Tag Archives: Anorexia

The Real Deal About Anorexia

Anorexia is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss.

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Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

I wasn’t able to blog yesterday because I got involved in a yard project. I wanted to expand my patio by a few feet so that I could move the table and chairs into a corner and make more room for a glider for Moli and I to sit on during  these gorgeous spring afternoons and evenings. It was tricky because I didn’t have any two by fours and it involved building up the side of the patio in order to level it out and accommodate a chair.

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One Of My Favorite Supplements

Today I’m going to talk about one of my favorite supplements, Resveratrol.  Talk about the fountain of youth! Resveratrol just may be it. 🙂 

Resveratrol
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Friday, April 22, 2020

This Is going to be a short post… Not to complain, but I’ve been working all freaking day on a new PowerPoint.   My eyes are falling out of their sockets, my butt hurts and my knees are stiff.  

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Change can be a good thing!

Hot Tea

I was devastated!  How was I going to work out? How was I going to get any research or writing done on my books? Who would make my tea? How could I start my day seeing patients without this respite that was such an important part of my morning , my life? It is literally what motivated me to get up every morning…

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The Best Vitamin C

In our newsletter this week we talked about the importance of vitamin C. 

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In this blog I want to give you some ideas about how to source the best vitamin C. The best vitamin C comes from Kakadu Plum from Australia or Camu Camu from the Amazon Rainforest.

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Scrumptious and Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Today we are going to do a Chicken Parmesan that is scrumptious and super easy.

I used only two chicken breasts which is enough to last me for three meals.  You could easily double the recipe. Here are the ingredients as I used them:

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The Food is at Fault!

The Blame Game

We tend to blame the victims of disordered eating, no matter what form it takes. Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Emotional Eating and Obesity are all assumed to be the result of poor choices and/or emotional disturbances that lead to over eating. Anorexia is often perceived as a choice the patient makes to achieve cosmetic improvements.

The eating problems plaguing Americans are the direct result of the deficiencies and toxins in the food supply and are not the result of implusive choices or vanity.

The Big Pharma complex, industrial farming, and the food and beverage industries, (I call them Big Pharma, Big Farming and Big Food or the 3 Big Pigs) have worked hard to convince us that our foods, beverages and drugs are safe as long as we take/eat them in moderation.

The issue is serious. The United States has the distinction of being the unhealthiest wealthiest country in the world today. So, how can a country with so many economic and natural resources not maintain healthy eating habits? The answer is simple and scary. Not only are the foods and drugs constructed by the 3 Big Pigs not safe, they are driving the catastrophic decline in the health of Americans and seriously decreasing the quality of life for millions of people.

Clean food heals the dysfunction and diseases caused by polluted foods. One of the reasons my patients get well is that they learn to trust food again by learning how to “eat clean.” Clean eating empowers them—it frees them from the slavery of addiction, and it calms the anxiety they have about eating. The more clean food they eat, the fewer cravings they have because the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight fluctuations stabilize in the presence of clean food. Under these circumstances my patients can learn new healthy eating patterns.

The sad thing is that most of the treatment for eating disorders completely ignores the role of food pollution during recovery. To highlight how important clean food is and how destructive therapies can be that ignore the problems with our food, I’m going to describe the experience of a young patient of mine (age 14) in a typical residential treatment program for eating disorders.

In the residential program MA was ingesting the majority of her calories in the form of Boost[1] as a behavioral consequence of refusing to eat. She was also being kept in bed, all day, every day, for 13 days in a row. Understand she was not being kept in bed because she was too medically unstable to be up and around; she was kept in bed because she refused to eat. Her parents, or their insurance company, were paying a small fortune for this “treatment.”

Her treatment with me began by giving her choices about her food. She could pick whatever she wanted, as long as it was clean and had the necessary nutrients for her to slowly regain her weight. She slowly but consistently has expanded her foods to include everything she needs to thrive while consistently gaining weight.

Here is her experience with my approach to eating disorder treatment:

The Blame Game-2

Did I mention this patient is only 14? She wasn’t asked to write this, she felt compelled to. After having such a terrible experience in residential treatment and finally finding a treatment program that was really working for her she needed to express what was changing in her relationship with food.

