immune function.

Not Sure What Kind of Animal Bone to Use?

Any kind will do. You can even use an assortment of different animals. Just make sure that all bones are sourced from animals that are organic and grass-fed or pastured and free-range. Remember, everything that the animal ate, how it lived, and where it lived all factor into the health benefits of your broth.

You can purchase bones ready to cook, or you can collect bones from meals and store them in your freezer until you have enough to build a good stock. Remember to only use bones and feet from animals that are grass-fed or free-range.

Make sure the bones, especially large bones, are cut into small pieces. This reduces cooking time and allows more material to become a part of the broth.

Cooking Suggestions

  1. Bake rinsed bones in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes
  2. Place cooled bones into a large stock pot and cover with 2/3 gallon of filtered water.
  3. Add 1/4 of apple cider vinegar or wine to water prior to cooking. This helps to pull out important nutrients from the bones.
  4. Add 1 or 2 quartered onions, 6 to 8 cut up carrots, ½ head of celery stalks, 10 to 15 garlic cloves, Himalayen salt, pepper, and your favorite spices. Leave plenty of room for water to boil.
  5. Heat slowly. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to simmer for at least 6 hours. Remove scum as it arises.
  6. Cook long and slow. Chicken bones can cook for 6-48 hours. Beef bones can cook for 12-72 hours. A long and slow cook time is necessary in order to fully extract the nutrients in and around bone.

After cooking, the broth will cool and a layer of fat will harden on top. This layer protects the broth beneath. Strain the broth, mashing up the vegetables so that the juice ends up in the broth. Discard the rest (unless you have a meat eating pet).

When the broth is cold, it should have fat in it. Do not discard the fat if you used grass-fed animals.

Discard this layer only when you are about to eat the broth.

Consume broth within 3 days or freeze for later use. Sip on the broth or use as the base in a nutrient-dense soup.

Eating Disorder Treatment Recipes - Bone Broth

Use Bone Broth with Your Next Fast

During a fast, the body receives little nourishment from food. Because of this, sometimes muscle tissue can break down.

  • When glycine is consumed, this limits or prevents the breakdown of protein tissue, like muscle.
  • Glycine is used for gluconeogenesis, which is when the liver makes sugar fuel for the body to burn in the absence of glucose.
  • Glycine is also necessary to detoxify the body of chemicals. This is because glycine is a precursor amino acid for glutathione, which is a major antioxidant and detoxifying agent in the body.
  • Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. It has been shown to improve sleep, as well as boost memory and performance.

What to Remember Most About This Article…

Bone broth is rich in minerals to strengthen the immune system, especially the part found in the gut, by supporting healthy digestion. Bone broth also contains collagen to strengthen tendons, joints, ligaments, bone, and skin. On top of that, collagen will support healthy skin to make it supple and strong to reduce the appearance of cellulite.

The collagen in bone broth will help heal the lining of the gut and relieve heartburn, GERD, Leaky Gut and other types of intestinal inflammation.

You can make bone broth at home and even use it in your next fast to give your body ample nourishment. The glycine in bone broth will detoxify the body of harmful chemicals, improve sleep, and boost memory and performance.

To learn more about the benefits of bone broth, be sure to listen to my interview with Chef Lance Roll!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: The Complete Series

Sugar: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Over the past few months, we’ve been posting quite a few blog articles that make up the “Fats Explained” series. Whether you are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must. Below is a list of all the articles in the series. Enjoy!

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated Fats

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids)

Fats Explained: Non-essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Fats Explained: Fatty Acids [Infographic]

Fats Explained: Conjugated Linoleic Acid – The Good Trans-fat

Fats Explained: Where to Get Pastured Butter

Fats Explained: Unhealthy Trans Fats

Fats Explained: Short, Medium, and Long Chain Fats

Fats Explained: Dietary Recommendations for Fat

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Dietary Recommendations for Fat

butter

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

A summary of dietary recommendations for fat:

  • When cooking, use a healthy saturated fat such as cold pressed unrefined organic virgin coconut oil.
  • As a healthy snack alternative, choose sprouted nuts and seeds as they are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids.
  • Incorporate organic flax meal into your favorite recipes, since it’s a great source of omega-3 essential fatty acids and fiber.
  • Eat more wild caught Salmon. Remember to only choose wild fish. Farm-raised fish contain very little omega-3, since they are fed land-based diets devoid of omega-3. Fish obtain ample amounts of omega-3 naturally through their wild diet.
  • Eat grass-fed, grass-finished animal protein and dairy.
  • Eat pastured pork that is fed non-GMO grain as a supplement.
  • Eat poultry that is either completely pastured or pastured and fed only organic grain as a supplement.
  • Supplement your diet with mercury-free high-quality raw fish oil such as Blue Ice from Green Pastures, which is a rich source of omega-3.
  • Make your own mayonnaise from coconut oil and use it in deviled eggs, and in egg, chicken and tuna salads
  • Use olive, macadamia nut, and avocado cold pressed extra virgin organic oils for salad dressings.
  • Choose full-fat, raw butter, cream, and dairy products from pastured cows rather than low-fat or fat-free versions. Check the product labels. Many low-fat versions contain unhealthy additives to make up for the lack of taste from fat.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Short, Medium, and Long Chain Fats

fats explained

There is another less well-known system of classification that is based on the length of the carbon chain within each fatty acid that is also very relevant to those wishing to manage their weight and especially their body fat. This is critical whether you are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity, or just want to be as healthy as possible.  In this system there are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA).

Coconut oil, for example, is composed predominately of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), also known as medium-chain triglycerides (MCT).

  The vast majority of fats and oils in our diets, 98% to 100%, whether they are saturated or unsaturated or come from animals or plants,  are composed of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). Both the saturated and unsaturated fat found in meat, milk, eggs, and plants (including most all vegetable oils) are composed of LCFA. Most Americans get way too much of these fats and not enough of the MCFAs.

While we have been led to believe that all saturated fatty acids are bad for us, the MCFA from the coconut, for example, which is a saturated fat, has health benefits that rival those of fish oil, or the raw unrefined omega-3 fats made from krill. Many believe that it is the perfect food.  In general, MCFA’s do not raise cholesterol, but actually protect against heart disease.   They also help to lower the risk of both atherosclerosis and they can be a significant weight management aid for those wishing to (ok, needing to) gain weight, as well as for those wishing to lose weight.

So How Does a MCFA Work?

Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) found in plant and animal fat are not easily absorbed by the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and require pancreatic enzymes and bile salts to break them down so that they can be absorbed by the intestine. Next, the long chain fatty acids must go through a complicated process through which they are delivered to a variety of tissues, including adipose, cardiac and skeletal tissue, and are then transported to the liver, and are finally oxidized for energy use.  This is how all saturated fat, unsaturated fat, and cholesterol that consists of long chain fatty acids (almost all of your dietary fat) is transported throughout the body.

In contrast, medium chain fatty acids, such as those found in coconut oil are absorbed by the GI tract with ease, and do not require any pancreatic enzymes to break them down, which means less work for your pancreas. Next, medium chain fatty acids are transported through the blood stream, directly to the liver, where they go directly into mitochondria and are immediately oxidized for energy. Medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil do not get packaged into lipoproteins, and do not get transported to a variety of tissues and are not stored as body fat, they go directly to the liver and are metabolized immediately for energy. So they do not cause weight gain.

The bottom line is that the medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil produce almost exclusively energy, whereas, long chain fatty acids found in other dietary fats produce body fat (and some energy).

Coconut Oil Boosts Energy.

Because the medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil are easily and rapidly transported into the mitochondria, unlike long chain fatty acids, they are immediately used for energy, which “heats up” the body and increases metabolism. Several animal studies and clinical studies have shown that ingestion of coconut oil increases metabolism and decreases body fat both in animal studies performed on mice, and humans. Rats that were fed a diet consisting of medium chain fatty acids had less subcutaneous fat, a visibly evident decrease in overall body fat, and increased metabolism and increased thermogenesis.

The energy burst that is produced by medium chain fatty acids is also important for athletic endurance. In one study, researchers tested the physical endurance of mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids vs. those fed a diet high in long chain fatty acids for six weeks. The mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids continually performed better then the others and displayed a much higher physical endurance. What this means is that you don’t want to eat coconut oil before bed, as it tends to keep you awake.

It Gets Even Better When It Comes to Coconut Oil!

Not only do you store less body fat, studies have shown that medium chain fatty acids also increase the oxidation of long chain fatty acids that are already in your body, tucked away in your love handles!  So not only does it prevent weight gain, it aids in weight loss. Similar to the animal studies, medium chain fatty acids also boost energy production in humans by speeding up metabolism. Finally, for those with cholesterol problems, this study found that people with high triglyceride levels who were given medium chain fatty acids for eight weeks had a 14.5%  decrease in their triglyceride levels! When it comes to coconut oil, use it often, as it is both delicious and good for you.

To learn more about coconut oil be sure to read these articles:

Coconut Oil and Dementia

Coconut Oil and Malnutrition

Coconut Oil: Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller-Pressed vs Cold-Pressed, Virgin vs Extra Virgin

The Coconut Oil Miracle with Dr. Bruce Fife (podcast)

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Unhealthy Trans Fats

Unhealthy Trans Fats

photo used under a creative commons license

Whether you are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Unhealthy Trans-Fats

The trans fatty acids that are detrimental to our health are those that are produced when vegetable oils are heated under pressure with hydrogen and a catalyst, in a process called hydrogenation. These fats are often referred to as hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils.  In the past few decades, food manufacturers have replaced saturated fats with trans fats in the vast majority of processed foods to prolong their shelf life, and to position their products as a healthier alternative. This was possible because saturated fats were being demonized at the time. Trans fats are found in the majority of processed and fried foods but can also be found in bulk foods such as nuts and fruits, whether or not they are organic. They are so common, it is nearly impossible to buy a processed food without a trans fat.

The following list is a compilation of the adverse effects reported in humans and animals from the consumption of trans fatty acids. This information is based on decades of research done by Dr. Mary Enig and has been confirmed by others.

  • Trans fats lower “good” HDL cholesterol in a dose response manner (the higher the trans fat level in the diet, the lower the HDL cholesterol in the serum).
  • Trans fats raise the bad LDL cholesterol in a dose response manner.
  • Trans fats increase tendency towards blocked arteries.
  • Trans fats raise total serum cholesterol levels 20-30mg.
  • Trans fats lower the amount of cream (volume) in milk from lactating females in all species studied, including humans, thus lowering the overall quality available to the infant.
  • Trans fats increase blood insulin levels in humans in response to glucose load, increasing risk for diabetes.
  • Trans fats increase insulin resistance thus having an undesirable effect in diabetics.
  • Trans fats affect immune response by lowering efficiency of B cell response.
  • Trans fats decrease levels of testosterone in male animals, increase level of abnormal sperm, and interfere with gestation in females.
  • Trans fats cause alterations in cell membranes, including membrane fluidity.
  • Trans fats cause alterations in fat cell size, cell number, and fatty acid composition.
  • Trans fats escalate adverse effects of essential fatty acid deficiencies.

Earlier in the “Fats Explained” series, we discussed Healthy Trans-Fats. You can read about healthy trans fats HERE.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

ANNOUNCEMENT – We’ve Updated our FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Eating Disorder Recovery eBook - The Norton Center, Cincinnati

Great news! We’ve updated our FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook. This book has been especially helpful for those suffering from eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder, and obesity! Some of the topics we cover include:

  • How to Eat Organic on a Budget
  • Appetite Hormones: Leptin, Ghrelin, Peptide YY
  • Preventing and Recovering from Malnutrition
  • Fats Explained
  • Dairy Explained
  • Grains Explained
  • Sugar: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
  • A Clean Eating Shopping Guide
  • ….and much more!

To receive our most current eBook, be sure to sign up HERE.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Where to Get Pastured Butter

butter

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Where to Get Pastured Butter

Pastured butter is an excellent source of CLA. To my knowledge, there are no American farms or cooperatives that are currently selling butter from 100% grass-fed cows. Although cheese from all-grass-fed cows is available from many suppliers, grass-fed butter cannot be found. Restrictive government regulations and lack of consumer awareness keep small-scale butter operations from being profitable.

An excellent source for all-grass-fed butter can be imported from Germany by the Allgau company. The butter is made from cows that are raised on pasture or grass silage, making it five times higher in CLA and also higher in vitamin E and beta carotene than commercial butter, whether organic or non-organic. It costs about twice as much as ordinary butter and about the same as organic butter. It is yellower than butter from cows raised in confinement, melts at a lower temperature, and has a terrific taste. You can purchase it online from igourmet.com.

Other options are to make your own butter, which isn’t nearly as difficult as it sounds. I’ve posted a recipe for butter here. You may also be able to convince your local supermarket to stock it, eliminating the high cost of shipping. Check this site out for grass-fed options – www.eatwild.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Conjugated Linoleic Acid – The Good Trans fat

Photo: Kabsik Park under a Creative Commons license.

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Trans fats vs. Non Trans Fats

Another way to categorize fats is whether or not a fat is a trans fat. There are two trans fatty acids.  The one that is exceptionally good for us is CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid, which is found in grass-fed animal protein such as beef, bison, venison etc. The other is man-made trans fat, which is a class unto itself. This fat is the industrially-produced, partially hydrogenated fat found in corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oil as well as that in margarine.  There really isn’t much else to say about man-made trans fats, other than that they are very damaging to the systems in the body that regulate eating and fat storage. They contribute to obesity and all of it’s complications, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, the aging process and various types of cancer. 

Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Good Trans-Fat

When we think of fats that are unhealthy, we think of trans fats.  But one of the healthiest fats, CLA, is a trans fat. Actually conjugated linoleic acid is both a trans fatty acid and a cis fatty acid. The cis bond causes a lower melting point and is apparently the reason for all of the health benefits associated with CLA. One of the reasons that CLA is so healthy, is that it allows us to absorb vitamins D, A and K. These vitamins are critical to our health and well-being, but can only be absorbed from full-fat grass-fed dairy and meat, as both contain high concentrations of CLA.  Another reason that CLA is so good for us is that it appears to convert readily to muscle instead of fat.

How CLA Effects Muscle and Body Fat

Grass-Fed Animal Protein and CLA

Most beef sold in the United States is not grass-fed. Instead, most cattle are raised on grain and other types of feed. The majority of these animals are also treated with hormones and antibiotics, which pass through to humans, resulting in higher rates of cancer in women who began their periods prematurely and resistance to antibiotics in the population at large.

How Is CLA Made?

Cows are ruminants, which means that they have more than one stomach. Digestion in such animals begins in an organ called the rumen, where CLA is formed. The animal regurgitates and re-chews its cud and eventually digests the CLAs from the grass, where they enter the meat and milk of the animal. Common ruminant food sources include cattle, goats, sheep and deer as they all graze on grass if left to their own devices.

Organic, grass-fed cows have 300 to 500 percent more CLA than cattle raised on other feeds. This is true of the beef, butter, milk and cheese produced from grass-fed cows. Grass-fed cows are the best source of CLA in the American diet.

The highest concentration of CLA in all foods, however, is contained in kangaroo meat. Raised wild in Australia, kangaroo meat is sold in 55 countries including the United States, though it is relatively difficult to find (in Cincinnati, you can find kangaroo meat at Jungle Jim’s). The meat is typically ground and used in sausage. Kangaroo has only been legal to eat since 1980 and is still not a staple meat in any diet, even in Australia. CLAs are also found to a much lesser extent in poultry. You can read more about food sources of CLA here.

Milk from Grass-Fed Cows is Higher in Vitamin E.

Cows that get all their nutrients from grazed grass—their natural diet—produce milk with 86 percent more vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) than cows fed a standard dairy diet, according to a recent study. The standard dairy diet consists of large amounts of “concentrate,” which is typically a dry mixture of corn and soy. The concentrate does not produce much CLA  or vitamin E.  In addition, the  grains are almost always genetically modified, causing all sorts of problems for humans, not the least of which is obesity.

Some organic dairies raise their cows on pasture grass and supplement them with organic concentrate; others keep their cows indoors and feed them organic concentrate and stored grasses. It’s important to know that the more freshly grazed grass in a cow’s diet, the more vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and CLA; Organic Valley is a nation-wide organic dairy that emphasizes grazing.

The Higher the Altitude, The More CLA.

