Category Archives: Services

Knee Replacement Recovery – Two Weeks

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement Recovery - Two Weeks Post Surgery

I am two weeks out today! Strangely, the first week was the easiest week and week two was much more difficult. The biggest issue this past week was that I couldn’t sleep. I was simply in too much pain.  It appears that the more active you are the less stiffness you have. At night we tend to be much less active, ergo more stiffness.  Stiffness and pain are not the same thing but it’s easy to get them confused, LOL. Especially at night when you simply cannot get comfortable no matter what position you are in.

Continue reading

Knee Replacement Surgery – PART TWO

medications

Knee replacement surgery is a huge undertaking.  I have already had an MRI, an x-ay of the knee and an ECG.  I am about eleven days out from the surgery and I just had the prescriptions filled. Anyone who knows me knows I don’t take any medication. Zero. Not even aspirin. For this procedure there are seven medications!

Continue reading

Knee Replacement Coming Up

Dr. Norton's Knee Replacement

I am going to have a total knee replacement in 2 weeks! 

For the uninitiated, this is a big deal.  I have already spent a considerable amount of time in preparation. I also spent years debating whether or not to even have it done.  If I’m being honest, it injures my pride…. but then, so does walking with a limp, LOL.

I injured my knee as a teenager.  I started dancing ballet when I was three and by the time I was 10 I was in pointe shoes.  These days I don’t think they put children that young in pointe shoes. That’s a good thing. I did pointe along with jazz, tap and ballroom until I graduated high school.

I stopped dancing for many years partly because of the injury to my knee but also because life just got in the way. I began dancing again as an adult about 20 years ago.  I danced salsa, which is my first love, merengue, bachata, and cha cha, in other words all the Latin ballroom dances.  I also did a bit of tango, waltz and foxtrot.

I still love to dance! But about four years ago I had to face the hard fact that I could no longer do it without causing myself too much pain. It was at that point that I began to seriously consider knee replacement. I had done the research and found an excellent surgeon and I believe that taking this step, no pun intended, will allow me to regain the use of my leg and possibly even allow me to dance again… Wouldn’t that be lovely?


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Diabulimia

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

Continue reading

What I Have Learned So far While Sheltering In Place

Here is what I have learned so far while Sheltering in Place:  

  • My new exercise routine, the one where I walk up and down 3 flights of stairs for half and hour (ok, 20 minutes) and have little stations set up on each floor for abs, arms, and core, might be a better workout than the one I was doing at the gym.  It is significantly more difficult. Who Knew?
2Read more

Perfectly Peelable Hard Boiled Eggs

(Hint: It Doesn’t Involve Boiling!)

One of my most basic go-to foods, is a hard boiled egg. For some reason, whenever I try to make them using the traditional method on the top of the stove, they are a pain to peel. It’s awful. My egg is pock marked because I cannot fully get under that membrane that runs under the shell.  Inevitably, I end up wasting part of the egg white because it is stuck to the shell.

Not anymore!

Behold, the perfectly peel-able hard BAKED egg.

Okay, here we go! Let your eggs rest on the counter for 30 minutes prior to doing this. This method will also work if you go straight from fridge to oven, but I felt they turned out better resting on the counter a bit. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Take your eggs and place them in a muffin tin. Do not add water to the bottom of the cups. It should look like this:
Carefully put the tray into the oven and let them bake for 30 minutes.  Take them out and immediately plunge them into an ice water bath.
Let them rest for 4-5 minutes. I promise, you will have a perfectly, peel-able egg!
Voila!
-Dr. Norton
#EatCleanGetSunBeWell

Looking For More Great Recipes?

Tired of the same old boring beef chili? Check out my bison chili!
Vegetarian or vegan and craving chili? Check out my cauliflower chili! 
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae
Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form
Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.
©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Bison Chili

 

Oh give me a home, where the buffalo roam… and this chili is cooking on my stove….

Seriously, if you follow me on Facebook, you know I am a chili fanatic. And you also know that my neighborhood has an annual chili cook-off. Here’s where that photo above, of a big, beautiful pot of chili comes into focus. Last year, I perfected the art of cauliflower chili. This year, I decided to make a meaty masterpiece. But I didn’t want to use beef. It’s so… expected. But I wanted all that beefy texture. That’s when bison popped into my head.

Bison is an amazing source of protein. Why? It is so good for you! Most of us hardly ever eat it. However, it definitely deserves more of a place in our weekly meal planning. Bison is always pasture raised-there’s no factory farming.  Consider the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) of bison. 100% pasture-raised buffalo meat contains 3-5 times more CLA than grain-fed animals. That itself is a reason to consider this incredibly flavorful, lean meat.

Hungry yet? Here’s the recipe!

Ingredients:

1/2 cup coconut oil

1 cup diced celery

1 cup diced onion

1 cup shredded carrots

2 lbs ground bison

2 jars of Whole Foods Organic Basil Marinara

1 jar of Jovial Foods Organic Diced Tomatoes

1 small box of red kidney beans (optional)

10 garlic cloves

1/4 cup cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper

2 teaspoons garlic salt

2 teaspoons sea salt

2 teaspoons herbs de provence (I’m kind of throwing you for a loop here, but trust me!)

1 teaspoon cacao powder

1 teaspoon korintje cinnamon

Directions:

Heat the 1/2 cup of coconut oil over a medium flame. Add the diced celery, onion and shredded carrot along with 2 pounds ground bison and 10 garlic cloves. Season with 1/4 cup of cumin, 2 teaspoons each of white pepper, garlic salt, sea salt and herbs de Provence. Add 1 teaspoon of cacao and cinnamon.

When everything is thoroughly mixed and sautéed, add two jars of Whole Foods organic basil marinara and one jar of Jovial Foods organic diced tomatoes. I added one small box of red kidney beans just to keep everyone else happy but it really didn’t need it. So feel free to add the beans or omit them.

Top with grassfed sour cream or grassfed shredded cheddar cheese, or both!

Enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

The question is why would the American Heart Association promote a biased review of the research on lipids? The AHA relies on corporate sponsorship for funding and it’s sponsors clearly influence the organizations recommendations for having a healthy heart in ways that should give us pause.

Ok, so maybe it didn’t start out that way. In the 70’s the research pointed to fats as the problem. Ansel Keys was perhaps the most well known researcher associated with these incorrect theories followed by Nathan Pritikin, creator of the Pritikin Diet.

Both men got it wrong for various reasons—they didn’t understand the role that hydrogenation plays with saturated fats like coconut oil, and/or they didn’t control for variables that had nothing to do with fat in their research, such as the role of other pollutants.

But scientifically, their theories were proven to be incorrect decades ago. Yet, we are still being told by the AHA that the good fats are bad and the bad fats are good and that we should eat more grains. Wrong! The myth is that dietary fat, especially cholesterol, causes vascular disease. It doesn’t. High cholesterol is not the problem. Healthy saturated fat is not the problem. Inflammation is the problem. And inflammation is driven by the simple carbs found in corn-based sugar like high fructose corn syrup, in grains that have been hybridized so that they convert to sugar as soon as we start chewing, and in hydrogenated fats that cause plaque to build inside our arteries.

These three things; sugar, starchy grains and bad fats, are the primary ingredients in most processed foods and they are the problem, not healthy fats like coconut oil. In other words, the fat from a grass-fed animal, or from wild caught fish or from the coconut is so good for you, it could be considered a supplement.

Based on the AHAs recommendations, Canola Oil would be good for you and it is one of the nastiest oils on the market. It is genetically engineered from a plant called Rapeseed, which is poisonous in nature and doesn’t get any better with genetic modification. But if you follow the AHA guidelines, that is what you would be using to fry that GMO-grain-fed beef burger before you slap it on a big old whole grain bun and throw on some catsup laced with GMO high fructose sugar. YUM!

Guess who is responsible for GMO Canola oil? Monsanto, the biotech giant, which is now owned by Bayer, the pharmaceutical conglomerate. Bayer/Monsanto just happens to be one of the AHAs biggest sponsors. And therein lies the problem. In the case of coconut oil, with all of it’s new found advantages over hydrogenated vegetable oils, it may be cutting into the Canola Oil market, and that would not make Bayer/Monsanto very happy.

And we do not want to make Monsanto unhappy as the company has a reputation for viciously going after the competition. Case in point, the organic farmers that Monsanto sued for patent infringement when the crops they harvested contained the seeds from Monsanto’s patented GMO plants. Monsanto planted next door to the organic farms with the understanding that the seeds would blow onto the organic farms and grow and then they sued the farmers when it happened. The farmers eventually won but not after many were put out of business. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monsanto_legal_cases

Bottom line; the AHA recommends replacing saturated fats like coconut oil and grass-fed butter with omega-6 fats like vegetable oils and margarine. This is a very bad idea. The research on omega-6 fats is clear, we get way too much of it. The ideal ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 is 1:1. Most Americans eat a ratio of 30:1, which has repeatedly been shown to contribute to chronic inflammation, or the real cause of vascular disease.

Other current sponsors of the AHA include Subway and Cheerios. Now the AHAs dietary recommendations, which include grains, make more sense. For example, the AHA includes processed carbohydrates like cereals in their recommendations for a healthy diet. Most children’s cereals are 50% sugar and a major contributor to sugar imbalances, inflammation, obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We are now seeing type 2 diabetes in children, and metabolic syndrome in teenagers. Both of these disorders were previously only seen in middle age. Sugar and simple carbs such as those found in cereal seem to be the culprit.

The AHA has a healthy check mark list, which includes Subway sandwiches and Cheerios. What a coincidence!

 

The AHA has made some other very questionable recommendations over the years, such as reducing the intake of dietary sodium to such low levels that the impact ended up being dangerous and actually increased the risk of suffering a fatal heart event.

The American Heart Association would also have us believe that cholesterol is bad for us. Cholesterol has been demonized in the same way that saturated fat has been demonized, so much so that we are all sufficiently afraid of cholesterol to blindly follow our doctor’s advice to start that statin at the first sign of high cholesterol.

But according to Al Sears and other alternative medicine and aging experts, you are at no greater risk of heart disease if your total cholesterol is 350 than if it’s 150 as long as your HDL cholesterol is above 85 and your triglycerides are below 100. I would add that your LDL cholesterol needs to be pattern A and not pattern B as we saw in the Part 1 of this series.

In general we have been sold a bill of goods on the whole cholesterol issue too. We are being told that cholesterol is the problem when it isn’t and we are being told that statins are the answer when they certainly are not. Excerpt from my soon to be released book:

            Food Kills: Food Cures

         You Decide!

 

The best example of that, is Statins, which some scientists are calling the biggest pharmaceutical scam ever perpetrated on the American public. Statins are the number 1, most prescribed medicine in the U.S. It turns out that statins do not prolong your life and that, because they decrease CoQ10, may be the reason we are seeing an epidemic of heart failure today. [1] [2]

Note: Heart failure is not the same thing as a heart attack. Heart failure results from the heart not being able to pump, not from clogged arteries. It occurs because statins weaken muscles and the heart is a muscle. Statins should never be prescribed without CoQ10 supplementation. Yet, I treat many people who are overweight, suffering from high cholesterol, and taking statins when they first start treatment, and I have never had a patient whose doctor prescribed CoQ10 along with their statin.

This is important when you consider that survival rates from heart failure are very low compared to survival rates from stroke or heart attack, which is kind of a kick in the butt if you are taking the statin to prolong your life. In other words, if you are taking a statin, you have decreased the likelihood of dying from a heart attack but increased the likelihood of dying from heart failure and you have not increased your life expectancy at all. In addition, on a statin you are more likely to develop a peripheral neuropathy (shaking of the hands, loss of feeling in the feet) dementia, and type 2 diabetes.

Bottom line: If you must take a statin, be sure to supplement with CoQ10 to prevent the muscle damage. But you must also compensate for the high blood sugar that the statins may cause by taking Berberine, because if you do not, the high blood sugars can cause gout as they also raise uric acid levels. Finally you will want to supplement with coconut oil to support your brain, as statins predispose you to cognitive decline.4

Or

You could learn to eat clean which includes plenty of coconut oil and healthy saturated fats, engage in effective exercise which raises AMPK (and reduces the risk of vascular disease and cognitive decline), get sunshine and supplement with Bergomot[3], which has been shown to be as effective as a statin with none of the nasty side effects.

I learned all of this the hard way. I was prescribed a Red Rice Yeast Extract (RRYE) because I refused to take a statin for my high LDL. I was not told that the RRYE is exactly the same thing as the primary ingredient in a statin (a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor.)

It turns out that the high LDL was pattern A LDL and as described in the first article in this series, not a problem, but I did not know that at the time. My blood pressure at that point in time was low, 110 over 70. My blood sugar and insulin levels were good, 90 and 3 respectively.

What I ended up with after a year of taking the RRYE was severe joint problems, higher blood pressure, blood sugar and insulin, an inability to build muscle and gout. It was unbelievable! In attempting to “treat” these conditions, I ate lots of fermented foods, supplemented a little too much, and then ended up with histamine intolerance because everything I was eating to be as healthy as possible was high in histamines.

In other words, just taking the natural version of a statin set in motion a cascade of problems that took me a year to figure out and cost me a fortune in doctor bills and supplements not to mention the pain and mental anguish. Multiply this by 10 and that is what people who opt for statins end up dealing with for the rest of their uncomfortable and likely shortened lives! I count myself lucky. But I hope that you do not have to experience what I did and that if you are, this information is helpful. Please let me know.

In the series of articles to follow, I will be discussing inflammation, it’s causes and what you can do to prevent it.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

[1] Biofactors. 2003;18(1-4):113-24. Statins lower plasma and lymphocyte ubiquinol/ubiquinone…… It has been shown that treatinghypercholesterolemic (high cholesterol) patients with statins leads to a decrease, at least in plasma, not only in cholesterol, but also in important non-sterol compounds such as ubiquinone (CoQ10), and possibly dolichols, that derive from the same biosynthetic pathway. Plasma CoQ10 decrease might result in impaired antioxidant protection, therefore leading to oxidative stress.

2 Biofactors. 2003;18(1-4):101-11. We are currently in the midst of a congestive heart failure epidemic in the United States, the cause or causes of which are unclear. As physicians, it is our duty to be absolutely certain that we are not inadvertently doing harm to our patients by creating a wide-spread deficiency of a nutrient critically important for normal heart function.

  1. Seneff, S., Davidson, R., and Mascitelli, L. (2012). Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Medical Hypotheses, 8, 213-217
  2. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statin

[3] Made up of brutieridin and meltidin

 

What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2

The American Heart Association would have us believe that the coconut has “has no known offsetting favorable effects.” It’s interesting that in societies where coconut is a staple of the diet, vascular disease is low to non-existent, whereas in western or westernized societies, where saturated fat is demonized, vascular disease, and it’s friend obesity, are epidemic.

For example, in Tokelau and Pukapuka, where a main staple of the diet is coconut, vascular disease is rare.[1] Another example are the Kitevan of New Guinea, who consume a considerable portion of their diet in coconut, but for whom researchers found no coronary heart disease.[2]

For 100 benefits for using coconut oil go to: //thecoconutmama.com/coconut-oil-uses/

[1] Am J Clin Nutr 1981 Aug;34(8):1552-61

[2]J Intern Med: 1993 March; 233(3):269-75

Here are 10 reasons coconut oil is good for you: Coconut oil is good for your heart – it has been shown to raise HDL (the good cholesterol) and improve the type of LDL cholesterol by making it more pattern A than pattern B which is a good thing as we saw in last weeks article.[1] 

  1. Coconut oil is good for your brain – it is the only thing that has been shown to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s when combined with exercise. It contains medium-chain triglycerides that have been shown to have therapeutic value for people with certain brain disorders, ADHD and epilepsy.[2] I use ¼ cup of coconut oil in my tea every morning. I notice a significant difference in brain fog if I do not use it.
  2. Coconut oil is good for your thyroid – Unlike soy oil and other vegetable oils, coconut oil does not interfere with thyroid function. It also has anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation that may lead to hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.[3]
  3. Coconut oil is good for weight loss – As a medium chain fatty acid coconut oil is the perfect “fuel” as it goes straight to the liver and is used as almost pure energy. Because it gives us this instant energy, we are less likely to snack on sugary items to get that jolt of energy that we need sometimes. It also suppresses your appetite. Coconut oil does not spike insulin. It has also been shown to help rid the body of excess fat.
  4. Coconut oil is good for the immune system – Lauric acid, which makes up about half of it’s fatty acids, can eliminate harmful pathogens such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. It has been shown to prevent cold/and the flu and to alleviate the symptoms of hepatitis C, Herpes and Epstein-barr. [4] I have had the flu once in my life and cannot remember the last time I had a cold.
  5. Coconut oil is good for getting rid of candida – In a mouse study comparing coconut oil with soybean or beef tallow, coconut fed mice had a 10-fold drop in gut candida. Candida infestation wreaks havoc in the body and is very difficult to treat ordinarily.
  6. Coconut oil is good for your teeth and gums- Swishing with coconut oil for 15 minutes every morning eliminates bad breath and has been shown to prevent plaque.7 It may also prevent encephalitis which is more likely if you have gingivitis (gum disease.) I put a teaspoon in my mouth while I am standing in front of my near infrared sauna every morning. My dentist is always raving about how healthy my gums are.
  7. Coconut oil is good for your hair and scalp– Making your own shampoo with coconut oil can help with dandruff as well as with other scalp conditions.
  8. Coconut oil is awesome for your dog’s coat – Coconut oil makes a great dog shampoo as it helps to eliminate odor. Just add a little though or you get a greasy doggie.
  9. Coconut oil is a natural meat tenderizer – but don’t use it for fish as you will end up with fish mush. I think the tenderizing quality is what makes it a good cellulite remedy. No research though to back that up, just my anecdotal observations.

[1] Lipids: 2009 July; 44(7):593-601

[2] BMC Neurosci. 2008; 9(Suppl 2): S16.

[3] Positive Med, September 16, 2015

[4] Organic Facts, Health Benefits of Coconut Oil

7 J Indian Soc Peridontol. 2014 Jul:18(4):441-6

A Word About Saturated Fats in General

There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When a fat is saturated, it means that the molecule has all of the hydrogen atoms it can hold.

 

Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals. Notice that this is the opposite of the way we are taught to think of fats.

Free radicals can damage healthy cells and cause a whole host of health issues.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to a variety of the illnesses that are currently plaguing Americans.

Saturated fats have many benefits if they meet the following criteria: Grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese); Grass-fed/grass-finished beef; Pastured sustainably grown pork and poultry (that are fed Non-GMO, organic grains only when absolutely necessary); Coconut and palm kernel oil; and Cacao have the following health benefits:[1]

The benefits that saturated fats offer us are:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of our cell membranes. They give our cells their necessary stiffness and integrity, and they prevent cell damage
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower the substances in the blood that increase the likelihood of heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids.
  • Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acid, which are critical to cardiovascular health, are better retained in body tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

 

[1] “The Skinny on Fats,”

Stay tuned for the last article in this series on why the AHA might be promoting the lipid theory of heart disease and what you can do about it to ensure that you are heart healthy.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

[1] BMC Neurosci. 2008; 9(Suppl 2): S16.

[2] Positive Med, September 16, 2015

[3] Organic Facts, Health Benefits of Coconut Oil

7 J Indian Soc Peridontol. 2014 Jul:18(4):441-6

[4] “The Skinny on Fats,”

[1] Am J Clin Nutr 1981 Aug;34(8):1552-61

[2]J Intern Med: 1993 March; 233(3):269-75

[3] Lipids: 2009 July; 44(7):593-601

#MondayMotivation for Eating Disorder Recovery

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

These Are A Few Of My Favorite Snacks!

It’s 11 a.m. and you are so hungry but lunch isn’t for another 90 minutes, or worse, 2 hours. What do you eat?

It’s 3 p.m. and you are really dragging but you still have miles to go before you are done for the day and able to head home for dinner. What do you eat?

It’s 7 p.m. and you had dinner, but suddenly you are hungry.  What do you eat?

I’m so glad you asked!

So many of us are on the go from the time we get up in the morning until we finally return home at the end of the day. Whether we are at work, or school, or running kids around from activity to activity, the best option is to plan ahead (like I always advise my patients about meals) and bring along some snacks. Even if you are at home, it can hard to choose foods to fill in the gap between meals.  So to make it easy, I’m introducing you to some of my favorite snacks.

Homemade Kale Chips

Store bought kale chips can be one of those items that has stuff in it that you wouldn’t necessarily want. So after much experimenting in my lab- my kitchen-  I’ve come up with a way to make kale chips at home. And they are so much better than store bought kale chips.  I use organic lacinato kale.

Lacinato kale can sometimes be referred to as dinosaur kale, or tuscan kale. It’s texture and size is different than traditional kale, and it is the best choice for making these chips.

Lacinato kale ready to be harvested. Isn’t it beautiful? I just had to share this photo.

Wash it really well and then let it dry completely. If I know I am going to be making these chips ahead of time, I just let it air dry for the day after washing it. If I’m in a hurry and want to make them right away, then I use a blow dryer to completely remove any moisture from the leaves. These will not become “chips” if there is any water on the kale when you add the oil, so remember, dry kale is the key. Once my kale is dry, I separate the leaves from the stem. This could be time consuming, but I’ve mastered the art of quickly separating the leaves from the stem by making two small slits at the bottom and running my two fingers down the stem on either side. Cut your kale leaves to the chip size that is ideal for you. (I like my kale chips medium sized.) Melt some coconut oil and add whatever spices you desire. It could coconut aminos and cayenne. It could be salt and herbs de provence. It really depends on your taste. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Add the kale chips to the spiced coconut oil mixture and make sure they are well coated. Place the kale chips in a single layer on the parchment paper. I bake these in a preheated 300 degree oven for 20-30 minutes to achieve that crispy, crunchy texture that I love about kale chips. I store them in a paper bag sealed tight if there are any leftovers.

Brown Bag Popcorn with Coconut Oil

We all love popcorn. Love it! Love the crunch! Love the salty, buttery flavor! What I don’t love is all the terrible ingredients in microwave popcorn. Have you ever flipped one of those bags over and read the ingredients? Half of them don’t even sound like food.  Instead, you should try my brown bag microwave popcorn with coconut oil. It’s delicious. Okay, here’s the key. You have to stand at the microwave and listen to your popcorn. Otherwise a) you will burn the popcorn and the bag or b) it won’t all get popped and you’ll have a bunch of seeds. First I melt the coconut oil, or grassfed butter, or a blend of both. I put my salt and spices in the melted fat and put it to the side.  Next, take your brown bag and fill the bottom with one layer of popcorn kernels. The amount of popcorn you put in the bag, depends on the bag size. So again, we just want a single layer of kernels. Don’t add anything else to the bag. Fold it over a few times so that it is sealed tight. Put it in the microwave and turn it on for five minutes. IT WILL NOT TAKE FIVE MINUTES. Now, I want you to listen as the popcorn is popping. When it gets to the point where it is 2-3 seconds between pops, pull that bag out. Open it up, pour the spiced, melted coconut oil or 100% grass fed butter into the bag. Shake it up really good, and enjoy! I swear this is the best popcorn you’ll have ever had.

Hummus and Vegetables

This is super easy. I make my own hummus, but you can use store bought as long as all the ingredients are real and it is organic (no citric acid, we are looking for lemon juice.) I love hummus with carrots and celery. It’s so fast and easy. If you love raw veggies, try green beans, tomatoes and peppers, zucchini and cucumber sticks- the list can go on and on.

Fresh Fruit

Seriously, it doesn’t get any easier than this. We all have our favorite fruits.   My favorite fruits include bing cherries, grapes, and bananas.

Hummus with Almond or Rice/Seed Crackers

This is also super easy. If you can find a real ingredient hummus (remember, organic with no citric acid, we are looking for lemon juice) try adding one of these two crackers to your snack. I’m including the pictures because it helps when you are looking for them in the grocery.

Note: These particular rosemary crackers are made with real ingredients. For some reason, some of the other varieties of the simple mills crackers have different ingredients. But these rosemary ones are amazing. The almond meal makes them super satisfying.

 

 

 

 

 

Guys, these are my favorite snacks! I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. Do you have a favorite snack? Tweet me @drrenae.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017 Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

“But Dr. Norton, What Do You Eat?

 

I get this question a lot. In fact, I’m sharing some guidelines with you that I myself use.  Most of us have some guidelines that we use to help guide our menu planning and daily eating. My guidelines extend beyond food, because although we are what we eat, our wellbeing is about more than just food.  So why these guidelines?

I follow these guidelines in order to balance:

  • Hormones
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Gut Health
    • Food allergies
    • Infections
    • Heavy metals
  • Organs and Systems

You may want to follow my guidelines in order to restore the balance in your body.