Whether you are bingeing, purging, restricting or are addicted- I guarantee that polluted food is playing a part in your illness. The food is at fault!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

[1] These are the first 10 ingredients in Boost: water, sugar, corn syrup, milk protein concentrate, vegetable oil, (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn) soy protein isolate, and Carrageenan. The only ingredient that is not GMO or a form of processed L-Glutamine (MSG) which is highly addicting, is the water. (See Chapter _ Sources of Food Pollution)

 

News You Can Use: Week of June 15th-21st, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 15th-21st, 2015.

NEWS:10 Foods That Will Ignite Your Energy

You’ve probably heard the term superfood—it’s often applied to things like brown rice, spinach, yogurt, tomatoes, and other healthy fare—but have you ever wondered what makes a food super? It’s about efficiency: Superfoods not only pack more nutritional punch per bite than other foods do, but they also have other properties that directly support the immune system, cut down on inflammation in the body, support mental health, and boost energy, stamina, and longevity. You can’t ask for much more than that from a single food! LEARN MORE

NEWS: 4 Sugar Secrets We Learned During Anne Alexander’s Facebook Q&A

Are you addicted to sugar? Don’t feel ashamed, it’s a vice millions of people are trying to overcome. To help get you on the right track, we recently invited Sugar Smart Express author Anne Alexander to answer readers’ sugar questions on the Rodale News Facebook page. Here are some of our favorite tips she shared: LEARN MORE

NEWS: At Least 110 Canned Food Brands Refuse to Give Up BPA

Bisphenol A, or BPA, has been implicated in health problems ranging from breast cancer to heart attacks. Since food brands aren’t eager to disclose whether they use the chemical, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) analyzed 252 brands of canned food to find out which ones do and which don’t use BPA. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Why You Eat At Night And How to Stop

People often say that your metabolism slows down at night, or that everything you eat after a certain hour “turns to fat.” That’s wrong. The problem is that people who eat late eat more. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Why Severe Anorexia Is so Difficult to Treat

Anorexia is the most deadly of any mental illness. So, why is proper treatment so hard to get, especially for people with a severe form of the disease? LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of June 1st-7th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 1st-7th, 2015.

NEWS: Eating Disorders Affect Adults, Too

Autumn lost so much to an eating disorder that lasted nearly 40 years. The job she could not perform. The friends who drifted away. The energy to do the activities she loved. The ability to have children. LEARN MORE

NEWS: What Are The Healthiest Cooking Oils?

The average consumer today is spoiled for choice when it comes to cooking oils. Most stores (including health food stores) in the West tend to be packed with oils of various colors, tastes and origins, and it can be difficult to distinguish the healthy ones from the unhealthy ones. LEARN MORE

NEWS: McDonald’s Stops Reporting Monthly Sales to Hide Plummeting Fast Food Business

Anti-GMO activists and those who advocate for organic foods have a lot to be happy about regarding the recent decision by fast food retailer giant McDonald’s to stop publishing its traditional monthly revenue reports. Their decision has everything to do with the fact that more Americans are now making better food choices. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Reasons Not to Shop the Store Perimeter Exclusively

You’ve probably heard this advice before – if you want to eat healthy, buy food only from the store perimeter. The perimeter is where you’ll find fresh produce, dairy, eggs, meat, and fish. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Obesity May Be Tougher on Male Immune Systems Than Females

With the risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for men than women, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets. They found that the difference may lie in the tendency of males to produce higher levels of white blood cells that encourage inflammation, which contributes to the negative health consequences of obesity such as insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of May 25th-31st, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 25th-31st.