Another interesting thing about pastured cows is that the colder the climate, the better the grass, and the more CLA. New research shows that cows that graze at relatively high altitudes may produce the healthiest milk and cheese of all. Milk from cows that graze in the Alps, for example, have more omega-3 fatty acids while also having significantly less saturated fat. The reason? It has to do with plant antifreeze. Omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids stay fluid at colder temperatures unlike saturated fats, which are solid at cold temperatures. A plant that has to withstand the cold needs more of this natural antifreeze to keep its cell membranes fluid in the cold. Cows that graze on this cold climate grass ingest more omega-3s as a result, which they then convert to CLA. In a recent study, cows that grazed in alpine meadows had more than twice the amount of CLA in their milk as similar cows that grazed down in the valley.  The lesson here is eat more Alpine cheese!

Natural CLA Vs. Synthetic CLA.

A new study shows that synthetic CLA pills may cause more harm than good. After reviewing 13 randomized studies, a group of researchers concluded that the pills do not reduce body weight or body fat to a significant degree. Worse yet, the researchers found that a kind of CLA found in the pills (CLA (t10, c12) may cause serious health complications, including an enlarged liver, lower levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Meanwhile, the main type of CLA found in meat and dairy products (c9, t11 or “rumenic acid”) has been given a clean bill of health. Once again, when it comes to fat, Mother Nature knows best!

Other Articles in This Series

Fats Explained: Fatty Acids (Infographic)

Fats Explained: Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Fatty Acids [Infographic]

Omega Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Below is an infographic we’ve created that summarizes some of the information we’ve posted about fatty acids. We strongly encourage you to read all the articles that we’ve posted about Omega Fatty Acids.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Fats Explained: Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, and Omega-9 Fatty Acids

Omega Fatty Acids Chart

Click here to view a larger version of this infographic.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Non-essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Macadamia Nuts

photo used under a creative commons license

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Non-essential Polyunsaturated Omega-5 Fatty Acid

While Omega-5s are polyunsaturated like Omega-3 and Omega-6, they are not considered essential, i.e. our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. Omega 5s from healthy sources are believed to have a positive effect on weight, cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5’s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to their phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA).

Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • Full-fat/grass-fed dairy
  • Tropical oils (unrefined, cold-pressed coconut and palm kernel)
  • Saw palmetto
  • Wild-caught salmon
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pomegranate seeds or unrefined, cold-pressed pomegranate oil

Non-Essential Monounsaturated Fatty Acids, Omegas 7, & 9

The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. 

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-7 Fatty Acids have been shown to have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a role in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA).

Common food sources are:

  • Grass-fed/Grass-finished meat
  • Full-fat, grass-fed dairy
  • Wild caught salmon
  • Sea buckthorn berries
  • Macadamia nuts

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked to healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA).

Natural sources of good Omega-9s include:

  • Olives
  • Expeller pressed olive oil
  • Avocado
  • Grass-fed/grass-finished meat
  • Sprouted nuts

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Avocado Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 Fatty Acids

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also referred to as Essential Fatty Acids; i.e. fats that our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of producing. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with: 

  • Regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • Transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • Managing proper kidney function
  • Dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • Regulating muscles and reflexes
  • Positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

Good sources of Omega 6 Fatty Acids are:

  • Olive Oil
  • Nuts
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Avocado
  • Flaxseed & Flaxseed Oil
  • Chia Seeds
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Acai Berries

Balancing Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 and Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega-6 and omega-3 fats need to be eaten in balance. Americans consume far too many omega-6 fatty acids, and far too little omega-3 fatty acids. The ideal balance between Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty acids would be 1:1. Experts estimate that Americans eat anywhere from 15:1 to 50:1 Omega 6 to Omega 3. So it isn’t the quantity of these polyunsaturated oils which governs the harm they do, but the relationship between them.  Obesity, free radical production, the formation of age pigment, blood clotting efficiency, inflammation, immunity from disease, and level of energy are all responsive to the ratio of unsaturated fats to saturated fats. The higher this ratio is, the greater the probability of harm there is.

When they are out of balance, we are susceptible to disease, whereas when we maintain a proper balance, we maintain and even improve our health. Some research is beginning to show that omega-6s and omega-3s only have a beneficial effect if you consume balanced amounts of both, so this ratio is not something to ignore. Since the Western diet supplies plenty of omega-6, you will probably have to focus on increasing your omega-3s from the list above.

In our next blog post, we’ll be talking about Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5s, Omega-7s, Omega-9s

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must. If you missed my article about saturated and unsaturated fats, be sure to read it HERE.

Omega 3 Salmon

Omega 3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega 7 and 9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega 3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega 5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Polyunsaturated Essential Omega-3 Fatty Acids 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids are referred to as Essential Fatty Acids; i.e. fats that our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of producing. As a result, we need to obtain Omega-3 Fatty Acids directly from dietary sources.

It is best to obtain Omega 3 directly from the foods that are rich in them. The chart below is a good guide.

Sources of Omega 3

In addition to supporting the heart, brain and eyes, studies show that Omega-3s:

  • Reduce inflammation throughout the body
  • Keep blood from clotting excessively
  • Maintain the fluidity of cell membranes
  • Lower the amount of lipids (fats such as cholesterol and triglycerides) circulating in the bloodstream
  • Decrease platelet aggregation, preventing excessive blood clotting
  • Inhibit thickening of the arteries by decreasing endothelial cells’ production of a platelet-derived growth factor (the lining of the arteries is composed of endothelial cells)
  • Increase the activity of another chemical derived from endothelial cells (endothelium-derived nitric oxide), which causes arteries to relax and dilate
  • Reduce the production of messenger chemicals called cytokines, which are involved in the inflammatory response associated with atherosclerosis
  • Reduce the risk of becoming obese and improve the body’s ability to respond to insulin by stimulating the secretion of leptin, a hormone that helps regulate food intake, body weight and metabolism, and is expressed primarily by adipocytes (fat cells)
  • Help prevent cancer cell growth

Conditions or symptoms that indicate a need for more Unsaturated Omega-3 foods:

  • Depression
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Fatigue
  • Dry, itchy skin
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Joint pain

Unsaturated Omega-3s have been show to protect against:

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Asthma
  • Diabetes
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Attention Disorders
  • Skin Disorders
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Digestive Difficulties

To Get the Most Polyunsaturated Essential Omega-3 Fat

Research indicates that omega-3s may be better absorbed from food than supplements. Norwegian researchers compared 71 volunteers’ absorption of omega-3s (EPA and DHA) from salmon, smoked salmon, cod (14 ounces of fish per week) versus cod liver oil (3 teaspoons per day). Cooked salmon provided 1.2 grams of omega-3s daily, while cod liver oil provided more than twice as much: 3 grams of omega-3s per day.

Despite the fact that the salmon group got less than half the amount of omega-3s as the cod liver oil group, blood levels of omega-3s increased quite a bit more in those actually eating salmon than in those taking cod liver oil. (This is such great news, as it is a hard sell getting patients to take their cod liver oil :-). My grandmother used to line us all up and it wasn’t an option not to take it. But most people did not grow up that way.)

The researchers found that after 8 weeks, EPA levels rose 129% and DHA rose 45% in those eating cooked salmon compared to 106% and 25%, respectively, in those taking cod liver oil.  In the group eating smoked salmon, blood levels of omega-3s rose about one-third less than in the salmon group. In those eating cod, the rise in omega-3s was very small.

But that’s not all. Concurrent with the rise in omega-3s in those who simply enjoyed a couple of meals featuring salmon, a drop was seen in blood levels of a number of chemicals that lead to inflammation (TNFalpha, IL-8, leukotriene B4, and thromboxane B2). The researchers think omega-3s may be better absorbed from fish because fish contains these fats in the form of triglycerides, while the omega-3s in almost all refined fish oils are in the ethyl ester form.

Once absorbed from the Salmon, the body converts omega-3s from triglycerides, to ester forms, as needed. The body does this naturally on it’s own. Since we want triglycerides to be as low as possible, this is a good thing.

Bottom line: Eat wild caught Salmon, 14 oz’s. a week, or eat less of that and include flax and walnuts along with grass-fed protein.  At the very least take a fermented, non-refined fish oil such as Blue Ice, from Green Pastures, every day!

The most common Omega-3s are α-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Compared with their plant Omega 3 counterparts, the marine Omega 3’s have another advantage; they are excellent sources of low fat protein.  They are also critical to our neurological well-being.  Fish oil, when combined with exercise, is the only thing presently known to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

In our next blog post, we’ll discuss Omega-6 Fatty Acids, and the importance of balancing your Omega-3s and Omega-6s!

Updated on Aug 5 2013.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated Fats

fats explained

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats were unhealthy, and that they were the root cause of the epidemics of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol in our society. What we know today is that saturated fats are not the problem. It is the polluted and/or processed version of saturated fats along with the overabundance of processed unsaturated fats that are causing the problems. Saturated fats such as grass-fed animal fats and coconut oil, which is mostly a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) along with unsaturated Omega 3 fats and the naturally occurring trans-fat CLA, are exceptionally good, indeed, healing for the body. Whereas man-made trans-fats and vegetable or seed fats that have been hydrogenated are literally killing us.

So in a nutshell:

Good Fat = saturated grass-fed animal fat, coconut fat (medium chain fatty acid) and unsaturated Omega 3 fats, especially those from natural sources such as flax seed, salmon, walnuts and leafy greens. (See next in series for complete list)

Bad Fat = Unsaturated trans-fats, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated vegetable and seed fats that have been heated and/or hydrogenated.  Corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oils should be avoided either because they are innately unhealthy or because of the manner in which they have been processed.

Types of Fats

There are several ways to categorize fats: Saturated or unsaturated; Mono or polyunsaturated; Trans or non-transfat; and Short chain (SCFA), Medium chain (MCFA) and Long chain (LCFA). Among the monounsaturated and the polyunsaturated fats there are the Omega fats, which are divided into Essential (Omegas 3 and 6) and Non-Essential (Omega 5, 7, and 9) fatty acids.

Saturated vs Unsaturated Fat

Most fats are either saturated or unsaturated. There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When an oil is saturated, it means that the molecule has all the hydrogen atoms it can hold.  Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem, because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals.

Free radicals damage healthy cells.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to various cancers including skin cancer. In contrast, unrefined cold-pressed coconut oil, which is primarily a saturated medium chain fatty acid, does not become rancid, and never needs refrigeration, assuming that its structure has not been damaged by processing. (Always buy unrefined, cold-pressed nut and seed oils instead of the refined version.)

Characteristics of Healthy Saturated Fats

Saturated fats from grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese) grass-fed/grass-finished beef, pastured pork and poultry (that are fed non-GMO grains and are usually organic) coconut and palm kernel oil and cacao have the following health benefits:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of cell membranes. They give cells their necessary stiffness and integrity.
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower lipoprotein – A substance in the blood that indicates proneness to heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids. Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acids are better retained in the tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

Unsaturated Fats (for the geeks)

Unlike the saturated fats that have a single bond between carbon atoms, monounsaturated fats have a single double bond between carbon atoms while polyunsaturated fats have two or more double bonds between carbon atoms. Unsaturated fats are primarily made up of the Omega fatty acids 3,5,6,7, and 9. (Trans-fats are also unsaturated. Stay tuned for our article on Trans Fats.)

Stay tuned for part 2 of this four part series.  In Part 2 we’ll talk about Omega Fatty Acids.

Updated on Aug 5 2013.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Source: The Skinny on Fats

Sugar: The Ugly

Sugar: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly


Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This is the third installment of my three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Ugly

When naturally derived glucose is consumed, a set of reactions occurs in the body, which allows it to be used as energy. When fructose is consumed, however, it apparently behaves more like fat with respect to the hormones involved in body weight regulation. Most of the carbohydrates we eat are made up of chains of glucose. When glucose enters the bloodstream, the body releases insulin to help regulate it. Fructose, on the other hand, is processed in the liver. If the liver cannot handle all of the fructose coming its way, it starts making fats from the fructose and sending them off into the bloodstream as triglycerides. This leads to all manner of problems, including increased:

  • Risk of abnormal blood clotting ailments and hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Total blood cholesterol levels (it serves in part as the raw material for the synthesis of cholesterol within the body)
  • LDL -“bad” cholesterol levels, and
  • Blood triglyceride levels, especially in diabetics (fructose has a greater propensity to increase serum triglycerides than glucose).

The CDC defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table”. Examples of added sugars include white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, maple syrup, pancake syrup, fructose sweetener, liquid fructose, honey, molasses, anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Bad

high fructose corn syrup

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Bad

Commercially, fructose is derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn. This is where things get sticky. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose:
  1. Crystalline fructose is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of enzymes to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.
  2. High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a mixture of glucose and fructose. It is made up of any of a group of corn syrups that have undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce the desired sweetness.
  3.  Sucrose, the third form, is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer.
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Good

sugar - the good, the bad, the ugly

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Good

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) that plays a critical role in providing energy for humans. It is found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar”. Glucose is one of the analytics the doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about 0.1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in Hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low these processes are impaired. So it is vital to our physiological as well as psychological well-being.

Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The majority of glucose in grain is combined into long chains of molecules called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches. Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose. The latter produces a higher blood sugar level.

Fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. Like glucose, it is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Pure, dry fructose is a very sweet, white, odorless, crystalline solid and is the most water-soluble of all the sugars, making it ideal as a sweetener. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Is Fruit Good for Me?

Is fruit healthy?

“Is fruit good for me?”. This is a question that I often hear from my patients that are in treatment for obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder.

There are many conflicting views on whether it is healthy to incorporate fruit into our everyday diet. The topic can be confusing! On one hand, we hear that it is full of sugar, on the other hand we constantly hear expressions like “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” and “eat an apple on going to bed, and you’ll keep the doctor from earning his bread.”

Let’s look at the sugar content of fruit. Fructose is a form of sugar that is found in fruit and in many processed foods, in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Eating an excessive amount of fructose can lead to serious health issues. Excessive fructose intake is associated with:

  • leptin resistance
  • insulin resistance
  • weight gain, obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • inhibited calcium absorption, which leads to vitamin D deficiency
  • blood clotting ailments and high blood pressure
  • type 2 diabetes
  • increased cholesterol levels
  • fatigue

Thanks to the power of technology, it is really easy to find the fructose content of various fruits. The fruits that are lowest in fructose include cranberries, apricots, nectarines, peaches, clementines, grapefruit and cantaloupe. The fruits that are highest in fructose include dried dates, raisins, dried figs, dried apricots and prunes. So, if we stick to the low fructose fruits and avoid the high fructose fruits, we should be good to go, right?

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. Fruit contains two forms of sugar; fructose and sucrose. Fructose belongs to the single sugar family. All sugars in the single sugar family share the same molecular formula, but have different chemical structures; other members of this family include glucose and galactose. Sucrose, on the other hand, belongs to the double sugar family; other members of this sugar family include lactose and maltose. Double sugars are made up of two single sugars. When we ingest sucrose, the body divides it into it’s two single sugar parts; glucose and fructose. Glucose circulates through the bloodstream as blood sugar and provides energy to many cells within the body. The brain uses 25% of the glucose supply for it’s own energy requirements!

When we are looking for low fructose fruits, we need to consider sucrose’s contribution to total dietary fructose (or total metabolic fructose). The chart below shows what happens to the total dietary fructose levels of fruit once we take the sucrose content into consideration (serving size in the chart is per 100 g of fruit).

Metabolic Fructose Content

What is an appropriate amount of fruit to eat on a daily basis? If you’re eating a lot of processed foods you should limit fruit consumption, since there is a lot of fructose hidden in these foods. Fruits such as tomatoes, avocado, lemons and limes are very low in sugar, these fruits don’t really need to be limited. As a general rule, Dr. Mercola recommends a daily intake of less than 25 grams of fructose. He recommends a daily intake of less than 15 grams of fructose for people that are overweight, have insulin resistance, high blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes, or high cholesterol. Of course, if you’re going to incorporate fructose into your diet, I would recommend consuming it in the form of whole organic fruit. Just be sure to consider the total dietary amount of fructose!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Premature Aging

botox

This week, ABC News ran a story about the increasing use of botox in individuals in their teens and 20s to fight premature aging. Out of the 6.1 million botox injections administered in 2012, almost 100,000 were given to patients in their 20s; that’s a 10% increase from 2011. In 2010, teenages received almost 12,000 botox injections; a 2% increase from 2008. Why is our population experiencing this premature aging?

Premature aging is caused by elevated levels of oxidative stress within the body. Dr. Weil defines oxidative stress as “the total burden placed on organisms by the constant production of free radicals in the normal course of metabolism plus whatever other pressures the environment brings to bear”.

There are a number of lifestyle problems that can lead to excessive oxidative stress, such as pathogens, excessive exercise, insufficient sleep, cigarette abuse, alcohol abuse, exposure to chemicals and toxins, heavy metals, natural and artificial radiation, and excessive stress.