 My Guidelines

 

  1. Eat 100% organic, Non-GMO, sustainably grown fruits and vegetables whenever possible, preferably 7-9 servings a day
  2. Eat wild-caught, low mercury, high selenium, non-endangered fish such as Coho, Salmon or Slipjack (avoid whale, shark, swordfish) at least 3 times a week to increase Omega 3 fat.
  3. Eat 100% grass-fed, Non-GMO unprocessed beef, pork, bison and game in order to increase conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) which help build muscle and reduces fat. Avoid processed meats.
  4. When eating red meat, have a green vegetable with it to mitigate the potentially toxic effects of heme (part of the extra iron in meat that is mostly good but can predispose us to cancer depending upon how it is metabolized in the gut*)
  5. Eat pastured poultry no more than 2 times a week (in order to cut down on Omega 6 fat).
  6. Cook with organic, cold-pressed extra virgin coconut oil, ghee, duck fat, lard from grass-fed beef and grass-fed butter (preferably raw) as much as possible. Raw grass-fed butter has the perfect 1:1 ration of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids. Use organic olive oil on a limited basis (to cut down on Omega 6)
  7. Drink or use in a recipe at least a cup of bone broth daily.
  8. Drink 3 liters of spring water per day
  9. Avoid grains and pseudo-grains. Grains contain toxic lectins that are associated with many diseases, not just autoimmune diseases, because they cause leaky gut. When it comes to healing a leaky gut, avoiding gluten is key.
    1. Grains to Avoid: Barley, corn, fonio, job, joborn, kamut, millet oats, rice, rye, sorghum, spelt, teff, triticale, wheat (all varieties including einkorn, durum, and semolina) and wild rice
    2. Pseudo-grains to Avoid: Amaranth, buckwheat, chia, quinoa
  10. In addition to avoiding these grains and pseudo-grains, there are a number of other foods to avoid:
    1. High glycemic or simple carbs
    2. Sugar and artificial sweeteners (except Xylitol, coconut crystals/sugar or Norbu sugar)
    3. Mass-produced vegetable oils
    4. Processed proteins including deli meats and overheated products such as pasteurized dairy
    5. Lactose
    6. Unsafe additives and chemicals
    7. Alcohol
    8. Foods for which you have developed sensitivity or an allergy
    9. Soy based products
  11. Get regular exercise that combines
  12. Weight-bearing activities for muscle development, bone health and raising metabolic rate, 3 to 4 times/week
  13. Low Intensity Sustained Training (LIST) if you want to improve cognitive functioning (no more than 30 minutes) 1 to 2 times/week
  14. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) to lose or maintain ideal weight. No more than 20 minutes, 3 to 4 times/week.
  15. Get plenty of rest. Do not use electronics in bed. Charge your phone in another room. Do not work in your bed. The bed should be for resting and sleeping. Sleep in a dark room. Cover any LED lights or get them out of your bedroom. Try to go to bed as much before midnight as possible (8 or 9 p.m.) and rise with the sun (5 or 6 a.m.)   As soon as you get up, expose yourself to bright light. It will help you fall asleep that night.
  16. Relax
  17. Practice some form of meditation or attend a religious service regularly
  18. Take yoga classes or long leisurely walks
  19. Laugh, a lot. If you need help, watch funny movies, go see a comedian or hang out with a little kid and do the things that they like to do.
  20. Avoid Heavy metals:
    1. Mercury – Amalgams used by dentists and vaccinations are the most common sources
    2. Aluminum has been shown to be a neurotoxin leading to Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s—sources include aluminum cookware, deodorants, antacids, and baking powder
    3. Cadmium can cause kidney damage. The main source is Teflon, some seafood, and cigarette smoke.


Finally, keep your teeth clean!  
It is amazing how important clean teeth are to our overall health. Poor dental hygiene has been associated with heart attack, meningitis and many other seemingly unrelated conditions. I recommend flossing with a water pik and adding hydrogen peroxide to the water (do not use mouth wash, most of them have crap in them), using an electric toothbrush twice a day and swishing with coconut oil at least once a weak.

Happy Eating!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment and recovery of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game-12

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Oh, Sugar!

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-4In my practice, I spend a lot of time trying to educate my patients about food. One of the major learning curves for my patients is sugar. It is truly astounding how much sugar is in our food. I blog about this all the time. So I thought I would address the number one myth that I encounter in my practice:

“I don’t add sugar to my foods, so I am ok, right?

WRONG.

You don’t have to add the sugar, it is already there.

Most people believe that “added sugar” means the sugar you add to your iced tea or put on your cereal. The Centers for Disease Control defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as cereals, breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table.” Examples of added sugars include:
➢ Coconut sugar
➢ Brown sugar
➢ Raw sugar
➢ Corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup
➢ Malt syrup
➢ Maple syrup
➢ Pancake syrup
➢ Fructose sweetener
➢ Liquid fructose
➢ Honey
➢ Molasses
➢ Anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin

Sugar has developed a well-deserved reputation for being dangerous. In its natural form, however, it is one of the most important sources of energy we have. For humans, sugar is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and serves as the primary energy source for the brain and the cells throughout the body. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of the species of each plant. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk.

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose  is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar.”
Glucose is one of the analytics your doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about .1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low, these mental processes may be impaired. When it is too high, we end up with insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes.

Glucose From Grains
Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The one that gives us the most trouble is the glucose from grain. The majority of the glucose found in grain is called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches and as such have a higher glycemic load, a term used to describe how fast a sugar raises blood sugar levels. This is important because, gaining weight and diabetes are more about high blood sugar levels than anything else. Keep your blood sugar levels under control and your weight will be much easier to manage and you will not be at risk for Type 2 Diabetes. Contrary to popular belief, weight gain is not nearly as much about the number of calories you eat as it is about how high your glycemic load is or how high your blood sugar levels are.
Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, (beans) for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, which lowers their blood sugar level. Whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose, which makes them two of the worst foods you can eat if you are trying to keep your blood sugars levels under control and manage your weight. (Raise your hand if you thought rice was good for you.)
U.S. grown grains have been hyper-hybridized to make them cheaper to grow. They are also starchier, more addicting and more fattening because they have a very high glycemic load. Grains in Europe, on the other hand, are still fairly simple genetically, which is one of the reasons that you can eat pasta in Italy and not worry about gaining weight. That’s how pasta got the rep for being good for you. The problem is that it doesn’t hold true here in the U.S. so if you are eating home-grown pasta, you are likely raising your blood sugar levels and gaining weight.

Glucose from Fruit – Fructose
Natural fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. It is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables. In this form it is not harmful, unless your health is already compromised, in which case, you may have to limit even these foods until your blood sugar levels stabilize. In general eating fruit is better than eating most grains, especially hyper-hybridized grains, because the fruit has more water and fiber which is why it doesn’t raise blood sugar levels as much as a starchy grain might.
Sugars to Avoid

Commercially derived fructose is “made” from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn, all of which are usually genetically engineered. This is where things get sticky. Commercially derived sugars are really just chemicals that resemble sugar. Most of the sweeteners in U.S. foods are no longer sugar, but are toxic chemicals designed to delight the glutamate receptors in the brain and basically fake them out. Unfortunately, sugar is one of the most common ingredients in processed foods. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose: crystalline, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
Crystalline Fructose
This form of commercial sugar is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can also be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of chemicals to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.

Sucrose (Table Sugar)
This commercial sugar is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer, meaning it registers in the brain in a way that makes us want to eat more of anything containing it. It is used in baked goods because it dissolves easily.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
HFCS is both a food additive and a preservative made from GMO corn that is ground into a fine powder and then broken down further with a fungus and a bacterium. It lasts longer than real sugar, tastes sweeter, and most importantly, from the food manufacturer’s perspective, it is cheaper and therefore much more profitable. Most important of all though, is that it is highly addicting and almost guarantees that the consumer will be more likely to repurchase any product containing it. This gives new meaning to the term consumer loyalty. Never mind that our bodies don’t know how to digest it and it can lead to a fatty liver (see below), Type 2 Diabetes, or obesity.

Good Choices
The best sugars on the market are:
Unrefined Coconut sugar or Coconut Sugar Syrup (coconut nectar) – They both come from the coconut, have a relatively low glycemic load and taste delicious. Both can easily be used in recipes. It is light brown in color so it looks more like brown sugar. Here are some of the main benefits:

Raw Manuka Honey – Honey has many medicinal properties. But the best is the raw Manuka honey in my humble opinion. I put a teaspoon in my sleepytime tea every night with a tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar.
➢ Anti-Bacterial
Hospitals around the world have been using bandages soaked in Manuka honey on patients in order to reduce inflammation and prevent MRSA staph infection in wounds and sores. One study found that when Manuka was used to treat infected caesarean and hysterectomy wounds, it had a success rate of 85 percent.

➢ Wound Healing
Not only is Manuka anti-bacterial, but it has also been found to help wounds heal faster.

➢ Anti-Fungal
Studies have found Manuka honey to have powerful anti-fungal properties. When used in its raw, natural form, Manuka honey is a great way to treat various types of fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

➢ Gum Disease Fighter
Studies have found that Manuka fights off three different types of mouth bacteria that can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. It might seem counterintuitive to rub a sugary substance on the gums, but research has found that rubbing Manuka on the gums after brushing can reduce plaque and bacteria in the mouth.

➢ Sore Throat Treatment
Manuka fights several bacteria that cause sore throats. When sore throat rears its ugly head, take a teaspoon of Manuka several times per day, swishing it in your mouth before swallowing.

➢ Acne Treatment
Studies have been done on Manuka as an acne treatment with positive results. When applied to the skin, Manuka can fight bacteria associated with acne and when taken internally, it can help fight bacteria in the intestines that may lead to skin blemishes as well as balance intestinal flora that are thrown off by antibiotics prescribed to combat acne.

➢ Sunburn Treatment
When applied to sunburned skin, Manuka can soothe the soreness and speed healing.

➢ Anti-Inflammatory
Manuka is a natural anti-inflammatory, which explains why it helps in wound healing, soothes sunburn and sore throat, and boosts the overall health of the body.

➢ Acid Reflux
Manuka honey can help with acid reflux because it coats the esophagus and intestinal tract which prevents damage from stomach acid and relieves symptoms. Manuka may also help to heal the damage already caused by acid reflux.

➢ Digestive Support
Using Manuka honey on a regular basis can prevent and treat bowel problems such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Manuka also encourages the growth of “good” bacteria in the intestines and gets rid of unwanted bacteria.

➢ Stomach Ulcer Treatment and Prevention
Research has found that Manuka honey prevents the growth of h. pylori (helicobacter pylori), the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers while maintaining good bacteria in the stomach.

➢ Energy Booster
Studies have found Manuka to be a great source of energy thanks to its healthy carbs and has also been found to improve the performance of endurance athletes. It assists the body in post-workout muscle repair and helps the body to maintain blood sugar levels during and after exercise.

Monk Fruit Sugar – Only buy it if it is without additives unless the additive is Erythritol, as Etythritol is a sugar alcohol that has a very low glycemic load. (See section on sugar alcohols below.) Monk fruit is indigenous to China and Thailand and is said to be 500 times sweeter than sugar. It’s colloquially referred to as monk fruit because it was said to have first been used by monks in China in the 13th century for medicinal purposes. Today it is thought to help in treating a cough and sore throat. The only problem I see with it, is that the hyper-sweetness makes it harder for us to appreciate natural sweetness.

So Just How Do I Cut Out All This Added Sugar?

➢ Limit processed foods as much as possible.
➢ Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
➢ Cut out artificially sweetened foods altogether. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, are the worst and have been shown to increase cravings for sugary foods and to have neurotoxic effects on the brain.
➢ Replace sugary foods with those that are naturally low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits or unsweetened cacao nibs. Jovial Foods makes a delicious ginger cookie that has a small amount of coconut sugar. Or make your own baked goods using coconut sugar, raw Manuka honey, or Xylitol sparingly as sweeteners or on hemp cereal.
➢ Avoid foods that contain any sugar made with corn, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup like the plague as these sugars are like sugar on steroids and they will make your child crave sugar all the time. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar” or “reduced sugar.” Just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
➢ Avoid processed foods that are marketed as being “low fat.” When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture. This is especially true of milk. Buy only 100% grass-fed milk.
➢ Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) fruits which also often has canola oil added as well, energy bars, apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread, etc. You can make your own versions of these foods and sweeten them naturally or find the ones that are not sweetened with harmful sweeteners. A good rule of thumb is the fewer the ingredients, the healthier the food if it is processed.

How to Eliminate Artificial Sweeteners From Your Diet
➢ Check your food labels at home and throw out everything that has in it: Aspartame, Acesulfame Potassium (K), Saccharin or Sucralose, Equal®, NutraSweet® or Splenda®
➢ Use natural sweeteners like coconut crystals, coconut nectar or organic raw honey, Monk fruit or Xylitol.
➢ Avoid products that are labeled “low calorie,” “diet,” or “sugar free,” since they all likely contain sugar additives, some of which are likely to be artificial sweeteners.
➢ Drink purified water instead of diet drinks.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game-9

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery- Reds Opening Day Edition!

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game-8

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game-6

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

How to Balance Your Hormones

Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-4

Common hormonal imbalances include:

  • Estrogen dominance: changes in sleep patterns, changes in weight and appetite, higher perceived stress, slowed metabolism
  • Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS): infertility, weight gain, higher risk for diabetes, acne, abnormal hair growth
  • Low estrogen: low sex drive, reproductive problems, menstrual irregularity, changes in mood
  • Hypothyroidism: slowed metabolism, weight gain, fatigue, anxiety, irritability, digestive issues, irregular periods
  • Low testosterone: erectile dysfunction, muscle loss, weight gain, fatigue, mood-related problems
  • Hyperthyroidism & Graves Disease: anxiety, thinning hair, weight loss, IBS, trouble sleeping, irregular heartbeats
  • Diabetes: weight gain, nerve damage (neuropathy), higher risk for vision loss, fatigue, trouble breathing, dry mouth, skin problems
  • Adrenal fatigue: fatigue, muscle aches and pains, anxiety and depression, trouble sleeping, brain fog, reproductive problems

Risk Factors & Causes of Hormonal Imbalances

 Hormonal imbalances are caused by a combination of factors such as diet, medical history, genetics, stress levels and exposure to toxins from the environment. The most common contributors are:

  • Leaky gut from food allergies and a lack of beneficial probiotic gut bacteria in the lining of the intestinal wall, makes us more susceptible to hormonal problems. Believe it or not, inflammation usually starts in the gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health
  • Toxicity (exposure to pesticides, toxins, viruses, cigarettes, excessive alcohol and harmful chemicals)
  • High amount of stress, and a lack of enough sleep and rest
  • Being overweight or obese
  • High levels of inflammation caused by a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle
  • Genetic susceptibility

10 Ways to Balance Hormones Naturally

  1. Eat Healthy Fats

Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. (Yes, cholesterol is a hormone, in fact cholesterol sulfate is the mother or all hormones and is absolutely essential for good heart health. The body produces it when skin is exposed to the sun. The by-product is vitamin D3.) Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss.

The best anti-inflammatory super healthy fats include: coconut oil, ghee or butter from 100% grass fed cows, avocados and wild-caught salmon.

I led with coconut oil, because it is far and away the most beneficial. Coconut oil has natural anti-bacterial and fat-burning effects. It is the only thing ever shown to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s, it does not store as a fat but is metabolized in the liver as almost pure energy. I cook everything but fish in coconut oil. I add a third of a cup to my coffee or tea every day. I also use it as a carrier oil for essential oil treatments.

(I sustained a very bad burn of the tongue, lips, and gums and I immediately went for the coconut oil. It offered instant relief, was moisturing and I believe prevented me from having to deal with infection. My tongue was so badly burned that it was lacerated. But the coconut oil started the healing process immediately.)

Avocado also has impressive benefits that include improving heart health, lowering inflammation, controlling your appetite and contributing to your daily intake of fiber and nutrients such as potassium.

Salmon is also impressive: it’s one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to lower inflammation and help with cognitive functions.

In terms of supplements, I use fermented cod liver oil, and Krill oil.

  1. Supplement with Adaptogen Herbs 

Adaptogens are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protect the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:

  • Improve thyroid function
  • Reduce anxiety and depression
  • Lower cholesterol naturally
  • Reduce brain cell degeneration
  • Stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels
  • Support adrenal gland functions
  1. Balance Your Intake of Omega-3 to Omega-6 Fats

The ideal ratio of Omega3 to Omega 6 fats is 1:1. Since the early 20th century, the use of refined vegetable oils and intake of omega-6 fatty acids in our diets have skyrocketed, going from 1:1 to 1:20-30. This appears to be one of the primary dietary factors causing degenerative and chronic disease in America.

So, stay away from safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut oils, and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead like wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products.

  1. Get More GLA

There is a type of omega-6 fat called GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) that can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, or by eating hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels which is important for males as well as females.

  1. Improve Gut Health & Heal Leaky Gut Syndrome

To date every patient I have seen in the last 4 years that was tested, had a leaky gut. Many doctors still do not know what a leaky gut is. In a study of critical care patients, researchers found that 100% of the patients in the ICU, all of whom were there for a variety of reasons, did in fact have a leaky gut. None had ever been diagnosed with a leaky gut.

Why is this so important? In a nutshell, it is a condition that not only affects your digestive tract, but also drives hormone issues. Gut problems have been found to trigger autoimmune reactions, including arthritis and thyroid disorders.

In my practice, it appears to have the greatest impact on patients trying to lose weight. They do everything right and still do not lose the weight. You might imagine how frustrating this is. It puts them at risk for giving up and assuming that clean eating is not helping them so why bother. It takes a long time to create a leaky gut and it takes a year or so of clean eating to clear it up. Once it is cleared up, hormones stabilize and achieving a healthy weight is very doable.

So what exactly is leaky gut syndrome?

When undigested food particles, like gluten for example, leak through your gut into your bloodstream, the inflammation that results impacts the entire body — especially glands like the thyroid, which is very susceptible to heightened inflammation.

Most people with leaky gut have a deficiency of probiotics in their guts. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin. (For more information, see my Leaky Gut Chapter.)

To heal the gut: Steer clear of the foods that damage your digestive system including: almost all processed foods unless they are non-GMO and organic, gluten, hydrogenated oils and added sugar.

The best foods to eat to heal a leaky gut are bone broth, goats milk kefir, fermented vegetables, and high-fiber foods like vegetables and sprouted seeds. In addition, supplements like digestive enzyme and probiotics can aid in repairing your gut lining, which in turn can balance your hormones.

  1. Eliminate Toxic Kitchen, Beauty and Body Care Products

 Another way to eliminate toxins in your body is to avoid conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate.

A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil. I make a lot of my own ointments and buy organic cosmetics online. They are actually less expensive than what I used to buy in department stores and have far fewer ingredients and almost nothing questionable. The only tricky thing is getting the right color, but these companies go the extra mile to accommodate you. Juice Beauty is one of my favorites. I also found an organic beauty parlor two blocks from my house that uses awesome hair and nail products and is a local family-owned business, called Alba Beauty Studio.

For more information on products that are endocrine disruptors and/or toxic, go to The Environmental Working Group evaluated over 72,000 products and ranked them in an easy-to-understand guide to make sure you have a resource to keep your family safe. Check out EWG’s “Skin Deep Cosmetic Database” today for recommendations for which products to use and avoid.

  1. Switch to Glass and Stainless Steal

Getting rid of plastic bottles, aluminum cans and containers is essential. It’s best to replace plastic and aluminum with glass and stainless steel because of the toxic effects of BPA. I think a lot of people think that they are harder to store, but they aren’t really. Costco has really good deals on stackable glass container sets.   I also strongly recommend switching from teflon pans to stainless steel, or even better, ceramic or cast iron. A relatively good source for cast iron in the Cincinnati area that is fairly inexpensive is Jungle Jims. When I changed, I just did it slowly, a pan at a time. TJMax has amazing deals on such things. This is where I got most of my pans which were 1/3 the cost of regular retail. I bought the same pan for $30 that sold for $90 at Sur La Tab.

  1. Exercise (Especially Interval Training)

 Probably the best thing you can do is invest the time in exercise. This is where you really get the biggest bang for your buck. My new favorite form is something called Optimal Prime, or Burst training. Another version is high intensity interval training (HIIT) − including one of my favorite types called burst training.

Exercise in general is great for balancing hormones because it reduces inflammation, can help you maintain a healthy weight, lowers stress, helps regulate your appetite, and aids in getting better sleep, all of which are critical for balancing hormones.

Whether we’re talking about endorphins from a “runner’s high”, testosterone, growth hormone or insulin, HIIT/burst/optimum prime training can help your body regulate the production and use of these important hormones.

For people with hormonal imbalances, the key with exercise is to be careful not to overdo it. Training for a shorter period of time (about 20 minutes three times a week) but with higher intensity works better for people who can’t afford to add any extra stress to their system. Keep in mind that optimal exercise can differ a lot from person to person however, so it’s a good idea to seek advise from a processional if you’re ever unsure.

  1. Get More/Better Sleep

We need 7 to 8 hours of good sleep every night to keep hormones in balance. The circadian rhythm is hard-wired into us for a reason. Sleep is a potent antioxidant. When we don’t get enough of it, we cannot fight free radicals as effectively. For example, our hormones work on a schedule that is tied to the circadian rhythm: Cortisol, which is the primary “stress hormone”, is regulated at midnight, which means that the best sleep you get is the sleep you get before midnight. Once midnight comes, cortisol levels start going back up. Therefore, people who go to bed after midnight never truly get a break from their sympathetic flight/fight stress response.

Sleep disturbances have been linked to higher levels of morning cortisol (the stress hormone) decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. I try to be asleep by 9:00 ish and get up before 6:00. I usually wake between 4 and lay in bed looking at emails, or texts from the day before or doing some social media. These are the things that keep many people up late. I just do them in the morning.

  1. Watch Your Caffeine

Caffeine in moderate amounts might be okay for some people, but drinking too much caffeine is almost as bad as not getting enough sleep. Caffeine, which can stay in your system for up to six hours, is a chemical that affects the central nervous system (CNS) and raises your heart rate, increases alertness, and changes the way your brain produces hormones.

If you drink too much coffee or drink it too late, it can elevate cortisol levels by interfering with your normal sleep cycle. It might also have an impact on other stress hormones, such as adrenaline production. You’re probably aware that caffeine is addictive by nature, increases nervousness and anxiety in many people, and is linked with insomnia.

I drink about 4 ounces with 4 to 6 ounces of coconut milk, cacao, cinnamon oil and coconut oil added.

If you need a little boost during the day, you could try matcha green tea or tulsi tea which are much lower in caffeine. The good news is that once you’re health is back on track, small amounts of caffeine are actually beneficial.

  1. Avoid Alcohol

Chronic alcohol consumption contributes to estrogen dominance and has been found to interfere with pancreatic functioning, increase liver disease risk, lowering testosterone and contributes to anxiety and malnutrition. To be clear, you can be malnourished and still be overweight.

The fact that alcohol damages the liver is not insignificant when you consider that the liver is very important for hormonal balance and has over 500 different functions in the body!

  1. Quit Smoking

Of course it’s extremely important to quit smoking too. Studies have found that smoking interferes with normal immunological and reproductive processes. Compared with nonsmokers, moderate to heavy smokers (≥ 10 cigarettes/day) have abnormal levels of steroid metabolites and reproductive hormones that can be up to 35 percent higher than usual.

  1. Supplement with Vitamin D3

According to an article from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vitamin D3’s role in promoting health is more profound than previously suspected. Researchers found that vitamin D has an impact in the following ways: It affects the adaptive immune system, the innate immune system, insulin secretion by the pancreatic β cell, and vascular health (heart and blood pressure regulation.) It also plays a significant role in brain and fetal development.

Vitamin D acts like a hormone inside the body. Sunshine is really the best way to optimize vitamin D levels because your bare skin actually makes vitamin D as a metabolite of cholesterol sulfate (yes, cholesterol which we need to be healthy and to have a healthy cardiovascular system) when exposed to even small amounts of direct sunlight. Most people should supplement with around 2,000 IU to 5,000 IU daily of vitamin D3 if they live in dark areas, during the winter, and on days when they’re not in the sun.

  1. Back Off Birth Control Pills

In simplest terms, “the pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. It is so hard to convince women not to use the pill. There are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy.

Here are just some of the risks:

  • Breakthrough bleeding between cycles
  • Increased risk of breast cancer
  • Increased risk of uterine bleeding, blood clotting, heart attack and stroke
  • Migraines
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Weight gain
  • Back pains
  • Mood changes
  • Nausea
  • Benign liver tumors
  • Breast tenderness

Precautions When Treating Hormonal Imbalances

For people with diagnosed hormonal disorders− including type 1 or type 2 diabetes, Adrenal Insufficiency, Addison’s Disease, Graves’s Disease and Cushing’s Syndrome for example− it’s always important to speak with your doctor before discontinuing medication use. The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision.

Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-3

Insulin Resistance

One in every three adults in the U.S. now has elevated blood sugar levels according to the American Diabetes Association. Millions of Americans suffer from some form of insulin resisance from prediabetes, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome. In a culture where catchup has sugar in it, maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging.

The effects of insulin resistance range from fatigue to stroke, amputation, blindness and even death. That is the bad news; the good news is that insulin resistance is preventable and treatable. My AwesomeEight group (all of whom lost over 200 pounds) were able to ditch their insulin, cholesterol and blood pressure medications by following the following recommendations and you can too.

Blood sugar goes up because of glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating carbohydrates. But other things can also impact blood sugar. Stress plays a significant role as it raises cortisol, which interferes with how insulin is used. Even how often you eat and how much you eat at one time impacts blood sugar.

What to Do

In general, eating a clean low-processed diet, getting HitFit, getting sunshine and plenty of good rest are the keys.