NEWS: The Body Image and Eating Disorder Tsunami

Negative body image and eating disorders constitute a not-so-silent Tsunami that are wreaking havoc in the lives of women and men today. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Melancholy of Anatomy: Excessive Weight and Depression

The complex relationship between weight and depressive disorders. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Whole Foods Market to Introduce New Store Format

Earlier this month, Whole Foods Market (WFM) disclosed its plan for a new store format, expected in early 2016. The new locations will be branded differently than existing WFM stores and cater to a more price conscious consumer. The average store will also be smaller (between 50-65% of the size of WFM stores). The as yet unnamed stores will carry a smaller variety of items and have a less polished format, according to WFM executives. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Make Your Food Last Longer Safely With These Food Storage Tips

Learning how to store food correctly is important for several reasons, whether it’s a matter of making fresh food last as long as possible or stockpiling food staples over a long period of time. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of May 18th-24th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 18th-24th.

NEWS: Bait and Switch—What You Need to Know Before Buying Seafood

It’s a sad fact that we’ve more or less made an entire healthy food group toxic due to man-made pollution. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Mindful Eating, ADHD and Nutrition

The words attention deficit are so strongly associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), many people overlook other far-reaching consequences of the disorder. Among them are poor eating habits, eating disorders, and a higher-than-average risk of becoming overweight as a result of having ADHD. For example, a recent study linked ADHD to binge eating(link is external). How these eating issues happen makes a lot of sense when you understand the impact of ADHD on life management as a whole. LEARN MORE

NEWS: To Weigh or Not to Weigh?

I got back from a couple of conferences and a ski trip a little while ago and weighed myself, as I occasionally do, and found I’d lost a few kilos. I was surprised, because my weight has been pretty stable for the past few years, and I hadn’t been aware of eating differently while I was away. It made me reflect on how six or seven years ago a change of this size, whether up or down, would have been as unthinkable as it would have been unbearable, since bodyweight was such a constant preoccupation, treated like a crutch even though I knew it was crippling me: LEARN MORE

NEWS: USDA To Begin Certifying Non-GMO Foods

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is initiating a certification program to label products that have been made without genetically modified ingredients. The Agricultural Marketing Services arm of the USDA (AMS) received a request for help from a global food manufacturer to verify that the soybeans and corn used in its products were non-GMO. The company was interested in labeling the product as non-GMO, because many consumers today are looking to buy these products. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Frozen Meals 2.0

Once upon a time, frozen meals were the equivalent of a nutrition train-wreck. This has changed in the last 2 decades, as food manufacturers identified the opportunity to provide a healthier solution for time-pressed families. The most famous brands of less unhealthy frozen meals are Healthy Choice (ConAgra) and Lean Cuisine (Nestle). LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of May 11th-17th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 11th-17th.

NEWS: Understanding What Clean Eating Really Is

Nobody wants to eat dirty. It just sounds gross. But if you’re not eating cleanly, that may be your only option. So you may be wondering what it takes to take the dirt out of your diet and wash it off so you can dine on the clean diet you deserve. Well, wonder no more. LEARN MORE

NEWS: GMOs, Obesity, and World Hunger

While few would argue that fast food restaurant fare is healthy, North Americans are coming to the realization that the local grocery store contains just as many nutritional pitfalls and health perils. True – even for those who steer clear of packaged items, opting to only shop in the outer aisles of their supermarket. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Can Too Much Protein Be Harmful?

The average American consumes about 100 grams of protein a day, which is much higher than actually required by the body – 55-65 grams per day if you weigh 150 lbs. Could excess consumption of protein be deleterious to one’s health? LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 30th-April 5th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 30th-April 5th.

Milk, Calcium, and Bone Health

Even if you live under a rock, you know that in the US the current recommendation for most of the population is to enjoy 3 servings of dairy a day, including milk. One of the most well funded and persuasive ad campaigns of the three decades has been the Got Milk campaign led by the National Dairy Council. Parents are encouraged to provide milk for their kids’ growing bones and schools serve milk with every meal. LEARN MORE

Why Sleepy Shopping May Lead to a Bigger Waistline

Imagine you just pulled an all-nighter studying for an important exam, worked a double shift through the night, or were up all night with your child who has the flu. The next morning, you find yourself hungry and suddenly remember the lone jar of mustard sitting in your fridge so you decide to stop at your local grocery store to stock up for the week. Stop! Step away from the automatic doors, maybe grab a healthy bite out, and embark on this mission afresh after getting some rest. LEARN MORE