There are a few simple things that we can do to prevent premature aging:

  • Get tested and treated for any pathogens (parasites, bacterial infections, fungal infections, viral infections). Many individuals with these pathogens are asymptomatic, or symptoms may be seemingly unrelated to a pathogen.
  • Avoid excessive exercise. If you feel you are addicted to exercise, seek professional help.
  • Get a good night’s sleep. The ideal time to sleep is from 10 pm to 6 am. 2 hours of sleep before midnight are worth 4 hours of sleep after midnight, when it comes to the body healing and recovering.
  • Avoid exposure to chemicals and toxins in your food and water. On a budget? Check out Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen! Install a water filter in your home that will remove toxins and chemicals. Avoid eating these genetically modified foods.
  • Minimize external sources of stress. Avoid people that are “energy robbers”, meditate, journal, learn breathing exercises, create a gratitude list. If you’re stress levels are too much to handle on your own, work with a professional that can teach you techniques to manage stress.
  • In addition to making lifestyle changes, take a good quality anti-oxidant supplement.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Benefits of Coconut Palm Sugar

In this week’s podcast with Dr. Bruce Fife, we mentioned Coconut Palm Sugar. I’ve received a few inquiries about the benefits of this delicious sugar, so we’ve created an infographic!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

How Visual Cues Affect the Amount of Food We Consume.

Sifu Renka/Creative Commons license

A study completed at Cornell University examined whether visual cues (as they relate to portion size) could influence the amount of food participants ate, without altering estimated food intake or satiation.

The study involved 54 participants between the ages of 18-46 with varying BMIs. The participants were divided into two groups; one group was given a bowl of soup in a normal bowl, the other group was given a bowl of soup in a self-refilling bowl. The self-refilling bowls were hooked up to a hose from underneath the table; the bowl would slowly refill as the participant ate.

Participants eating from the self-refilling bowl consumed 73% more soup than those participants eating from the normal bowl. Those that ate from the self-refilling bowl did not believe that they ate more soup than those eating from the normal bowls; they didn’t even perceive their appetite to be more satisfied!

The study findings suggest that people typically use their eyes to count calories, not their stomachs. The study also shows the importance of being mindful and the importance of having accurate visual cues to prevent overeating.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Source: Bottomless bowls: why visual cues of portion size may influence intake.

 

Avoiding Food Additives

photo used under a creative commons license

This week Shape magazine published an article about food additives that are still being used in the United States even though these same food additives have been banned in many other countries. Mira Calton (nutritionist) and Jayon Calton (Ph.D.), authors of Rich Food, Poor Food, recommend avoiding foods containing these additives at all costs. Here’s the list!

  1. Coloring Agents (such as blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5, yellow 6 etc).
  2. Olestra (Olean)
  3. Brominated Vegetable Oil
  4. Potassium Bromate/Brominated Flour
  5. Azodicarbonamide
  6. BHA and BHT
  7. Synthetic Hormones (rBGH and rBST)
  8. Arsenic

Dr. Mercola discussed the risks associated with coloring agents (food dyes) in his article ‘Are You or Your Family Eating Toxic Dyes?‘. Here’s an excerpt from the article….

Blue #1 (Brilliant Blue) – An unpublished study suggested the possibility that Blue 1 caused kidney tumors in mice. What it’s in: Baked goods, beverages, desert powders, candies, cereal, drugs, and other products.

Blue #2 (Indigo Carmine) – Causes a statistically significant incidence of tumors, particularly brain gliomas, in male rats. What it’s in: Colored beverages, candies, pet food, & other food and drugs.

Citrus Red #2 – It’s toxic to rodents at modest levels and caused tumors of the urinary bladder and possibly other organs. What it’s in: Skins of Florida oranges.

Green #3 (Fast Green) – Caused significant increases in bladder and testes tumors in male rats. What it’s in: Drugs, personal care products, cosmetic products except in eye area, candies, beverages, ice cream, sorbet; ingested drugs, lipsticks, and externally applied cosmetics.

Red #3 (Erythrosine) – Recognized in 1990 by the FDA as a thyroid carcinogen in animals and is banned in cosmetics and externally applied drugs. What it’s in: Sausage casings, oral medication, maraschino cherries, baked goods, candies.

Red #40 (Allura Red) – This is the most-widely used and consumed dye. It may accelerate the appearance of immune-system tumors in mice. It also causes hypersensitivity (allergy-like) reactions in some consumers and might trigger hyperactivity in children. What it’s in: Beverages, bakery goods, dessert powders, candies, cereals, foods, drugs, and cosmetics.

Yellow #5 (Tartrazine) – Yellow 5 causes sometimes-severe hypersensitivity reactions and might trigger hyperactivity and other behavioral effects in children. What it’s in: Pet foods, numerous bakery goods, beverages, dessert powders, candies, cereals, gelatin desserts, and many other foods, as well as pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.

Yellow #6 (Sunset Yellow) – Caused adrenal tumors in animals and occasionally causes severe hypersensitivity reactions. What it’s in: Color bakery goods, cereals, beverages, dessert powders, candies, gelatin deserts, sausage, cosmetics and drugs.

Olestra or Olean is a fat substitute used in fat-free foods such as fat-free potato chips. In a two week study by Proctor and Gamble, consuming 8 grams of olestra per day (equal to 16 olestra-containing potato chips) resulted in a dramatic decrease in fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, cartatenoids, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene in humans. Other studies show that this depletion is augmented when olestra is eaten with meals. Olestra has been shown to increase cancer rates in rats. Olestra is also associated with gastrointestinal disturbances such as diarrhea, loose stools, nausea, and gas.

Brominated vegetable oil (BVO) is an emulsifier that contains the chemical flame retardant, bromine. 10% of beverages sold in the United States contain brominated vegetable oilincluding Mountain Dew, Powerade, Fanta Orange, Fresca, Gatorade, Squirt, and Sunkist Peach Soda. Without Brominated Vegetable Oil the flavorings in these drinks would not remain suspended in the drink; they would separate from the liquid and float to the surface. It is banned in some countries because it tends to build up in the body. Brominated Vegetable Oil is links to impaired neurological development, reduced fertility, early onset of puberty, and altered thyroid hormones.

Potassium Bromate/Brominated flour is found in many baked goods, including buns used at fast food restaurants. The FDA recognizes that this is a dangerous additive. Instead of banning this additive, the FDA simply recommends that bakeries “avoid” using it. The International Agency for Research on Cancer categorizes Potassium Bromate as a 2B additive (possibly carcinogenic to humans). The World Health Organization recommended the removal of Potassium Bromate from all foods in 1993, the FDA ignored this suggestion. The ingredient was even mentioned on the sci-fi show “The Fringe”. Check out this dialog!

Walter, picking up box of “Toaster Pastries” and muttering to himself: “Corn starch, soy lecithin, potassium bromate… potassium bromate?!!!! This supermarket is trying to kill us! You — potassium bromate, do you know what that is?”

Supermarket worker: “Are you OK, sir?”

Walter: “It is known to induce renal cell tumors and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum! Do you know what you are putting into our bodies? Death! Delicious, strawberry-flavored death!”

Supermarket worker: “OK, I’m calling security.”

Azodicarbonamide is found in many commercial breads and baked goods; it’s a bleaching agent and dough strengthener. It’s also an anti-foaming agent that is also used in plastics, photography, and electronics. Some countries have banned this food additive because it was causing asthmatic and allergic reactions in humans. Adding azodicarbonamide to foods is a criminal offense in Singapore!

BHA and BHT are chemicals used to preserve processed foods. These chemicals are linked to hyperactivity (especially in children). It’s quite concerning that BHA and BHT are considered “safe” by the FDA, yet the United States Department of Health and Human Services considers these same chemicals to be carcinogenic!

rBGH or rBST is a genetically modified bovine growth hormone that is used to increase milk production in cows. Milk from rBGH/rBST-treated cows contains a higher amount of the hormone IGF-1. Elevated IGF-1 levels are associated with numerous form of cancer (such as breast, prostate, colon, lung cancer) and an increase in the rate of fraternal twin births in humans. Milk from rBGH/rBST-treated cows has lower nutritional value, contains an increased amount of antibiotics, and contains an increased amount of pus from the infected udders of cows.

Arsenic is a chemical that is found in conventional chicken. It is used in chicken feed to promote growth, to decrease infections, improve efficiency in feeding chickens, and increase pigmentation (resulting in fresher looking chicken in the grocery stores). Arsenic is also found in rice and rice-based products (such as infant cereal and rice milk). Rice farmers use poultry litter that comes from arsenic-ingesting chickens to fertilize their crops. Poultry litter is a mixture of chicken manure, chicken feathers, and chicken bedding materials that are remaining once the chickens are sent to the slaughterhouse. Arsenic is classified as being carcinogenic by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), but is classified as being safe for human consumption in small amounts. As a side note, recent studies have found that one-third of feather samples from chickens in the US contain diphenhydramine (the active ingredient in Benadryl) and most feather samples from chickens in the US contain caffeine and/or tylenol. That’s right! Chicken farmers often feed their chickens diphenhydramine to calm the chickens down, and caffeine to keep the chickens awake so that they can spend more time eating! Yet another reason to stick to organic, pastured chicken!

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

13 Banned Foods Still Allowed in the United States

Health Risks of Potassium Bromate Maybe Not So Fringe

Brominated Battle: Soda Chemical Has Cloudy Health History

What’s Azodicarbonamide? What’s it Doing in Your Bread? (and How to Pronounce it?)

BHT and BHA

The Problems with Olestra

The Evidence on Arsenic and Rice

 

Misleading Food Labels!

Photo credit: yisris via Flickr/Creative Commons

Organic, light, multigrain, reduced fat, all natural, no added sugar. With all the food labels on our grocery store shelves, it can be quite difficult to make healthy choices when it comes what we put into our shopping cart! You are not alone in this confusion; according to a Nielsen survey 59% of consumers have difficulty interpreting food labels. This year, in Europe, significant changes are being made to the way foods will be labeled. Nutrition facts will be displayed on the front of food packages and identified with a “red light, yellow light, green light approach”; red will indicate that something is unhealthy, yellow will indicate that something is moderately unhealthy, green will indicate something is healthy.  Below is a list of the most misleading food labels on our grocery store shelves.

  1. “All Natural” – The FDA has not defined the label “all natural”. It usually means that the product doesn’t contain artificial color, artificial flavors, and synthetic ingredients. The term “all natural” can be easily manipulated by food manufacturers. For example, some food manufacturers argue that High Fructose Corn Syrup is “all natural” because it is derived from corn.
  2. “Multigrain” – Products labeled “multigrain” are highly processed, most nutritional value is lost through processing. Many of our grains, in the US, have been genetically manipulated through hybridization. As a general rule, I try to stick to ancient grains. There are several companies that make great products using ancient grains. One of my favorites is Jovial Foods, they make cookies, pasta, and flour.
  3. “No Sugar Added” – If you are trying to cut back on carbs, items with this label might be appealing. These products can still be high in natural sugars and could be sweetened with maltodextrin (a form of MSG). Below is a label for “no sugar added” Juicy Juice Apple Juice; no sugar added, but 26 grams of sugar per serving!
  4. “Sugar Free” – Products labeled “sugar free” must have less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving. These products are typically sweetened with neurotoxic artificial sweeteners such as aspartame.
  5. “Zero Trans Fat” – Trans-fats are fats that have a hydrogen atom added to prevent the product from breaking down on the shelves (or in our bodies, for that matter). Trans fats in foods are like “BIG SUV’s trying to park into ‘compact’ parking spaces of our cells that are reserved for healthy Omega-3 fats (DHA). When this happens, our neurotransmitters responsible for focus, mood and memory have a hard time finding and recognizing their receptors due to the inflammation of the membranes on the brain cells caused by the consumption of trans-fats.” Currently, the FDA does not require trans-fats to be listed on nutrition labels, if the product contains less than 0.5 g of trans-fats per serving. If you are really serious about keeping all unhealthy trans-fats out of your diet, be sure to check the ingredients list for “hydrogenated oils” and/or “partially hydrogenated oils”. These ingredients are actually trans-fats.
  6. “Free Range” – The terms “free-range”, “free-roaming”, and “cage-free” are not currently regulated by the government. “Free-roaming” and “cage-free” chickens live a cage-free life and are allowed to roam freely, as long as it is within the four walls of their barn. “Free-range” chickens live in slightly better conditions; they are allowed to leave the barn, but many times the areas they have access to usually are dirt-surfaced or concrete-surfaced areas. The term “pastured” means that the eggs came from chickens that are cage-free in a grassy pasture. Eggs from pastured chickens are generally more nutritious since the diet of the chickens includes bugs and earthworms.
  7. “Fat-free” – When food manufacturers remove all the fat from a product, that product becomes unpalatable. Oftentimes, food manufacturers add flavor back into the product using harmful ingredients such as monosodium glutamate (MSG). These products can also be loaded with sugar, which is easily stored in the body as fat.
  8. “Gluten-free” – Unless you are a celiac or have gluten intolerance, there is no real benefit of eating gluten-free products. Many people associate gluten-free diets with weight loss. A study at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center showed that 81% of people on a gluten-free diet gain weight and more than 40% of those on a gluten-free diet are overweight. According to blogger Diana Herrington at care2 make a difference, there are several drawbacks associated with gluten-free products:
    • They contain too little fiber.
    • They contain too many carbs.
    • Gluten-free products are expensive; on average 242% more than products containing gluten.
    • They contain a lot of bad carbs that cause digestive issues and have a high glycemic index. These carbs also don’t usually contain many nutrients.
    • They contain too many calories; almost TWICE as much calories as their counterparts.
    • They lack important nutrients such as iron, calcium, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and folate.
    • They often contain xanthan gum that is derived from corn, soy or wheat. Corn and soy are the most genetically modified crops in the United States.
    • They contain many unhealthy sugars.
  9. “Organic” – “Organic” – If a product is labeled “organic”, it contains at least 95% organic ingredients; the remaining 5% can be non-organic. If a product is labeled “made with organic ingredients”, it contains at least 70% organic ingredients, the remaining 30% can be non-organic. Be sure to check the food labels to find out what non-organic ingredients the product contains! To be organic, it must say 100% organic.
  10. “Fat-free or low-fat milk” – There are several dangers associated with eating low-fat or fat-free milk (for tips on choosing the healthiest milk, see my article HERE)
    “A study at Harvard found that women who ate two or more servings of low-fat or non-fat dairy per day, like skim milk or yogurt, had 85% higher risk of infertility than those that ate full-fat dairy products.”
    -Chris Kresser“Low fat milk causes weight gain. This is how farmers fatten pigs. If they give them whole milk, the pigs stay lean. Low fat milk is missing all the vitamins that you get in the fat. The industry has figured out that they make a lot more money on butter and butterfat if they put it in ice cream. So they take the cream out of the milk, put it into ice cream. They would much rather you spend the money on ice cream, than on butter or buttercream; they make a lot more money.”
     -Sally Fallon, Weston A. Price Foundation“A note on the production of skim milk powder: liquid milk is forced through a tiny hole at high pressure, and then blown out into the air. This causes a lot of nitrates to form and the cholesterol in the milk is oxidized. Those of you who are familiar with my work know that cholesterol is your best friend; you don’t have to worry about natural cholesterol in your food; however, you do not want to eat oxidized cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, to atherosclerosis. So when you drink reduced-fat milk thinking that it will help you avoid heart disease, you are actually consuming oxidized cholesterol, which initiates the process of heart disease.”
    -Weston A. Price Foundation, Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry“Let us get rid of one fallacy which is that skim milk is actually milk that has had the cream skimmed off the top. That actually sounds logical but it is not how is done, at least not in this modern world. That process would not remove all the cream so what is done in modern processing is the milk is spun around with centrifuges, eventually completely separating the cream (fat) and milk. It is first clarified, then separated, then pasteurized (or ultra-pasteurized), and then finally homogenized. This over-processing has now removed every healthy vitamin, living enzyme, and natural mineral. Welcome to your now-dead beverage……Skim milk will not support life. So by removing the cream you have essentially turned the milk into something completely useless, especially the pasteurized variety as you have not only removed the healthy fat but you have also as stated removed the living nutrients.”
    -Raw Milk Truth“Researchers from Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute conducted a study that monitored the dietary habits of more than 20,000 Swedish women for a decade.  It turned out that women who consumed full fat milk or cheese had a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than the rest of the group.  The results were convincing enough for the researchers to recommend that a glass of full fat milk every day will cut weight gain by 15%, and a portion of full fat cheese each day will cut weight gain by 30%.  Alicja Wolk, professor at the Karolinska Institute stated, ‘The surprising conclusion was that increased consumption of (full fat) cheese meant that overweight women lost weight.’