  1. Eat Clean
  • An anti-inflammatory diet is key. I’m talking about lots of good fats, healthy proteins, and good fiber from non-starchy vegies, a bit of fruit (especially berries)
  • Protein: The bestproteins for managing blood sugar include: wild fish such as salmon, pastured eggs and poultry, 100% grass-fed beef or lamb, raw dairy products (including yogurt, kefir or raw cheeses)
  • Fats: The best fats are extra virgin coconut oil, MCT oil, extra virgin olive oil, nuts and seeds (like almonds, chia, hemp and flax), and avocado. These fats are delicious besides being very good for you.
  • High fiber foods: fresh veggies, whole pieces of fruit (not juice), sprouted beans or peas, and hemp. The highest fiber foods are artichokes, green leafy vegetables, chia seeds, flaxseeds, apples, pumpkin seeds, almonds, avocado and sweet potatoes.
  1. Blood-sugar stabilizers
  • Cinammon – has been found to have 18 percent phenol content in dry weight. For type-2 diabetics or those who suffer from insulin resistance, studies have shown that improved insulin sensitivity and blood glucose control can be had for as little as 1 teaspoon per day. Improved insulin resistance helps in weight control and lessens the risk of heart disease.
  • Cloves – contain 30 percent levels of the antioxidant phenol in dry weight. It also contains the antioxidants anthocyanins and quercetin. This herb has antiseptic as well as germicidal properties. It also offers anti-inflammatory, analgesic and digestive health benefits. Clove oil can be used to for something as uncomplicated as toothaches, headaches, cough and even indigestion.
  • Oregano – is popularly found in Spanish and Mediterranean cooking and is sometimes known as marjoram. It adds depth and flavor to any dish and goes well with tomatoes, eggplant and meat. It has been thought to treat bacteria and parasitic infection and its oil has been used to treat head lice. In a recent study, oregano was found to treat giardia – an infection of the intestines brought about by microscopic parasites – effectively. Herbalists even recommend it as a treatment for E-coli.
  • Sage – contains phytosterols reputed to have a cooling action. Herbal medicine practitioners use it to treat uterine bleeding and cramps. A German study on this herb shows that diabetics who drank infusions of sage on an empty stomach reduced their blood sugar levels. It is popularly used to flavor meat and soup dishes and can even be drunk as tea.
  • Garlic – Garlic contains sulfur compounds – specifically hydrogen sulfide gas – which dilate blood vessels. It is this effect that reduces blood pressure. This same compound helps in the metabolism of iron and protects against oxidative damage and even high cholesterol. Garlic can be found in different types of vegetable and meat recipes and adds a characteristic flavor in soups and sauces.
  • Other blood sugar stabilizers are: apple cider vinegar, green tea, and herbal teas.
  1. Stay Away from Sweeteners

Use natural/unrefined, organic sugar sources such as coconut crystals, stevia, pure maple syrup, blackstrap molasses or raw honey. The really dangerous sugars contain high fructose corn syrup, fructose or dextrose.

  1. Avoid Grains

If you must use flour, choose those made with 100 percent whole grains, or else try coconut flour/meal, or almond flour for a healthier option.

  1. Beverages

Stick with water, seltzer, green, herbal tea or black tea, and coffee in moderation (1 or 2 cups early in the day). Limit alcoholic beverages as they can also raise blood sugar, especially if you consume sweetened alcoholic drinks. NO SOFT DRINKS! ESPECIALLY NO DIET DRINKS

  1. Get Regular Exercise

High Intensity Interval Training or Burst training is the best. Doing about 30–60 minutes of exercise 3 days of the week (such as running, cycling, swimming and lifting weights) and doing weight bearing on the opposite days is ideal. 4. Manage Stress

  1. Essential Oils For Stress

 Lavender, rose and frankincense) are all helpful for diabetics and those with insulin resistance.

  1. De-stress

Yoga, massage and acupuncture are great. Other ways to wind down include spending more time outdoors, joining groups in your community, and connecting with family and friends more.

  1. Get Enough Rest

The best sleep you can get is the sleep you get before midnight. A lack of sleep raises stress and appetite hormones (like cortisol and ghrelin, which make you hungry), making it harder to avoid snacks that are high in sugar.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of The Blame Game

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017 Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/.

 

Why Is Diet Soda Dangerous for Anorexics?

Copy of Copy of Copy of NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY-3

Why is diet soda dangerous for anorexics? One word: Cholesterol.

Inflammatory Toxins

I talk a lot about inflammation. There are a number of additives that have been shown to be inflammatory. Here are a few of the most common ones.

  • Aspartame – H.J. Roberts, M.D., coined the term “aspartame disease” in a book filled with over 1,000 pages of information about the negative health consequences of ingesting aspartame, which included headache, dizziness, vomiting, memory loss, and fibromyalgia among other disorders. Aspartame is composed of Aspartic Acid, Phenylalanine, and Methanol, all of which have serious side effects.
  • Aspartic Acid. Aspartic acid, or aspartate, makes up about 40 percent of aspartame. In the brain, aspartate acts as a neurotransmitter, helping information get from one neuron to another. An excess amount of aspartate in the brain releases free radicals and, in turn, kills the neurons by allowing an excess of calcium to be absorbed. Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dementia and Parkinson’s disease are only a few of the chronic illnesses linked to excessive amounts of aspartate over an extended period of time. The FDA has also reported nausea, vision, sleeping problems, migraines and more as side the effects of excessive aspartate consumption too.
  • Phenylalanine, an amino acid, makes up about 50 percent of aspartame. Phenylalanine raises blood phenylalanine levels, which can decrease serotonin and lead to depression, seizures and even schizophrenia.
  • Methanol. Methanol, also known as wood alcohol makes up the remaining 10 percent of aspartame. This is where things get especially dangerous. Methanol breaks down into formic acid, which is harmless for all animals except humans. In humans, the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme converts methanol into formaldehyde, which wreaks havoc with sensitive proteins and DNA. The formaldehyde, or methanol poisoning, is a neurotoxin causing such conditions as:
  • Headaches
  • Ear buzzing
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Gastrointestinal disturbances
  • Weakness
  • Vertigo
  • Chills
  • Memory lapses
  • Numbness and shooting pains in the extremities
  • Behavioral disturbances
  • Neuritis

The most well-known problems from methanol poisoning are vision problems, including misty vision, progressive contraction of visual fields, blurring of vision, obscuration of vision, retinal damage, and blindness. Formaldehyde is also a known carcinogen that causes retinal damage, interferes with DNA replication and may cause birth defects. The Environmental Protection Agency recommends a daily limit of 7.8 mg a day of methanol, which equals half of an 8 oz. aspartame-sweetened beverage.[1]

If you don’t believe that there is formaldehyde in your Coke just smell it when it is warm.

By-Products of Aspartame

Diketopiperazine (DKP) is produced by the body when aspartame is metabolized. Uterine polyps and increased cholesterol levels have been linked to DKP.

Many of us in the eating disorders field are seeing anorexic patients with high cholesterol levels, especially among those who also binge and purge. Perhaps this is due in part to the fact that most patients suffering from anorexia live on diet soft drinks, thus influencing DKP levels. DKP may also help to explain this paradox of high cholesterol and low body fat among the bulimarexic population . [2]

Are you drinking diet soda?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

[1] Documentary: Sweet Misery

June 29, 2013 | 230,764 views

[2] Rigaud D. Diabete Metab. 2009;35:57-63.

Ohwada R. Int J Eat Disord. 2006;39:598-601.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

Remember, it is the action that counts.

Remember, it is the action that counts.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2017, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#WednesdayWisdom

anitas21st-birthday

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2017. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-5

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#TestimonialTuesday for Eating Disorder Recovery

recipe-5

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-9

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia,  and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Or by form 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday for Eating Disorder Recovery

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-4

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Self Care Strategies For The Holidays

self-care-strategies-2It’s the most (adjective) time of year.

How would you fill in that sentence? Joyful? Exciting? Peaceful? Stressful? Exhausting? Depressing?

The holidays are not easy for anyone. Even people who love the holidays can admit to moments of exhaustion and stress.

Here we are, 10 days before Christmas Eve, and I can honestly say that I have no idea where the time went. Wasn’t it just Thanksgiving? How can we actually enjoy the holiday when we just want it to be over by the time it arrives.

This is why self care is so essential for those of us who tend to get burned out during the lead up to the holidays.

What does self care look like?

Here’s my top ten list of self care strategies:

  1. Take a nap.  Yes, you! Lay down and take a nap. Everyone could use extra rest. If you can’t sleep, even just laying down for 20 minutes with your eyes closed may help reduce the feelings of anxiety or stress you are feeling.
  2. Color.  I’ve been posting a lot of articles about how coloring in those adult coloring books is scientifically proven to be as effective as meditation. So go grab your crayons or colored pencils, your fancy coloring book and zen out. In a pinch, I suggest a pen and a piece of paper. Doodling should have the same effect. There is a whole art form devoted to doodling called Zentangle. Check out this article from Psychology Today.
  3. Go listen to some music. You can do this while coloring, or while napping/resting. Or you can just do it on its own. Think about the last time you just sat and listened to music. It was probably a really long time ago.
  4. Call a friend. This is an excellent time to phone a friend. You can commiserate about how nothing is wrapped, or how your mother in law is driving you insane or whatever. Trust me, you’ll feel better.
  5. Take a walk. Just going outside, especially if the sun is shining (which it isn’t today in Cincinnati) and feeling that sunshine on your face and hands while you walk can really help you relax.
  6. Spend some time with a pet. Pets just make us feel better and more relaxed. So take your dog with you while you walk, or spend five minutes playing with your cat.
  7. Cut a corner. If you feel yourself getting worked up about something on your list of to-do’s ask yourself if you can cut a corner. Does everyone really need homemade bath salts? Or can a jar from the store work just as well? Sometimes what we plan doesn’t match reality in terms of time or ability. And that’s okay.  There were  good intentions, but reality has constraints. Cut a corner.
  8.  Nourish yourself. Make sure you are eating foods that are nourishing you- not draining you. There’s a lot of sweets floating around this time of year and quite frankly, most of us don’t feel great after we overindulge.
  9. Gratitude check in. Sit down with a piece of paper and spend two minutes writing down things you are grateful for. You might be surprised at what comes to mind, but go with it. Gratitude in even the smallest things can help us bear the anxiety of the holiday.
  10. Call your therapist.  If you can get an appointment with your therapist during christmas week, take it and don’t give it up! That is gold!  A conversation with your therapist during christmas week can help reinforce all the good things you’ve been doing for yourself and bring perspective to whatever your worries. Truly.
  11. Finally, give yourself permission to laugh Do my Mad Lib! Remember silly mad libs? You choose the adjectives, nouns, adverbs, etc.  I created a silly mad lib to give you a laugh! If you do it, send me your mad lib(drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com with the subject line Mad Lib) and I will share it in my special holiday newsletter! It’s great to be able to have a laugh at the holidays!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Want to hear more about navigating the holidays when you have an eating disorder? Check out my interview with Mark Heyne of Cincinnati Edition on 91.7 WVXU Cincinnati.

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Your Thanksgiving Questions. My Thanksgiving Answers!

thanksgiving-5

You asked. I have answers. The always fun Thanksgiving Question and Answer blog post.

Before we get into the nitty gritty, I want to take a moment to let you know that I am infusing some humor into this special post because, quite frankly, this is the most difficult holiday for folks with eating disorders and their families. Humor is a special kind balm in every sticky and uncomfortable situation that gives us perspective.

Here we go!

Thanksgiving stands firm as my favorite holiday – cooking/baking, Macy’s parade, family, time off work and of course, Charlie Brown Thanksgiving! But, each year poses another struggle to overcome in this journey called recovery. I am 12 years going strong (on December 18th) in recovery to an eating disorder. The path has not been smooth travel; but, every hardship created strength within. This year, God presented before me the one struggle I cannot release. . .eating in front of others. I have always been criticized, critiqued and condemned for what’s on my plate. When knee deep in eating disorder behavior, it was condemnation over lack of food and combinations created to fill my cravings with least calories possible. Travelling through recovery, I continue to get criticized and critiqued over foods chosen (now much healthier portions and recipes made from scratch). I hear comments like, “Well, we know you wouldn’t eat that,” “You eat so healthy (in a condemning voice),” “What are you eating? (in a disapproving connotation)” There are other comments made about my lifestyle, which is now very healthy emotionally and physically. It gets old hearing others comment about my looks or eating habits when I know I continue each day to choose what is best for my health. Others do not realize that staying healthy and choosing recovery every day is not easy. Their comments do not help. It makes me fill with anxiety when eating with others and so I often avoid it. I am presented with the challenge to kindly stick up for myself and become a bit more transparent. With God’s help, I will enjoy every part of this Thanksgiving and respond to any comment accordingly.  

Everyone with an eating disorder struggles with these issues as you so eloquently describe them. Sometimes people are genuinely trying to say and do the right thing and it comes out wrong. And sometimes they are just being intrusive. In any case your responsibility starts and ends with being kind while taking care of yourself. You said it, stick up for yourself graciously. What does this look like?

img_0874

Don’t be petty.

Kidding! That’s what you say INSIDE. Outside you smile and say, “Yes, it’s just so delicious,” or “I’m truly enjoying this moment.” And then you transition to something else. “Did you see the Bengals game last Sunday?” (I’ll talk about transitions a little later.)

Most importantly, enjoy the parts of this Thanksgiving that have the most meaning for you. It might not be the food.  THAT IS TOTALLY OKAY. If you need someone to give you permission to acknowledge that your favorite part of Thanksgiving has nothing to do with food or eating in front of people- I grant you permission. Sometimes just releasing yourself from that expectation is helpful.

Thank you so much for addressing Thanksgiving for those of us who cannot get happy about it due to our eating disorders and food allergies. Some of my issues concern becoming like amnesia when asked to bring “a dish” to a dinner.   I mentally freak out and can’t think of anything I can make to bring. Then there is the comparison issue going on at the event – who made the best dish and so on. I can’t do that anymore. There is the issue of timing of the meal. My son and daughter in law eat around 7 pm. That is too late for me to eat that much food and I’m starving – not a good thing. Also food allergies – mine are gluten, dairy, turkey, soy. After many mistakes and problem issues I now prepare my gf dressing, sugar free cranberries, roasted chicken and gf pumpkin pie. They can eat the cranberries I bring and I take a regular pumpkin pie for them and whip cream.

Want to mention that one of the best Thanksgivings I ever had was with my former partner we were in Nassau and had the most wonderful, fresh caught that day seafood with a French cream sauce and capers and Caesar Salad. Unforgettable!

So this letter went on a little longer, and I cut it short so that parts that might identify this person were omitted. But let me say this. This is all very common. Food allergies, the comparing of the dishes, the time of the meal-  so many people share these frustrations. Here’s what I think. Or rather, what I’d bring. You say, you had this amazing Thanksgiving in Nassau. I would bring Caesar salad. Because a) it’s something you love. b) who doesn’t love caesar salad? c) it’s easy.

To address the other issues that were in this question (both public and omitted), I say this: Come when you can. Leave when you have to. It is what it is. You can’t control people, places, things. No is a complete sentence.

willy-wonka-meme

Do I approach the subject of food to my daughter or just avoid the topic?

I am assuming that she has an eating disorder. DO NOT APPROACH IT. SAY NOTHING! That being said, here is what you should say: “We’re so glad you are here!” Talk about anything but anything related to food.

How do I protect my child’s privacy and still appropriately answer questions from relatives about a) Why is she not at Thanksgiving (if she chooses not to attend) or b) How is she? or c) Comments about what she is eating or how she is looking.

Make sure you are within kicking distance of the people asking the above questions. A good kick to the shins under the table should solve the problem. Kidding! In all seriousness, you can’t really warn them ahead of time, that actually makes it worse, but you need to practice and master the art of transitions. What are transitions? I’ll give you a few examples.

Well meaning family member (let’s give them the benefit of the doubt):  Where is your daughter? Why isn’t she at Thanksgiving? 

You: She wanted to do something else this year. What are your children doing for thanksgiving? or She wanted to do something else this year. Can you help me get people drinks? Can you go ask Aunt Shirley what she’d like to drink? or She wanted to do something else this year. Boy, Judy sure looks busy in the kitchen, I’m going to ask her what I can do to help. 

Well meaning family member: How is she? (concerned furrowed eyebrows)

You: She’s good. How are you? or She’s good. Did you see this new recipe I’m trying? or She’s good. Did you see I made grandma’s green beans? or She’s good. Did I tell you i just started watching this new television series on Netflix that I love? Do you have Netflix? It’s so much better than cable. 

Well meaning family member: God, she looks so thin. 

You: (Saying nothing.) Did I tell you I’m going full out black friday shopping tomorrow? I’m literally lining up at 6am to buy a television for $5. (or whatever). or (Say nothing and ignore the comment) Hey I’m thinking about going to see Second City’s Holidazed and Confused at Playhouse in the Park for the holidays. I saw them on TV and it looks so funny.  When you directly ignore the comment it sends a very strong message.

In all these examples, you are appropriately answering their questions, while also protecting her privacy. Anyone looking to get into a deep conversation on Thanksgiving about how your daughter is doing needs to examine their own reasons for essentially starting an inappropriate conversation at an inappropriate time.

What is the best way to convey how loved and wanted she is at these family events?

Just say it, lots.

Guys, just remember, stay away from the politics. Stay away from the food talk. Express your sincere gratitude at having loved ones with you. And if you don’t have it, you don’t have to say anything. And make sure you have a good thanksgiving soundtrack, it helps with the lulls at the table.

Just remember:

998

Happy Thanksgiving!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Post Election Depression and Anxiety? Here’s What to Do.

copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety-2

Listless? Sad? Anxious?

Many Americans are feeling depressed and anxious as a result of the election outcome. This has been an incredibly stressful election cycle. Approximately half of the country is walking around in shock.

This is one of those moments, when self care is so important. I’ve talked about it before, and I usually talk about it during the holidays, but for many, this is really a good time to practice self care.

Here’s what to do:

Feel free to cry and be upset. It won’t help to push those feelings away, you need to accept them. This is when it can be very helpful to get together with others who are feeling the same way and spend some time talking about it. This election was very triggering for many people, across a broad range of issues, which brings me to my next point.

Be with other people. Don’t isolate yourself. If you spent all day yesterday in bed under a blanket, it’s time to get up and get dressed and get together with someone. And when I say get together with someone, I mean spend time face to face with someone.

Stay off social media and turn off the tv. The 24 hour news cycle dominates Facebook, twitter and television. It can be very hard to escape the constant barrage of coverage. There is a time to be tuned in, but right now I recomennd tuning out.

Find comfort in your daily routine. This can be difficult but it is worth it. Making your coffee, packing lunches, eating regular meals, all these daily routines and rituals can be very comforting during a time like this.

Distract yourself with something fun and/or something inspiring. Read something inspiring. Watch a movie that inspires you. Go see a play. Inspiration has healing power.

Laughter is important. Laughter releases endorphins and it’s contagious. So if you are in a group, make a commitment to keep it light once you get past the heavy stuff.

Finally, give yourself time. If you are experiencing anxiety and depression as a result of the election, you need to give yourself time. Yes, officials have to come out the day after the election and tell everyone to get along. But that doesn’t mean that you are supposed to be over your feelings. Grief doesn’t have a time table.
However, if you are unable to put any of the above recommendations into action and you find yourself unable to get out of bed or continue to isolate despite your desire to be with others, it’s time to reach out to a professional who can help you.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

 

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

#TestimonialTuesday

recipe-5

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-8

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-7

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr. Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit © 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#TestimonialTuesday

recipe-3

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-5

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Recipe: Cauliflower Chili

recipe

For those of you who are unaware, Cincinnati is chili country. We have strong opinions about chili in the Queen City. So I decided to try out my clean chili recipe on my unsuspecting neighbors at our block party last weekend. If I may brag for a moment, I won the “Best Chili” award!

So what set my chili apart? Cauliflower.

Yes, you read that right.  It can be used to make pizza dough, rice, and mashed “potatoes.”It is an excellent substitute and incredibly versatile. But even more than that, it is so good for you

Back to the block party. Everyone was shocked that my chili was meatless, vegan, and grain free, because it had so much flavor and such a wonderful meaty texture. When I revealed that cauliflower was the secret ingredient, everyone wanted the recipe.

Here’s what you need:

4 large carrots

1 large onion

6 cloves of garlic

2 bags of frozen rinsed cauliflower

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup organic cacao

2 tbsp organic cinnamon

1 tbsp bourbon smoked paprika

2 jars of organic basil marinara

Start by prepping your vegetables. Peel your carrots, peel your onion and pull out your cauliflower.

img_0243

Is this amazing frozen cauliflower? I love that you can get heirloom organic varieties in the frozen food section!

Give that cauliflower a really good rinse.

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

Look at all this amazing color! I love it!

 

Next you are going to pull out your food processor and pulse the carrots, onion, garlic and frozen cauliflower. Keep it chunky. We don’t want teeny tiny bits, we want this to have that wonderful mouth feel that typical chili has.

I pulse the carrots first.

I pulse the carrots first.

img_0246

Pulse the onion and garlic. I used red onion because I had it on hand. Whatever onion you have on hand will work.

img_0244

Add the cauliflower and keep pulsing.

Then take 1/2 cup of coconut oil and heat it up in large pot. Throw in the vegetables and sauté them until they start to soften. Add cumin, salt and white pepper to taste. Add cacao, cinnamon, and bourbon smoked paprika. The vegetables should be coated in the spices.

img_0252

Your kitchen should be smelling amazing right now.

I want you to add two jars of organic basil marinara.

img_0253

This is the marinara sauce I use. You can find it at Whole Foods.

Then you are going to lower the heat way down and walk away. Let this thing cook down for an hour, maybe two and let the flavors come together. Every once in a while, check it, give it a stir, make sure it isn’t burning on the bottom.

In the end, it will look like this:

img_0254

Doesn’t this look amazing?

This recipe has minimal prep time, with maximum flavor. Make it this weekend and you’ll have lunch all week long.  Try it and tell me what you think!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-4

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

What Is An Antioxidant?

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety-2What is An Antioxidant?

Antioxidants are the nutrients found in food that neutralize free radicals by sharing an electron with the free radical, making it whole again. Thus, antioxidants stop the chain reaction of free radical formation and the oxidative stress that prematurely ages us.  As a result, antioxidants provide protection against a long list of conditions and chronic diseases.  More importantly, they keep us from aging prematurely.

Antioxidants come in several forms, including the vitamins A, C, and E, alpha lipoic acid, plant-derived polyphenols, and the element selenium. They are also found in nuts, broccoli, and colorful fruits and vegetables.  Blueberries, pomegranates, broccoli sprouts, green tea, and dark chocolate are just some of the antioxidant-rich “superfoods” found in almost any supermarket today.

The Mother of All Antioxidants: Glutathione

The mother of all antioxidants is glutathione.  Glutathione is a combination of three amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.  It is referred to as the master detoxifier because it recycles all of the other antioxidants. So, although vitamin C, E and Alpha Lipoic acid are potent antioxidants, they can become depleted.  Glutathione basically fortifies and then recycles them.  

Besides recycling other antioxidants, glutathione also defuses free radicals on its own.  The secret of glutathione’s power is the sulfur it contains. Sulfur is the sticky stuff that allows it to snatch up free radicals and other toxins in our body so that they can be excreted.  I take 2 teaspoons of organic sulfur crystals every day  to support my glutathione.  It works.  I have one patient that says if forced to choose the one thing she would take if she could only take one health aid, it would be her sulfur crystals.

You may remember reading about sulfur before on my blog.  Recall that the mother of all hormones is cholesterol sulfate and the mother of all vitamins is its metabolite, vitamin D3 sulfate. The common denominator between the big three—glutathione disulfide, cholesterol sulfate, and vitamin D3 sulfate—is sulfur.  It’s no surprise then that the longest-living and healthiest people in the world hail from places where sulfur is more abundant, such as Greece, Italy, Japan and Iceland.  Sulfur is the common denominator again and again in my research and one deserving of our attention if we want to prevent premature aging as well as disease.

It is disturbing that most of us have never heard of these three super antioxidants, given their importance in promoting overall health.  In fact, glutathione disulfide, vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate, are very poorly understood and relatively unknown to the medical community, let alone the general public.  Why is this so?  Well, probably because until very recently, pharmaceutical companies hadn’t figured out how to make a buck off of them.  You can’t take a glutathione pill, the body must produce it on its own.  Likewise, you get cholesterol and vitamin D3 sulfate from the sun, not off the shelf.  If the American public was more informed about the role of sulfur, we would be able to manage the onslaught of free radicals that we are currently subjected to on a daily basis far better and perhaps the aging process would not be accelerating as much as it is at present.

Although you can’t ingest glutathione directly, you can supplement to help your body produce more if it.  Some are saying that the ability to produce more glutathione would be like discovering the proverbial Fountain of Youth.

Getting your Glutathione Going

In order to transfer the electrons that neutralize free radicals, glutathione needs a cofactor (helper) in the form of a coenzyme called NAD+, which you can get from several different supplement companies.  Another way to support glutathione is to take organic sulfur crystals as I mentioned above.  You can purchase it online.  A good one is made by Happy Body.  

Taking melatonin is another way of supporting glutathione.  The best way to take it is in the form of organic tart cherry juice, which is loaded with Melatonin naturally.  The added benefit is that it makes you sleep better so be sure to take it at night.  All three of these strategies, organic sulfur crystals, NAD+ and melatonin, reduce free radicals.  Reducing free radicals improves skin, hearing, hair, memory, endurance, sexual function, muscle and bone health.  It would also prevent cancer, vascular disease and dementia.  Need I say more?

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-3

Happy #MotivationMonday!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Considering Antidepressants? Consider This!

copy-of-copy-of-natural-options-for-anxiety

Depressed? If you’ve spoken with you family physician about feeling depressed and you were offered an antidepressant without any medical testing or alternative solutions, know that you are not alone.