Anorexia Affects More Men Than Previously Thought

Zachary Haines was 16 years old when a physical examination put his 5’7”, 230-pound body within the obese range. Soon after, Zachary began working out and watching his diet, entering his junior year at high school 45 pounds lighter. LEARN MORE

4 Steps to End Emotional Eating

When Kami waltzed in the room, I cringed. She had her head held high, and offered me a firm, confident handshake and a brilliant smile. Dressed to the nines in a size two expensive summer dress and high heels, her persona screamed, “I am the Martha Stewart of Corporate America on a Weekend Getaway.” She was stunning, and looked more put together than I’ve ever felt in my whole life. LEARN MORE

Yes, You Can Get Addicted to Exercise

People are often astonished to discover exercise isn’t always a panacea. Because physical activity confers so many benefits to our muscles, bones, liver, heart, and brain—not to mention its powerful mood-boosting effects—the notion that it could be hazardous to our well-being may seem ridiculous. Unfortunately, for approximately 3 percent of the population, striving to stay fit does them more harm than good. LEARN MORE

What to Do When Organic Isn’t an Option

Whether you’re stuck in a food desert or have a tight food budget, you don’t need to be exposed to dangerous pesticides. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 9th-15th, 2015

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 9th-15th.

High Fructose Corn Syrup Now Labeled as Fructose or HFCS-90

The Corn Refiners Association is now labeling high fructose corn syrup as fructose. Packing on products such as General Mills Vanilla Chex cereal now states the product contains no high fructose corn syrup, while the ingredients list contains the simple word, “fructose.” This fructose is actually a manufactured sugar called HFCS-90, and is made up of 90% pure fructose. High fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, contains 42% or 55 percent fructose. Health issues relating to free fructose include diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, and liver failure. LEARN MORE

Reduced-Fat-Peanut-Butter Fail

Peanut butter is a great, nutritious food, and a staple in many American homes. It is high in calories, because peanuts are high in (healthy) fats. A 2-tablespoon serving of peanut butter has about 190 calories. LEARN MORE

Could Common Food Emulsifiers Be the Cause of Obesity?

Many foods sold in supermarkets today include additives from a family known asemulsifiers. You may have noticed some popular emulsifiers when reading the ingredient list of your favorite foods: soy lecithin, polysorbate 80, and carrageenan to name just a few. LEARN MORE

Genes and Eating Disorders

Living in an eating disorder professional world and a culture that is certifiably nuts about its expectations regarding body size and shape, I push myself to read the latest research and whatever else comes to my “in box,” regarding eating disorders. Staying relevant is the key in so many things… LEARN MORE

Fake Olive Oil: What You Need To Know New

You’d have to live in a cave to not have heard about the health benefits of olive oil. It’s a monounsaturated fat that is a major component of the Mediterranean diet and is believed to be a factor why people in that area of the world are some of the healthiest and long-lived. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use: Week of March 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 2nd-8th.

Boys’ quest for ‘perfect body’ fuels rise in eating disorders

A significant rise in the number of boys and young men suffering from eating disorders has contributed to a worrying 30pc jump in reports of the illness in Ireland, new figures obtained by the Sunday Independent reveal. LEARN MORE

Feeling Stuck in Your Battle Against an Eating Disorder?

Imagine a kind of eating disorder treatment where how many times you binged or purged, or how much weight you gained this week, or how well you stuck to your meal plan was not important. LEARN MORE

Why the “Eat Less, Move More” Approach Often Fails

If you want to lose weight, the solution is simple: Eat less and move more, right? Everyone one knows that. But eating less and moving more is a lot easier for some people than others. It is easiest for people who are in the normal weight range and have perhaps gained a few pounds over the holidays. New research explains why this approach often fails with obese individuals. And why some calories are better than others when seeking to lose weight. LEARN MORE