    Yet skim and 1% milk is pervasive in school lunch programs, and throughout the American diet.  If you summarize the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) food pyramid you see an emphasis on grains plus skim milk, the very combination that fattens hogs so efficiently!  In fact, the USDA recommends we start the low-fat habit early: children as young as pre-school are recommended to consume non-fat or low fat milk, yogurt and cheese. With a food pyramid like this it’s little wonder we face an obesity epidemic from childhood onward.”
    -Ann M Childers, MD. Life Balance Northwest

    “Guess what they feed a pig if they want to make it as fat as possible as fast as possible?

    Low-fat milk, because if they give the pig milk with fat in it, the pig gets satiated. It’s satisfied and won’t eat any more. But if they give it low-fat milk, it will eat the grain they feed it forever because it’ll have a deficiency of fat.

    Now think of what we’re eating for breakfast in this country…

    If you don’t want to get fat you’re told to drink low-fat milk, and corn or wheat or oat-based cereal.

    It’s the prescription to make you as fat as possible as quickly as you can get there. You’ll never stop wanting to eat because you’re never getting any food that causes satiation.

    Americans are told to eat a diet that is scientifically designed to make you as fat as possible as fast as possible.”

    -Dr. Al Sears, MD. Power for Healthy Living

  11. “Contains no MSG” – Currently, the FDA regulations state that an ingredient can contain up to 98% MSG before the ingredients have to state that the product contains MSG. There may be autolyzed yeast, hydrolyzed protein, natural flavoring, carrageenan, sodium caseinate, maltodextrin, and numerous other ingredients that contain or create processed free glutamic acid (MSG) during the manufacturing process. You can get a complete list of aliases for MSG HERE.
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

LET’S EAT: Maji Teaches Mongo What It Means to Eat Clean!

LET'S EAT!: Maji Teaches Mongo What It Means to Eat Clean!

LET’S EAT: Maji Teaches Mongo What it Means to Eat Clean, the second book in the Maji & Mongo series, is set to release on March 15, but you can pre-order it now at amazon.com!

“Maji and Mongo were dogs of the same breed but they were very different, very different indeed! One a sad couch potato, the other a happy playful tornado!

When they met, Mongo ate chips and dips, cookies and candy. He didn’t even know how great water could taste! But Maji shows him that food from the ground is the best all around and that being healthy and strong can come in handy. Don’t miss the fun these two pups have together! Join them and make up your mind to eat clean forever!”

The Maji and Mongo books are lifestyle picture books for 3 to 7 year olds that address the issue of outdoor play and clean eating in a way that makes it sound like irresistible fun. They use a rhyming format that children love. The illustrations of Maji and Mongo are adorable and quickly capture the attention and the hearts of children. The books also contain valuable tips for parents who want to help their children be more active and enjoy more wholesome foods.

LET’S EAT addresses the importance of drinking water (versus soda), how it gives one energy and vitality. It presents guidelines on how to eat healthy in a fun way, i.e., eating clean, eating organic so you don’t have scrambled-up brains, eating foods that came from the ground versus from a bag, avoiding GMOs, pesticides, chemicals, and junk food in general.

“What my research was showing me was that the American food supply is polluted and that many of those suffering from disordered eating, actually suffer from food addictions that are the result of these pollutants. I found an abundance of data available on the role that food additives play in damaging the biological systems that regulate weight. Specifically, the American food supply is polluted by:

        • Antibiotics
        • Artificial growth hormones
        • High fructose corn syrup
        • Artificial dyes (made from coal tar and petrochemicals)
        • Artificial sweeteners derived from chemicals
        • Synthetically created chemical pesticide and fertilizers
        • Genetically engineered proteins and ingredients
        • Sewage sludge
        • Irradiation

These substances have been shown to be carcinogenic, neurotoxic, obesogenic and addictive, especially for children, whose brains are still developing. As a result, the U.S. is among the top ten fastest countries in the world with the distinction of being number one for having the fattest children. The impact on the health of our nation has already been catastrophic and will get much worse if we do not do something to protect our children. Indeed, U.S. children today will be the first generation in decades to have a shorter life expectancy than that of their parents. The Maji & Mongo book series is an attempt at fighting back, by engaging children and their parents in an entertaining and endearing read that puts across the importance of getting outdoors and eating clean.”
-Dr. J. Renae Norton 

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Top Ten Supplements

photo used under creative commons license

Dr. Donald W. Miller, Jr recently published an article listing the top ten supplements that he takes on a daily basis. The article is particularly informative, as it also lists both recommended dosages and the benefits of taking each supplement. These are the top ten supplements he recommends:

  1. Vitamin D3
  2. Iodine
  3. Selenium
  4. Vitamin K2
  5. Magnesium
  6. Alpha Lipoic Acid
  7. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)
  8. L-Carnitine
  9. Omega 3 Fatty Acids
  10. Resversatol

To read more about the benefits of taking each of these supplements, be sure to read the full article HERE. As always, be sure to consult with your physician before starting any new supplements!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Coconut Oil and Dementia

photo used under a creative commons license

It is predicted that by the year 2050 that 15,000,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. Is there anything we can do to protect ourselves from this diagnosis? I recently read an article by Dr. Mary Newport called “What If There Was a Cure for Alzheimers and No One Knew?” that gives some hope!

In 2003, Dr. Newport’s 53-year-old husband was diagnosed with progressive dementia. By 2008, he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease after an MRI showed shrunken areas within his brain. Her husband began to experience periods when the effects of the disease were extreme, but would also experience days when the effects were more tolerable.

Dr. Newport began looking for medical research studies for her husband to participate in. There were two in particular that she was interested in; one involved a vaccination, the other involved medication. She researched the medication used in the study and found that the “promising” ingredient in the medication was medium-chain triglyceride oil. She had her husband supplement with coconut oil on a daily basis. Before starting the coconut oil, she asked her husband to draw a clock. She had him complete the same task after 14 days of coconut oil supplementation and after 37 days of coconut oil supplementation. These were the resulting illustrations:

Coconut Oil and Dementia

After 60 days of supplementing with coconut oil, changes in her husband were pretty significant.   He is able to happily walk into the kitchen each morning, engage in conversation and tell jokes. His tremor was became barely noticeable, his concentration and focus had improved greatly. On a trip to visit family, her husband’s interaction with relatives had changed significantly in comparison to their visit the year before. He recognized people by name, his facial expressions were more animated, he was more involved in conversations, he understood jokes immediately, he was able to speak in sentences. Due to atrophy is his brain he will never be completely “normal”, but the improvements that have been made since starting supplementation with coconut oil have been amazing. Her husband currently takes 7 teaspoons of coconut oil twice per day.

Why does coconut oil have this effect on individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease? When we ingest coconut oil, the liver converts it into ketone bodies instead of storing it as fat. These ketone bodies are then available to be used by the brain for energy when glucose is not available. Typically, we do not have ketone bodies available for energy unless we have been starving for days or are eating a very low carbohydrate diet. Neurons in some areas in the brain of those with Alzheimer’s Disease are unable to use glucose for energy because of insulin resistance. These neurons eventually end up dying off even before symptoms of the disease appear. When these neurons have ketone bodies available for energy they may be able to stay alive and function.

Alzheimer’s Disease is now being referred to by some as Type III Diabetes. A study completed by Dr. Suzanne de la Monte of Rhode Island Hospital found that diabetes is associated with several neuronal factors that are associated with dementia. Alzheimer’s Disease progresses when insulin resistance develops within the brain. When this occurs lipid metabolism is prevented, resulting in a build up of lipids in the brain. This build-up results in an increase in inflammation as well as the appearance of dementia symptoms. When an individual with Alzheimer’s Disease supplements with coconut oil, inflammation begins to decrease, the brain can better absorb cholesterol. This results in improved neural function.

For more information about coconut oil and dementia, be sure to readthe award-winning book “Stop Alzheimer’s Now! How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson’s, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders” by Dr. Bruce Fife

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

What If There Was a Cure for Alzheimers and No One Knew?

Alzheimer’s is really just ‘type-3’ diabetes, new research shows

Avoiding Neurotoxins

photo used under a creative commons license

“A neurotoxin is a substance which inhibits the functions of neurons. Neurons are found throughout the brain and nervous system, and the function of these unique cells is critical for a variety of tasks, ranging from autonomic nervous system jobs like swallowing to higher-level brain function. Neurotoxins can work in a variety of ways, with the danger of exposure varying, depending on the neurotoxin involved and the dosage.”

Neurotoxins can be found in nearly every processed food and beverage on grocery store shelves. This includes processed organic foods! The consumption of processed foods in the American diet are skyrocketing and shows no sign of slowing down. In 2010, Americans spent 90% of their food budget on processed foods! 1 out of every 4 Americans are sensitive to neurotoxic food additives, but only 1 out of 250 Americans know that their symptoms are a reaction to these additives. The most common neurotoxic food additives in processed foods in the United States include:

  • aspartame
  • autolyzed anything
  • barley malt
  • beef base
  • beef flavoring
  • beef stock
  • bouillon
  • broth of any kind
  • calcium caseinate
  • carrageenan
  • caseinate
  • chicken base
  • chicken broth
  • chicken flavoring
  • chicken stock
  • disodium anything
  • dough conditioner
  • flavoring
  • gelatin
  • gelatinized anything
  • glutamate
  • guar gum
  • hydrolyzed anything
  • kombu extract
  • l-cysteine
  • malt anything
  • malted anything
  • milk solids
  • monosodium glutamate
  • natural flavor
  • nutrasweet
  • pork base
  • pork flavoring
  • protein concentrate
  • protein extract
  • seasoned salt
  • seasoning
  • smoke flavoring
  • sodium caseinate
  • solids of any kind
  • soup base
  • soy extract
  • soy protein anything
  • soy sauce
  • spice
  • stock
  • textured protein
  • textured vegetable protein
  • umami
  • vegetable gum
  • whey anything
  • yeast extract
How can we best protect ourselves from neurotoxic food additives? The best way is to eat a clean diet which minimizes the consumption of processed foods. If you must eat processed foods, it is important to become educated on what food additives to avoid. Overwhelmed by the idea of eliminating processed foods from your diet? You don’t need to eliminate all processed foods at once. Just make it a goal to gradually eliminate more processed foods every time you go grocery shopping. Many of my patients find the website “100 Days of Real Food” to be an excellent source for recipes and tips on how to ditch the processed foods and switch to clean eating! Dallas and Melissa Hartwig, authors of “It Starts with Food” offer several free must-read resources. You can view them all HERE!
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Seeds Explained: Heirloom, Hybrid, GMO [infographic]


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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Halloween Candy Makeovers + Alternatives to Halloween Candy

Alternatives to Halloween Candy

photo used under a creative commons license, via Bunches and Bits

I’ve received a few inquiries from my patients and readers requesting recipes for healthier versions of their favorite Halloween treats! I’ve found a few recipes that would be a healthier alternative for an occasional treat!

Homemade Twix Bars 

Homemade Vegan Kit Kat Bars

Homemade Rolos

3 Ingredient Halloween Apple Bites

Vanilla Bean Coconut Butter Cups with Chocolate Peanut Butter

For those of you looking for non-candy treats to hand out to trick-or-treaters, check out this article!20 Ways to Do Halloween Without Candy

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

HealThy Mouth Summit

photo used under a creative commons license, flickr user shermeee

Recently, I posted an article that discussed the dangers of fluoride. I received several inquiries from both readers and patients, asking for a list of reliable resources for information about dental health. Next month, there is going to be a free online summit that will feature an expert panel of dentists, doctors, nutritionists and authors that will be providing cutting edge information to help you attain optimal dental health.

For more information about the HealThy Mouth Summit and for FREE registration be sure to check out: www.healthymouthsummit.com!

Eating Disorders & Obesity: Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D

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The majority of the patients I see in my practice today (whether obese, anorexic, bulimarexic, or bulimic) are diagnosed with having a vitamin D deficiency by their family physician. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with reduced immune system function, 17 different types of cancer, heart disease, psychological disorders, neurological disorders, diabetes, stroke, hypertension, bone loss, muscle mass loss. Typically, when a patient’s blood test* comes back from the lab showing a deficiency in vitamin D, their physician prescribes them a vitamin D supplement. Is there a difference between the vitamin D supplement that is prescribed, the vitamin D that is sold at health food stores, and the vitamin D we obtain naturally from food and the sun? What is the best source of vitamin D?

If your physician writes you a prescription for vitamin D and you take it to the pharmacy, your pharmacist will hand you a bottle of vitamin D2 (or ergocalciferol). Vitamin D2 is a synthetic form of vitamin D that is derived from fungal sources using ultraviolet radiation; it REALLY shouldn’t be allowed to be called a vitamin, it’s more like a franken-vitamin! Synthetic vitamin D is less biologically active than natural forms of vitamin D; it takes the body 500% longer to convert synthetic vitamin D into a usable form. In addition to prescription vitamin D supplements, vitamin D2 can be found in “vitamin-enriched” foods, such as milk. There has been research done that looked at mortality rates for people who supplemented using vitamin D2 versus vitamin D3; it was determined individuals that supplemented with vitamin D2 had a two percent relative risk increase.

If you go to the health food store and pick up a bottle of vitamin D, you will likely be buying vitamin D3 (or cholecalciferol). Vitamin D3 is a natural form of vitamin D, it’s usually derived from either lanolin or cod liver oil extract. It is much easier for the body to convert vitamin D3 into a usable form. The study that compared mortality rates for those supplementing with vitamin D2 versus vitamin D3, individuals that supplemented with vitamin D3 had a six percent relative risk decrease. The Vitamin D Council recommends vitamin D3 for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

It is always best to discuss supplementing with vitamin D3 with your doctor, especially if you have sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, or lymphoma. The Vitamin D Council recommends a daily dosage of 1000 IU of vitamin D3 per 25 lbs of body weight; if you weigh 150 lbs, the recommended dosage would be 6000 IU per day. If your lab test shows that you are vitamin D deficient, each additional 1000 IU will usually producse a 10 ng/ml increase; if you weight 150 lbs, and your vitamin D test shows your vitamin D is 40 ng/ml, you would take 6000 IU per day PLUS an additional 2000 IU to be in the middle of the optimal range. The Vitamin D Council considers:

  •  a vitamin D level of < 50 ng/ml to be deficient
  • a vitamin D level of 50-70 ng/ml to be optimal
  • a vitamin D level of 70-100 ng/ml to be ideal if being treated for cancer or heart disease
  • a vitamin D level that is > 100 ng/ml to be excessive

In addition to taking a vitamin D3 supplement, there are several other sources of natural vitamin D that you can take advantage of. The best source of vitamin D is exposure to sunlight, but the amount of sun exposure that is considered safe is not usually enough to prevent and treat disease. There are also foods that are rich in vitamin D, such as eggs, organ meats, animal fat, cod liver oil and fish, but if you are vitamin D deficient it may be difficult to get vitamin D to an optimal level with food alone. In order to properly metabolize vitamin D, it is important to make sure you are getting sufficient magnesium, vitamin K, vitamin A, zinc and boron.

*it’s important to make sure your vitamin D levels are checked using a test called 25(OH)D as opposed to 1,25(OH)D. 25(OH)D is a better overall marker of vitamin D status.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
 Test Values and Treatment for Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D: How to Determine Your Optimal Dose

 

The Potential Effects of Yoga on Overall Health

Adiponectin, leptin, and yoga practice

photo used under a creative commons license

A recent study published by Ohio State University investigated the mechanisms of hatha yoga’s potential stress-reduction benefits. To do so, researchers compared adiponectin and leptin levels in yoga novices and yoga experts; a novice was defined as an individual that participated in 6-12 yoga sessions in the past year, an expert was defined as an individual that had participated in 1-2 yoga weekly yoga session for at least two years AND at least 2 weekly sessions in the past year.

Leptin is also known as the “starvation hormone”.Leptin sends a signal to our brains that fat cells have enough stored energy to engage in normal metabolic processes. Every individual has an optimal level of leptin, which is thought to be determined genetically. When leptin levels are below optimal levels, the brain receives a message to conserve energy because the body is in a state of deprivation. When this occurs, the brain sends a message to the body that it is hungry (in an attempt to get the individual to eat) so that leptin levels can be restored to an optimal level. Leptin has pro-inflammatory properties. Leptin levels are typically high in obese individuals and low in underweight, malnourished individuals. Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) typically have high leptin levels.

Adiponectin is a hormone that is produced in fat cells; it is released from adipose tissue. Adiponectin has an impact on the regulation of glucose and a role in the processing of fatty acids. Adiponectin has anti-inflammatory properties. Adiponectin levels are typically low in obese individuals, low in individuals with Binge-Eating Disorder (BED), and high in individuals with anorexia or bulimia. Individuals with MDD typically have low adiponectin levels. Adiponectin and leptin counter-regulate each other to regulate body weight; when leptin levels increase, adiponectin levels decrease, and when leptin levels decrease, adoponectin levels increase.