The use of antidepressants in the United States has skyrocketed in the last decade. According to the New York Times, “One in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication; among women in their 40s and 50s, the figure is one in four.” Even more disturbing is that “nearly two-thirds of a sample of more than 5,000 patients who had been given a diagnosis of depression within the previous 12 months did not meet the criteria for major depressive episode as described by the psychiatrists’ bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or D.S.M.).”

So before you run out and fill that prescription, consider the following:

There are a number of reasons that we end up with a mood disorder but they all come down to an imbalance or deficiency in one of the following: neurotransmitters, hormones, or the immune system.

Neurotransmitters

 The 3 most common are Norepinephrine, Serotonin and Dopamine. They interface and in so doing affect our mood.

nuerotransmitters

There are other important neurotransmitters as well that can become unbalanced by drugs or medications.

nuerotransmitter-2

“Okay…how do I know if my neurotransmitters are unbalanced?”

That’s a great question! You can test this. I tell my patients to speak with their physicians about the Neuroscience NueroAdrenal Panel. This saliva and urine test measures

  • Serotonin
  • Dopamine
  • Norepinephrine
  • Epinephrine
  • GABA
  • PEA
  • Histamine
  • Glutamate
  • Creatinine
  • DHEA
  • Cortisol 4 times in one day

Hormones

Estrogen and testosterone are the most likely hormones to become unbalanced causing mood disorders. Adrenal fatigue is another common cause of anxiety.

hormones 

“Okay…but how do I test my hormones?”  Again, talk to your physician.  If your hormones are found to be out of balance you can supplement with bioidentical hormones. This is not the same as traditional hormone replacement.

Immune System Failure

Seventy percent of the immune system is in the gut. The majority of Americans suffer from leaky gut and do not realize it. The gut is now seen as the little brain. Leaky gut = Leaky brain (anxiety, depression, & dementia.)

What to do:

  1. Heal the gut – Clean food, bone broth, & probiotics
  2. Supplement with antioxidants. There are two type of antioxidants: enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants.
  • Enzymatic antioxidants break down and remove free radicals and require the minerals zinc, copper, manganese, and iron.
  • Non-enzymatic antioxidants are vitamins C and E, glutathione, lipoic acid, carotenoids, and CoQ10.
  • Pterostillbene (improved version of resveratrol)
  • Astaxanthin – Although it’s technically a carotenoid, it deserves its own special mention due to its superb nutritional advantage. It is 65 times more powerful than vitamin C, 54 times more powerful than beta-carotene, and 14 times more powerful than vitamin E.  
Like resveratrol, it can also cross the blood-brain barrier, AND the blood-retinal barrier – something that beta-carotene and lycopene cannot do.
  • Vitamin C – Important structural component of bones, blood vessels, tendons, and ligaments.
You can get vitamin C from raw, organic vegetables and fruits, but you can also take it as a supplement or have it administered intravenously (IV). Note that most of the vitamin C in the US is synthetic and likely to contain GMOs. Real vitamin C is hard to find. When taking a vitamin C supplement, opt for one made with liposomal technology, which makes the nutrient more absorbable to your cells. The best brand is LipoNaturals.
  • Vitamin E – Natural vitamin E is a family of eight different compounds: four tocopherols and four tocotrienols so always get one that contains all 8.
  1. Take Low Dose Naltrexone- An opioid blocker that reboots the immune system especially if you have been diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder, cancer, Alzheimer’s or vascular disease.
  2. Supplement with foods that have been shown to have antidepressant and antianxiety properties.
  • Hemp Seeds – have been shown to have antidepressant and antianxiety properties. Of the 20 known amino acids, hemp supplies them all, including the essential ones the body can’t produce. Also high in fiber, hemp seeds are more digestible than any other high-protein food, including meat, cheese, eggs, human milk, or cows’ milk. They’re also high in antioxidants, and minerals like iron, zinc and copper as well as calcium, magnesium, potassium, carotene, thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin B6 and vitamin E. Finally they contain chlorophyll, sulfur, phosphorus, phospholipids, and phytosterols. They help people suffering from tuberculosis, psoriasis, and even colon and prostate cancer.
  • Cherimoya – Another natural antidepressant is a plant called Cherimoya. It is used in traditional Mexican medicine for its anxiety-relieving, anticonvulsant, and tranquilizing properties, and positive effects on depressive disorders.
  • Rhodiola – Rhodiola is an herb thought to strengthen the nervous system, fight depression, enhance immunity, elevate the capacity for exercise, enhance memory, aid weight reduction, increase sexual function and improve energy levels.
  • Passionflower. A few small clinical trials suggest that passionflower might help with anxiety. Passionflower is generally considered safe when taken as directed, but some studies found it can cause drowsiness, dizziness and confusion and is best taken at night.

Of questionable use are:

  • Valerian. In some studies, people who used valerian reported less anxiety and stress. In other studies, people reported no benefit. Valerian is generally considered safe at recommended doses, but since long-term safety trials are lacking, don’t take it for more than a few weeks at a time. It can cause some side effects such as headaches and drowsiness.
  • Chamomile. Limited data shows that short-term use of chamomile is generally considered safe and can be effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety. Use of chamomile can cause allergic reactions in some people who are sensitive to the family of plants that includes chamomile. Other members of this family are ragweed, marigolds, daisies and chrysanthemums.
  • Lavender. Some evidence suggests that oral lavender or aromatherapy with lavender can reduce anxiety; however, evidence is preliminary and limited. Oral lavender can cause constipation and headache. It also can increase appetite and the sedative effect of other medications and supplements and can cause low blood pressure.
  • Lemon balm. Preliminary research shows lemon balm can reduce some symptoms of anxiety, such as nervousness and excitability. Lemon balm is generally well-tolerated and considered safe for short-term use, but can cause nausea and abdominal pain.
  • Kava. Kava appeared to be a promising treatment for anxiety, but reports of serious liver damage — even with short-term use — caused several European countries to pull it off the market. The Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings but not banned sales in the United States. Avoid using kava until more rigorous safety studies are done, especially if you have liver problems or take medications that affect your liver.
  1. Manage Your Sulfur

Sulfur deficiency is a greatly overlooked source of ill health and mood disorder. There are four primary sources of sulfur and all are deficient in US diets:

  • Cholesterol Sulfate – The mother of all hormones is Cholesterol Sulfate, which we get from the sun shining on our skin. Without it the other hormones do not function.

USE A UVB LAMP REGULARLY TO INCREASE CHOLESTEROL SULFATE

  • Vitamin D3 Sulfate – Mother of all vitamins, although it is not really a vitamin, but a hormone that comes from the production of Cholesterol sulfate. Critical for the immune system.

USE A UVB LAMP REGULARLY TO INCREASE VITAMIN D3 NATURALLY

  • Glutathione Disulfide – Mother of all antioxidants

SUPPLEMLENT WITH ORGANIC SULFUR CRYSTALS to SUPPORT GLUTATHIONE

  • Broccoli sprouts – Fresh broccoli sprouts contain Sulforanphane, which is an organosulfur compound that acts as a powerful antioxidant. It has an amazing impact on joint pain and arthritis. It is also an “exceptionally rich source” of enzymes that “detoxify” cancer-causing compounds.

EAT RAW BROCCOLI SPROUTS 4 OR 5 TIMES A WEEK

  1. Fight Free Radicals with Antioxidants
  • Organic Sulfur Crystals
  • Astaxanthin
  • Vitamins C, D, E, K, and A – Get A, D and K from fermented Cod liver oil in exactly the right combination (never supplement with A alone.) Take C in liposomal form from a compounded natural source.
  • Cholesterol sulfate – from sunshine
  • Vitamin D3 – from sunshine
  • NAD+
  • Pterostillbene
  • CoQ10
  • Foods high in polyphenols

Finally, there are things you can do, that do not cost a penny, that can help minimize anxiety and depression.

Exercise

The research is very clear, exercise is a must for minimizing anxiety and depression. It does this is by increasing the level of endorphins, the “feel good” hormones, in your brain. It also de-stresses you. Medication and yoga are also excellent for reducing stress. Sometimes all you need to do is get outside for a walk. A sauna can relax you or perhaps you need something very physical like a game of tennis or kick boxing. Try watching a funny movie, or something that makes you feel good. Do not exercise excessively – High Intensity Interval Training combined with weight bearing exercise is the best combination. Any aerobic exercise should be limited to no more than half an hour as oxidative stress (more free radicals)

Build a solid support system

A support system composed of friends, family and, if necessary, professional counselors,  can help you work through your emotional stress.

Eat Clean

Polluted food causes problems on two fronts: It drives more free radicals which destroy the immune system and it lacks antioxidants which we must have to support the immune system. Without an intact immune system, we are vulnerable to disease processes that drive anxiety and depression. Avoid fructose, sugar and grains in order to normalize insulin and leptin, both of which are powerful tools against depression. Clean eating is 100% grass-fed, organic, wild caught and fresh instead of processed. (See Clean Eating Protocol)

Eat the Right Fats

Coconut oil is at the top of the list and should be used to cook with but should also be used as a supplement. Duck fat, ghee from grass fed beef and raw butter are the only oils to use for cooking. (See infograph on fats) Supplement with a high quality omega 3 krill oil and use fermented Cod Liver oil, which has the right combination of vitamins K, A and D, all of which are critical for clear thinking and mental calm.

Get UVB light from the sun

The research is also very clear here, people with the lowest vitamin D levels are 11 times more prone to depression than normal.

What to Avoid

  1. Sugar and Gluten

Americans are OD’ing on sugar, sugar substitutes and gluten. It is critical to avoid fructose, sugar and grains in order to normalize insulin and leptin, both of which drive depression when they are out of balance.

  1. Food Allergies/Sensitivities

Eating foods that you are allergic or sensitive to can drive considerable anxiety and depression. Have yourself tested and eliminate those foods. In many cases you can add them back in as your gut heals. For example, it is common for people to be allergic to dairy and not know it.

Final Thoughts

This is a game of avoiding free radicals while increasing antioxidants. We explored increasing antioxidants above. Now lets look at avoiding the things that put us more at risk. In general, the body knows best and does it best. When we interfere with medications, we usually make things worse. This is certainly true when it comes to mood disorders. Here is what Dr. Richard Mercola says about antidepressants:

“First of all, when looking at the research literature, short-term trials show that antidepressants do NOT provide any clinically significant benefits for mild to moderate depression, compared to a placebo. As you know, all drugs have benefit-to-risk ratios, so if a drug is as effective as a placebo in relieving symptoms, it really doesn’t make sense to use them as a first line of defense.

And yet doctors all over America prescribe them as if they were indeed sugar pills! However, it gets worse. Research into the long-term effects of antidepressants shows that patients are no longer really recuperating from their depressive episodes as was the general norm prior to the advent of modern antidepressants. The depression appears to be lifting faster, but patients tend to relapse more frequently, turning what ought to have been a passing phase into an increasingly chronic state of depression.

Long-term studies now indicate that of people with major depression, only about 15 percent that are treated with an antidepressant go into remission and stay well for a long period of time. The remaining 85 percent start having continuing relapses and become chronically depressed.

According to Whitaker’s research, this tendency to sensitize your brain to long-term depression appears to be the same both for the earlier tricyclic antidepressants and the newer SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).

In addition, SSRI’s have been shown to increase your risk of developing bipolar depression, according to Whitaker. Anywhere from 25 to 50 percent of children who take an antidepressant for five years convert to bipolar illness. In adults, about 25 percent of long term users convert from a diagnosis of unipolar depression to bipolar.

This is a serious concern because once you’re categorized as bipolar, you’re often treated with a potent cocktail of medications including an antipsychotic medication, and long-term bipolar outcomes are grim in the United States. For starters, only about 35 percent of bipolar patients are employed, so the risk of permanent disability is great. Another risk inherent with long-term use is that of cognitive decline.”

Finally, anyone whose physician is prescribing them antidepressants without taking the time to rule out underlying medical reasons why they could be feeling “depressed” should do themselves a favor and get a second opinion. 

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

#MotivationMonday

copy-of-copy-of-copy-of-the-blame-game-2

Can’t Sleep? Considering Sleeping Pills? Try This First!

art in theeveryday

More and more of my patients are complaining about their sleep. Falling asleep, staying asleep and length of sleep are all common complaints.  Some patients have been offered sleeping medication by their physicians without any consideration for what they can do help themselves.

Although there are many sleep myths, there are two myths related to sleeping medication that I want to discuss.

Myth: Sleeping pills have many benefits despite their side effects (one of which is a good chance of dying.)

Fact: They are really not that effective, and they have a lot of negative side effects.

Sleeping pills generally only increase the amount of time you sleep by a matter of minutes. If you have ever taken one, you know that far from waking up refreshed, sleeping pills can impair your functioning the next day, making you even less alert and more disoriented than you would have been from just being tired.

Sleeping pills have also been shown to have strange side effects that include waking hallucinations, sleepwalking, sleep driving, sleep eating, amnesia, and depression.   Perhaps it is the body’s way of reproducing the lost REM sleep? The most important thing when it comes to sleeping pills is that they do not address the underlying problem.

Myth: Unless I want to take a prescribed sleeping pill, there is nothing I can do to improve my sleep.

Fact: There are many natural things that can help you get to sleep, enhance REM sleep, and stay asleep.

  • 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) has been shown to extend the REM phase significantly. It also increases the deep sleep stages of non-REM sleep. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Stanford University conducted a clinical study on REM sleep. They found those people who took 5-HTP increased the amount of REM sleep they enjoyed at night by as much as 53%.
  • The sleep hormone melatonin, which is made from serotonin, the neurotransmitter known as the happy hormone enhances sleep. Serotonin comes from the amino acid tryptophan. You can only get tryptophan from foods like cottage cheese, brown rice, avocados, bananas, walnuts, tomatoes, meat, turkey (highest tryptophan food) and starchy carbohydrates (bread, pasta, carrots and potatoes). But you can supplement with Melatonin or you can drink tart cherry juice, which is naturally loaded with it. Studies have shown, that people who drink two glasses of tart cherry juice per day see as much as a 90 minute increase in their daily sleep.
  • In addition to tryptophan, we also need Vitamin B6 to produce serotonin. B6 can raise serotonin production even more when you take 5-HTP and vitamin B6 together. In fact, laboratory research shows taking vitamin B6 can increase serotonin production by as much as 60%.12 Many older adults suffer unknowingly from a deficiency of this crucial vitamin.
  • Gamma-aminobutryric Acid (GABA) GABA has a calming and relaxing effect and helps you get to sleep because it suppresses excessive brain activity. It puts the brain into neutral gear and helps put a stop to racing thoughts and anxiety that makes it impossible to fall asleep. When you’re short on GABA, your thoughts and worries run amok like a hamster in a wheel. Other research shows a GABA deficiency interferes with the deep “delta” sleep that usually begins within 45 minutes after bedtime. Finally GABA promotes alpha waves in the brain, which occur when you’re feeling relaxed.
  • As is often the case, we have to get these supplements across the blood brain barrier and the best way to do that is with an amino acid. In this case taurine, which increases your body’s GABA levels and is an excellent stress buster on its own, works well. A recent study in the Journal of Neuroscience found taurine increases the number of GABA receptors in the brain. They also found taurine calms neurons, or brain cells,15 helping you feel more relaxed.
  • To stay asleep, especially if you’re feeling stressed or anxious, you’ll want to take L-theanine, Niacinamide and Passion flower extract. L-theanine has an amazing power to soothe and quiet your brain because it raises levels of serotonin and GABA. Niacinamide, better known as vitamin B3, can also help you relax, sleep better, and lower the anxiety caused by stress. Passion flower extract is particularly helpful for coping with the hormonal changes that can keep you awake, in particular rising cortisol levels. Cortisol is the stress hormone, or the flight or fight hormone.
  • Magnesium is absolutely essential for a good nights sleep as it can stop body aches or wayward leg 
syndrome from waking you up at night. I recommend Magnesium L Threonate.

This combination of nutrients, can help you fall asleep more quickly, wake up less often during the night, and sleep more deeply. The product I use is Advanced Sleep Formula by Advanced Bionutritionals as it combines all of these in a way that maximizes sleep.

Sleep Soundly and Feel Sensational!

Good sleep hygiene is absolutely essential for good health, and there are many things you can do to insure a good night’s sleep. If you have trouble falling asleep in general try these approaches:

  1. Sleep in a completely dark room. Use black out curtains or an eye mask if necessary to create complete darkness.
  2. Keep the room cool and the bed warm. You can always take the blankets off if you get too warm, but a warm room is more difficult change without waking up. Try to get fresh air in your bedroom at night.
  3. Keep your bedroom free of clutter, you will sleep better in an organized room
  4. Cover electronic sources of light.
  5. Use a noise machine or a fan to create white noise which is soothing and which blocks out other noises

If you can’t sleep because you are anxious:

  1. Make a list of the things that you are worrying about getting done. This helps you organize the next day and you can let it go
  2. Journal using pen and paper not a laptop. Journaling also helps you to let go by clarifying your thoughts and feelings about your day. Once you have it sorted out emotionally you can put it to rest when you close your journal.
  3. Turn off the TV and read a book an hour or so before you want to fall asleep unless you are reading something that you cannot put down. Most people get sleepy when they read but not everyone does. If you are one of those people that can read a good book all night, then don’t start.
  4. Count your blessings or say a prayer.
  5. Use tension/relaxation to relax muscle groups. Tense the muscle, hold for 10 seconds and then relax. Do it ten times for each muscle group to really relieve muscle tension
  6. Use melatonin, vitamin B or magnesium L threonate.
  7. Use homeopathic remedies that are relaxing or make you sleepy like poppy seed and ashwaganda
  8. Take an Epsom salts bath before bed
  9. Get into the habit of taking tart cherry juice concentrate from the Montmorency cherries every night.

Sweet dreams!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Natural Anxiety Relief

NATURAL OPTIONS FOR ANXIETY

Treatment for anxiety does not have to equal “drugs.” You have nothing to lose, and everything to gain, by applying lifestyle modifications before trying medication. You may be surprised by how much such changes lessen anxiety naturally. If you often feel anxious or have panic attacks I strongly recommend the following:

  • Exercise

In addition to the creation of new neurons, including those that release the calming neurotransmitter GABA, exercise boosts levels of potent brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, which may help buffer some of the effects of stress. Many avid exercisers also feel a sense of euphoria after a workout, sometimes known as the “runner’s high.” It can be quite addictive, in a good way, once you experience just how good it feels to get your heart rate up and your body moving.

  • Optimizing Your Gut Flora

Your gut and brain work in tandem, each influencing the other. This is why your intestinal health can have such a profound influence on your mental health and vice versa. It’s also the reason why your diet is so closely linked to your mental health.

Prior research has shown that the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus had a marked effect on GABA levels in certain brain regions and lowered the stress-induced hormone corticosterone, resulting in reduced anxiety- and depression-related behavior.  The probiotic known as Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 has also been shown to normalize anxiety-like behavior in mice with infectious colitis.

So optimizing your gut flora with beneficial bacteria is a highly useful strategy. This is done by eliminating sugars and processed foods and eating plenty of non-starchy vegetables, avoiding processed vegetable oils, and using healthy fats. Additionally, eating plenty of fermented vegetables like sauerkraut or taking a high-potency probiotic would be useful to reestablish healthy gut flora.

  • Omega-3 Fats

Your diet should include a high-quality source of animal-based omega-3 fats, like anchovies, sardines, wild-caught Alaskan salmon or krill oil. The omega-3 fats EPA and DHA play an important role in your emotional well-being, and research has shown a dramatic 20 percent reduction in anxiety among medical students taking omega 3s.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

Copy of The Blame Game (1)

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

Copy of The Blame Game-8

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

Copy of The Blame Game-3

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

The Blame Game-6

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

#MotivationMonday

Copy of The Blame Game-2

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Confessions of a Junk Food Junkie

youarethesunshinethatmakesmyday-2

Dear Russet Burbanks, You are the sunshine that makes my day. Love, Dr. N.

This morning, I woke up thinking about Dunkin Donuts. I don’t know why, but I just did.

So I hopped into my car, and headed over to the closest Dunkin Donuts to get my most favorite breakfast.

“Hey Dr. Renae,” a voice over the speaker greeted me. “Your usual?”

“Yup,” I replied. I spun the car around to the next window and picked up a chocolate iced donut (hold the sprinkles -let’s not go too crazy) and a mocha coolatta (extra whip cream, of course.)

So I headed over to my favorite writing spot and spent some time going over my newest book, Phenomenal Fast Food, which argues in favor of highly processed foods. These are the safest foods in our food system. They are designed, engineered, tested, packaged, and preserved. Fresh, real food becomes rancid very quickly causing all kind of gastrointestinal distress when ingested. Furthermore, no one has really researched them. What happens to you after a lifetime of pasture raised meats, dairy and organic fruits and vegetables? Personally, I’m frightened of the possibilities. On the other hand, scientifically formulated foods have an extended shelf life and rarely go bad.

I was including this latest internet treasure, a photo of six year old chicken nuggets and fries that still appear to be perfectly edible, when I heard my stomach rumble.

Mmm….chicken nuggets… mmm….french fries. Those ever so special Russet Burbank potatoes, crop dusted with methamidophos until snow white, then harvested and sitting for six weeks in a special controlled warehouse to off gas chemical residues before being processed…Rumble, gurgle, growl…It does it every time!

So I put aside my important work and hopped back in my car. When you get the urge, you get the urge. You know what I mean? I pulled into the drive–thru, whereupon being asked if I’d like to super size my meal, I wholeheartedly said, “yes to extra fries! Yes to extra nuggets! Yes to extra coke!” Then I thought about all that sugar in a coke, and asked for a diet coke instead.  Because we all know aspartame is totally safe. Again, processed perfection. Enhanced living through chemistry.

I decided to eat and drive. I’m really good at multitasking. So I ripped open the ketchup with my teeth, squirted it out on some random mail I left in my car and proceeded to dip and drive. It was hard managing the ketchup and fries, the sweet and sour sauce and nuggets, but I did it.

I pulled into my driveway thinking I was going to get some work done, but instead I felt exhausted. All that driving, those drive-thru, I was basically ready for a nap. Besides, my blood sugar was skyrocketing and I could feel my blood pressure rising and thought that a heart attack, or blood sugar attack, (at the very least a headache) was imminent. I needed to rest.

So I headed upstairs, breathing heavy, because the salt sometimes does that to me. My dog, upon smelling the rancid fast food odors, came running and starting licking my skin like the food was coming out of my pores. Once he settled down, we took a nap.

When I woke up, it was dark out. My stomach was rumbling. For a moment, I thought that I might want an apple, but the thought of eating an apple was preposterous! I don’t keep food in my fridge! Everyone knows when you buy fresh food it just spoils!

As I dragged myself out of bed, and got ready for my dinner out with my friends, I hoped that we were going some place good. I had heard about that newest restaurant where the portions are triple what they are every where else, everything is deep fried and you actually drink out of a bottomless cup that is replenished directly through the floor to a vat of beverage with these crazy sippy straws. I couldn’t wait to try it out!

You know me, living life to the fullest! Nothing stops me!

It was just then I felt a sharp pain in my belly, and figured I better take some Gas-X before the big girls night out. After all, I wanted to make sure there was room for dessert.

APRIL FOOLS!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

Eating Disorder Recovery

Copy of The Blame Game

Errors of Thinking- #8 Mind Reading

 

Copy of Copy of Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-2

Mind Reading can happen in two forms.  The first form assumes that someone else should know what you are thinking.  This can happen naturally in relationships.  After all, the more time we spend with someone, the more likely we are to know how they feel about something. We are better able to read their non verbal cues and often recognize needs before they are communicated.  But you can run into trouble when you start expecting the person to act or do something without ever communicating that need.

Imagine you are coming home from a really long day.  You still have to cook dinner for everyone, you still have to deal with the dishes and getting everyone to bed. After dinner your partner usually watches the news and then helps the kids with homework. But that night, you also have to work on a project that is due tomorrow. The only way you see that happening is if you hand off the clean up duty to your partner that night.  Okay, all settled, you think to yourself. So you rush in, you tell your partner, I really have to work on a project tonight. He nods his head. So you make dinner, eat dinner, and your spouse disappears to go watch tv as usual after dinner leaving you with dishes. So you storm into the tv room and start a fight about how you have to work on your project and why can’t he just do the dishes! Your spouse says, “I thought you were going to work on it after you put the kids to bed.  I had no idea you wanted me to do the dishes.  All you had to do was ask.”  It’s then that you realize you never actually told him how you wanted his help. You made a plan that involved the two of you but never communicated it.  Sound familiar? That’s one form of mind reading.

The second form of mind reading assumes that you know what another person is thinking. In general, this thought tends to be negative and riddled with anxiety. For example, you raise your hand to answer a question in class, but your answer is wrong. You are embarassed. As you look around the room, you think the guy sitting across from you who is looking at you thinks you are stupid.  Next thing you know, you are so embarrassed, you have resolved to never answer a question in this class again.

You can see how if you are anxious to begin with, this kind of thinking can catch on like wild fire, and before you know it, you are feeling pretty depressed.

Engaging in mind reading, in either form, is a recipe for disaster.

So what can we do about it?

Communicate, communicate, communicate.