Mothers, Daughters and Food

The mother-daughter relationship is a strong and storied one, both celebrated and disparaged. From the moment a pregnant woman knows she’s having a daughter—in my case, not until she was born—she begins to imagine passing on a lifetime’s worth of female experience to her child. A daughter naturally feels more known to a mother, especially in the early years before she fully develops her own personality. We delight in dressing them adorably in part because they reflect our own, younger, cuter selves. We are as proud of their accomplishments as if they were our own, and it can be difficult not to superimpose our own desires onto the dreams we have for them. We imagine that they will “be there” for us even when they are adults with their own families. A daughter is forever, as the adage says. LEARN MORE

3 Myths About Eating Disorders Debunked

In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, this month’s blog post is dedicated to briefly discussing three common misconceptions surrounding eating disorders (ED) and hopefully raising awareness about these disorders more generally. Eating disorders can be devastating illnesses, but with help, recovery is possible. If you are struggling with symptoms of an eating disorder, please reach out to someone you trust and consider treatment. If you know someone who is showing signs of an eating disorder, consider reaching out to let them know that you care and encourage them to seek help. Contact information for the anonymous National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) helpline is listed at the bottom of this article. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Eat Clean

News You Can Use-Week of February 23rd-March 1st

NEWS: ‘I Had No Idea’ It’s National Eating Disorders Week

Next week is National Eating Disorders Week, with the theme of “I Had No Idea” for 2015. Many people who are aware of eating disorders may not think they have one, but the campaign seeks to educate people on healthy methods of managing weight along with empowerment activities that help individuals embrace positive qualities in themselves as opposed to an unrealistic ideal. Murray State’s Women’s Center Director Abigail French discusses events at Murray State University for the awareness week, Tuesday and Wednesday. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Eating Disorders Awareness Week reminds students of epidemic

Leah Nash developed an eating disorder when she was just 14 years old. For the next six years, she lived miserably, confined to a cage of anorexia nervosa. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Eating Disorder Many Women Don’t Know They Have

Binging on food has become an acceptable cliché these days—think gorging on Ben & Jerry’s after a breakup. Few of us equate bouts of overeating with anorexia or bulimia. But just like them, binge eating can be an eating disorder, and it’s going to be on more people’s radars in upcoming months. An awareness campaign kicked off this week, with tennis great Monica Seles leading the way. As she revealed at an event, “Binge eating disorder was as tough as any moment on the tennis court.” LEARN MORE

NEWS: 8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victim hood, and victory versus defeat. LEARN MORE

NEWS: I Had No Idea

This Monday marks the start of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an annual national campaign to raise awareness around eating disorders. If you don’t have an eating disorder (and I’m deeply, truly glad for you if you’ve never experienced one), and if you don’t know anyone who has an eating disorder (you do, I promise, but you might not be aware of it), you might think this campaign has nothing to do with you. LEARN MORE

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 23rd-March 1st.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use Week of January 19th-25th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 19th-25th

What If All Nutrition Studies Are Based On Wrong Data?

A majority of nutrition studies, conclusions and recommendations are based on flawed data. The result is bad advice dispensed to the public. This is the conclusion of a paper titled Energy balance measurement: when something is not better than nothing, published in the International Journal of Obesity. LEARN MORE

High Fructose Corn Syrup More Toxic than Sugar … for Females

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the most despised ingredients in consumer health circles. The corn derived sweetener has replaced sugar in soft drinks as well as thousands of other foods and beverages since the 1980′s. HFCS has been blamed by some people for the rise in obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and a host of other maladies. LEARN MORE

The Truth About Coconut Water

Coconut water is a big business, raking in almost half a billion dollars in sales last year. Just 10 years ago, most Americans hadn’t even heard of coconut water. Today, coconut water is considered the natural and healthy alternative to sports drinks, but it comes with a hefty price tag. LEARN MORE

The top 10 “Big Food” health slogans and myths busted!

Like they say, if you hear something enough times, you start believing it, even if at first it sounds absurd. That’s how advertising for toxic products works, and Americans have been falling for it for generations. You may recognize some or all of these popular slogans, or you may not. It doesn’t really matter to Big Food, as long as you consume them. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Salted Coconuts


Ingredients

6 oz Macadamia nuts

6 oz. Walnuts

6 oz. Brazil nuts

Coconut Oil

Seasonings of your choice

Directions:

In the microwave warm

¼ cup coconut oil

Add:

Himalayan Pink Salt

Garlic powder (or your favorite spices)

Put into a Mason jar and add the nuts. Shake it up until nuts are well coated. Dump onto paper towels and salt nuts if more salt is needed. Put back into jar and refrigerate. Eat cold.