Fifty well-matched women between the ages of 30-65 participated in the research study; 25 were yoga novices, 25 were yoga experts. Three fasting leptin and adiponectin blood samples were taken from each woman on three separate occasions. Leptin was 36% higher in yoga novices in comparison to yoga experts, adiponectin was 28% higher in yoga experts in comparison to yoga novices. Additionally, adiponectin/leptin ratios were nearly twice as high in yoga experts in comparison to yoga novices. Among the expert group, leptin levels were lower in those experts with the most yoga experience.

There have been several studies completed that have highlighted the importance of leptin and adiponectin in the prevention of type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. This study raises the possibility that long-term or more intensive yoga could possibly have a positive effect on overall health through the alteration of leptin and adiponectin production. These hormones are especially of importance in the recovery process for eating disorders and obesity.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: Kiecolt-Glaser JK, et al, Adiponectin, leptin, and yoga practice, Physiol Behav (2012), doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2012.01.016

The Dangers of Fluoride

photo used under a creative commons license, flickr user shermeee

Most of us are exposed to fluoride on a daily basis, whether it’s in our dental care products, prescription medications (it’s one of the basic ingredients in Prozac) or the water we drink, cook with, and bathe in. Fluoride is marketed as being the “key to preventing tooth decay”, but what we aren’t told is that fluoride has never been approved by the FDA and does NOT meet “requirements of safety and effectiveness.” But there’s more that we aren’t told, fluoride may also cause extensive damage to our bodies.

Fluoride is a neurotoxin! Neurotoxins are toxins that target the nervous system and disrupt the signaling that allows neurons to communicate effectively. Exposure to neurotoxins can result in a variety of forms of damage. In the case of fluoride, researchers are seeing impaired neurobehavioral development, brain damage, and reduced IQ levels. There have been many animal studies completed on the effects of fluoride; these studies have found that fluoride causes:

  • A reduction in nicotinic receptors in the brain. Nicotinic receptors are a type of cholinergic receptor; cholinergic receptors are involved with organ function and vital processes like digestive and cardiovascular systems.
  • A reduction in protein content in the brain
  • Alterations in protein expression in the brain
  • Damages to the hippocampus. The hippocampus is responsible for encoding long-term memories and helping with spatial navigation
  • Inhibition of cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase is one of many important enzymes needed for the proper functioning of the nervous system
  • Increased oxidative stress, resulting from a decrease in the three most important antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase)

In addition to the causing brain damage, fluoride has a detrimental effect on other systems in our body. Fluoride has been linked to:

  • Endocrine disruption
  • An increased risk of 23 types of cancer
  • Hyperactivity, lethargy
  • Genetic damage
  • Dementia
  • Reproductive damage
  • Skin problems
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Premature puberty
  • Skeletal fluorosis, resulting in brittle bones and joint pain
  • Dental fluorosis, causing the teeth to become pitted, cracked, and brittle
  • Arthritis
  • Glucose intolerance
  • Damage to collagen tissue in the body
  • Iodine displacement within the body
  • Lower life expectancy

There are several ways we can protect ourselves from the harmful effects of fluoride.

  • We can avoid dental care products that contain fluoride. Be a box-turner when you are looking for fluoride-free toothpaste, even though a toothpaste may be marketed as being “healthy”, there may be other ingredients that are questionable or may cause damage to the teeth and gums; such as sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), glycerin, sodium saccharin, sweeteners and hydrated silica. There are two toothpastes that I have found that don’t contain any questionable ingredients; Earthpaste and OraWellness Brushing Blend.
  • Minimize exposure to fluoridated water; use a kitchen water filter that contains activated alumina, limit time spent in the bath or shower. If you’re really serious about it, you can have a whole-house fluoride filtration system installed, but those are typically quite expensive. The fluoride added to municipal water systems is a man-made form of fluoride; it’s a chemical by-product that is produced during the manufacturing of aluminum, steel, cement, phosphate and nuclear weapons.
  • Avoid fluoridated bottled water, soft drinks and commercial dairy products
  • Eat a diet that is rich in selenium. People that are exposed to high levels of fluoride have normal levels of antioxidants when they also eating diets that are high in selenium. Animal studies have shown selenium can prevent organ damage (heart, liver, kidneys) and minimize the brain damage that accompanies excess fluoride. Foods that are highest in selenium include brazil nuts, shellfish (especially oysters and mussels), liver, fish, sunflower seeds, bran, caviar, bacon, pork chops, lobster, crab, and shrimp
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

//www.wisegeek.com/what-are-nicotinic-receptors.htm

//pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/TIB/cholinesterase.html

//www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-hippocampus.htm

//www.naturalnews.com/028849_fluoride_dangers.html

//www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-thyroid.htm

//www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/foods-high-in-selenium.php

//www.naturalnews.com/037267_fluoride_selenium_protection.html

How to Choose a Healthy Yogurt

The Health Benefits of Yogurt

Photo by flickr user ‘quimpg’ used under a creative commons license.

High in protein, rich in calcium and delicious, there’s no wonder as to why yogurt is becoming an increasingly popular part of the American diet.  But the benefits of yogurt don’t stop here! According to an article published by Fitness Magazine yogurt can also:

  • Aid in weight loss and fat loss
  • Provide the body with good-for-you bacteria
  • Provide the body with vitamins such as potassium, phosphorous, riboflavin, iodine, zinc, vitamin B5, and vitamin B12
  • Help the body recover from workouts faster
  • Prevent high blood pressure
  • Improve immune system function
  • Improve dental health

As the popularity of yogurt increases, so does the number of varieties of yogurt in the dairy case. Are all varieties of yogurt created equal? How can you be sure you are choosing the healthiest yogurt? Of course, the healthiest yogurt would be homemade. But what if you want to buy a store-bought variety? Here are some tips!

1. Choose yogurt that is organic. Keep in mind, the yogurt may not always be labeled organic. Some of the smaller dairies do follow all organic principles but just might not be able to afford to purchase the USDA “organic” label. You can usually find this information by calling the dairy directly or by visiting the dairy’s website.

2. Choose yogurt that is grassfed. Grassfed dairy contains more Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA). CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue, and decrease in stored body fat. Studies show that individuals that include CLA in their diets may:

        • reduce their risks of developing certain cancers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure and heart disease
        • experience an increase in metabolism
        • lower their cholesterol and triglycerides
        • lower their insulin resistance (a Penn State study found that CLA mimicked synthetic diabetes medication)
        • experience a reduction in belly fat, especially in the overweight and obese
        • experience an increase in lean muscle

3. Choose yogurt that is made from milk from an A2 Beta Casein cow (Guernsey is best, but there are other breeds such as Brown Swiss and Jersey etc.). This information is sometimes more difficult to find, in most cases you would have to either contact the dairy directly, but sometimes the dairy does include this information on their website. If you want to play it safe, goat milk yogurt or sheep milk yogurt will always contain A2 Beta Casein.

4. Avoid “fat-free” or “low fat” yogurt. Here are a few reasons that I avoid fat-free and low-fat dairy:

 “A study at Harvard found that women who ate two or more servings of low-fat or non-fat dairy per day, like skim milk or yogurt, had 85% higher risk of infertility than those that ate full-fat dairy products.”  – Chris Kresser

“Low fat milk causes weight gain. This is how farmers fatten pigs. If they give them whole milk, the pigs stay lean.Low fat milk is missing all the vitamins that you get in the fat. The industry has figured out that they make a lot more money on butter and butterfat if they put it in ice cream. So they take the cream out of the milk, put it into ice cream. They would much rather you spend the money on ice cream, than on butter or buttercream; they make a lot more money.” -Sally Fallon, Weston A. Price Foundation

“A note on the production of skim milk powder: liquid milk is forced through a tiny hole at high pressure, and then blown out into the air. This causes a lot of nitrates to form and the cholesterol in the milk is oxidized. Those of you who are familiar with my work know that cholesterol is your best friend; you don’t have to worry about natural cholesterol in your food; however, you do not want to eat oxidized cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, to atherosclerosis. So when you drink reduced-fat milk thinking that it will help you avoid heart disease, you are actually consuming oxidized cholesterol, which initiates the process of heart disease.”  -Weston A. Price Foundation, Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry

“Let us get rid of one fallacy which is that skim milk is actually milk that has had the cream skimmed off the top. That actually sounds logical but it is not how is done, at least not in this modern world. That process would not remove all the cream so what is done in modern processing is the milk is spun around with centrifuges, eventually completely separating the cream (fat) and milk. It is first clarified, then separated, then pasteurized (or ultra-pasteurized), and then finally homogenized. This over-processing has now removed every healthy vitamin, living enzyme, and natural mineral. Welcome to your now-dead beverage……Skim milk will not support life. So by removing the cream you have essentially turned the milk into something completely useless, especially the pasteurized variety as you have not only removed the healthy fat but you have also as stated removed the living nutrients.”
-Raw Milk Truth

“Researchers from Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute conducted a study that monitored the dietary habits of more than 20,000 Swedish women for a decade.  It turned out that women who consumed full fat milk or cheese had a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than the rest of the group.  The results were convincing enough for the researchers to recommend that a glass of full fat milk every day will cut weight gain by 15%, and a portion of full fat cheese each day will cut weight gain by 30%.  Alicia Wolk, professor at the Karolinska Institute stated, ‘The surprising conclusion was that increased consumption of (full fat) cheese meant that overweight women lost weight.’ 

Yet skim and 1% milk is pervasive in school lunch programs, and throughout the American diet.  If you summarize the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) food pyramid you see an emphasis on grains plus skim milk, the very combination that fattens hogs so efficiently!  In fact, the USDA recommends we start the low-fat habit early: children as young as pre-school are recommended to consume non-fat or low fat milk, yogurt and cheese. With a food pyramid like this it’s little wonder we face an obesity epidemic from childhood onward.” -Ann M Childers, MD. Life Balance Northwest

“Guess what they feed a pig if they want to make it as fat as possible as fast as possible? Low-fat milk, because if they give the pig milk with fat in it, the pig gets satiated. It’s satisfied and won’t eat any more. But if they give it low-fat milk, it will eat the grain they feed it forever because it’ll have a deficiency of fat.

Now think of what we’re eating for breakfast in this country…If you don’t want to get fat you’re told to drink low-fat milk, and corn or wheat or oat-based cereal. It’s the prescription to make you as fat as possible as quickly as you can get there. You’ll never stop wanting to eat because you’re never getting any food that causes satiation. Americans are told to eat a diet that is scientifically designed to make you as fat as possible as fast as possible.” -Dr. Al Sears, MD. Power for Healthy Living

Secondly, the body needs fat soluble vitamins in order to digest protein. Vitamin A is one of the vitamins it needs; this is most common in animal fat. If the body isn’t getting fat soluble vitamins from the food it is trying to digest, it’s going to start pulling vitamins from the liver. The liver of those recovering from eating disorders and obesity is already under a lot of stress so fat free/low fat sources of protein are not the way to go, if attaining maximum health is the goal. Additionally, those with eating disorders such as anorexia are usually quite deficient in vitamin A; there is also a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in the obese population.

5. As with all food choices, when choosing a yogurt you should try to find the least processed variety. If available in your area, yogurt made from raw milk is ideal. In many areas, raw milk yogurt is not available, so try to find a variety that is lightly pasteurized.

6. Be sure to check the ingredients label for unwanted ingredients such as agave syrup, artificial sweeteners, high fructose corn syrup and monosodium glutamate (MSG). Be sure to check for hidden sources of MSG such as skim milk powder, natural flavors, gelatin, pectin (Truth in Labeling provides a list of all hidden sources of MSG). Typically, unflavored yogurt is your safest bet. You can always add your own organic fruit, or maybe a bit of coconut nectar if you find it is too tart.

Currently, one of my favorite brands of yogurt is Erivan. It has no added thickeners, stabilizers, or milk solids. The cows on Erivan Dairy are primarily grassfed; any supplemental feed is fertilized organically. Calves are fed their mother’s milk. According to the Erivan website, the yogurt is made from “a choice blend of the freshest raw cow’s milk, pasteurized only once – just before culturing”. Erivan also notes that since the yogurt “is incubated in its own container, valuable whey, containing minerals, vitamins and protein is not lost.”

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

 

Nutritional Benefits of Adzuki Beans

photo used under a creative commons license

While shopping at Whole Foods Market I discovered a “new to me” food, adzuki beans (pronounced “azuki”). I haven’t seen these beans in stores before, so I had to find out if adzuki beans have any health benefits over other beans. Here’s what I’ve found out!

Adzuki beans are grown in East Asia. They are traditionally used for both sweet and savory dishes in East Asia. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, adzuki beans are believed to clear toxins from the body, clear heat from the body, reduce abdominal fullness and swelling due to edema, disperse blood statis, and improve jaundice. Adzuki beans are also high in iron, making it a good food for those who suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Adzuki beans may also promote good spleen and stomach health. They also believed to improve “yang” energy; you may have low yang energy if you have low productivity, are indecisive, are depressed or overly emotional, are controlling, are overly introverted, you tend to hold on to things too long, or have stagnant energy.

Nutritionally, how do adzuki beans compare to other beans? In comparison to mung beans, adzuki beans contain:

– almost twice as much iron

– more than twice as much potassium

– about 25% more magnesium

– almost twice as much phosphorous

– almost 2.5 times more zinc

– about 2 times more copper

– about 2 times more manganese

Mung beans beat adzuki beans in three areas. Mung beans contain less sodium, more selenium, and more vitamin A.

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© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Agave Syrup. Miracle Sweetener or Metabolic Nightmare?

Blue agave

photo used under a creative commons license via flickr user jay8085

Recently, I’ve received a few inquiries about the healthiness of agave nectar. Agave nectar is marketed as being a low glycemic, natural, plant-based sweetener with numerous health benefits such as improved calcium absorption, improved immune system function, and increased energy. How healthy is agave nectar? Is it the miracle sweetener that we should all be using?

Most agave nectar that is sold in stores today is a highly processed, man-made, condensed fructose syrup. This type of agave nectar contains a varying amount of fructose ranging from 70-97%. In comparison, high fructose corn syrup contains about 55% fructose. Anytime we consume more than 25 grams of fructose per day, it begins to take a toll on metabolic function. When consumed in excess, there is often an increase in insulin resistance. The majority of fructose is metabolized by the liver and converted directly to fat; often unhealthy visceral fat. In “The 76 Dangers of Sugar”, Dr. Mercola reports that fructose also –

  • elevates uric acid, which decreases nitric oxide, raises angiotensin, and causes your smooth muscle cells to contract, thereby raising your blood pressure and potentially damaging your kidneys. Increased uric acid also leads to chronic, low-level inflammation, which has far-reaching consequences for your health. For example, chronically inflamed blood vessels lead to heart attacks and strokes; also, a good deal of evidence exists that some cancers are caused by chronic inflammation.
  • Fructose tricks your body into gaining weight by fooling your metabolism—it turns off your body’s appetite-control system. Fructose does not appropriately stimulate insulin, which in turn does not suppress ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) and doesn’t stimulate leptin (the “satiety hormone”), which together result in your eating more and developing insulin resistance.
  • Fructose rapidly leads to weight gain and abdominal obesity (“beer belly”), decreased HDL, increased LDL, elevated triglycerides, elevated blood sugar, and high blood pressure—i.e., classic metabolic syndrome.
  • Fructose metabolism is very similar to ethanol metabolism, which has a multitude of toxic effects, including NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). It’s alcohol without the buzz.

Coconut nectar is an excellent substitute for agave nectar. While processed agave nectar is nutrient void, coconut nectar contains 17 amino acids, potassium, magnesium, zinc, iron, vitamin C, and vitamin B. In addition, it has a very low glycemic load. There are several companies that make coconut nectar, the brand I use is by a company called Coconut Secret and can be purchased online, at some health food stores or at Whole Foods.

Sources: Shocking! This ‘Tequila’ Sweetener if Far Worse than High Fructose Corn Syrup

Agave a Triumph of Marketing over Truth

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© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Defensive Eating – Protecting Your Brain from the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

Protecting The Brain from the Effects of Neurotoxins

“O is for Occipital Lobe” by Eric on Flickr. Used under Creative Commons license.

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a chemical that food manufacturers add to their products to enhance flavor; it is a cheap way to make very low quality foods taste great. What food manufacturers don’t want us to know is that MSG is a neurotoxin. A neurotoxin is a chemical that has a degenerative effect on the brain and nervous system.