In the first example, it’s pretty clear how communication could’ve eliminated an unnecessary argument and saved time.  If you are changing normal routines and responsibilities, it’s always good to check in with the people that are affected so that you aren’t leaving the success of the new routine up to whether or not the person is an excellent mind reader. Chances are, they aren’t.  In the example above, the person communicated the need (working on the project) but not the plan (partner does dishes). No matter how much you are in sync with another person, it never hurts to get verbal confirmation.

In the second example, there are several questions you can ask yourself. First of all, clearly identify what you think the other person is thinking.  “The guy across from me thinks I’m dumb because I answered the question wrong.” Next, write it down. Just seeing it on paper may make you question your assumption.  Next consider the evidence for and against your conclusion. You may only be considering evidence that supports your conclusion and missing the larger picture. And what is the quality of your evidence? If it’s just a look someone gives you, that’s not the same as the person shouting “Duh,” after your professor corrects your answer.  Then ask yourself, if the thought were true, would it mean more about you, or the person? In this example, what does it say about the other person that they would think someone is stupid for answering a question wrong?  Finally, you can always try acting counter to the thought. If the thought makes you want to crawl under your desk, then maybe you should try raising your hand again at the next question.  Or perhaps you would look at the other student and smile.

Like I said before, mind reading can happen naturally. In small doses, it doesn’t cause a problem. But if mind reading is causing you anxiety or leading to miscommunications that are causing arguments, then it’s time to address the common error of thinking.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

 

Is Residential “Treatment” Really Treatment?

Nothing worth having wasnever achieved without effortI have been saying publicly that residential treatment centers for eating disorders don’t work. Behind the scenes, I have lamented the atrocities my patients have undergone while in residential treatment. Given that this problem has finally been exposed, I would like to share with you some of the experiences my patients have shared with me, as well as my own experience with this exploitive form of “treatment.”

Let’s start with the patient that was effectively incarcerated in a residential treatment center for nearly a year. She entered the center at 90 pounds and eleven months later, and only after a court order, she escaped weighing 180 pounds. She described the state of her body at that point as consisting primarily of “pasty white blubber.”

While she was in “treatment” she was not allowed to communicate with her parents, who were not allowed to communicate with her either. She was forced to eat 4000 to 5000 calories per day in the form of cereal, bagels, candy bars, soft drinks, and highly processed proteins such as hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken fingers etc. If she refused to eat this polluted excuse for real food, she was isolated and tube fed. She was not allowed to do any fitness work, despite being healthy physically. She pleaded, begged and threatened staff, but to no avail until her parents got a court order to have her released.

The trust between psychologist and patient, which is truly the foundation of healing for any patient, but especially for patients with eating disorders, had been so damaged as a result of her experience at this residential treatment center, that she could not bring herself to engage in treatment again. Her trust for practitioners had been damaged beyond repair at that point. (If you’re out there, CJ, and you’re reading this, I pray you found your way back to good health. Sending you positive vibes and good wishes. You can do it.)

This residential treatment center was charging $10,000 a week ($40,000 a month) and the parents were paying about $10,000 of that out-of-pocket per month. In other words, they paid close to a hundred thousand dollars for the so-called treatment that their daughter received. The insurance company paid a tidy sum as well. No wonder the treatment center kept this young woman against her will and against the wishes of her parents! They were making a fortune. One thing is for sure, they were not particularly interested in her well-being. Their motive was clearly profit.

Think that sounds harsh? According to the most recent article in the New York Times, for profit residential eating disorder facilities have grown over the past few years, along with their elaborate marketing efforts and business development plans. Private equity investment companies are responsible for the proliferation of these treatment centers. Why? Because there is money to be made in exploiting a disorder that is not very well understood and becomes increasingly difficult to treat the longer the patient goes untreated. For parents grappling with their worst nightmare, these facilities promote their facilities as being critical to the survival of a loved one. They use scare tactics to coerce parents and significant others into signing their loved ones into treatment. In the case of the patient above they threw away the key.

When scare tactics don’t work, some treatment centers market their businesses, using expensive brochures, as something akin to a luxury spa or a drug and alcohol treatment center for the uber rich. The question is, do these programs actually help? Not according to the research. Their success rates are abysmal, at around 30%. My experience is that they make things worse. The example above may sound extreme, but I could share many more like it.

A question the consumer should be asking is who regulates these places? As far as I can tell, apparently no one regulates them, which sets the stage for people who desperately need good treatment to be exploited. For example, in order to do business they have to have referrals, right? I have seen first hand how this plays out. A therapist, who used residential treatment as a “consequence” for continuing to purge, refers an unwilling teen to a residential treatment center. The parents, who are at their wits end, agree to relinquish the responsibility of trying to save their daughter’s life to the treatment center. The treatment center plays on their fear and insists that this is the only course of action in order to protect their child. So the unwilling child ends up in residential treatment half a continent away.

But, and this is the kicker, the child can only get out of the residential treatment center if she agrees to go back to the referring therapist! Don’t forget, she wasn’t doing well with that therapist. However, since she would do anything to get out, she agrees. The therapist and the treatment center refer back and forth, patting each other’s backs and padding each other’s wallets.

In my humble opinion, this is a conflict of interest that has the potential to be damaging to the client. In this case, the patient went through this scenario 3 times with this therapist and in the end it backfired. The child decided she wanted to stay in the residential treatment instead of living her life. (No homework, no chores, no decisions…..just a lot of TV and the occasional art class and group therapy session.) She had already missed two and a half years of high school and wasn’t used to the demands of going to school. In addition, her friends were no longer her friends. When she came to me and I declined to put her back in a residential program, what do you think she did? Went back to that therapist and ended up back in the residential treatment center, again!

As you might imagine, despite courting me relentlessly to refer to them, I have never received a referral from a residential treatment center looking for after care for their Cincinnati clients. It does not seem to matter that I am qualified or that I can demonstrate excellent outcomes, as soon as they realize I will not be referring to them, they are uninterested in referring their graduates. Huh!

I was recently contacted by an investigative reporter, who is planning to file a class action suit against residential treatment centers in California, where she had been a “victim” of such treatment herself. I hope that she wins or that she is at least able to shine some light on a seemingly unregulated industry.

On a more positive note, relatively speaking, let’s take my patient who is currently in remission after only nine months of treatment here at the Norton Center. She came to me from a residential treatment center where she had been on bed rest for 14 days prior to being released. Why was she on bed rest despite the fact that she was medically stable? Because she was refusing to eat any of the institutional processed and highly polluted foods that she was being offered. The bed rest was a “consequence” for not eating. Another consequence was that the staff were instructed not to speak with her. She was to have (in her words) “no human contact.”

She was also being forced to either drink or be tube fed 6 to 8 Boosts a day. If you read the ingredients of a boost, there is almost no food in it. The first ingredient is water, the next ingredient is a GMO sugar. The third ingredient is high fructose corn syrup, another sugar, only this time a sugar on steroids, which is also genetically engineered. Finally, we get something that resembles a food in protein concentrate. However, because it is from a concentrate, the protein has been denatured, which renders it more dangerous than healthy. Then, we start with all of the hydrogenated processed oils, including vegetable oil, canola oil, high Oleic sunflower oil and corn oil. Hydrogenated oils are dangerous. Awesome! Right?

Try to imagine what this would be like: lying in a small room in your bed, unable to get out of bed except for your supervised bathroom visits, and all you have to look forward to is trying to get down a Boost. And when you can’t, or when you throw up because you are so sick of it, no worries—a tube is inserted into your little body and you are fed the Boost through the tube. Let’s see you throw that up.

The insurance company for this patient was being billed around $1500 a day. The Boosts cost $20.21 per day. What were they charging for? She received therapy from a social worker for a short period sporatically during the week, had art therapy every day and spent “maybe 5 minutes a day” with an M.D.

This patient is currently in complete remission, her weight restored to normal. She is back in school full-time, getting straight A’s, setting her sights on law school, traveling with her orchestra, doing amazing art, and voluntarily eating about 2500 clean calories a day, which is good considering that she is fairly petite.

Why do I bring this client up? I firmly believe that the majority of eating disorder patients belong in outpatient therapy. When a patient is able to still participate in work, school, family life, extracurriculars, and friendships, they are able to stay connected with their real life, with its problems and challenges. Inevitably, those challenges and problems are discussed and dissected during session. Her recovery is tied to the successes she has in coping in a different way with those issues.

Another reason intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) works better is that it allows the family to participate. In the case of this patient, (and most of my patients) I could not have been nearly as successful without the involvement the mom. The research is clear, family treatment is the only form of treatment that has been shown to be effective in treating Anorexia. Most families cannot relocate to be with their child throughout the months that she is in residential treatment, such that she is alone and all too often isolated from her loved ones. In addition, the cost of IOP in my practice is closer to $1500 a week instead of the $1500 a day charged by residential programs.

The main thing though is that recovery doesn’t happen locked in a beautiful tower with spa amenities. It doesn’t happen locked in a small prison like room with supervised bathroom visits. Recovery happens when a patient encounters a difficult moment in her real life, among her family and friends, and makes a choice to consciously try a new behavior, instead of relying on the more comfortable Eating Disorder (ED) behaviors.

My advice for anyone considering treatment would be this: look past all the packaging. Resist the fear and guilt tactics. Ask yourself the following: Do you connect with the therapist? Does your child connect with the therapist? Is there even a therapist? (In most treatment centers, the actual therapist sees your child for an hour a week.) Does the treating practitioner understand the role that polluted food plays in the development and escalation of disordered eating? Or the role that clean food plays in recovery? Will they include the family in treatment? Is treatment individualized or is it a one size fits all approach? Can his/her life continue while getting treatment assuming s/he is medically stable?

Answers to these questions should help you make an informed decision.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

It’s Pi Day (3.14)! Clean Pizza Tutorial!

O N E D R O P

It’s Pi Day (3.14) and right now the internet is blowing up with photos of pies and pie recipes.

Most people who know me, know that I am not a baker. I make pies once a year.  Therefore, I will not be discussing sweet pies today.

However, I am all about discussing PIZZA PIE! (You’re shocked, aren’t you?)

Here’s the question I am asked every week by new patients:

“Dr. Norton, does eating clean mean giving up pizza?”

(Wait for it..)

No! You can still have your pizza!  (We are going to have to modify it slightly, and I promise you it will taste a thousand times better than any pizza you’ve had before!)

One thing that I work really hard to help my clients understand is that eating clean does not mean deprivation. It means finding the highest quality foods and adapting old recipes to work with new ingredients.

Let’s start with the dough. This is really the biggest modification of pizza.  We can go one of two ways. You can use either Einkorn Pizza Dough or Cauliflower Pizza Crust.

Why Einkorn? Einkorn is a very ancient grain (still used in Italy today) that still has much of the original protein and is not nearly as starchy as the hyper hybridized wheat found in the United States.  If you are non celiac gluten sensitive, you might want to try the Einkorn dough.  (I get my einkorn flour at Jovial Foods). You may be pleasantly surprised that it is easier to digest with no tummy trauma.

“But Dr. Norton, I can’t eat wheat.” Then I suggest you try making cauliflower pizza crust. You haven’t heard of this? Here’s the most amazing, easy recipe! This is also a great recipe if you are trying to get more vegetables into your child’s diet.

Then we need some organic tomatoes. I only buy glass jar tomatoes and it is incredibly easy to just use them straight from the jar, or take a moment and make a super quick tomato sauce (basil, garlic, oregano). I top my pizza with raw organic shredded cheese and grass-fed unprocessed pepperoni. And because I love tomatoes so much, I add a little fresh sliced tomato on top as well. You can top yours with whatever organic ingredients you like. Keep your meats grass fed/pastured and your cheese raw and organic. That’s really the key to adapting this for clean eating.

Here’s what my pizza looks like:

1009927_1043866195634151_784481049178820511_n

Although it may not look like it, the Einkorn crust was very crispy and the organic ingredients were wonderful together. (Also, I’m drooling looking at this picture while I type. Seriously, this beats any takeout or restaurant pizza any day.)

Consider topping yours with some fresh organic basil after pulling it out of the oven. The aroma of the tomatoes with the fresh basil will send you to pizza heaven.

Happy Pi Day!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

 

 

Errors of Thinking- #7 Uncritical Acceptance of the Critic

 

Copy of Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-5

I’m going to let you in on a little secret, just because someone says you are lazy, doesn’t mean it’s actually true. Even if it’s your mother!

Are you shocked?

I find that many people suffer from this error of thinking and sadly, it’s often those that are closest to us whose criticisms go unquestioned.  Instead we accept it, and repeat it back to ourselves as if it were true. It’s painful when people who are close to us criticize us.

The deeper issue though, is that we define our self worth by what others think of us.  Stop and think about that for a moment. If a person praises us, we think we are worthy. If a person criticizes us, we think we are unworthy. From my vantage we have relinquished the control of our self esteem to an outsider. And that’s never a good thing.

How do we conquer this error of thinking?

Stop and ask yourself:

Is the person criticizing you an authority on the topic? (Usually, they aren’t.)

Does this person have all the information? (Usually they don’t.)

Is this person’s criticism constructive or destructive? (Constructive criticism is often situation specific, and is not a generalized assassination of character.)

Finally:

If you are in the moment and experiencing criticism, and can feel your emotions rising, do not respond immediately. Give yourself permission to think about what the critic is saying when your emotions have cooled off.

Remember, just because someone says something about you, it doesn’t mean it’s true.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

 

How to Dine Out and Eat Clean

How to Dine Out and Eat Clean

Not a day goes by that a patient doesn’t ask me, “What about going out to eat? How can I eat clean when I am in a restaurant?”

My answer is always the same. It is not easy and you have to do your homework. You may also have to go with your own food or beverage. Yup, that is what I do. I take my own Ginger Ale. This is not ideal, but it is better than drinking their tap water or wishing I had a vodka tonic. (Q Ginger Ale is made with organic agave and has only 15 grams of sugar per bottle and lots of real ginger.) I have also been known to take my own salad dressing.

Most of us believe that we just have to avoid fast food restaurants in order to remain healthy. It turns out that it isn’t just fast food that is the problem. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics shows 92% of all restaurants, big and small, mom and pop or national chains, exceed the calorie requirements for a single meal.  That burrito bowl at Chipotle? That’s actually 2 portions. You should split that with someone.

Researchers measured meals from 364 different restaurants across the U.S. They found that 123 of them had a single meal—without beverages, appetizers, or desserts—that exceeded a person’s caloric requirements for a whole day!

A patient of mine lamented recently that she does fine all week eating clean at home but that when she goes out to eat, she almost always overeats. It makes sense according to the senior author of the study, Dr. Susan B. Roberts of Tufts University, “These findings make it clear that making healthy choices while eating out is difficult because the combination of tempting options and excessive portions often overwhelm our self-control . . .” She goes on to say “Although fast food restaurants are often the easiest targets for criticism . . . Small restaurants typically provide just as many calories. And sometimes more.”

One very interesting finding was that five of the restaurants in the study provided side dishes at no extra cost. The average energy provided by these items was 471 kcal, which was greater than the 443 kcal for the entrées they accompanied. No wonder you can gain a couple of pounds going out to dinner once or twice a week.

Which ones are the worst? The study showed that American, Chinese, and Italian restaurants had the highest calorie counts, averaging 1,500 calories per meal.

So what can you do? Start by choosing the healthiest restaurants. Always pick the ones that offer grass-fed and wild caught. If you are lucky enough to have any organic restaurants, choose those. Stick to the items on the menu with the fewest ingredients. Pass on the bread and do consider bringing your own dressing. Order the veggies not the pastas, pastries or pancakes.  In Cincinnati, I dine at the Capital Grille. I always order the lamp chops and a side of asparagus.

Do you have any favorite restaurants in Cincinnati where eating clean is easy? I’d love to know! I’m compiling a list. Send me a Facebook message or Tweet me @drrenae.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Errors of Thinking- #6 Comparative Thinking

Copy of Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-3

A good friend of mine won’t look at Facebook. When I ask her why, her response is “Compare and despair.”

Well, isn’t that the truth!

Comparing yourself negatively to others is not only harmful to your self esteem, it is harmful to your spirit. It makes you feel hopeless.  Context is important when observing our thinking. The playing field is rarely level, which is why it is so crucial to stop yourself from negative comparing. Even if Susan lost 55 pounds last year and Ted lost 50 pounds, maybe they both weighed more to begin with? Maybe they each had more weight to lose? The most important question is, why does it matter?

It doesn’t.

What matters is the amazing fact that this person lost 30 pounds. If you’ve ever had 30 pounds to lose, then you know that is an accomplishment. Comparative thinking diminishes our successes and robs us of our accomplishments.

Further, this kind of thinking doesn’t take into account the goals you set.  After all, what is the point of feeling bad about goals that you didn’t reach when you didn’t set them? Realistically, how could your actions have added up to an accomplishment if you weren’t effectively taking steps in that direction?

You are closing the door on opportunity when you think this way.

So the next time you find yourself comparing and despairing, stop.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016.
Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook
Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

Errors of Thinking- #5 Global Labeling


Really? Every day? 365 days a year? I’m pretty sure a lot of things worked out for you today.  What happened?

What happened is Global Labeling.

Global Labeling is an error of thinking characterized by generalizing one or two negative qualities and applying them without any consideration to context.  When something bad happens once, a person who has this error of thinking will ignore all evidence to the contrary and have a very one dimensional view of themselves or others. There’s no complexity to their thoughts. In fact, they are having judgements. Expect language to be very colorful and emotionally loaded.  This error of thinking is the ultimate kind of generalization. Instead of providing context for an error, a person will attach unhealthy labels to themselves and/or others.

When projected outward towards others, global labeling can really represent some of the worst kind of thinking, like stereotypes and prejudice.  Expect snap judgements and relationship problems when someone is thinking this way.

If you are global labeling yourself, you are damaging your self esteem and you owe it to yourself to shake this error of thinking.

So how do you do that?

Suspend judgement.

Ask yourself, am I giving an accurate account of what happened? Am I providing context? Or am I just negatively labeling myself?

When considering your thoughts about others, ask yourself, am I considering this person as an individual? Or am I lumping them into group based on only one or two experiences I’ve had?

-Dr. Norton
#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED), as well as obesity. She is also the author of The Sun Plus Diet, due out in summer 2016. 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr. J. Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2016, Dr. J. Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com/

 

Errors of Thinking- #4 Catastrophizing

Copy of Never make an exception of yourself-2

Stop right there. Is that really true? We all have job pressures, but if it is something small, you should know that you are catastrophizing. It is also sometimes referred to as magnifying.
We all can remember a time that we have thought this way. Thanksgiving is ruined because someone brought the wrong brand of cranberry sauce. The wedding is ruined because the wrong color napkins were ordered. But this kind of thinking should happen rarely, if at all. But what if it is happening all the time?
A really good clue that you may be catastrophizing is if you find yourself using the words “what if” in conjunction with an expectation that disaster will strike, no matter what. If a friend challenges your thought with another possible outcome like “maybe you can ask for an extension,” you will still have an answer that is catastrophic. “I can’t ask for an extension! I’ll lose my job.” When a true catastrophe does strike, you think it’s the end of everything. “I’ve lost my job, I’ll never find another one.”
 You can see how this error of thinking causes panic.
 So how do you get off the hamster wheel of anxiety when you sense disaster looming?
 Ask yourself the following questions:
 Is it really as bad as it seems?
 Has it been this bad before and it’s gotten better?
 Have I lost perspective? (This is key.)
 These questions should help ground you and challenge your perception of the situation.
-Dr. Norton
#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Errors of Thinking- #3 Overgeneralization

Copy of Never make an exception of yourself
“Since I overate at the last party I went to, I know I will overeat at every party I go to.”
Huh. Really?
Just because one event happened, does not necessarily mean that you will repeat the behavior.  In fact, your ability to recognize the error in your behavior is actually a really good sign that you will be able to prepare and have a strategy to prevent the behavior from repeating.
When you overgeneralize you see a single event as a never ending pattern of defeat. It’s… well, discouraging and depressing.
So how can you beat this error of thinking?
Next time you catch yourself overgeneralizing, stop and remind yourself, “Just because I overate at this party, does not necessarily mean that I will overeat at the next party.”  You will feel less anxiety, less defeat, and more likely to map out strategies of how to handle eating at the next party.
Remember: You got this!
-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Errors of Thinking- #2 Perfectionsim

Never make an exception of yourself-4

Here is a major error of thinking- Perfectionism.

Here’s why perfectionism is so dangerous: it is focused on avoiding failure, so we are actively tracking our failure as opposed to actively seeking our success.  It’s a very different thing to say, “I like to exercise every day.”  In the thought above, the person has already decided that if they don’t exercise seven days a week for at least one hour, they’ve failed. There’s no room for success in the thought above. It is negatively oriented. There is a lot of room for anxiety and depression.

Perfectionism is often accompanied by depression and anxiety. Doesn’t the statement above make you anxious just reading it?

The next time you feel your thought ending in an unrealistic, conditional way- stop and ask yourself if you are thinking like a perfectionist.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

15 Errors of Thinking Series- #1 All or Nothing Thinking

ERRORS

I thought I’d start a series on the 15 Errors of Thinking, AKA Dealing More Realistically with Mistakes.

This is actually a favorite topic of mine, because whenever I find myself stuck, I find I’m having an error in my thinking.

We’re going to tackle them one at time so that we can really contemplate why this kind of thinking is an error and how we can help ourselves by identifying this error and correcting it.

Today we are looking at a personal favorite of mine:

 

Never make an exception of yourself-2

Oh man. Have you ever thought this way? Might as well just give up and forget it. The whole week is ruined. All that progress made, and it’s over, right?

Wrong.

After a week of doing really good at changing a behavior, clearly this person is feeling like a failure. But they aren’t a failure and it certainly isn’t reason to give up on changing your behavior. If they had 3 meals a day, for a week, that’s 21 meals. That means 1 meal out of 21 was a “failure.” So for 95% of the week, this person followed their meal plan. Is that a failure? Not in my book!

In fact, this person has done amazing for most of the week. Don’t let an error in thinking rob you of your success!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

Positive Self Talk!

POSITIVE SELF TALK

Everyone could use a reminder about the power of positive self talk.

Self talk is that inner voice that helps us calm our monkey minds once the hamster wheel of anxiety or depression starts spinning.

Self talk is just a part of DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) but it can be applied in any moment to help us cope with the present emotion.

For example, it is Monday morning and you are dreading going to work.  You have a project to work on that seems like it will never be finished.  You literally cannot get your butt out of bed to get ready to leave.

Here’s how to use positive self talk. As soon as you think, “I really don’t want to go to work because I am never going to finish that project.” Tell yourself (either inside your mind or quietly) “Stop- I am. I can. I will.” You should feel a literal difference in your body- your breath, your heart rate, etc.

A good sign that you could use a little positive self talk is if you find yourself saying “always” or “never” in relationship to a negative feeling your are having. For example, “I am never going to finish this project.” That should send up a little signal that you need some positive self talk to get you through this moment. Remember, as our arousal level goes up, problem solving goes out the window. So if you want to complete the project, you have got to bring the arousal level down.

“Always” and “never” represent black and white thinking and can get us into trouble.

The best thing about positive self talk is that the more we practice it, the better we become at it. It becomes second nature to have these positive thoughts as a response to our negative ones.

Here are a few of my favorites in case you need some new positive phrases to try:

POSITIVE SELF TALK-5This is a classic. Don’t you just feel simultaneously comforted, motivated and determined? I do!

POSITIVE SELF TALK-3

Definitely feeling confident thinking this.

POSITIVE SELF TALK-4

Yes! The ultimate! For when you really need to get pumped up. “Let’s Do This!”

What’s your favorite self talk phrase? Tweet me @drrenae 

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

#letsdothis #iamicaniwill #igotthis

Is Food Addiction A Made Up Concept to Excuse the Overeater?

 

Food

No.

A significant portion of the U.S. diet is as addicting as heroin or cocaine.

Sugar, for example, especially in the form of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), registers in the same part of the brain as does heroin and cocaine!

Other staples of the American diet are addictive, too. Dr. Mark Hyman says that U.S. wheat contains “super starch and super gluten – making it super fattening and super inflammatory.” Hyman also says wheat has “a super drug that makes you crazy, hungry and addicted.”

The “super drug” Hyman is referring to is actually a group proteins called “gluteomorphins” (after gluten and morphine) that cross the blood-brain barrier. Converted “exorphins,” like endorphins, the small molecules in the brain that make you feel high during a long run, these proteins can lead to addiction. According to Dr. Hyman, their presence not only causes addictive eating behavior including cravings, bingeing, and overeating, but they can also “cause multiple problems including schizophrenia and autism.”

Those with obvious eating issues often think of themselves as weak-willed or victimized in some way when they cannot resist the urge to binge or over eat a particular food. But the truth is that polluted foods are designed to make you want more, and they are highly effective when it comes to driving over-eating.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell.

Dear Whole Foods- I Never Got The Memo

DEAR WHOLE FOODS-I NEVER GOT THE MEMO

Let’s play a word association game.

Me: Whole Foods?

You:__________

Did you say “organic?” I did.

Except that’s not really true anymore. I don’t know if anyone else has noticed this, but more and more “conventional” food seems to be replacing the organic foods in Whole Foods.

Here is a really basic example: I was having my special treat of an organic coffee at the Whole Foods organic coffee bar, when I discovered that neither of these items are organic anymore. What? I did not get the memo!