You can also use Norbu or coconut sugar in the coconut oil to make a sweet version. I still put in a little bit of salt.

Melt in Your Mouth High Protein Low Fat Fudge

fudge
Melt over very low heat:

2 4oz packages of SunSpire organic baking bar 100% unsweetened cacao

16 ounces of Nutiva coconut manna or Artisana Raw coconut butter

1 ½ cups XYLITOL sugar

1 cup shredded coconut – medium shred

1 cup shelled hemp seed Florettes

When well blended pour into silicone cupcake holders and freeze. Pop out of holders and store in freezer or refrigerator.

Alternatively, grease glass pan, pour in mixture and refrigerate until solid enough to cut into bars.

Must be kept cold until eaten.

The fat in this fudge is metabolized as almost pure energy as it is primarily a medium chain fat, which does not store as a fat but is used by the liver. So this fudge will give you a kick of energy and no guilt!

News You Can Use-Week of January 12th-18th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 12th-18th!”

For Anorexic Men, the Focus Is on Muscle

Anorexia is typically associated with women, but a new report finds that men — especially men obsessed with muscularity — can develop the eating disorder, too. LEARN MORE

Can You Spot the Misleading Claim on This Cereal Package?

Chex is hiding something from consumers. In its updated product packaging for Chex Vanilla, there are many bold claims. One of them is a lie. LEARN MORE

Making Your New Year’s Resolution Stick

It can be daunting when your list of New Year’s Resolutions is as long as your holiday shopping list. In addition to the post-holiday slump, not being able to keep your resolutions by February, March or even late January may increase your anxiety. When your holiday decorations are packed up and stored away, the frustration of an unused gym membership or other reminders of failed resolutions can make the later winter months feel hopeless. LEARN MORE

How to Improve Your Body Image

A stunning 91% of women report being unhappy with their bodies, though far less than this number are actually overweight. Pressure to conform to the mythical perfect body can leave both women and men feeling miserable, overwhelmed, and inadequate. In a society where thin models parade across billboards and every fashion magazine contains dozens of weight-loss tips, though, it’s most frequently women who struggle with body images issues. Bad body image isn’t just a minor psychological problem, either. It can lead to serious, life-threatening physical and psychological health issues, in addition to destroying your quality of life. In one study, researchers found that 75% of women had patterns of disordered eating. LEARN MORE

Food is Family

You don’t have to be an eating disorder specialist to understand the significance of food. Food plays a role in every physical, recreational and relational arena in life. Food is a representation of a family’s love and often becomes the battleground when a member develops an eating disorder. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

You News You Can Use-Week of December 29th-January 4th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 29th-January 4th!”

NEWS: Understanding Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder where people become concerned about their weight. They try to prevent weight gain and may starve themselves to achieve this. Anorexia nervosa is not about weight, but mostly an unhealthy way to cope with emotional problems. Thinness to them equates to self-worth.LEARN MORE

NEWS: 3 Reasons Diet Food is Making You Fat

There is no shortage of food products geared towards the weight loss market. After all, 50 million Americans will start (or restart) a weight loss diet next week. Catering to this large demographic has become a key strategy for many food companies. There’s only one problem with these foods. They don’t work. LEARN MORE

NEWS: About Those Vegetables in Kids’ Snacks

Every parent’s dream is a kid who eats her veggies. For various reasons (avalanche of ads for less healthy foods, poor adult role models, nothing fresh available when needed, etc.), the real thing is often a tough sell. Wouldn’t it be great to sneak veggies into a snack? LEARN MORE

NEWS: Mushrooms and onions contain immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients

Plants have had to evolve through various environmental stressors and have developed very sophisticated systems to protect them from predators and the elements. These complex systems offer humans unique survival advantages through reducing oxidative stress and improving immune system coordination. Mushrooms and onions are packed full of immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding eating disorders and how they are treated

In the early part of the 20th century, Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, proclaimed: “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin.” Cut to 2014, and that philosophy is alive and well and perpetuated in society—fueled in part by the media’s emphasis on youth and beauty. But in reality, too thin can be life threatening. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of December 22nd-28th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 22nd-28th!”