Consumed on a regular basis, MSG creates lesions in the hypothalamus part of the brain.  When this occurs, neurotoxins enter the brain and cause damage. The damage caused results in abnormal development such as obesity, impaired growth, sexual reproductive problems, sleep difficulties and emotional problems.

One source of MSG is derived from fermented sugar beets. Currently, thanks to a company called Monsanto, 90% of sugar beets in the United States today are genetically modified to contain the pesticide gene of Roundup. So, by ingesting MSG we also ingest a known carcinogen.

At first glance, it would seem that removing MSG from our diets would be easy. I mean, just look at the food label, and make sure the product doesn’t list “MSG” or “Monosodium Glutamate” in the ingredients list.  Nothing to it, right? In an ideal world, this would be the case. Unfortunately, if the ingredient is made up of less than 99% MSG, the food manufacturer doesn’t have to list MSG in the ingredients list. MSG can be “hidden” in our foods under more than 50 alternative names and forms including, autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, dry milk powder, dry milk protein, gelatin, glutamate, glutamic acid, hydrolyzed corn gluten, hydrolyzed soy protein, hydrolyzed wheat protein, monopotassium glutamate, monosodium glutamate, natrium glutamate, sodium caseinate, textured protein, yeast food, yeast nutrient, etc.

The best way to protect yourself from the neurological effects of MSG is adapt a lifestyle of “clean eating”. Clean eating involves eliminating all processed foods from our diet; a processed food is any food that comes in a bottle, box, bag, can, carton or shrink-wrap, as well as the vast majority of deli and restaurant foods. It is virtually impossible to avoid these foods your entire life; never eating in a restaurant is a somewhat unrealistic expectation in today’s society. So, what can we do to protect ourselves from the neurological effects of MSG when we are in situations where MSG is nearly impossible to avoid?

In 2008, Phytomedicine released a report for a study which explored the use of Red Clover to protect the brain from the effects of MSG. Red Clover contains phytoestrogenic isoflavones which can possibly protect the brain from glutamate toxicity. The study found that by taking Red Clover before consuming MSG, there was a significantly increased cell survival rate and significantly decreased release of cellular lactate dehydrogenase, an indicator of cell damage. You can supplement with Red Clover in a variety of forms (such as teas, tinctures, tablets, capsules, liquid extracts, and extracts), but a whole herb supplement is thought to be the most effective.

Another way to protect our brain from the effects of MSG, is to supplement with Pyruvate. Pyruvate produces energy in the brain. When energy is produced in the brain, the brain is protected against neurotoxicity. Pyruvate is available as a supplement in most health food stores.

Keep in mind, these supplements are good to use when you can’t avoid ingesting MSG. Obviously it is better to avoid MSG altogether, when possible. As I heard a health professional say “it’s like putting a helmet on your head so you can strike yourself with a sledgehammer.”

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

The phytoestrogenic isoflavones from Trifolium pratense L. (Red clover) protects human cortical neurons from glutamate toxicity. Occhiuto F, Sangla G, Samperi S, Palumbo DR, DePasquale R, Circosta C. Phytomedicine. 2008 Sep; 15(9):676-82.

Health Ranger interviews neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock on MSG and brain-damaging excitotoxins

Hidden Names for MSG

Choosing a Healthy Protein Powder

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.” 

Currently, Americans spend over $2.7 billion dollars on sports nutrition products. One of the most popular products? Protein powder. The majority of stores have an overwhelming amount of various brands of protein powders, even gas stations are selling pre-mixed protein shakes in their beverage coolers! With so many brands on the grocery store shelf, how can we be sure we are picking the healthiest protein powder?

Look for a protein powder that is ‘undenatured’ or ‘cold processed’. The majority of protein powders in stores are subjected to extreme heat when they are being processed. Protein powders contain glutamic acid, which is normally healthy. Glutamic acid becomes a problem when it is exposed to heat. When protein powder is manufactured, it is exposed to extreme heat, which converts glutamic acid into free glutamic acid, also known as monosodium glutamate (MSG). You can read more about the dangers of MSG here (link to MSG article).

Always avoid soy protein powder. Soy is one of the most genetically modified crops in the US. They contain phytoestrogens, goitrogens, phytates, and trypsin inhibitors; you can read about all of these here. Soy protein is typically made from the sludge that is left over from deriving soy oil from the soy bean. Food Renegade describes it well in her article “The Dangers of Soy” when she says “Soy foods aren’t real food. They aren’t traditional. They aren’t old. They’re industrial waste products dressed up in pretty clothes and marketed to an ignorant public.” Instead of soy protein, I typically use whey protein.

Next, look at the ingredients label. Be sure the powder doesn’t contain any neurotoxins or other additives such as high fructose corn syrup. Additionally, most protein powders contain hidden sources of MSG. How do companies get away with not listing MSG on the ingredients label? Thanks to the FDA, it’s quite easy. If an ingredient is less than 99% pure glutamate, than it doesn’t need to be listed as MSG on the label! Here’s a list of hidden sources of MSG that ALWAYS contain MSG:

Glutamic acid,  Glutamate
Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
Monopotassium glutamate
Calcium glutamate
Monoammonium glutamate
Magnesium glutamate
Natrium glutamate
Yeast extract
Anything “hydrolyzed”
Any “hydrolyzed protein”
Calcium caseinate,  Sodium caseinate
Yeast food, Yeast nutrient
Autolyzed yeast
Gelatin
Textured protein
Soy protein, soy protein concentrate
Soy protein isolate
Whey protein, whey protein concentrate
Whey protein isolate
Anything “…protein”
Vetsin
Ajinomoto

I tend to avoid protein powders that contain a long list of ingredients, especially if many of the ingredients are impossible to pronounce. As with all foods, as a general rule, if I can’t pronounce it, I don’t eat it. Here’s a good example of one of the most popular heat-processed protein powders on the market:

Micellar Alpha And Beta Caseins And Caseinates, Rich In Alpha-Lactalbumin, Whey Isolates, Whey Peptides, L-Glutamine, Taurine, Lactoferrin), Lean Lipids(TM) (Trans Fat Free Lipid Complex Consisting of Canola Oil, Sunflower And/Or Safflower Oil, MCT’s, L-Carnitine), Fructose, Cocoa Powder, Maltodextrin, CytiVite I(TM) (Vitamin And Mineral Premix Consisting Of Vitamin A Acetate, Ascorbic Acid, Folate, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Niacinamide, Pyridoxine HCL, Cyanocobalamin, Biotin, Pantothenic Acid, Di-Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Iodine, Potassium Chloride, Ferrous Fumarate, Magnesium Oxide, Copper Gluconate, Zinc Oxide, Chromium Nicotinate), Natural And Artificial Flavors, Acesulfame Potassium, Sucralose, Soy Lecithin.

Next, look for protein powder that is made from hormone-free grassfed milk. Grassfed milk contains five times more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), the perfect ratio of essential fatty acids, and contains more beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin D than grain-fed milk. You also want to make sure the protein is a “concentrate” and not an “isolate”. Isolates are proteins stripped away from their nutritional cofactors.

After all these criteria, it may seem that almost every protein powder on the shelf is eliminated, right? I have found one protein powder that is delicious and meets all of the above criteria called, One World Whey. There are a few other cold-processed, grassfed protein powders available such as Upgraded Whey Protein Powder, Mercola Pure Power Protein, and Miracle Whey, but I haven’t personally tried these brands.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

 

Health Effects of Coffee

Health Effects of Coffee

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

This year coffee consumption in the United States has jumped ahead of soft drink consumption by more than 10%. The United States imports 35% of the world coffee bean supply to keep up with our consumption of over 400 million cups of coffee per day OR 4500 cups of coffee per second. The increasing popularity of coffee shows no sign of stopping; in 2010 56% of Americans consumed coffee, now in 2012 64% of Americans enjoy the beverage. How healthy is it to consume that much coffee? How are coffee bean farmers keeping up to our demand?

Up until 30 years ago, coffee beans were traditionally grown in shady, tropical, bio diverse environments. As demand began to increase, farmers had to find methods of increasing yield. This is where scientists stepped in to lend a hand. A fancy, new variety of coffee bean plant was developed that had the potential to produce more than three times more coffee beans. Problem solved, right? Not so fast. There was one major requirement that these plants needed to thrive, a sunny environment. Farmers were strongly encouraged USAID and other international development agencies to clear their land of rainforest plants that previously provided shade and begin to exclusively use the new sun-tolerant coffee bean plants.

Since sun-tolerant coffee bean plants were introduced, coffee bean plants have become one the most heavily chemically-treated crops of ANY agricultural commodity. When farmers cleared their land to create ideal growing conditions for the sun-tolerant plants their soil quality became extremely poor, resulting in the introduction of chemical fertilizers to promote plant growth. According to the CS Monitor, more than 250 pounds of fertilizer is used per acre of land. The new full-sun growing environment resulted in an increase in insects, weeds, fungus, pests, resulting in the introduction of an insane amount of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. What effects do these chemicals have on our health?

When pesticides are applied to any crop, they are applied in a fat-soluble base, so that they won’t wash off of the plants. Fat-solubility makes these chemical extremely difficult for the body to eliminate. If the body does not have enough resources to break the fat-soluble substance into a water-soluble substance, it moves the toxins into stored body fat until resources are available. As we consume more and more toxins, our bodies are forced to create more fat to store the toxins in. This especially becomes an issue for people that participate in physical exercise. When we exercise, our body dips into our stored body fat for energy, forcing our body to process the toxins in the fat without the right nutrients to do so. This results in scarring or cirrhosis of the liver.

Does this mean we should eliminate coffee from our diets altogether? Not necessarily. Should we avoid non-organic coffee? Most definitely. There are a small amount of organic coffee bean farmers that still use the shade-tolerant variety of plants. As of 2003, organic coffee only represented 0.6% of coffee consumption in the major coffee consuming countries. Starbucks has introduced some organic coffee blends, but at this point it only accounts for 2.3% of the beans they purchase and sell.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
Real Food Summit – Paul Chek – Eating Whole Foods for Body, Mind and Soul

Eggs: Free-Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free or Pastured?

Eggs; Free Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free or Pastured?
“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.Free-Range, Free-Roaming, Cage-Free, Pastured…..just a few of the labels you may come see when you are shopping for eggs at your local grocery store. It can be quite overwhelming to decipher all these labels to determine which type of egg is healthiest. Let’s take a look at some of these labels and figure out what type of eggs are the best choice.The terms “free-range”, “free-roaming”, and “cage-free” are not currently regulated by the government. “Free-roaming” and “cage-free” chickens live a cage-free life and are allowed to roam freely, as long as it is within the four walls of their barn. “Free-range” chickens live in slightly better conditions; they are allowed to leave the barn, but many times the areas they have access to usually are dirt-surfaced or concrete-surfaced areas.The term “pastured” means that the eggs came from chickens that are cage-free in a grassy pasture. Eggs from pastured chickens are generally more nutritious since the diet of the chickens includes bugs and earthworms. In comparison, non-pastured chickens are fed a processed feed. Check out the ingredients of one popular feed that is made specifically for chickens living in confined areas:

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain Byproducts, Roughage Products, Forage, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline Chloride, Folic Acid, Manadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex, Methionine Supplement, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Manganous Oxide, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Chloride, Zinc Oxide, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Sodium Selenite.

How does the nutritional value of eggs from chickens that are raised in confined areas compare to eggs from pastured chickens? Eggs from pastured chickens contain:

  • 1/3 less cholesterol
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 3 times more vitamin E
  • 7 times more beta carotene

I found these statistics on the Mother Earth News Website:

  • In 1974, the British Journal of Nutrition found that pastured eggs had 50 percent more folic acid and 70 percent more vitamin B12 than eggs from factory farm hens.
  • In 1988, Artemis Simopoulos, co-author of The Omega Diet, found pastured eggs in Greece contained 13 times more omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids than U.S. commercial eggs.
  • A 1998 study in Animal Feed Science and Technology found that pastured eggs had higher omega-3s and vitamin E than eggs from caged hens.
  • A 1999 study by Barb Gorski at Pennsylvania State University found that eggs from pastured birds had 10 percent less fat, 34 percent less cholesterol, 40 percent more vitamin A, and four times the omega-3s compared to the standard USDA data. Her study also tested pastured chicken meat, and found it to have 21 percent less fat, 30 percent less saturated fat and 50 percent more vitamin A than the USDA standard.
  • In 2003, Heather Karsten at Pennsylvania State University compared eggs from two groups of Hy-Line variety hens, with one kept in standard crowded factory farm conditions and the other on mixed grass and legume pasture. The eggs had similar levels of fat and cholesterol, but the pastured eggs had three times more omega-3s, 220 percent more vitamin E and 62 percent more vitamin A than eggs from caged hens.
  • The 2005 study Mother Earth News conducted of four heritage-breed pastured flocks in Kansas found that pastured eggs had roughly half the cholesterol, 50 percent more vitamin E, and three times more beta carotene.
The verdict? Definitely go with pasture-raised eggs when at all possible. They may be more expensive than other eggs, but the benefits are well worth it. The owner of the Cheeseslave blog posted a great comparison that is a really good example of just how economical pastured eggs really are:“Let’s say you pay $5 for a dozen pastured eggs. That means each egg costs about 42 cents. A “large” egg is about 2 ounces, so you’re paying 20 cents per ounce.
  • Twenty cents, people. How does that compare to other foods of a similar nutrient density?
  • Raw grass fed organic butter ($8 per pound): 50 cents per ounce
  • Raw grass fed organic cream ($7 per pint): 44 cents per ounce
  • Pasteurized grass fed butter – ($5 per pound): 31 cents per ounce
  • Grass fed organic ground beef ($4 per pound): 25 cents per ounce
  • Grass fed organic beef liver ($3 per pound): 19 cents per ounce
  • Raw grass fed organic milk ($10.50 per gallon): 8 cents per ounce”
If you live in the Cincinnati area, you can get organic, pastured eggs for $3 per dozen at Red Sun Farm in Loveland. Look at these beauties!
Red Sun Farms Pastured Eggs
 Let’s Connect!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

What’s the Deal with Nuts?

Macadamia Nuts

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

There have been numerous studies that show that people who eat a healthy diet that incorporates nuts typically experience greater health benefits (such as weight loss, and lower levels of bad cholesterol) than those who eat a healthy diet that does not incorporate nuts. Do all nuts offer the same health benefits? Are all nuts created equal? There is one kind of nut that stands head and shoulders above the rest; the macadamia nut! High in protein, fiber, and healthy fat content, macadamia nuts are the most energy dense nut available.

Macadamia nuts contain the highest level of monounsaturated fat than any other natural, commercially available food. Monounsaturated fats have been shown to be beneficial in lowering bad cholesterol levels. A study published by UC Irvine demonstrated that foods that contain unsaturated fats curb the appetite and makes people feel fuller longer. Combine this with the high fiber content of macadamia nuts and they quickly become one of the most satisfying nuts on the store shelf.

Macadamia nuts also contain the best ratio of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acid ratio. The ideal diet contains an 1:1 ratio of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids. The typical person eating the Standard American Diet (SAD) is estimated to be at a 1:30 omega-3:omega-6 fatty acid ratio, mainly due to the increase of soy and corn in our food supply. Diets that have an unbalanced omega-3:omega-6 ratio lead to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. With the exception of macadamia nuts, the majority of nuts contain too little omega-3 fatty acids and too much omega-6 fatty acids. Check out these nutrition stats from Nutrition Data:

Omega-3 Fatty Acids (mg)

Omega-6 Fatty Acids (mg)

Macadamia

60

360

Almonds

2

3400

Hazelnuts

20

2200

Pistachios

70

3700

Brazil Nuts

5.1

5800

Cashews

7

2200

Walnuts

2500

10100

Pecans

280

5800

In addition to the aforementioned benefits, macadamia nuts:
  • Are low in polyunsaturated fats
  • Are low in linoleic acid
  • Are cholesterol-free
  • Contain all essential amino acids; and a few non-essential amino acids
  • Are a good source of vitamin e, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and folate
  • Contain antioxidants, such as squalene
  • Are rich in the minerals iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcum, zinc, copper, and selenium

Aside from coconut oil, macadamia nut oil is the healthiest cooking oil. Its low omega-6 fatty acid content makes it a highly stable oil that is least likely to oxidize when exposed to heat. The rich, buttery- tasting oil is also high in monounsaturated fat; even higher than the olive oil found in most kitchens today. Macadamia nut oil contains palmetoleic acid, an omega-7 fatty acid that is rarely found in food. Macadamia nut oil can be used for sautéing, stir frying, and salad dressings, basically anything you would typically use olive oil for.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Are Macadamia Nuts Superior to All Other Nuts?