I stopped drinking coffee about a year ago in order to bring my homocystine levels down, and it worked like a charm. But I do love coffee and every once in a while I allow myself to sit at the Whole Foods coffee bar with my laptop and a delicious cup of hot coffee with coconut milk and cinnamon feeling safe in the assumption that both were organic. For some reason I looked at the coffee urns and noticed that it didn’t say organic and when I ask my barista what was up, he informed me that six months ago Whole Foods made the decision to no longer have an organic coffee bar. I feel betrayed and frustrated. This is just one more example of the reversal in what Whole Foods used to be about.

In fact you can’t get an item in their bakery or their deli that doesn’t contain canola oil.

I know that Whole Foods has a promise to be transparent in regards to GMO labeling by 2018. I guess I just wonder why the commitment is to labeling as opposed to having only Non-GMO verified items on the shelves, and in their prepared foods section? Considering the amount of literature on their own website, OMG Let’s Stop Eating GMO’s, Whole Foods Commits to GMO Transparency, 6 Shopping Tips for Avoiding GMO’s, GMO Fast Facts, it seems ironic to me that Whole Foods has tons of unlabeled GMO’s, especially in their prepared food sections. 

In fact, according to Whole Foods own literature, only 45% of items in their store are non-gmo and/or organic. Not even half! Their quality standards, as outlined in their 2015 stakeholders report, makes no mention of an emphasis on Non-GMO products. To be fair, they do mention their GMO Transparency in Labeling by 2018 initiative.

While I understand that Whole Foods is a publicly traded company, and that they have investor returns that they need to make in order to keep their investors satisfied, I cannot help but wonder if their commitment to organic and non-gmo foods has been diluted by trying to obtain profits for the majority shareholders.

And yes, in case you were wondering, the majority shareholders of Whole Foods are the same as the majority shareholders of Monsanto.

 

 

Christmas Week Self Care Strategies

DR. Norton's-2

If ever there was a week for self care, I would say the week of Christmas is one of them.

Unless you are extremely organized, and have been working towards Christmas all year, chances are you are scrambling to make it to Christmas. Last minute gifts, trying to cram in as many traditions as possible- it can leave a person exhausted.  It’s no surprise people are totally burned out by Christmas Day.

I cannot stress how important self care is during the holidays.

What does self care look like?

Here’s my top ten list of self care strategies!

  1. Take a nap.  Yes, you! Lay down and take a nap. Everyone could use extra rest. If you can’t sleep, even just laying down for 20 minutes with your eyes closed may help reduce the feelings of anxiety or stress you are feeling.
  2. Color.  I’ve been posting a lot of articles about how coloring in those adult coloring books is scientifically proven to be as effective as meditation. So go grab your crayons or colored pencils, your fancy coloring book and zen out. In a pinch, I suggest a pen and a piece of paper. Doodling should have the same effect. There is a whole art form devoted to doodling called Zentangle. Check out this article from Psychology Today.
  3. Go listen to some music. You can do this while coloring, or while napping/resting. Or you can just do it on its own. Think about the last time you just sat and listened to music. It was probably a really long time ago.
  4. Call a friend. This is an excellent time to phone a friend. You can commiserate about how nothing is wrapped, or how your mother in law is driving you insane or whatever. Trust me, you’ll feel better.
  5. Take a walk. Just going outside, especially if the sun is shining (which it isn’t today in Cincinnati) and feeling that sunshine on your face and hands while you walk can really help you relax.
  6. Spend some time with a pet. Pets just make us feel better and more relaxed. So take your dog with you while you walk, or spend five minutes playing with your cat.
  7. Cut a corner. If you feel yourself getting worked up about something on your list of to-do’s ask yourself if you can cut a corner. Does everyone really need homemade bath salts? Or can a jar from the store work just as well? Sometimes what we plan doesn’t match reality in terms of time or ability. And that’s okay.  There were  good intentions, but reality has constraints. Cut a corner.
  8.  Nourish yourself. Make sure you are eating foods that are nourishing you- not draining you. There’s a lot of sweets floating around this time of year and quite frankly, most of us don’t feel great after we overindulge.
  9. Gratitude check in. Sit down with a piece of paper and spend two minutes writing down things you are grateful for. You might be surprised at what comes to mind, but go with it. Gratitude in even the smallest things can help us bear the anxiety of the holiday.
  10. Call your therapist.  If you can get an appointment with your therapist during christmas week, take it and don’t give it up! That is gold!  A conversation with your therapist during christmas week can help reinforce all the good things you’ve been doing for yourself and bring perspective to whatever your worries. Truly.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Want to hear more about the holidays and eating disorders? Check out my interview with Mark Heyne of Cincinnati Edition on 91.7 WVXU Cincinnnati.

 

In Case You Missed It! My Interview with Mark Heyne on 91.7 WVXU Cincinnati

From the Camdons-2

I had such a great time on Monday with Mark Heyne of Cincinnati Edition talking about Eating Disorders and the holidays.

In case you wanted to tune in, but missed it, here is the show.

Thanks, Mark! I’m glad we got to talk about why the holidays are especially hard on eating disorder patients and my treatment protocol.

Remember to rest during these next few days. It can be a really overwhelming time, so take good care of yourself!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Dr. Norton’s Favorite Organic Beauty Products

neon

Autoimmune disease is the 8th leading cause of death among women and most people cannot name one autoimmune disease.

Why is this happening?

One of the reasons is that makeup and personal care products contain endocrine disruptors that interfere with our immune response. What are endocrine disruptors?  An endocrine disruptor is a synthetic chemical that when absorbed into the body either mimics or blocks hormones and disrupts the body’s normal functions. This disruption can happen through altering normal hormone levels, halting or stimulating the production of hormones, or changing the way hormones travel through the body, thus affecting the functions that these hormones control. Chemicals that are known human endocrine disruptors include diethylstilbesterol (the drug DES), dioxin, PCBs, DDT, and some other pesticides. Many chemicals, particularly pesticides and plasticizers, are suspected endocrine disruptors based on limited animal studies.

So not only are we bombarded with endocrine disruptors in our natural environment and our food, we are are also subject to them in personal care products that we use daily.  Parabens are a good example of an endocrine disruptor. Propyl Paraben, which is found in food items, is also used in body wash, lotion, etc.

Consider this unsettling statistic: Did you know that just using make-up can add 5 pounds of chemicals into your body a year that are dangerous and a threat to your health? I’m not talking about the lotions, shampoo, deodorant and other personal care products; this is just what you put on your face! It may explain why women are dying of autoimmune diseases at a much higher rate than men; men tend not to use as much makeup. For a great discussion of the problems associated with cosmetics see this article by Mercola.

I bring all this to your attention, because this past year I made the switch to exclusively organic make-up, deodordant, shampoos and conditioners or brands that are safe.  And much like when I made the switch to clean eating, the results are amazing. Here are some of my favorite products that I have discovered along the way:

HABA Products

HABA is a Japanese company that uses Squalane for most of it’s products.  HABA’s products do not contain any parabens, artificial fragrance, mineral oil, artificial colourant and petro-chemical surfactants; ingredients that are likely to cause skin irritation and allergic reactions.I get my facial washes and oils, makeup, shampoo and conditioners and body lotions from this company.

1397204766579

Squalane is the more stable version of squalene, which comes from and is found in the liver of sharks, who have very high natural immunity. Although shark livers typically have some of the highest concentrations, many plants, including olives, avocados, rice bran, wheat germ, and some vegetable oils contain Squalene as well.

One of the most common uses for Squalene is in cosmetics. It is light, colorless, and odorless, and can almost immediately improve skin softness and smoothness without feeling heavy or greasy. It’s usually suitable for all skin types, and regular use is said to help fade fine wrinkles, prevent skin pigmentation, lighten freckles, and improve skin texture. It may be able to relieve eczema and some researchers have also speculated that it can regenerate skin cells. I absolutely love it!

Be aware, the instructions are in Japanese, but there’s always an illustration too! You should be able to figure it out!

3_1024x1024-2

You could also pretend you are on vacation in Japan while using these products- an additional clean beauty bonus!

Juice Beauty

Juice Beauty is another company I really like that makes great blushes and lipsticks. Bonus: all of their products are gluten free. Not many people realize that gluten can be found in lipstick, lipbalm, skin care and shampoos. Best of all, you can find Juice Beauty in big name stores, like Ulta and Sephora.

m-reflecting-gloss-4up-open-web-photo

You don’t want to be eating chemicals or gluten all day, do you?

They also make skin care products, hair products and it turns out Gwenyth Paltrow is teaming up with Juice Beauty to develop a new line of “high performance makeup” with certified organic ingredients. Look for it in 2016.

Intelligent Nutrients

They make the best body lotion.

20e59dcb6076d92d545c9b2246fc4bee

The body refiner has no plastic beads to pollute the environment.

 

It is kind of hard to rub on, (very thick) so I spray some MSM water from Dr. Ron’s on my body first and then add the lotion. Very healing and moisturizing. The MSM adds magnesium, which is very good for us. I really don’t think you can go wrong with any product from their line. If you read my blog you know I love their infrared hair dryer and their plant stem cell renewal complex.

The Sun

The best thing that ever happened to my skin is the sun. After I began laying out in the sun again, my skin went back to being skin, instead of crepe. Moderation is the key, no burning! Just pinking!

Alba Organic Beauty Studio, Hyde Park, OH. 

I go to an organic hair salon, Alba Organic Beauty Studio, here in Hyde Park, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio.  Love it, love them!  Organic nail polish and hair products, even hair dye….awesome!

logo_alba_organic_beauty_studio

Check out their range of services!

 

 

So as you can see, going organic in your beauty regimen can be beautiful and beneficial. No patchouli scented hippy’s here. There are so many amazing products out there now because consumers are demanding safe cosmetics and personal care products. And we should!

If you are curious about the current beauty/personal care products you use, I highly recommend taking a moment and using the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep Database.  You can search by product name or category. You may be surprised by the toxicity of the products you are currently using or you may discover you have a knack for choosing healthy beauty products. Either way, I encourage you to take a moment and find out.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Dr. Norton’s All Purpose Meat Marinade

all purpose meat marinade

Today I am sharing with you guys my all purpose meat marinade. It is so good! Remember when I told you that I have a food saver and that I use it all the time? Well here is my tip/trick:

Before you freeze your cuts of meat in individual food saver bags, add this marinade! That way they marinate while they are defrosting and I swear it tastes so good!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Give the Gift of Health This Holiday!

From the Camdons

Here we are in the midst of the holiday season. Inevitably we all have to buy gifts for people that are difficult to shop for. They either have everything, or they are uncommunicative about what they would like.

Let me challenge you to give this person the gift of health this holiday. I have rounded up a few, select items that I think are fabulous gifts. After all, nothing says “I love you,” more than a gift that is meant to extend the time that you have with a person on this earth. It’s like saying, “I love having you in my life so much, I want to make your life even longer.”

 

VitaMix Blender

CS-rglam-red

I know you are never supposed to give an appliance for a gift, but for us health nuts/foodies, a VitaMix is the ultimate luxury.

Can you think of a better gift than this VitaMix? Seriously.  I couldn’t live without mine. It makes my smoothie every morning and it will make my soup at night after a hard days work in a matter of minutes, and it comes with a recipe book! Available in a multitude of finishes (although I have a whole red theme going on in my kitchen.) The one thing I consistently hear in my practice, for patients who are exploring making smoothies, is that it is really difficult to replicate the texture of a smoothie that you get from a juice bar or health food store. I totally disagree. With a VitaMix you can!  It really comes down to the equipment.  When you really think about it, it’s ridiculous to spend $10.00 on a smoothie every day (That’s what a good smoothie costs these days.)  That’s a $300 a month smoothie habit!  I guarantee you, this is one of the best kitchen appliances and personal health appliances in my house. If you love her/him splurge on this one.

VitaMix Blender, C Series, 5200 ($449-499). Other models starting at $259 up to $799. www.vitamix.com

 

Crock Pot

81c-sSofeNL._SL1500_

Again, another kitchen appliance I couldn’t live without.  And frankly, the bigger, the better.  It makes my bone broth and/or some of the best meat dishes I have ever tasted. I usually throw a roast into the bone broth just before it is done. It doesn’t matter how tough a cut, it melts in your mouth. If you throw in some chicken breasts, when you take them out after 4 or 5 hours, they shred. Throw on some homemade barbeque sauce and oh my goodness it tastes just like pulled pork! My one piece of advice when looking for a crock pot is to make sure yours has a timer element. Otherwise, if you are away at work or out of the house, it won’t automatically turn off and switch to the warm setting.

Crock Pot Programmable Cook and Carry ($49.00) on Amazon.

Food Saver

FoodSaver-V3835-300x300

I got him a food saver.

Another must have for the health nut. For example, after you brew your bones for 3 or 4 days for your bone broth, you DO NOT THROW THEM AWAY. You keep using them until they disintegrate, you just add new ones each time so that you get the marrow too.  So of course, you have to shrink-wrap them to refreeze them. Enter the food saver. So quick and easy to use!

It is also a must for the healthy person on the go. I encourage my patients to get into the habit of cooking sometime over the weekend or on one of their days off and freezing enough for several meals. No excuse then for not having something quick to eat. Just take it out in the morning and heat it up when you get home. The food saver makes it so much easier. You can also freeze fish, poultry and red meat in a marinade and use your food savor to freeze individual portions. Then when you thaw it out, it is ready to go.  So you save time making all the marinade at once and in terms of prepping it the evening you want to have it.  Click here for the marinade recipe.

Food Saver V3835 (179.99) at FoodSaver.com (By the way, they were running a pretty hefty sale with all kinds of discounts and bonus parts when I looked at the website. )

 

Near Infrared Sauna

HYPOALLERGENICBUNDLE.MAIN__16431.1421346471.1280.1280

Can you imagine how much you really love someone when you give them a gift like this? You are saying, “your health is so important, I want you around for forever. Here’s a way to do that.”

 

This is probably one of the most important health appliances in my arsenal. It is one of the reasons that I was able to change my leaky gut to a squeaky clean gut. For my patients wishing to lose weight, it has definitely made a difference. And finally, it is a great way to detox heavy metals. I have a very small one that I ordered from Wendy Meyers and I love it.

Complete Near Infared Pocket Sauna, ($1100.45) at Liveto110.com. The store is giving a 10% discount if you purchase all the elements of the Near Infared Pocket Sauna in a bundle. ( I got mine for $250.)

 

Intelligent Nutrients Near Infrared Hair Dryer

hair-dryer

I love Intelligent Nutrients. I’ve tweeted my praises of their stem cell plant renewal complex, but I want to introduce you all to their amazing Near Infared Hair Dryer. This awesome blow dryer kills germs and microbes and does a fantastic job on your hair at the same time. Infrared heat infuses cuticle while protecting outer cuticle, decreasing dry time. The anti-microbial violet technology helps cleanse and deodorize while smoothing, increasing shine and manageability. It’s just a great blow dryer.

Intelligent Nutrients Near Infared Hair Dryer, ($200) Intelligent Nutrients (Again, I saw holiday promotional discounts when working on this, so you could probably save yourself a chunk of change and add some shampoo and styling products and commit to removing one more toxin from your life.)

 

UVB Lamp

B2R

 

Another very critical tool if you have cholesterol or vitamin D issues is the UVB lamp. We stop getting the right kind of sun for increasing Cholesterol Sulfate here in Cincinnati in November and must use an alternate source for several months. So from now until March, this is my primary source of UVB sunlight.

In case you do not know how important this is, the UVB rays create Cholesterol sulfate when they are absorbed by the body (which is the mother of all hormones.) The by- product of the cholesterol sulfate is vitamin D3, which is critical for the immune system. Most Americans are deficient in Vitamin D3. The UVB lamp allowed me to take my vitamin D3 from 21 to 53 in 3 months. This is far and away the best way to get your vitamin D3, as the supplements cannot compare. That said, it you have low vitamin D3, and cannot get sun, then supplement, but use the highest quality you can find and include vitamin K with it.  Even better is get yourself  to a sunny place, with a beach.  But if you cannot, get a lamp>

UV Skinlight B2R, ($236.00) from LightYears2.com.

The Four Agreements Book

51MfVDOlEkL._SX338_BO1,204,203,200_

 

This is a book of inspirational advice that I have found very helpful personally and that I have used with my patients, most of whom, have also found it to be life-changing. The author is Don Miguel Ruiz. It is hard to describe the work, except to say that he seems to touch everyone with his unique way of teaching us to:

  • Be impeccable with our words
  • Make no assumptions
  • Never personalize anything
  • Always do our best

The Four Agreements, by Don Miguel Ruiz.  ($6.65) on Amazon.com.

 

Again, give the gift of health to someone you love this year. Long after the paper has been torn off, and other gifts have disappeared to the back of the closet, I guarantee you these gifts will still be playing a role in your loved one’s health (or your own) on a daily basis.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Food is at Fault!

The Blame Game

We tend to blame the victims of disordered eating, no matter what form it takes. Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Emotional Eating and Obesity are all assumed to be the result of poor choices and/or emotional disturbances that lead to over eating. Anorexia is often perceived as a choice the patient makes to achieve cosmetic improvements.

The eating problems plaguing Americans are the direct result of the deficiencies and toxins in the food supply and are not the result of implusive choices or vanity.

The Big Pharma complex, industrial farming, and the food and beverage industries, (I call them Big Pharma, Big Farming and Big Food or the 3 Big Pigs) have worked hard to convince us that our foods, beverages and drugs are safe as long as we take/eat them in moderation.

The issue is serious. The United States has the distinction of being the unhealthiest wealthiest country in the world today. So, how can a country with so many economic and natural resources not maintain healthy eating habits? The answer is simple and scary. Not only are the foods and drugs constructed by the 3 Big Pigs not safe, they are driving the catastrophic decline in the health of Americans and seriously decreasing the quality of life for millions of people.

Clean food heals the dysfunction and diseases caused by polluted foods. One of the reasons my patients get well is that they learn to trust food again by learning how to “eat clean.” Clean eating empowers them—it frees them from the slavery of addiction, and it calms the anxiety they have about eating. The more clean food they eat, the fewer cravings they have because the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight fluctuations stabilize in the presence of clean food. Under these circumstances my patients can learn new healthy eating patterns.

The sad thing is that most of the treatment for eating disorders completely ignores the role of food pollution during recovery. To highlight how important clean food is and how destructive therapies can be that ignore the problems with our food, I’m going to describe the experience of a young patient of mine (age 14) in a typical residential treatment program for eating disorders.

In the residential program MA was ingesting the majority of her calories in the form of Boost[1] as a behavioral consequence of refusing to eat. She was also being kept in bed, all day, every day, for 13 days in a row. Understand she was not being kept in bed because she was too medically unstable to be up and around; she was kept in bed because she refused to eat. Her parents, or their insurance company, were paying a small fortune for this “treatment.”

Her treatment with me began by giving her choices about her food. She could pick whatever she wanted, as long as it was clean and had the necessary nutrients for her to slowly regain her weight. She slowly but consistently has expanded her foods to include everything she needs to thrive while consistently gaining weight.

Here is her experience with my approach to eating disorder treatment:

 The Blame Game-2

Did I mention this patient is only 14? She wasn’t asked to write this, she felt compelled to. After having such a terrible experience in residential treatment and finally finding a treatment program that was really working for her she needed to express what was changing in her relationship with food.

Whether you are bingeing, purging, restricting or are addicted- I guarantee that polluted food is playing a part in your illness. The food is at fault!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

[1] These are the first 10 ingredients in Boost: water, sugar, corn syrup, milk protein concentrate, vegetable oil, (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn) soy protein isolate, and Carrageenan. The only ingredient that is not GMO or a form of processed L-Glutamine (MSG) which is highly addicting, is the water. (See Chapter _ Sources of Food Pollution)

 

Mark Your Calendars!

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Hey guys, I’ve got great news! If you missed the chance to ask me a question about the holidays and eating disorders, you have another chance to ask me!

Mark your calendars for Monday December 14th at 1:30 p.m. I’ll be joining Cincinnati Edition host Mark Heyne to talk about eating disorders during the holidays. We will have time to take questions.

You can tune in online!

 

Clean Cocktail Sauce

cocktail sauce

I got a bunch of emails after my last newsletter, asking for my clean eating version of cocktail sauce. Here it is!

It’s super fast to prepare, tastes fresh and you can adjust the spicy element as you desire.

 

Mix well! Enjoy!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

I Am Anorexic And It Is Thanksgiving. HELP!

I Am

If you are reading this, you are probably in recovery. (Or you mistook it for some Pro-Ana trash. Sorry, but read on anyway). All of my patients, whether they are suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating or Obesity want to know what to do at Thanksgiving. Depending upon the disorder, there are very specific challenges. If you have food addictions, the holiday is triggering. If you restrict, you may be attacked with a spoonful of mashed potatoes by a well-meaning grandmother. If you purge, you may be trying to remember where the most remote bathroom is at your Aunt’s house in case you blow it.

I put out a call to action on Twitter and Facebook for questions/concerns about the holiday and here’s what I got:

Any ideas/coping skills to get through eating at a dinner table of 20 or more people? I have to eat in front of people, which I hate doing. I have bulimia. I feel like everyone is staring at me when I’m sitting there.

This is a very common feeling/reaction. There is a lot of shame associated with bulimia. The reality is that no one is paying attention to you and most people are worried about how people are seeing them. Try to focus on making the person next to you feel comfortable and it will make you feel more comfortable. Think of yourself as the helper and not the helpless, the therapist and not the patient.

I have been working really hard to kick my sugar habit. I’ve been stressing about how I am going to face the dessert buffet. There are certain desserts that are “family” recipes that we have every year. I just know that sugar is a very slippery slope for me. I don’t want to start back down that road. Is there a polite way to say no thanks?

I think that you can legitimately say that you are allergic to processed sugar. That’s one way. You could also say, “that looks delicious but I promised myself no dessert.”  You could also say you worry about your blood sugar levels and you promised yourself no dessert. (I wouldn’t comment on the fact that you only allow yourself to eat “good sugar.” This can be misconstrued.)

This is going to sound crazy, but then again we’re talking about my family, so here goes: I cannot eat gluten. About three quarters of my family gets it, but inevitably, the preparer of most of the food (my mother) makes everything with all kinds of gluten. I’ve politely suggested adaptions that are easy but she claims she cannot do it. It won’t turn out right. I’ve kind of just given up. Is it rude to just bring my own food?

Absolutely not! If you are gluten intolerant it is your responsibility to take care of your gut and lead by example. Avoiding gluten is absolutely critical. I say, bring your own food!

My question is totally not related to food at all but has more to do with family- when a certain member of the family starts talking politics it gets really uncomfortable because obviously not everyone shares the same feelings on a lot of hot button topics right now (i.e. syrian refugees, presidential candidates, conspiracy theories.) Do you have any advice? I hate having to sit and listen without being able to challenge the person’s point of view, but at the same time, I know better than to engage. Thoughts?

I’d get real behavioral on this person. Nod when you like what the person is saying, make eye contact and smile. Give no response, not even a nervous smile, and make no eye contact if you don’t like what the person is saying. Look at your plate. Then get up. It’s time to go do the dishes. Eventually even an amoeba will learn to stop doing this at the table.

My daughter has been in therapy for anorexia for about six weeks. Any advice or words of wisdom? 

Just remember that this is extremely anxiety provoking. Any focus on how she looks, what she is eating, what she is going to eat, or what she ate, just makes it worse. The biggest issue for the parent of the anorexic is dealing with their fear. Because the fear turns into anger in a flash. And your daughter can’t help that she is anorexic. It is a disease (of the mind.) Not a choice.

Finally, my holiday tips which have helped my patients over the years get through the holiday relatively unscathed.

  1. Get perspective.  This is a holiday to celebrate survival.  The pilgrims and the Indians came together to give thanks that they made it through another bitter winter and that they had enough food.  So yes the focus is on food, and we have taken it to the extreme, but the real thanks is about how people, families and even members of different cultures/races work together to survive.  This is a holiday that recognizes the importance of the family and the role that our grandparents and their grandparents played in our family history. Families are important, no matter how annoying they are.

So here is a tip: Understand that this is not about you, or your eating disorder.  No one really cares how you look, they just want to make sure you are ok. Translated, that means that if you don’t want the focus to be on you, focus on the person next to you.  Ask her/him questions.  Think of yourself as a Jr. shrink or an investigative reporter.  You will find that people love to talk about themselves and you have control of the conversation when you are the one asking the questions.  (You like control, right?)

  1. Plan ahead when it comes to the food.  If you know that there will be no food there that you can eat without getting triggered or sick, then take some of your own food.  The safest thing to eat is turkey, especially the breast meat.  Take a side dish to go with the turkey that you can share and you are all set.  Try some sweet potatoes, that are prepared this way.

You can also take your favorite snack for before dinner.  Popcorn that has coconut oil and sea salt on it is awesome and way better than the chips or pretzels dipped in who knows what.  Or shrimp and cocktail sauce that you make yourself out of organic catsup and horseradish with a dash of Coconut Aminos. Yummy!

Take your own drink and if you are inspired, your own desert.  Don’t feel like making desert? How about some organic gelato or ice cream? Cinnamon flavored ice cream is my personal favorite.

Worried about what people will think?  Don’t.  No one cares what you are eating.  Worry more about them eating the delicious stuff that you bring.  In fact, you may want to plan on sharing.

  1. Pace yourself.  Use the days off to rest and pamper yourself.  Get in an extra workout.  Start a new book.  Take a walk, before or after dinner.  Organize a closet that has been driving you nuts, but don’t organize the whole house or spend days cooking by yourself.  Take short cuts wherever and whenever you can.  Hold a baby.  Pet something.