NEWS: Cooper Connection: Coping with holiday stress

For many, the holiday season is a time filled with friends, family and festivities.

But while the holidays can be a time for family traditions and celebrations, it can leave others feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Even the most seasoned party-goer can get weary. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How to Choose Eggnog

Christmas is almost here and it’s time for Eggnog! Have you ever wondered what’s inside? LEARN MORE

NEWS: How To Do Christmas Better

Dressing up isolation as peacefulness. Maintaining, on this one potentially exceptional day of the year, immovable exercise, work, and food routines, noting deviations as tiny as a few calories. Being emotionally disconnected. Registering others’ sadness and incomprehension, but not really caring. Giving the false name of ‘celebrating what is’ to a bleak new absence of pressure to make anything else possible. Being aware of the perversity of the physical and mental state of anorexia. Not even trying, beyond a single crumb of Christmas icing, to bridge the gulf separating that awareness from action. Suffocating natural appetites with the sheer force of determination not to feel them. Feeling satisfaction at the danger of bulimia averted. Looking forward to another year and another vista of absolute unchanging predictability. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 84% of Vegetarians and Vegans Return to Meat. Why?

One of my daughters recently asked me for suggestions on types of meat she might enjoy. I was shocked. A vegetarian for nearly 18 years, she has always found meat, well, icky. In retrospect, I should not have been surprised about her new interest in carnivory. After all, as a researcher, I have studied vegetarians who return to meat. But I never figured she would join the ranks of ex-vegetarians, so I asked her to jot down a few words about why she originally gave up the consumption of flesh and why she now feels compelled to change her veggie ways. Here’s what she wrote…. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding eating disorders and how they are treated

In the early part of the 20th century, Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, proclaimed: “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin.” Cut to 2014, and that philosophy is alive and well and perpetuated in society—fueled in part by the media’s emphasis on youth and beauty. But in reality, too thin can be life threatening. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of December 15th-21st

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 15th-21st!”

New Victims of Anorexia: Elementary Age Girls and 40 Somethings

Eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia are on the rise, and doctors who treat them here in Connecticut are seeing a dangerous trend. LEARN MORE

Selenium in broccoli and garlic boosts immune system, could help fight cancer

Most Natural News readers know that broccoli is a good cancer preventative. Not everyone knows that garlic is another good food to help stave off cancer cell reproduction. The compound or trace mineral selenium was isolated as the main cancer fighter, according to the latest research from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. LEARN MORE

Poor diet links obese mothers, stunted children

Obesity and malnutrition are often thought of as problems at opposite ends of the nutrition spectrum, but the study found that 6.7% of Egyptian mothers were obese and had stunted children. In these ‘double-burden’ households with obese mothers and stunted children, malnutrition is unlikely to be down to scarcity of food. LEARN MORE

Count chemicals, not calories

If you just can’t seem to lose weight, maybe even just those last 10 to 15 pounds you want to “shed,” perhaps it’s because your body is being “informed” with incorrect information about whether it’s hungry and whether it’s getting the proper nutrition. Maybe mixed signals are being sent in, over and over, so that your system doesn’t even know HOW to fix itself. Have you hit a “brick wall” with weight loss programs and systems? Start over right here. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Defining “Food Junkie” W/ Dr. Vera Tarman

Vera Tarman

On this week’s episode I spoke with Dr. Vera Tarman. Dr. Tarman is the author of Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction.

She is also the founder and spokesperson for Addictions Unplugged. Dr. Vera Tarman has focused her medical practice over the past 17 years on addiction treatment and recovery. Along with serving the addiction community through her own private practice, she has been the Medical Director at Renascent since 2006 and the Staff physician with Salvation Army Homestead since 2004.