//nutritiondata.self.com/

Mmmmmmmmmmmm… Fat


//www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-10/uoc–uss100608.php

Smart Fuel: Macadamia Oil

More on Omega


//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909

Wheat – The Staff of Life or the Kiss of Death?

Wheat

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Today’s wheat is not the same wheat eaten during biblical times, when wheat was referred to as the “Staff of Life”. The wheat consumed in the United States today is a product of many, many years of hybridization with the purpose of creating a greater yielding crop that is resistant to heat, drought and cold, making it a more lucrative crop for industrial farmers.  (Shouldn’t “industrial farmer” be an oxymoron?)  Besides being cheap and plentiful, it is virtually impossible for humans or animals to digest without significant health consequences.

How did the Staff of Life become the Kiss of Death?

The first variety of wheat, called Einkorn, was grown by man more than 12,000 years ago. Einkorn is a fairly simple plant with only 14 chromosomes. Today’s wheat is much more complex, it has 42 chromosomes.  This is how we arrived to the type of wheat we consume today:


During the mid-18th century, there were 5 different varieties of Triticum Aestivum (commonly known as Bread Wheat), today there are 25,000 varieties.

It is no secret that the number of calories consumed by Americans has increased. A study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition documented a 440 calorie per day increase from 1977 to 2006 in 28,400 children and 36,800 adults. That is an extra 3080 calories per week.  It only takes 3500 extra calories to gain a pound. At the same time that calorie intake began to increase, a new variety of wheat was introduced into the American food system. This wheat was unique, because it contained a protein called gliadin. According to Dr. William Davis, author of The Wheat Belly, gliadin “exerts opiate-like effects”. Gliadin binds to the opiate receptors in the brain but instead of resulting in a “high” that would typically be experienced with the use of an opiate drug, gliadin causes us to experience food cravings (for wheat products as well as for other foods). This explains why so many Americans began gaining weight around this time.

Dr. Davis has also seen a link between wheat consumption and the development of eating disorders. He recently published an article stating that “we know that when people with celiac disease remove all wheat/gluten from the diet, calorie intake goes down 400 calories per day. We know that normal volunteers administered an opiate-blocking drug, such as naloxone or naltrexone, reduce calorie intake by around 400 calories per day. We also know that people with eating disorders, such as binge eating disorder, reduce calorie intake, yup, 400 calories per day when injected with an opiate-blocking drug. We also know that a drug company filed its FDA application in 2011 for naltrexone, a drug already on the market for heroin addiction, to be prescribed for weight loss.

Einkorn, the original wheat, can still be purchased today and may be an alternative for those looking for a wheat replacement. A company called “Jovial Foods” sells organic einkorn flour, organic einkorn berries, and einkorn-based cookies and pasta. Jovial Foods grows their einkorn on five different organic farms in Italy. All the ingredients in their products are completely non-GMO. As an added bonus, they use palm fruit oil in their cookies! None of their foods contain excitotoxins, MSG, high fructose corn syrup, or any other concerning food additives. You can buy their products directly from their website, or in some stores.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Working-In vs. Working-Out

photo used under creative commons license

Working-in involves engaging in slow, relaxed movements that don’t tend to elevate heart and respiratory rates. When you work-out, your body burns energy through the process of pumping blood from the organs and glands to your muscles. Conversely, when you work-in you keep blood in your organs and glands, increasing energy by allowing your organs and glands to take in fresh, arterial blood. Additionally, working-in:

  • Moves nutrition through your body
  • Improves your body’s breathing mechanism
  • Helps detoxify your body by moving waste through your body
  • Stimulates energy throughout your body to run cellular and biological systems
  • Resets natural biological rhythms, allowing your body to run more efficiently. The result? More energy to do other activities you love.

Practicing yoga and meditation are the most popular ways to engage in working-in. Incorporating yoga and meditation into your routine can also help in recovery from your eating disorder. A study from the Psychology of Women Quarterly reported that people who practice yoga reported “less self-objectification, greater satisfaction with their physical appearance, and fewer disordered eating attitudes”. Yoga is an excellent way to improve your ability to “be in the moment” by requiring you to focus on breathing and sensations throughout the body. If you experience body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), yoga has the potential to relieve the symptoms by allowing you to experience your body in a physical way, as opposed to a visual way. Meditation is proven to reduce depression, anxiety, and episodes of binge eating.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Characteristics of The Traditional Diet (as discovered by Dr. Weston A Price)

Dr Weston A Price

Dr Weston A Price

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Born in 1870, Weston A. Price was a dentist that was known for his discoveries in the relationship between nutrition, dental health, and physical health. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Price traveled to remote parts of the word that were virtually unaffected by western civilization to determine what type of diet was necessary to attain optimal health. Price found fourteen groups of people ranging from inhabitants of remote Swiss Valleys, South Sea Islanders and Eskimos that had perfect dental health, beautiful facial structure, excellent physical development, and virtually no degenerative diseases.

Price analyzed the diets of all fourteen groups of people and made a great discovery: although each groups varied greatly, dependent on geographic location, all the diets had some definite commonalities. All of their diets were the exact opposite of the “politically correct” nutrition standards, and of the guidelines set out in the food pyramid that is published by the USDA. Specifically, all of their diets:

  • Contained no refined or denatured foods or ingredients (refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, white flour, canned foods, pasteurized/homogenized lowfat milk products, refined/hydrogenated vegetable oils, protein powders, artificial vitamins, food additives and colorings.)
  • Contained some sort of animal product, typically the entire animal was consumed (muscle meat, organs, bones, fats). Bones were consumed in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths
  • Had 4 times more minerals and water-soluble vitamins then that of that found in the Standard American Diet (SAD), and 10 times more fat-soluble vitamins from animal sources (Vitamin A, D and K2)
  • Contained some cooked foods, but all traditional cultures ate at least a portion of their animal foods raw (raw dairy, etc)
  • Incorporated foods that were high in food enzymes and beneficial bacteria from lacto-fermented foods.
  • Included grains, seeds and nuts that were prepared by soaking, sprouting, fermenting or naturally leavening to neutralize anti-nutrients
  • Contained between 30%-80% fat calories, only about 4% of these coming from naturally occurring polyunsaturated oils. The remaining fats were in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Had an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids
  • Contained some salt
  • Made provisions for the health of generations to come. Pregnant women and children were provided with additional nutrient-rich animal foods

So, how can we integrate some of Weston A. Price’s findings into our diets? Here are some things that the Weston A. Price Foundation suggests you can do – keep in mind that while it may be difficult and in some cases unrealistic to follow all these guidelines 100% of the time, anything that you can integrate into your diet will offer health benefits.

  • Eat whole, unprocessed foods
  • Eat meat and animal products from grass-fed animals, which are rich in CLA
  • Eat wild-caught fish and shellfish from unpolluted water
  • Eat full fat dairy products (raw or fermented when available) from grass-fed cows
  • Use animal fats, specifically butter liberally
  • Use traditional vegetable oils only. This includes extra virgin olive oil, expeller-expressed sesame oil, small amounts of expeller-expressed flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil
  • Supplement with Cod Liver Oil
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, when possible)
  • Use properly prepared whole grains, legumes and nuts (soaked, sprouted or sour leavened)
  • Make fermented foods a regular part of your diet (examples include – kefir, miso, kimchee, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, sour cream – Bubbie’s brand of sauerkraut and pickles are properly fermented)
  • Incorporate bone broth into your diet on a regular basis
  • Use filtered water for cooking and drinking
  • Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and a small amount of expeller-expressed flax oil.
  • Use natural sweeteners in moderation (raw honey, maple syrup, maple sugar, date sugar, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder)
  • Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals
  • Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel
  • Use only natural, food-based supplements
  • Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light
  • Think positive thoughts and practice forgiveness

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Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: The Weston A Price Foundation www.westonaprice.org

Why Does CLA Cause an Increase in Lean Skeletal Muscle Mass and a Decrease in Stored Body Fat?

Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Upon posting the article on ‘CLA + Trans-Fat’, I received a few inquiries about how CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue, and decrease in stored body fat. In order to understand the process involved, we first need to examine the process involved in gaining lean skeletal muscle mass and the process involved in accumulating body fat.

How Do We Gain Lean Muscle Mass?

Every muscle cell has a protein-transporter which exists in a dormant cell in the center of the cell. This protein-transporter is known as ‘Glucose Transporter 4’ or simply ‘GLUT4’.

GLUT4 becomes activated in muscle cells when the cells experience tension and vibration, such as that which occurs during strength-training.

When GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose. The muscle cell uses this glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, resulting in an increase in lean muscle mass.


How Do We Accumulate Body Fat?

Much like muscle cells, every fat cell in the body also contains a dormant protein-transporter known as GLUT4.

GLUT4 becomes activated in fat cells when they experience an increase in insulin, most commonly occurring when we eat.

When we take in nutrients, some of those nutrients are converted into glucose, resulting in increased blood sugar levels. In response, our bodies begin to produce insulin. This insulin travels through our blood stream, activating the GLUT4 within our fat cells.

When the GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose, resulting in an increase in the size of our fat cells.

How does CLA Effect the Growth of Muscle + Fat Cells?

Studies clearly show that CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue and a decrease in stored body fat. What causes this?

When we eat a food that contains CLA, our muscle cells experience an increased concentration of GLUT4. Conversely, our fat cells experience a decreased concentration of GLUT4. This change in concentration allows our muscle cells to take in more glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, while forcing our fat cells to taking in less glucose after eating. The result? Increased growth in muscle tissue, decreased growth in fat tissue.

And that’s why we can enjoy foods like grass-fed whipped cream, grass-fed cheeses and grass-fed butter without worrying about gaining body fat!

Let’s Connect!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Benefits of Butter

 

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats are unhealthy, the root cause of the epidemic of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol that is plaguing our society. I can’t help but to wonder where this theory originated from and if there is really any truth to it? Can something my own grandparents regularly incorporated into their diet really be the cause of many of the health issues that are afflicting our nation?

When it was first announced that saturated fats were unhealthy, the soybean industry saw an opportunity for profit. They spent millions of dollars on an anti-saturated fat campaign, which resulted in butter and other saturated fats being viewed as “evil villains” that had no place in our diet. We were convinced that in order to attain optimal health, we should stop consuming butter and start consuming (often soy-based) margarine. The soybean industry wasn’t the only industry to profit off of this campaign, producers of America’s other main crops (cotton and corn) also benefited, as the majority of margarine is primarily composed of cottonseed, corn and soy oil.

The Weston A Price Foundation has done extensive research about these claims that saturated fats, like butter, have a negative effect on our health. Their research demonstrated that butter actually contains ingredients that PREVENT heart disease. They found that margarine INCREASES the risk of heart disease, due to the free-radicals that are generated during the process of producing margarine. Research by the Medical Research Council demonstrated that men who incorporate butter into their diets ran half the risk of developing heart disease than those who used margarine. Their research also demonstrated that butter does not cause weight gain. To the contrary, margarine is much more likely to result in weight gain because it lacks so many important nutrients, resulting in “cravings and bingeing.”

Butter, especially grassfed butter, is an excellent source of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K2. It is also somewhat unique in the fact that it contains all of these vitamins co-factors that are required for our bodies to experience optimal benefit. Depending on the source of the butter, the concentration of these vitamins will vary. As a general rule, the more yellow the butter, the more concentrated the nutrients. Also, grassfed butter will typically be higher in nutrient content in the Spring and Autumn when the grass is greenest.

Vitamin A (or retinol) from butter is more easily absorbed by the body than from any other dietary source. Vitamin A is a ‘catalyst’, in that it helps our body to absorb other minerals. Since it is a fairly stable vitamin, little to no damage is done during the pasteurization of butter. Some of the main health benefits of vitamin A include:

  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it promotes good eye health
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents urinary stones
  • it reduces the risk of developing cancer
  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it improves reproductive health

Vitamin D is essential to obtaining maximum health. Much like Vitamin A, it serves as a catalyst in the absorption of minerals. Some of the health benefits of Vitamin D include:

  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents osteomalacia and rickets
  • it improves cardiovascular health
  • it protects against osteoporosis and arthritis
  • it improves mental health
  • assists many bodily processes, such as regulating blood pressure, reducing muscle spasms, helps in cell formation, regulating insulin secretion

‘Activator X’, which is now known to be vitamin K2 was discovered by Dr Weston A Price in 1945. Grainfed butter is only a moderate source of this vitamin, grassfed butter contains up to 50 times more vitamin K2. This is because grass and other leafy greens contain vitamin K1, which is converted into vitamin K2 during the fermentation process that occurs in the cows stomach. Corn-based feed contains little vitamin K1 (0.3 µg/100 grams, some leafy greens contain more than 800µg/100 grams). Vitamins A, D and K all work together in our bodies. When we ingest foods containing vitamin A and vitamin D, a signal is sent to our cells to create certain proteins, vitamin K then activates these proteins. Vitamin K2 also plays a major role in:

  • the prevention of tooth decay
  • growth and development
  • reproduction
  • protection against heart disease
  • brain function

Vitamin E has many biological functions, it’s anti-oxidant function is the most well-known. In addition to it’s anti-oxidant content, vitamin e:

  • Promotes heart health
  • Promotes respiratory health
  • Helps with normal PMS symptoms
  • Supports circulation
  • Supports prostate and breast health
  • Is good for your brain
  • May help hot flashes in menopausal women

Butter possesses many other health benefits beyond it’s content of vitamins A, D, E and K2.

  • Butter is a good sources of short and medium chain triglycerides (these are the types of fat that cannot be stored in adipose tissue)
  • Butter contains the medium chain triglyceride, lauric acid. There are only two dietary choices when it comes to lauric acid: small amounts of butter or large amounts of coconut oil
  • Butter contains the short chain triglyceride, butyric acid. This short chain triglyceride is only found in butter
  • Grassfed butter contains a perfect balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids
  • Grassfed butter is an excellent source of CLA. It contains 300-500 times more CLA than grainfed butter
  • Butter contains lecithin, which helps the body utilize cholesterol and other components of fat
  • It is an excellent source of many trace minerals, including manganese, zinc, chromium and iodine.

I often make my own butter, using whipping cream from Snowville Creamery. The Snowville Creamery website provides directions on how to make it:

It is best to start with cream at about 55-60 F.

There are many ways to churn butter, but any form of agitation will cause the butter to form. The easiest way is to pour cream into a food processor up to the liquid fill line and run the processor beyond whipped cream until the butter separates from the buttermilk. You can also use a mixer, a hand whisk, or put cream in a jar and shake it.

Once the butter has separated from the buttermilk, pour the butter and milk into a strainer or colander. The milk that pours off of the butter is good to drink or use for cooking.

The butter that is retained in the strainer should be rinsed with cool water and repeatedly kneaded with a wooden spoon until all the milk is expelled and the water runs clear.

The butter can then be placed into a butter mold or bowl. For salted butter, add salt before pressing. Enjoy!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

 

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Why Butter is Better – Weston A Price
The Skinny on Fats – Weston A Price
Why Butter is Better – Mercola
Grass Fed Butter – Choosing a Better Butter
On the Trail of the Elusive X-Factor – Weston A Price
7 Health Benefits of Vitamin A
Benefits of Vitamin E
Health Benefits of Vitamin D

Dairy: Raw vs. Pasteurized

Choosing Healthy Dairy Products

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In support of the raw dairy community and the education of dairy consumers, Natural News has just released an infographic about organic raw (fresh) dairy products versus conventional (pasteurized) dairy products.

This infographic is an excellent resource as it explains the differences between the nutritional properties, animal compassion and health implications of raw dairy versus pasteurized dairy.

For more information on choosing health dairy products see my article ‘Dairy Aisle Confusion

Copyright (c) 2012 by Mike Adams. All rights reserved. Posted with permission from Natural News.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

CLA + Trans-Fat

Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is both a trans-fatty and cis-fatty acid that is naturally produced in the stomachs of ruminant animals (like cattle, sheep and goats). Wait. I know what you’re thinking, “You said CLA is a trans-fat. Aren’t trans-fats bad?”.

There are some trans-fats that have no place in our foods today. The trans-fats that are detrimental to our health are of the “industrially-produced” variety. Indeed,  80% of the trans-fats consumed in the Standard American Diet are industrially-produced. Maria Emmerich gives a good description of how our bodies process these types of trans-fats:

“Trans-fats in foods are like BIG SUV’s trying to park into ‘compact’ parking spaces of our cells that are reserved for healthy Omega-3 fats (DHA). When this happens, our neurotransmitters responsible for focus, mood and memory have a hard time finding and recognizing their receptors due to  the inflammation of the membranes on the brain cells caused by the consumption of trans-fats.”