Just remember, whether you are hosting or are a guest this Thursday, this holiday is about survival, adapting and gratitude. That first brutal winter, after the Mayflower arrived, most of the colonists remained on the ship where they suffered from outbreaks of contagious diseases and scurvy. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. And it was only because the Native Americans were willing to share their wisdom on how to survive in this new land that the pilgrims were able to survive.

You can see why my patients are such an inspiration, especially at this time of year. On they tread, to territory they don’t necessarily want to explore, and yet they know they have to. They must adapt, their lives depend on it. And as they move through recovery, I see them blossom as individuals and in relationship to their loved ones.

Happy Thanksgiving!

-Dr. Norton
#GetSunEatCleanBeWell.

“These Are a Few of My Favorite Fats…”

Dale Carnegie

(Imagine Julie Andrews spinning through the alps, praising my favorite fats…)

My four favorite fats are:

  • Canola Oil
  • Crisco
  • Soybean Oil
  • I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter.

Just Kidding! Those are my most disliked fats.

My favorite fats are:

  • 100% grass-fed raw butter
  • 100% grass-fed Ghee
  • Organic, cold-pressed, extra virgin coconut oil
  • Italian, cold-pressed, extra virgin olive oil

Best sources of fat:

  • 100% grass-fed animals and game
  • Wild caught fish that are low in mercury, high in selenium
  • Coconuts and olives

In general, those first four fats are hydrogenated, rendering them a trans fat and/or they contain GMO ingredients. Whereas my favorite fats are raw except for the Ghee, which is a clarified butter, and the fats found in grazed animals and wild-caught fish.

Raw Butter

It is hard to find raw butter in some parts of the country, like Ohio. Here you have to join a herd share. But it’s well worth it. For one thing it tastes amazing. In addition, raw butter from 100% grass fed cows is the best fat you can get. It is the only fat with a perfect ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 fats, which is 1:1. This is important because we get way too much Omega 6 fat in the standard American diet, like 30:1. Experts say that the ratio is as high as 60:1 for individuals that are really unhealthy.

Ghee

Ghee is a class of clarified butter that originated in ancient India and is commonly used in South Asian cuisines, traditional medicine, and religious rituals. Ghee is prepared by simmering butter, which is churned from cream, and removing the liquid residue. The texture, color, and taste of ghee depend on the quality of the butter, source of the milk used in the process, and the duration of the boiling. This is one of the dairy products that can be heated without destroying the goodness because it has no lactose and very little protein.

Coconut Oil

I am going to do an entire blog on coconut oil. Go here to listen to Bruce Fife and I talk about it. He is the coconut king.

In a nutshell, no pun intended, coconut oil is as good as it gets. I fries well, has a high smoke point, tastes great (no it doesn’t make your food taste like coconut) and doesn’t store as body fat. It basically is pure energy as it goes straight to the liver. It emulsifies fat and actually does reduce cellulite. It is also amazing for your brain and you can use it on your skin and in your hair.

Olive Oil

I loved Olive Oil, even as a kid, she was my nerdy, flakey hero! But it just barely makes my list, and I use it sparingly as it is an Omega 6 oil. Usually I only use it in salad dressings (unless I make them from yogurt or heavy cream). I also marinade fish in olive oil and lemon juice, although I fry the fish in butter or ghee. Make sure that your olive oil is actually really olive oil. Word on the street is that they are lacing it with canola oil and other lesser oils. So buy organic and from a known source. I prefer the old Italian family olive oil makers as they seem to make the best oils.

Fat From 100% Grass-fed Beef

The one thing you need to know about this fat is that it stores as muscle, not fat! That’s right conjugated linolenic acid, (CLA) the main fat in grass-fed beef ends up as muscle, not fat. That is why people didn’t like grass-fed beef initially as it did not have the “marbling” or fat that grain-fed beef had. But guess what? The thing that makes the cow full of fat, makes us full of fat too. So you decide. Pastured animal fat is also GMO free, another big plus.

Fat From Wild-caught Fish

 Definitely one of the healthiest fats you can eat. Omega-3 fatty acids are helpful for the heart, immune system and against a range of diseases.

They have been shown to lower elevated triglyceride levels, curb stiffness caused by rheumatoid arthritis, lower depression levels, reduce symptoms of attention deficit disorder and protecting against Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to WebMD. That’s a lot!

“I simply remember my favorite fats, and then I don’t feeeeeeeeeel, soooooooooo baaaaaaaad!”

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

Thanksgiving. You Have Concerns. I Have Solutions.

diwali festivalThere’s still time to send me a question for my special Thanksgiving Q&A blog post next week.

If you have an eating disorder, or have a loved one with an eating disorder, and Thanksgiving is keeping you up at night, send me your concern.

If you have been free from bingeing but the thought of navigating the dessert buffet is stressing you out,  send me your concern.

If you have food issues and Thanksgiving is less of a gratitude event and more of a “grit your teeth through it” event, know that you are not alone.

Send your Thanksgiving issue to drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com or tweet me @drrenae. I’ll answer it in a special blog post next week.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

 

Fat Chance You Know The Truth About Fats

 

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats are unhealthy and that they are the root cause of the epidemics of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol in our society. This is simply not the case. Ansel Keys was perhaps the most well known researcher associated with these theories followed by Nathan Pritikin, creator of the Pritikin Diet. Both men got it wrong for various reasons. For example, when they looked at coconut oil, which is one of the best oils you can use, they used hydrogenated coconut oil. Any processed oil, especially hydrogenated oil, is going to be bad for you. Heat denatures protein and ruins the oil, making it dangerous to consume. So unrefined cold pressed is the way to go. These two researchers also missed the boat because they didn’t control for the role of other pollutants in processed fats.

Scientifically, their theories were proven to be incorrect decades ago. Yet we are still being told that the good fats are bad and the bad fats are good. Likewise, we are encouraged to eat less fat, when we should be eating more of the good fat and none of the bad fats. But which is which? Well I have a chart for you that is as comprehensive as I can make it and still fit it all on one page

Untitled design-8

Note the Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio (green column). The United States tends to consume oils with a 30-60:1 Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio. That’s way too high.

What is apparent today is that saturated fats are not the problem. It is the polluted and/or processed version of saturated fats, along with the over abundance of processed unsaturated oils that are causing some of the most serious health problems we face today in the U.S.

In a nutshell, the healthy fats are grass-fed animal fats and medium-chain fatty acids such as coconut oil, along with unsaturated Omega 3 fats and the naturally occurring trans/sis fat, conjugated linolenic acid (CLA). They taste delicious, control blood sugar levels[1] and have healing qualities from which everyone benefits. Whereas man-made polluted trans fats and vegetable or seed fats that have been hydrogenated or otherwise processed are literally killing us.

Questions about the fats you use in your kitchen? Listen to my blog talk radio program about Dietary Fats.

[1] //researchnews.osu.edu/archive/linoiso.htm

I Do Eat In Moderation! Until I Start Bingeing…

FAIRY

Many people today talk about being “addicted” to a food or foods. I think that most people believe they are using the term loosely, i.e. that they are not really “addicted”. I would disagree. I see far more people in my practice today with food addictions than without, regardless of the type of disordered eating they have. Many of them have been in treatment for years, sometimes half of their lives. Some of them are on disability because of their eating disorders, which I believe are driven by food addiction and by the complications of food addiction. Whether they are anorexic, obese or bulimic, they almost always have food addictions. I can’t tell you how many Anorexic patients I have that are addicted to sugar. Since they are deathly afraid of fat, they treat themselves with candy. I have one patient who suffered from Anorexia that ate jolly ranchers and very little else for years prior to treating with me.

Food addiction as a component of an eating disorder is a change that has come about largely because U.S. foods are increasingly polluted due to the manner in which they are processed or grown. For example, U.S. grains, which are hyper-hybridized, meaning they took the protein out and left the starch in, are super addicting. That’s one of the reasons you cannot lay off the bread or the cereal once you start eating it.

Likewise, one of the most common food additives, processed free glutamate (aka MSG) which, is added to nearly every packaged food and drink, is also highly addicting, as well as fattening. It has been used for 75 years to fatten lab rats in obesity studies. The problem is that it is not labeled as MSG. Instead it is hidden from the consumer and called such innocuous names as “citric acid” or “malted barley” or “hydrolyzed yeast”. If you are eating packaged foods or drinks, it is virtually impossible to avoid processed free glutamate unless you are familiar with the 30 or 40 names by which it may be labeled.

Untitled design-7

Then there is U.S. genetically engineered sugar, especially that found in the form of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) that has been shown to be as addicting as Heroin or Cocaine, and is in virtually every processed food, including condiments. The content of sugar in some cereals targeted to children is as high as 60%! Ever wonder why your kid will eat nothing but cereal for breakfast? Or why one of your favorite “healthy” binge foods is cereal? Or how about that Coke that you love so much? It has the equivalent of 12 teaspoons of sugar in the form of HFCS (classic) or GMO table sugar if you go with the new improved version from Mexico.

The other reason people are dealing with addiction without realizing it, is that no one is minding the store when it comes to treatment. By that I mean that treatment is still all about moderation instead of abstinence. There is a myth that U.S. foods are safe and that the obesity epidemic, which has made us the most obese country in the world, is the result of overeating due to a lack of willpower. Not true. Americans do not lack willpower. They lack information. U.S. foods are anything but safe. They are polluted, causing disordered eating among the majority of the population, unwanted weight gain, premature aging and the escalation of killer diseases. U.S. foods are obesogenic, autogenic, carcinogenic, and allergenic for most of the people eating them. Unfortunately, Americans are clueless about the safety of their food. The true nature of this problem is simply below the radar of the average person.

While I can understand, no matter how strenuously I disagree, with the food industry’s tactics, i.e. they look at making us addicted to their product as a way to create customer loyalty. I do not understand how those of us entrusted with responsibility for protecting and healing, can promote the ingestion of polluted foods during re-feeding when it comes to bulimia, anorexia, or obesity.

Isn’t it the job of the residential and intensive out-patient eating disorder centers, and/or the diet industry expert/coach, to know about the impact that polluted food has on bingeing, overeating and food addiction? I mean, isn’t that kind of fundamental? Where is the accurate information? Where is the science in their treatment protocols? How do they get away with such abysmal results? Why do insurance companies pay so much money for such poor outcomes?

Want to hear more about addiction? Listen to my most popular blog talk radio show featuring Vera Tarmen. Then let me know what you think on twitter @drrenae.

Thanksgiving. You Have Questions. I Have Answers.

THE NEW YOU

Thanksgiving is a really hard holiday for a lot of people.

For people who are newly recovering from an eating disorder it can be tough. For obese patients, the thought of having to face all that food is enough to make them want to skip the holiday altogether. For binge eaters, who are in an already stressful situation, they just want to hide out in the kitchen eating. For a patient with an eating disorder who is not in treatment, it can be an incredibly uncomfortable situation. For parents of a child with an eating disorder, the thought of having all that food on the table and the person not eating can make them livid. I could go on and on. But I won’t.

Instead, I want to hear from you. What is your concern about Thanksgiving? Do you have a specific question? I’d love to hear from you. I’m compiling questions to answer in a blog post right before Thanksgiving. My goal is provide some tools to manage the holiday. I’ll also include my answers in my newsletter on Tuesday November 24th.

So, please tweet me your questions @drrenae, send me an email at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com with the subject Turkey Time, or message me on Facebook. All questions will remain anonymous.

I promise, with a little courage from you asking the questions, and me giving you the tools, this Thanksgiving will be different. Because you’ll be prepared. Let’s face the fear before we sit down at the table.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

The Number One Food Myth and Our Denial

SINCE

For the past week or so I have been talking about the moderation versus abstinence model when it comes to recovery from eating disorders and obesity. I advocate clean eating, or abstinence from polluted foods, which I define as follows:

  • All organic fruits and vegetables (or sticking with the clean 15 and avoiding the dirty dozen)
  • 100% grass-fed sources of animal protein
  • Wild-caught fish low in mercury and not exposed to nuclear waste
  • Oils that have been minimally processed, are organic and Non-GMO, – coconut, olive, ghee, grass-fed raw butter
  • Foods free of MSG, GMOs and food additives, food coloring or chemicals used in processing
  • Minimal grains – substitute hemp seed florettes or nut flowers
  • No protein powders – use Sacha Inchi instead
  • No sodas made with sugar, no cigarettes and minimal alcohol – red wine in very limited amounts
  • No table sugar – use Xylitol
  • No table salt – use naturally harvested Himalayan sea salt
  • Good bottled water – FIJI is nice
  • Lots of pre-biotics and pro-biotics
  • Lots of fermented vegetables and drinks – like Kombucha and kimchi
  • Sea weed (unless you have Hashimotos)
  • Get Sun!

Eating this way and getting sunshine will stabilize your weight, reverse the aging process, prevent or reverse autoimmunity, decrease or eliminate inflammation, support your neuro and cardio vascular systems, help to stabilize your hormones, clear your gut and improve your immunity. So with all of those benefits, why isn’t everyone eating healthy? Because they are in denial.

According to the results of a poll conducted by Consumer Reports Health “Americans tend to give themselves high marks for healthy eating, but when we asked how many sugary drinks, fatty foods, and fruits and veggies they consumed, we found that their definition of healthy eating was questionable,” said Nancy Metcalf of Consumer Reports Health, which conducted the poll.

Of the 1,234 American adults polled, 89.7 percent said their diet was “somewhat” (52.6 percent), “very” (31.5 percent), or “extremely” healthy (5.6 percent).

But 43 percent of the survey respondents said they drank at least one sugary soda or other sweetened drink every day, and just one in four said they limited sweets, sugars or fats in their diet. Just looking at the sugar alone; we know now how deadly sugar is when it comes to inflammation, especially neurovascular health. Sugar has recently been shown to be as addicting as heroin or cocaine. It is also a problem when it comes to neurological health. For example, it is now believed that Alzheimer’s is a new form of diabetes. Indeed some are calling it Type 3 diabetes and of course it is largely driven by the excessive amounts of sugar in the US diet, especially the sugar in soft drinks. But it also driven by the high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) that can be found in most US processed foods. HFCS is in everything from catsup to cookies.

Instead of avoiding these “foods,” Americans are trying to use them in moderation. The poll found that 4 in 10 Americans said they ate “pretty much everything” or “mostly everything” that they want. Given that the United States is the number one fattest country in the world with the distinction of being the unhealthiest, wealthiest country in the world, I’d say we are in denial.

The poll also found that few count calories or weigh themselves, but when they were asked to report their weight, 4 in 10 were wrong. Huh, go figure! A third said they were at a healthy weight when they actually were overweight or obese according to the researchers. Interestingly, 8% thought they were overweight or obese when they were actually a normal weight using their BMIs. Budding Anorexics?

Only 3 in 10 Americans surveyed by Consumer Reports said they eat the recommended five or more servings of fresh fruit or vegetables daily. For those who do not eat the recommended amounts, the most common reason was that they thought they were consuming enough already. Denial.

Other reasons given were that vegetables are hard to store or spoil too quickly — an excuse given by 29 percent of Americans. I hear this a lot in my practice. Can you say frozen vegetables? As a single person, I am a big believer. They have been shown to be just as nutritious, sometimes even more nutritious. They are definitely easier and faster to prepare. (I pride myself on being able to prepare a scrumptious meal in under 8 minutes.) Costco has the best deal, a 5 pound bag of frozen fruits or vegetables for around $6.50. They are delicious and great for smoothies and you cannot beat that price.

Many people say they don’t like vegetables. In the poll, 17% said someone in their household didn’t like vegetables, and 13% said they don’t like them. I believe this is a consequence of eating so much polluted food that is loaded with MSG which over excites the taste buds and makes you crave fake salt and sugar. If you prepare the vegetable correctly, I defy you not to like them. Steam, boil or even nuke them and add coconut oil, sea salt, along with your favorite herbs and spices…..so delicious!

Those polled also said that vegetables take too long to prepare or are too difficult to prepare. Come on! There is nothing easier than sticking the frozen vegetable in a microwave safe dish adding some coconut oil and sprinkling on organic seasonings. Three minutes and 30 seconds and voila!

I care deeply about my patients. I have to dispel a lot of food myths in my practice and one of the biggest is the Moderation Myth. Moderation worked for a previous generation because our food was nowhere near as polluted as it is now.

The new food truth is this: In light of what we know about polluted food, Abstinence is the only guarantee of health.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

What Does the Anorexic Know That We Don’t?

What Does the Anorexic Know That We Don’t?

Last week I wrote about the new research on Anorexia and addiction. In a nutshell it turns out that the individual suffering from Anorexia is addicted to restricting. This research looked at stimulus and response. It doesn’t really explain how it happens.

My theory is that the individual suffering from Anorexia conditions this response (not necessarily consciously) by continuously programming the advantages of fat free foods and demonizing foods with fat until the brain reacts accordingly.

It’s a sort of feedback loop, s/he sees fat free food, the part of the brain that drives addiction fires up, and she is reinforced for seeking out more fat free foods. And/or s/he sees foods with fat and experiences fear, does not eat the foods with fat, experiences relief, which again, reinforces eating more fat free foods.

Of course, this is a very dangerous solution to a very serious problem. Giving up fat, which is actually very good for you when it is the right fat, is definitely not the solution. And restricting is incredibly dangerous.

But I cannot ignore that many foods in the United States are polluted and eating them is also not good for you!

As the obesity rate soars, Anorexia is affecting more of the population, with younger children, older women and more men. I cannot help thinking that what the individual suffering from Anorexia is reacting to, in part, is the truly unhealthy nature of U.S. foods.

It is fascinating. I have been saying for years that those suffering from Anorexia are addicted to restricting. When it comes to treating Anorexia, I believe that it is this dynamic that makes it impossible for approaches using a moderation model to be effective and helps to explain why abstinence from polluted foods works so much better for this population.

The problem with the moderation model used by most treatment centers is that processed foods are designed as binge foods. Yes, I said “designed”. The food industry refers to the ideal customer as a “heavy user” and does everything possible to insure that once we eat the food, we will never want to stop.

Polluted foods are loaded with MSG, an excitatory neurotoxin, that has been used for years to fatten lab rats. When the Anorexic patient goes into residential treatment, where she will be forced or strongly pressured into eating polluted foods, she often enters as an Anorexic and exits as a Bulimic or a Bulimarexic.

Impact Residential Treatment Has Had on Me:

Residential Treatment

 

Years of research, and personal, as well as clinical experience, has shown me that eating polluted food is dangerous, even if you eat it in moderation. It actually attacks the parts of the brain that regulate healthy eating. I think avoiding it altogether by eating clean food is safer. It offers the opportunity for great healing to take place. I am a believer in what Hippocrates taught us: Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

At the end of the day, my Anorexic patients are much more willing to eat clean unpolluted food, than they are to eat polluted or processed foods. This is a good thing, as the clean food not only nourishes them but allows them to gain weight slowly, usually as muscle, instead of as middle fat. Clean eating also “feels better” in them, i.e. it doesn’t cause bloating or inflammation or migraines or rashes….. They report that they learn how to trust food again. I am convinced that this is why patients that recover by eating clean are significantly less likely to relapse.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

A Lack of Information is Fattening

Untitled design-4

“I am lazy, stupid and fat!”  A cruel statement, right? But this is what my patient who is recovering from Bulimarexia hears in her head every day, all day long. The reality is that she is a hard worker, very smart and a normal weight after years of struggling with an eating disorder.

But her fear of suddenly or somehow becoming “fat” is so intense that it may take another couple of years for this voice in her head to go away, and it may never go away completely.

Sound crazy? It isn’t unusual for people to think this way.  We are afraid of being obese as a culture. The sight of an obese person strikes fear in the hearts of many. Unfortunately we often hate the things we fear, which leads to stigma. And stigma, especially in the case of obesity, gets in the way of recovery, as it tends to be internalized by the individual being stigmatized. It also impacts members of our society that are not obese in ways that are detrimental to their health.

What I see when I look an obese patient is a person with a medical condition, a person that is often very ill. As a health care provider that has had great success working with the morbidly obese, I know that the problem can be reversed and that with the right information the person can lead a perfectly normal life.

But most people will not see or relate to the illness. They will react with fear, and/or they will stereotype the individual that is obese. Research on the stigma attached to obesity shows that overweight individuals in the U.S. are assumed to be lazy and lacking in intelligence. They are often viewed with disgust. They regularly experience bias in the workplace as well as in many other areas of their lives. Even their own doctors may be biased when it comes to treating them.

For example, according to an article in Psychology Today “A survey involving a nationally representative sample of primary care physicians revealed that, not only did more than half of respondents think that patients who are obese were awkward and unattractive, but more than 50 percent believed that they would be noncompliant with treatment. One-third thought of them as “weak-willed” and “lazy.” 

I recently published an article in Western Pennsylvania Healthcare News on the failure of medicine to treat obesity effectively. While doing the research for that article, I discovered that the rates of obesity are high among physicians, many of whom are overworked and most of whom do not understand the role of nutrition in obesity. For example, the standard advice today from most physicians is still to recommend eating more grains and less fat, which is exactly the opposite of what you should be doing if you are overweight. (Link to why grains are bad for you and why saturated fats are good for you) So much for “Physician heal thyself”.

But the other thing that really stood out while I was researching the article was how overwhelmed physicians felt while trying to treat obese individuals. I also get this from my doctor friends. In another study the researchers found that as the patients’ weight increased, “physicians reported having less patience, less faith in the patients’ ability to comply with treatment, and less desire to help them.” 

When it comes to my own patients, I am always amazed to discover that the issue of their weight does not come up with their primary care doctor even when they have serious complications of obesity and/or need to lose anywhere from 100 to 200+ pounds. One patient said “Talk about the elephant in the room! If I were oozing blood or had a terrible rash, I am sure my doctor would mention it. But because it is my weight, and he makes the assumption that I can’t or won’t do anything about it, we gloss over it.”

The problem with this is that the stigma of being obese can lead to more obesity as well as to other serious problems. Being stigmatized for being obese sets up many vicious cycles or self-fulfilling prophesies. For example, if going to the doctor doesn’t help, then going to the doctor becomes less likely. This in turn means that the complications of being obese, which include diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure, may not be diagnosed until they are advanced.

Likewise, many obese individuals are uncomfortable going to a gym or putting on work out clothes because of their fear of being judged. Obviously this makes it less likely that they will workout or get fit, and more likely that they will continue to gain weight.

The obesity epidemic may also be one of the reasons that younger children, older women and more men are developing Anorexia; I believe that these conditions are over-reactions or maladaptive responses to the fear of being obese. Of course, fear of being obese also leads to bingeing and purging, or bulimia.

The point is that obesity is a serious medical condition. However I do not believe that it has anything to do with will-power or motivation, and it certainly is not related to one’s intelligence. It is the direct result of the polluted nature of U.S. foods.

In other words, OBESITY IS NOT THE RESULT OF EATING TOO MUCH. It is the result of EATING POLLUTED FOOD.

The sooner we face that as a nation, the sooner we can stop blaming the victims of food pollution and start fixing the problem. Some people would have us believe that the obesity epidemic is getting better. It isn’t. The reason I say this is that nearly 30% of today’s children are obese. Nearly 72% of men and 67% of women in my generation are currently overweight or obese. When we were children, only 10% of us were overweight. This does not bode well for the future or for our children.

U.S. foods are polluted with addictants, obesogens, carcinogens, GMOs, MSG and trans fats to name a few of the pollutants. All of these “ingredients” drive overeating and/or bingeing. They also cause us to store more fat than we need and feel less like being active. Finally they damage the mechanisms for regulating eating and fat storage.

Yes, that is correct. Even if you eat a little of them, you can gain unneeded weight. (You can also develop many other problems, like vascular disease, autoimmune disorders, cancer and type 2 diabetes.)

Sound like an over statement? Consider that the U.S. is the wealthiest unhealthiest country in the world. We are also the most obese and we are nearly dead last when it comes to general health, with one of the lowest infant survival rates, despite having the best medical technology.

Are you surprised? I find that most people are surprised to hear these things despite the fact that this information is definitely out there. We just don’t think of ourselves this way. We have all drunk the coolaide. But ignorance, in this case, is not bliss. It is sheer agony and it makes those who are the victims feel ashamed and weak, which makes them more vulnerable to remedies that do not work, such as dieting, or bypass surgery, or cryochambers. (link to article on woman dying)

What disturbs me the most is that if we keep believing that we can eat anything, as long as we eat it in moderation, we are not going to fix the problem. The foods that are the most dangerous are “designed” to make us keep us eating them.

We cannot fix the problem with this kind of thinking even though it is very fixable! Find out more about what your food is really doing inside your body. You may be surprised. What I can promise you is that lack of information is fattening.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

Don’t take away my Bacon! (As long as it’s non GMO, pasture raised)

baconThis morning I woke up to twitter ablaze with the latest WHO findings that processed red meats cause cancer and that red meat is “probably carcinogenic.”

I’m going to break it down for you, because to me, as a professional who deals with food myths on a daily basis, this report is irritating.

In my practice, I am constantly dispelling myths left right and center, in hopes of educating people on how to eat to nourish their bodies for optimal function.

When the article refers to bacon, what kind of bacon are these scientists talking about? Because to me, that is actually the important information. If it’s non-gmo, pasture raised bacon (which, albeit, can be tough to find) then I have to tell you, I am eating it. If it’s name brand bacon full of gmo slop feed, with nitrates, then thanks, but I think I agree with them, and I’ll pass.