Naturally-occurring trans-fats, like CLA, are thought to be beneficial to our overall health. Studies show that individuals that include CLA in their diets may:

  • reduce their risks of developing certain cancers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure and heart disease
  • experience an increase in metabolism
  • lower their cholesterol and triglycerides
  • lower their insulin resistance (a Penn State study found that CLA mimicked synthetic diabetes medication)
  • experience a reduction in belly fat, especially in the overweight and obese
  • experience an increase in lean muscle

Although CLA can increase metabolism, including it in one’s diet is less likely to produce weight loss and more likely result in a change in body composition; i.e. a reduction in body fat and an increase lean muscle. CLA appears to reduce body fat because of it’s ability to regulate fat metabolism. In other words,  CLA may not reduce the number of fat cells in our bodies, but it does keep small fat cells from getting larger.

So what are the best sources of CLA? I typically use beef, full-fat milk (raw, if available in your area), full-fat raw cheese and butter. I always get organic, grass-fed meat and dairy, it contains 300%-500% more CLA (for more information on choosing healthy dairy products, read this article). There are also CLA supplements available, but these are rarely beneficial. CLA supplements are typically a synthetic form of CLA that is derived from plant oils. I always recommend getting all nutrients in their natural form, when possible.


Currently, the FDA does not require trans-fats to be listed on nutrition labels, if the product contains less than 0.5 g of trans-fats per serving.

If you are really serious about keeping all unhealthy trans-fats out of your diet, be sure to check the ingredients list for “hydrogenated oils” and/or “partially hydrogenated oils”. These ingredients are actually trans-fats. Just because some of your favorite foods contain trans-fats, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy these foods. Here are some popular grocery store items that contain trans-fats, with healthy alternatives*….

Not so good choice – Girl Scout Samoa Cookies
Better choice – Homemade “Samoa Cookies

Not so good choice – Pay Day Candy Bar
Better choice – Homemade “Pay Day” Bar

Not so good choice – Premium Plus Crackers
Better choice – Homemade “Premium Plus” Crackers

Not so good choice – Aunt Jemima Buttermilk Pancakes
Better Choice – My Quinoa Pancakes or my Protein Pancakes

Not so good choice – Taquitos
Better Choice – Homemade “Taquitos”

*I prefer using Jay Robb protein powder for recipes that incorporate Whey Protein

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

//articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/04/26/natural-trans-fats-actually-have-health-benefits.aspx
//articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/10/18/dairies-unite-to-set-safety-standards-for-raw-milk-cheese.aspx
//jn.nutrition.org/content/130/12/2943.full
//www.adsa.org/jointabs/iaafs108.pdf
//www.springerlink.com/content/jx34483r3888840n/
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20463040
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820159

Is All Butter Created Equal?

Food Additives + A new kid-friendly recipe

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Corndogs! A favorite of almost every child in the US. What exactly are we feeding our children when we serve them this favorite? Are there any healthier alternatives?

Check out this long list of ingredients one of the most popular brands of corn dogs:

Batter Ingredients: Water, Enriched Wheat Flour (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Enriched Corn Meal (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate), Modified Food Starch, Soybean Oil, Honey Solids (with Wheat Starch, Calcium Stearate, Hydroxylated Lecithin), Artificial Flavor, and Onion Powder, Cooked in Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Hot Dog Ingredients: Pork, Mechanically Separated Turkey, Water, Corn Syrup, Dextrose, Modified Corn Starch, Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Potassium Lactate, Flavorings, Beef, Extractives of Paprika, Sodium Diacetate, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Sodium Nitrite.

Enriched wheat flour – Enriched wheat flour is made by removing all the ‘nutrients’ out of wheat when processing it into flour but then decides to the ‘nutrients’ back in once processing is complete. Wheat normally includes fifteen ‘nutrients’, this particular company only added five (likely synthetic) nutrients back in. Same sort of scenario with the ‘enriched corn meal’, but with the addition of corn (one of the most genetically modified crops in the US).

Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate. – Inhalation of this chemical can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and bronchial asthma. Although not inhaled in this case, but I am still not a fan of ingesting this chemical. The FDA does list this on their GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list, but consuming an excessive amount of phosphate will lead to bone loss.

Soybean oil AND partially hydrogenated soybean oil. Soy is another of the most highly genetically modified crops in the US. It’s a really unstable oil, especially when heated. Soybean oil also contains polyunsaturated fats and, once hydrogenated, trans fats. Trans fats are associated with major health issues, including ADHD, mood disturbances, depression, heart attacks and strokes. It takes the body nine months to detox from trans fats. You might notice that there is no mention of ‘trans fats’ on the nutrition label of corn dogs. Why? Because the FDA does not require trans fats to be labeled for any product containing less than 0.5 g of trans fats!

 

Corn syrup, modified food starch, wheat starch, artificial flavor, dextrose, hydroxylated lecithin, flavorings. All possible sources of the neurotoxin, monosodium glutamate (MSG). MSG wreaks havoc on many body systems, including the brain. For more information on the effects of MSG, see my article here.

So, what can we serve our children as an alternative to the store-bought corn dog? How about these super fun mini corn dog muffins?


Low Carb Mini Corn Dog Muffins

2 US Wellness Sugar Free Beef Franks (sugar free, MSG free, nitrate free, nitrite free, gluten free, and grass-fed)

1 cup Almond Flour

¾ tsp baking powder

¼ tsp salt

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 tbsp coconut oil (or grass-fed butter), melted

¼ cup plain greek yogurt

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Cut the hot dogs into 15 pieces, set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix eggs, coconut oil and yogurt until well combined.

Add in almond flour, baking powder and salt. Mix again.

Pour batter into mini muffin cups or into a greased mini muffin pan.

Push down one piece of hot dog into the center of each muffin.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until edges begin to brown.

Serves 5 (3 mini muffins each)

Nutrition Info (per serving):

245 calories, 20 g fat, 14 g protein, 5 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Nutrition Info for Store-bought corn dogs (baked):
220 calories, 11 g fat, 6 g protein, 25 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Nutrition Info for fast-food corn dogs (fried):
375 calories, 21 g fat, 14 g protein, 36 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. To view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles, use the search feature to search on the topic of your choice.”

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
//news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
//jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
//www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
//www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
//www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
//ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Vitamins and Supplements – Read Your Labels

photo used under creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

I recently listened to a podcast that was discussing the drawbacks of prescription-strength vitamins, specifically prenatal vitamins. My first reaction was, this can’t be right. Prenatal vitamins? The vitamins needed at the most critical time for the health of the mother, to say nothing of the health of the unborn child?   I never cease to be amazed at what, we as  Americans will swallow assuming it to be safe.  The claims made by the podcast turned out to be true.   I’ve done my own research; this is what I found for one of the more popular prenatal vitamins:

 Soy lecithin – According to Dr. Kaayla Daniels, author of “The Whole Soy Story”, ingesting soy can lead to:

  • Digestive distress
  • Malnutrition
  • Thyroid dysfunction
  • Cognitive decline
  • Reproductive disorders
  • Infertility
  • Birth defects
  • Immune system breakdown
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer

Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil or “trans fats” have been proven to lead to colon cancer, depression, endometriosis, heart disease and infertility.

Gelatin (and soy lecithin) – Both are sources of monosodium glutamate (MSG). MSG is known to cause:

  • Brain damage
  • Endocrine disorders (obesity and reproductive disorders)
  • Behavior disorders
  • Adverse reactions
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Obesity
  • Retinal degeneration
  • Migraine
  • Seizures
  • Cancer
  • Heart irregularities
  • Asthma

Sorbitol – An artificial sweetener that can cause:

  • severe bowel problems
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal pain
  • weight loss,
  • an increase or decrease in urination
  • vomiting, and seizures (in severe cases)

Glycerin – A petroleum product. Petroleum products are obesogens and affect the endocrine system. Studies show obesogens cause stunted growth in children.

Propylene Glycol – A chemical which is also found in anti-freeze. It is suspected to cause:

  • liver damage
  • kidney damage
  • contact dermatitis
  • inhibited skin cell growth
  • nausea, vomiting
  • depression

FD&C blue No.1 – An artificial color, synthesized from petroleum (kind of like ingesting blue crude oil, yum). Studies show this dye can trigger:

  • Learning disabilities
  • Asthma attacks
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Nervousness
  • Lack of concentration
  • Cancer

Titanium Dioxide – Tiny pieces of titanium, a chemical that has never been tested for safety for human ingestion. Titanium Dioxide has been linked to:

  • Cancer
  • Allergies and immunotoxicity
  • Organ system toxicity

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
The Real Essentials – Is Your Shampoo, Toothpaste, and Soap Destroying Your Health? – //www.therealessentials.com/care1.html
Down with Basics – The 5 Hidden Dangers in Toothpaste – //downwithbasics.com/?p=7
EWG’s Skin Deep Cosmetics Database – //www.ewg.org/skindeep/
Michaels, J. (2011, November 11). Supplements, Target Areas & Libidos. The Jillian Michaels Show Podcast. Podcast retrieved from www.apple.com/itunes.

Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

This is the second part of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”.  This series is designed to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, whether it’s weight loss or weight restoration. “Appetite Hormones 101” will be made up of three articles that describe the major appetite hormones: leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY.

Ghrelin

Ghrelin, discovered in1999 by scientists, is known as “the hunger hormone”. Produced in the stomach and pancreas, Ghrelin stimulates the appetite with the purpose of increasing the intake of food and promoting the storage of fat.  So when Ghrelin levels are high, we feel  hungry.  After we eat, Ghrelin levels fall and we feel satisfied.

Leptin and Ghrelin have a “teeter-totter” relationship. When leptin levels rise, ghrelin levels fall. Likewise, when ghrelin levels rise, leptin levels fall.

Ghrelin levels are highest right before eating meals and lowest right after eating meals.

Leptin, acts on regulatory centres in the brain to inhibit food intake and increase energy expenditure, acting as a long-term regulator of body weight. Whereas Ghrelin is a fast-acting hormone that operates as a meal-initiation signal for short-term regulation of energy balance.

There are distinct abnormalities in the production of Ghrelin among obese and eating disordered individuals. Those with anorexia tend to have high levels of ghrelin which often normalize with weight restoration.  Among those with bulimia, Ghrelin does not respond as strongly when food is eaten, which could contribute to binge eating as the individual suffering from Bulimia does not “get full” even if they have overeaten. Obese individuals tend to have low levels of Ghrelin, probably because they are Leptin Resistant, since Leptin and Ghrelin are inversely related. Research also shows that Ghrelin levels are higher after an individual loses weight, which may make it more difficult to maintain weight loss.

There are several easy things we can do to help manage ghrelin levels:

  • Eat a diet high in good quality protein (organic, grass-fed, free range etc. when possible)
  • Get an adequate amount of sleep
  • Practice meditation and relaxation techniques to reduce everyday stress
  • Drink plenty of water, since ghrelin levels are affected by thirst
  • Avoid processed fructose (especially high fructose corn syrup)

Although these things can make irregular ghrelin levels tolerable, the best way to normalize ghrelin levels is to address the root cause head on. In most cases, irregular ghrelin levels can be corrected by committing to living a healthier lifestyle through exercise, healthy dietary choices, weight restoration (for the anorexic individual), or weight loss (for the obese individual).

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Medscape News – Sibling hormone to appetite-boosting ghrelin has opposite effects, raising hopes for a new obesity treatment – //www.medscape.com/viewarticle/538867

WiseGEEK – What Is Ghrelin? – //www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ghrelin.htm

Journal of Pediatrics – Ghrelin levels in obesity and anorexia nervosa: effect of weight reduction or recuperation – //www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(03)00737-6/abstract

The Disadvantages of Low Fat Milk

Choosing Healthy Dairy Products

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In the media, we often see that the healthiest milk we can drink is low fat or fat free dairy milk. A prime example is this advertisement, that was released late last month…

In my practice, I am often asked if there are any disadvantages of drinking low fat or fat free dairy milk. I’ve done some research and the results are in! Here’s what I’ve found:

 “A study at Harvard found that women who ate two or more servings of low-fat or non-fat dairy per day, like skim milk or yogurt, had 85% higher risk of infertility than those that ate full-fat dairy products.” 
-Chris Kresser, in response to this study

“Low fat milk causes weight gain. This is how farmers fatten pigs. If they give them whole milk, the pigs stay lean.

Low fat milk is missing all the vitamins that you get in the fat. The industry has figured out that they make a lot more money on butter and butterfat if they put it in ice cream. So they take the cream out of the milk, put it into ice cream. They would much rather you spend the money on ice cream, than on butter or buttercream; they make a lot more money.”
     -Sally Fallon, Weston A. Price Foundation

“A note on the production of skim milk powder: liquid milk is forced through a tiny hole at high pressure, and then blown out into the air. This causes a lot of nitrates to form and the cholesterol in the milk is oxidized. Those of you who are familiar with my work know that cholesterol is your best friend; you don’t have to worry about natural cholesterol in your food; however, you do not want to eat oxidized cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, to atherosclerosis. So when you drink reduced-fat milk thinking that it will help you avoid heart disease, you are actually consuming oxidized cholesterol, which initiates the process of heart disease.”
     -Weston A. Price Foundation, Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry

“Let us get rid of one fallacy which is that skim milk is actually milk that has had the cream skimmed off the top. That actually sounds logical but it is not how is done, at least not in this modern world. That process would not remove all the cream so what is done in modern processing is the milk is spun around with centrifuges, eventually completely separating the cream (fat) and milk. It is first clarified, then separated, then pasteurized (or ultra-pasteurized), and then finally homogenized. This over-processing has now removed every healthy vitamin, living enzyme, and natural mineral. Welcome to your now-dead beverage……Skim milk will not support life. So by removing the cream you have essentially turned the milk into something completely useless, especially the pasteurized variety as you have not only removed the healthy fat but you have also as stated removed the living nutrients.”
     -Raw Milk Truth

“Researchers from Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute conducted a study that monitored the dietary habits of more than 20,000 Swedish women for a decade.  It turned out that women who consumed full fat milk or cheese had a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than the rest of the group.  The results were convincing enough for the researchers to recommend that a glass of full fat milk every day will cut weight gain by 15%, and a portion of full fat cheese each day will cut weight gain by 30%.  Alicja Wolk, professor at the Karolinska Institute stated, ‘The surprising conclusion was that increased consumption of (full fat) cheese meant that overweight women lost weight.’

Yet skim and 1% milk is pervasive in school lunch programs, and throughout the American diet.  If you summarize the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) food pyramid you see an emphasis on grains plus skim milk, the very combination that fattens hogs so efficiently!  In fact, the USDA recommends we start the low-fat habit early: children as young as pre-school are recommended to consume non-fat or low fat milk, yogurt and cheese. With a food pyramid like this it’s little wonder we face an obesity epidemic from childhood onward.”
      -Ann M Childers, MD. Life Balance Northwest

“Guess what they feed a pig if they want to make it as fat as possible as fast as possible?
Low-fat milk, because if they give the pig milk with fat in it, the pig gets satiated. It’s satisfied and won’t eat any more. But if they give it low-fat milk, it will eat the grain they feed it forever because it’ll have a deficiency of fat.
Now think of what we’re eating for breakfast in this country…
If you don’t want to get fat you’re told to drink low-fat milk, and corn or wheat or oat-based cereal.
It’s the prescription to make you as fat as possible as quickly as you can get there. You’ll never stop wanting to eat because you’re never getting any food that causes satiation.
Americans are told to eat a diet that is scientifically designed to make you as fat as possible as fast as possible.”
-Dr. Al Sears, MD. Power for Healthy Living

I recently read somewhere that we are becoming Homobesians!  (Instead of Homosapians) Is it any wonder?  -J. Renae Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
Healthy Baby Code – 5 Myths About Pregnancy Nutrition #1: A Low-Fat Diet is the Best Choice (//healthybabycode.com/5-myths-about-pregnancy-nutrition-1-a-low-fat-diet-is-the-best-choice)
Croxton, S. (2009, June 3). Eat Fat, Lose Fat! with Sally Fallon. The Underground Wellness Podcast. Podcast retrieved from www.undergroundwellness.com
Weston A. Price Foundation – Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry. (//www.westonaprice.org/modern-foods/dirty-secrets-of-the-food-processing-industry)
Raw Milk Truth – Benefits of Raw Milk. Why Skim Milk Makes You Fatter.  (//rawmilktruth.com/Benefits-of-Raw-Milk-Why-Skim-Milk-Makes-You-Fatter.html)
Life Balance Northwest – Just Say ‘No’ to Skim Milk. (//annchilders.blogspot.com/2011/02/just-say-no-to-skim-milk.html)
Al Sears, MD. Power for Healthy Living – The Skinny on Fat.

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user kakie