Clearly, although these foods have they same name, they are actually totally different.

Let’s take it further.

For example, would I ever recommend that people eat bologna? No. Would I ever recommend that people eat beef? Absolutely. But again, we are back the same kind of requirements that I have about bacon. If the beef is grassfed, pastured, non gmo, no antibiotics, etc. Then yeah, I’ll take a steak grilled spiced with fresh rosemary. But if it’s conventional beef, grain fed on a lot? I’d rather pass.

In terms of the carcinogenic aspect of red meats, I’ve always understood this to be related to the cooking method. Red meats and lamb are often grilled or broiled. The article mentions this prevailing concept, but then quickly says the scientists didn’t have enough data. This is why I eat my steak with Rosemary. It’s helps to mitigate the carcinogenic effects up to 90%. Here’s a study that explains that. I also typically eat a lot of greens when I have steak. The chlorophyll from the greens also has a mitigating effect.

I’d be wary of recommending that a person not eat any grassfed beef. Grassfed beef is so full of vitamin b and zinc, both of which actually play a really important role in a person’s mental health, believe it or not. Vitamin B deficiencies can present as anxiety, insomnia, depression and zinc deficiencies can lead to symptoms of depression, ADHD, and difficulty with learning and memory.

So my take on the latest research? Too general to really be helpful. Follow the guiding principles of eating clean in your daily life, it’s much simpler.

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

No Eggs-cuses Breakfast

No Eggs-cuses Breakfast

No Eggs-cuses Breakfast

Some of us have a really tough time making breakfast. In the rush to get the day started, these Egg Muffins have saved the day, many a morning! You can have all the convenience of “fast food” if you just take a little time once or twice a week to make these and store in the fridge. I actually love to have them on hand as a snack when my days are crazy. I need all that protein.  You can mix up the vegetables if you like, just be conscious of whether or not the vegetable has a lot of water (i.e. zucchini).

Egg Muffins

Ingredients
1/4 cup red bell pepper, diced
1/4 cup carrots, grated
1/2 cup frozen spinach thawed and wrong out
2 to 3 tablespoons basil, diced
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
1 teaspoon bourbon smoked paprika
10 – 12 organic pastured eggs
Instructions
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees

2. Grease a 12-cup muffin pan with coconut oil

3. In a medium bowl, combine red bell pepper, shredded carrots, spinach, and basil

4. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, salt and pepper

5. Add egg mixture to the veggie mixture and stir to combine

6. Using a measuring cup or a ice cream scoop fill muffin cups with egg mixture being sure not to fill cups to the rim (about 1/4 to 1/3 cup in each cup)

7. Bake the egg muffins for 20 to 25 minutes or until eggs are set in the middle

8. Muffins can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 to 4 days

 

If you make these, let me know how they turned out on twitter @DrRenae.

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

-Dr. Norton

 

#MotivationMonday Stage 3- Preparation

Preparation

Here we are in the third week of my #MotivationMonday series on Change. If you looked for me last week, but didn’t find me, it’s because I was honoring Labor Day. Everyone deserves a day of rest!

Last time we met, we were talking about the contemplation stage of change. You know where you want to be with the change you are seeking, but you aren’t quite ready to go.

Preparation is the third stage of change. Most people at this stage are planning to take action within the month, and they are making adjustments before they begin.

What does this look like?

Let’s go back to my example of a patient who binges at 4 p.m. everyday on candy.

In the contemplation stage, the patient was considering doing some lunges or phoning a friend instead of eating candy. Well, if they were in the preparation stage, they might be considering that they need to be wearing comfortable shoes, and making sure that everyday those shoes were in their car. They might be thinking about their schedule every day at 4 p.m. They need to have the ability to stop and do some lunges. So maybe they are avoiding meetings at 4 p.m. If they were still considering phoning a friend, they would want to reach out to those people and just let them know that they should expect a phone call everyday and making detailed notes about who is available at 4 p.m. and who is not.

This brings me to my next point about Preparation. It is important to make public your intended change.

Why?

Well for one thing, in the preparation stage, a patient might still have some ambivalence about the change. Talking about it publicly can help air some of those feelings. For another reason, a patient needs support. This way, loved ones can be as supportive as possible in this endeavor to change. A patient may also discover that some people are not as supportive as they would like, and that’s an important discovery as well. It helps to prepare the patient.

Patients who prepare are more likely to succeed. Patients who cut short the preparation stage lower their chances of success.

So, theoretically, could you wake up one day and just stop binging on candy at 4p.m.? Yes.

But I would challenge you to consider this: how would you feel if you failed? Would it keep you from trying to tackle the problem again?

Afterall, if you have a plan, you can always examine the plan. You can analyze what part of the plan was successful and what part was not. Without a plan, it can feel like it is just a failure.

Next week, we’ll discuss the fourth stage of change and its complexities for both the patient and the professional.

Get Sun. Eat Clean. Be Well.

-Dr. Norton

 

 

Change- A Seven Week #MotivationMonday series

This week I’m starting a seven week #MotivationMonday series on Change.

If you’ve ever tried to change a behavior, then you will understand just how difficult change can be. But I’d also guess that you would say that change was the best thing you ever did for yourself. Change can be the ultimate act of self love.

There are six stages in the process of change.

If it doesn't challenge youDoes that surprise you?

My patients find it reassuring to discover that change does not happen overnight. I don’t expect them to wake up the following day and be onboard with everything I ask of them.

Often, my first contact with a patient is when they have really hit rock bottom. But that’s when the seeds of change are planted. So if you are reading this, and feeling you are at your bottom, I challenge you to spend the next seven Mondays with me.

For this week, I want to you to answer this question:

What are you looking to change in your life?

Clean Ranch Dressing

For the Clean Eating Ranch Dressing Recipe, use all organic ingredients unless otherwise instructed

  • ½ cup Kalona Cottage Cheese (or any grass-fed)
  • 2/3 cup Kalona Sour Cream (or any grass-fed)
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder (or 2 tbsp diced onion)
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley (or 1 sprig fresh chopped)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried chives (or 1 tbsp fresh chopped)
  • 1/4 teaspoon Himalayan sea salt
  • 4 capfuls garlic juice
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup coconut crystals vinegar or any organic white vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper to taste

Directions:

Put all ingredients into blender and blend until creamy. Adjust spices. Dilute with water from the cottage cheese of sour cream cartons or use milk.

Makes  1 ¾ cups.

Nutrition (2 tbsp) – 44 calories, 4 g fat, 1 g protein, 1 g carbs

News You Can Use-Week of June 8th-14th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 8th-14th, 2015.

NEWS: 5 Gut-Friendly Foods to Help You Lose Weight

You eat avocados for your heart and fish for your brain, but are you feeding your gut? Your gut is more than just the food processing plant for your body—it has major implications for your appetite, your immune system, and even your mood. LEARN MORE

NEWS: What is Most Harmful to Your Nutritional Health?

Here’s an interesting survey conducted recently by Civic Science. Over 4300 adults were asked the following question: “Which of these do you feel is most harmful to your nutritional health?” LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is Your Child Eating Cancer-Causing Glyphosate For Breakfast? Most Likely, Yes

Although there aren’t any genetically modified oats on the marketplace today, that doesn’t mean we should run to stores with open arms, thankful that we’re eating healthy foods. The truth is, products containing oats are typically sprayed with the cancer-causing herbicide ingredient — you know, the one that a division of the World Health Organization recently deemed “probably carcinogenic to humans” — known as glyphosate. LEARN MORE

News: Is Facebook Making Us Hate Our Bodies?

It is estimated that Facebook had nearly 1.3 billion users in 2013. That translates to 1/6 of the world population. In North America, just under half of the population is on Facebook and 71% of adults who are online are on Facebook. A 2010 study revealed that teens spend more than 7 ½ hours per day online, and much of that time is spent on social media sites like Facebook. Social media has become ingrained into our way of life. But what is the emotional cost of our immersion in social media? Specifically, how does social media, like Facebook, impact how we feel about our bodies? LEARN MORE

 

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of April 26th-May 3rd, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 27th-May 3rd.

NEWS: Ask Well: Do Microwaves Degrade Food Nutrients?

Are there any good quality studies regarding loss of nutrients due to heating (not cooking) food in a microwave? LEARN MORE

NEWS: What to Tell Your Daughter about Her Weight

I remember the first time I heard that I was going to have a baby boy.  There was a part of me that felt immediate relief that my baby wasn’t going to be a girl.  It was the part of me that spent hours each day as a researcher studying weight management, body image, and disordered eating.  I knew, with a son, that it was less likely that these issues would affect my child. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Kraft to Overhaul Mac & Cheese, Remove Artificial Dyes and Preservatives

Good news this week. On Monday, Kraft announced that it will be removing artificial ingredients from its iconic Mac and Cheese line of products in the US by January 2016. Changes in consumer awareness and a preference for more natural and healthy foods are forcing the largest food companies in America to improve their offering or see sales decline. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 8 Things to Know About the Humble Pea

Peas, of the legume family, are not a sexy food. They are, however, tasty and packed with nutrients. Here’s what you need to know: LEARN MORE

NEWS: Leaky gut syndrome, Candida, and autoimmune disease

Candida is not inherently bad, but when left unchecked, when it takes over the gut and is allowed to flourish, it will damage the intestinal wall. Then Candida, along with other microbes, will migrate outside of the intestinal tract and into the body, flourishing everywhere, fed by all the sugars and damaged cells that are also entering the bloodstream. The immune system will react to the Candida (and gluten, with those two similar proteins) as it should, fighting invading pathogens that do not belong in the blood. LEARN MORE

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use- Week of March 23rd-29th, 2015

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 23rd-29th.

11 Reasons to Ditch Processed Foods

The Facts: Processed foods may seem like a deal in terms of convenience, but when you break down the cost, it’s generally cheaper—and way healthier—to make those same foods from scratch. For instance, a popular brand’s microwave bowl of chili costs $3.39 and includes harmful bisphenol A, fake food dye, and industrial meat raised using antibiotics, as well as other questionable additives. LEARN MORE

Bored, Blue or Blah? 4 Ways to Cope (Without Eating!)

Do you munch when you are bored?  Most of us do!  Here are some easy, scientifically researched ideas on how to beat boredom eating. LEARN MORE

Junk food industry fights against consumers’ right to know about added sugars in foods

Around 20 years ago, food labels were introduced to help Americans consume a healthier and more nutritious diet. Recently, the FDA looked at these labels and came up with a list of possible changes, which they felt were necessary to meet the needs of the American public and create more transparency regarding food. LEARN MORE

Diet Soda – Another Reason to Avoid

A new study shows a high correlation between diet soda intake and waist circumference in older Americans. Researchers followed 700 Americans over the age of 65 for over 10 years. The diet soda drinkers gained 3.2 inches in waist circumference, non-drinkers gained only 0.8 inches. LEARN MORE

How To Eat Clean (Without Going Crazy)

Like most people who care about eating healthfully, at one point or another, you’ve probably tried to stick to super-strict guidelines that effectively eliminated all pleasure and flexibility from your diet. How’d that work out? Chances are, not well. Unsurprisingly, joyless eating isn’t sustainable. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of December 8th-14th!

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 8th-14th!”

Obesity Shortens Life By Eight Years, Warn Scientists

Obese young people could be shortening their lives by more than eight years and storing up a future of ill health, scientists have warned. LEARN MORE

Eating More Green Vegetables May Aid Heart Health, Reduce Risk Of Obesity, Diabetes

Eat your greens, they’re good for you.” This is statement that many of us heard as a child while pushing vegetables around the plate in disgust at dinner time. But it seems our parents may have had a point; three new studies reveal that a chemical called nitrate – found in green vegetables including spinach, lettuce and celery – may aid heart health and reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes. LEARN MORE

Maybe We Just Shouldn’t Ever Buy Grocery Store Chicken

The latest scandal in supermarket chicken comes from Canada. This time, a supermarket was reported to be re-labeling its chicken to have a later sell-by date, based on nothing more than a smell test. Should we maybe just stop buying supermarket chicken altogether? LEARN MORE

Is the Propellant in Pam Cooking Spray Harmful?

Do you use zero-calorie oil sprays? You know, of course, that they do contain some calories. FDA loopholes allow the manufacturers to round the calorie count down to 0. These oils-in-a-can also contain an ingredient you may be interested to learn more about: Propellant. LEARN MORE

Slow Down!

Common sense says if you eat slowly over the course of, say, a 20-minute meal, you’ll eat less than someone who eats quickly over the course of that same meal. This approach to healthier eating has been confirmed by a report published in a May 2014 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, wherein 22 studies on eating rate and calorie intake were reviewed. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Food Pollution and the Role It Plays In Our Health

Presentation3

Food Pollution is very serious and is not a topic we should take lightly. Click on the links below to learn how the pollution in our food plays a role in eating disorders, obesity, premature aging, and escalating mortality rates in the U.S.

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD POLLUTION

WELLNESS PRESENTATION OBESITY

WELLNESS PRESENTATION DISEASES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION EATING DISORDERS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION THE CAUSE

WELLNESS PRESENTATION GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOODS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION MSG AND OTHER ADDITIVES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD ADDICTION

 

About Dr. Renae Norton

A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //www.EatingDisorderPro.com

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Food Pollution and Disordered Eating

 

drjrenaenorton

On this week’s episode of the podcast I spoke with our caller Joe about food pollution and disordered eating. He asked a lot of great questions and we discussed a lot of different topics such as food pollution, GMOs, Organic Foods, disordered eating, and much more! You can tune in HERE.

What We Covered:

2:10- Today’s Caller Joe

3:20- How does Food Pollution relate to clean eating?

5:00- What is Food Pollution?

6:14-What is Disordered Eating?

7:55- How to determine if you’re a disordered eater

11:15- Effects of eating out

14:01- Health risks caused by polluted food

20:25- Why do people buy unsafe food?

24:55- High Fructose Corn Syrup

27:04- How to avoid pollutants

29:05- Organic or Non-GMO?

30:10- Effects of GMOs

32:00- Clean food is medicine for the body

33:55- If you’re avoiding polluted food, does that mean you’re eating clean?

38:55- What are clean foods?

39:30- Costs of eating organic vs. eating non-organic

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

 

News You Can Use – Week of May 12-18, 2014

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 12 – 18, 2014!”

Study Questions Fat and Heart Disease Link
Many of us have long been told that saturated fat, the type found in meat, butter and cheese, causes heart disease. But a large and exhaustive new analysis by a team of international scientists found no evidence that eating saturated fat increased heart attacks and other cardiac events. LEARN MORE
The Quest for a Natural Sugar Substitute
On a Sunday evening last September, stevia became famous. In the final episode of “Breaking Bad,” an image of the sweetener filled the TV screen. Lydia emptied the packet into her mug of camomile tea, not knowing that Walt, her former partner, had poisoned it. “How are you feeling?” he later asked. “Kind of under the weather, like you’ve got the flu? That would be the ricin I gave you. I slipped it into that stevia crap that you’re always putting in your tea.” LEARN MORE
World’s Number 1 Herbicide Discovered in U.S. Mothers’ Breast Milk
In the first ever testing on glyphosate herbicide in the breast milk of American women, Moms Across America and Sustainable Pulse have found ‘high’ levels in 3 out of the 10 samples tested. LEARN MORE
New Anti-GMO-Labeling Bill Would Deny You Your Right to Know
For anyone who wants to know whether there are GMOs in the food supply, a new bill introduced by Congressman Mike Pompeo (R-KS) is essentially a “slap in the face of all average citizens,” as former Stonyfield Farms CEO Gary Hirschberg called it. LEARN MORE
Eating Disorders in the Online World
The internet can be a place where people with eating disorders seek and find reliable information about what they’re doing to their bodies, about how their experiences are typical of the disorder they suffer from, about what recovery entails and how to embark on it; it can be a place where they seek and find support from others who have gone through the same thing and come out the other side, or are going through it and want to be free of it too. But the online world can also be a place where sufferers encourage each other to be ill ‘better’, where support means spiralling ever deeper into the pathological cognitive and behavioural patterns that maintain physical deterioration. LEARN MORE
Are You Programmed to Enjoy Exercise?
For years, scientists have been bedeviled by the question of why so few people regularly exercise when we know that we should. There are obvious reasons, including poor health and jammed schedules. But researchers have begun to speculate that genetics might also play a role, as some recent experiments suggest. LEARN MORE
Why Do “Farmers” Want To Keep Trans-Fats in Your Food?
 The FDA is close to deciding that partially hydrogenated fats should be removed from the American food supply. This is a good thing. Partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) contain trans-fats, which are the worst type of fat for your cardiovascular health. LEARN MORE
Eating legumes helps to lower bad cholesterol
Eating a daily serving of cooked beans is linked with lower levels of “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to new review study from researchers in Canada. LEARN MORE
Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

UPDATE! New Service – Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN)

fruit

I’m very excited to announce that I am now offering Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) to my clients. FDN gives patients the opportunity to improve their health by getting to the root cause of their symptoms. Many patients have had success using Functional Diagnostic Nutrition. In one case, for example, a patient was able to loose unwanted middle fat, regulate emotions well enough to discontinue an antidepressant and sleep without sleeping pills. If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me by email or phone at 513-205-6543 and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) is an opt-in model of self-care; i.e. you have the option of learning how to be more pro-active regarding your own health and nutritional needs. Think of FDN Practitioners as health detectives. They help patients find the underlying causes of disease instead of relying on traditional medicine which primarily focuses on symptom relief. By integrating FDN into your current treatment plan, you have the opportunity to find healing opportunities in a natural health restoring process.

Here’s a testimonial from one of my clients that has incorporated FDN into their treatment plan:

“By integrating FDN into my treatment for Anorexia, I have experienced dramatic results. Before using FDN I was functioning poorly; I was extremely obsessive, anxious, and had great difficulty eating regularly. If anything stressful happened in my life, I instantly resorted back to anorexic behaviors. My energy was drained. I was reliant on caffeine and other over-the-counter medications to get through routine activities. I also had to take psychotropic medications to deal with anxiety and depression. After a few months of following the FDN protocol these symptoms and problems improved dramatically. I no longer obsess over calories and macronutrient ratios, as I have learned how to listen to my body to determine how much I need to eat. I am no longer taking medication for anxiety, which has become more of a rarity; if I do get anxious, the feelings do not last nearly as long and aren’t nearly as intense. My energy level is incredible, I haven’t had to use any caffeine or other stimulants to have enough energy to get through the day. Using FDN is one of the best decisions I have made. I feel better now than I did even before my Eating Disorder. I truly hope your other patients will take the opportunity to incorporate FDN into their recovery!” WL 

If you are interested in incorporating FDN into your treatment plan, contact me at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com or discuss it with me at your next session! If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area or are not suffering from obesity or an eating disorder but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com

New Service! Functional Diagnostic Nutrition

eating disorders functional diagnostic nutrition

I’m very excited to announce that I am going to be offering Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) to my clients. FDN gives patients the opportunity to improve their health by getting to the root cause of their symptoms. Many patients have had success using Functional Diagnostic Nutrition. In one case, for example, a patient was able to loose unwanted middle fat, regulate emotions well enough to discontinue an antidepressant and sleep without sleeping pills. This service, which we are ramping up at present, will be fully available in January 2013! If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me by email or phone at 513-205-6543 and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) is an opt-in model of self-care; i.e. you have the option of learning how to be more pro-active regarding your own health and nutritional needs. Think of FDN Practitioners as health detectives. They help patients find the underlying causes of disease instead of relying on traditional medicine which primarily focuses on symptom relief. By integrating FDN into your current treatment plan, you have the opportunity to find healing opportunities in a natural health restoring process.

Most people interested in integrating FDN into their treatment ask three questions: “Will an FDN Practitioner know what is wrong with me?”, “Can FDN help me?”, and “Has FDN helped other people like me?”.

Will an FDN Practitioner know what is wrong with me? Yes! FDN Practitioners can identify malfunctions occurring within your body that are at the root cause of your health issues. They can identify these malfunctions through the use of functional lab work. This is lab work that uses scientifically documented indexes of normal versus abnormal functioning in organs such as the liver and pancreas as well as in systems such as the endocrine system and digestive system.

Can FDN help me? Your FDN Practitioner will help you identify healing opportunities instead of just treating symptoms. For example, instead of trying to relieve a symptom such as recurring migraines, your FDN Practitioner will work with you to determine the root cause of your migraines and create a protocol that will focus on resolving the root cause. Over time, you will be rebuilding, repairing and restoring normal function within your body by following a holistic program that looks at rest, exercise, diet, supplements and stress reduction. You will come to understand the role that the Pillars of Health; Hormone, Immune, Digestion, Detoxification and Intestinal Barrier Systems play in the problems you are having presently.

Has FDN helped other people like me? Yes! Through the use of FDN, over 11,000 people have experienced their best level of health in many years. Many of these people have been able to resolve their health conditions. There are currently over 500 FDN Practitioners in 30 countries that are helping thousands of people!

Here’s a testimonial from one of my clients that has incorporated FDN into their treatment plan:

“By integrating FDN into my treatment for Anorexia, I have experienced dramatic results. Before using FDN I was functioning poorly; I was extremely obsessive, anxious, and had great difficulty eating regularly. If anything stressful happened in my life, I instantly resorted back to anorexic behaviors. My energy was drained. I was reliant on caffeine and other over-the-counter medications to get through routine activities. I also had to take psychotropic medications to deal with anxiety and depression. After a few months of following the FDN protocol these symptoms and problems improved dramatically. I no longer obsess over calories and macronutrient ratios, as I have learned how to listen to my body to determine how much I need to eat. I am no longer taking medication for anxiety, which has become more of a rarity; if I do get anxious, the feelings do not last nearly as long and aren’t nearly as intense. My energy level is incredible, I haven’t had to use any caffeine or other stimulants to have enough energy to get through the day. Using FDN is one of the best decisions I have made. I feel better now than I did even before my Eating Disorder. I truly hope your other patients will take the opportunity to incorporate FDN into their recovery!” 

If you are interested in incorporating FDN into your treatment plan, contact me at drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com or discuss it with me at your next session! If you aren’t in the Cincinnati area or are not suffering from obesity or an eating disorder but are interested in improving your health with FDN, contact me and I will help you connect with an FDN Practitioner.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //www.eatingdisorderpro.com

New Service: Metabolic Testing

What Is It?

HabiTrack is an effective, accurate metabolic monitoring and nutritional analysis system. It provides you with the information you need to manage your weight, whether you are re-feeding, losing or maintaining. It is customized specifically for you and it works!

Accurate, individualized, and continuous feedback are the key success factors in any behavioral change program! That is what we have created, a feedback loop that will allow you to re-establish or perhaps establish for the first time, a healthy relationship with food.

How Does It Work?

HabiTrack gives you a comprehensive analysis of your resting metabolism and 5 days worth of your typical food intake.

For those whose metabolism is unusually slow or fast, the goal will be to bring it into the normal range by making changes in food intake, exercise and supplementation. The system will allow us to accurately track the progress that you are making in doing this and make adjustments where necessary.

For those whose metabolism falls within the normal range, the system will take the guess work out of eating healthy, as you will know exactly how many calories/day you can eat to gain, maintain or lose weight. Research shows that most people needing to lose weight guesstimate too low, which results in YoYo’ing and increases the likelihood that they will fail and regain the unhealthy weight.

I believe that this is a program that many of you have been waiting for and I can’t wait to share it with you!

Who needs it?

Anyone trying to manage an eating disorder and everyone wanting a more healthy lifestyle!
If you are re-feeding as a result of being Anorexic, Bulimic or Bulimarexic your biggest fear is gaining weight in an uncontrolled way. Knowing your resting metabolism and the foods that you can eat without fear of rapid weight gain, allows you to begin the process of re-feeding with significantly less anxiety.

If you are overweight or suffering from Obesity, the research is clear that you probably cut your calories too much by dieting, which inevitably leads to failure and additional weight gain. Knowing the exact number of calories you burn while at rest usually allows you to eat much more than you think you should. This prevents you from slowing your metabolism down and insures your long term success.
The Process

Diagnostic Session:
In the initial session your RMR (resting metabolic rate) is taken, which will establish a base-line for your metabolism. You will be asked to provide us with a five-day food record, which we will analyze using a state of the art food analysis program. We will combine the results of the RMR and nutritional analysis in preparation for your consult with Dr. Norton.

Consulting Sessions:

During this session with Dr. Norton, you will be given feedback that accurately describes your metabolic status along with recommendations for eating and exercise strategies as well as supplements that have been shown to positively impact metabolism. The information has been customized to meet your unique nutritional, psychological and physiological needs.

Armed with this information, you can take charge of your recovery and/or your weight management. For individuals who are recovering from Anorexia or Bulimarexia, the information will greatly reduce the stress of re-feeding. For individuals suffering from obesity, or for those who are overweight, it will eliminate the need to diet, WHICH DOESN’T WORK!

Follow-up RMR Sessions:

We recommend that you repeat the RMR assessment monthly until you have met your metabolic goal. If you are engaged in activities to increase or decrease your metabolism, this will allow us to monitor the relative effectiveness of the changes that you are making and to make suggested changes when necessary.

Follow-up Food Analysis:

You can submit another food record for analysis at this time, or any time you wish, to Lesley or Elisa. Simply fill out the form below, cut and paste it into an email and send it to us at AnalyzeThis@eatingdisorderpro.com. Your results will be emailed to you. If you are already a client, they’ll be in your chart at your next visit. We can even generate recipes and grocery lists that have been analyzed especially for you. Just let us know what you need!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’