If you missed it, you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered:

0:55- Dr. Vera Tarman, Author of Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction

1:43- Dr. Tarman’s Professional Background

2:20- Definition of Food Addiction

3:05- Signs of Food Addiction

7:06- Causes of Food Addiction

7:15- Below The Radar-Dr. Norton’s Book

9:15- Are People Born With Food Addiction?

12:11- Caller Joe

13:01- What Is The Solution For Food Addiction?

13:45- What Do You Abstain From?

15:00- How Do You Determine What To Eliminate?

16:22- Are Coconut Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup The Same?

18:24- Coconut Sugar and Norbu Sweetener

23:32- If You Have A Food Addiction, Will You Always Have One?

25:48- Ways To Overcome Food Addictions

30:26-Can You Become Addicted To Fruit?

32:53- Physical & Emotional Addiction

33:26- Definition of Addiction

39:06- Stages of Recovery

40:08- What Is The Number One Sign You’re Addicted To Something?

41:43- Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction

42:54- Contact Dr. Vera Tarman at addictionsunplugged.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

News You Can Use-Week of December 1st-7th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 1st-7th!”

High sugar, salt, fatty foods trigger brain

When people think of addiction, they think of hard drugs and alcohol. But the disease has many forms. One kind in particular is much less publicized. But its addicts abuse the most readily accessible substance that’s key to survival – food. LEARN MORE

Nature Valley Can’t Boast “100% Natural” Any Longer

Chalk this up as another win for consumers, thanks to our friends at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). Effective immediately, General Mills will be removing the misleading “100% Natural” label from approximately 30 Nature Valley bars and products. LEARN MORE

Is a Serving of Bread One Slice or Two Slices?

One of the the most important pieces of information on a nutrition label is the serving size, which is the basis for determining the amount of calories, carbs and all other nutrients. For beverages, the serving size is usually one cup (8 fluid ounces). When it comes to bread, the natural units for a serving are not grams or ounces, but rather slices. So is a serving one slice or two? LEARN MORE

Prescribing Vegetables, Not Pills

Alaijah Borden was 10 years old and significantly overweight when Dr. Sundari Periasamy, a pediatrician at Harlem Hospital Center in New York, enrolled the middle-schooler in an innovative program to increase her consumption of fruits and vegetables–and, hopefully, to reduce her weight. LEARN MORE

How to avoid GMOs when you’re on a budget

What’s the most controversial topic at the grocery store these days? It’s GMOs. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 24th-30th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 24th-30th!”

How To Avoid A Thanksgiving Day Meltdown

The season of food-centered parties and gift-giving starts with a bang with Thanksgiving dinner. The annual meal comes with high expectations, as relatives and friends anticipate a multi-course feast. LEARN MORE

Food Addiction: Retraining Your Brain To Eat Healthy

Why are so many of us hopelessly addicted to fatty and sugary foods that we know are bad for us? Why do we never get the same cravings for fruit, vegetables or brown rice that we do for chocolate, crisps and chips? LEARN MORE

Surviving Thanksgiving

Each year, as the holidays approach, we go into a panic. How will I survive Thanksgiving? There is the thought of spending time with family, the pressure of creating a perfect holiday meal, and the guilt over the 51 million turkeys that will sacrifice their lives for the occasion. But amidst all of these other pressing concerns, there is one that stands out above the rest in the national panic: How will I stick to my diet? My advice is simple. Don’t. LEARN MORE

Adolescent Girls and ‘Not-Quite’ Eating Disorders

These girls, aged 12 to 15, never crossed the line into fulleating disorders. In fact, they became healthy young women with normal-enough eating. Siena switched from a vegetarian diet to a gluten-free one, to one that involved lots of raw vegetables. Bella rarely ate much in front of her friends, though her weight tended to run a little higher than one might expect. Meagan dieted on and off, though never with much persistence. Caroline obsessed about being “fat” so often that her friends began to eye-roll.Kendra went through a phase of only eating “healthy” foods, fearing sweets and junk. LEARN MORE

Trust Yourself

You know if what you’re doing or what you’re thinking is good for you or bad for you. It’s up to you to point yourself in the right direction. To do that, you have to place a tremendous amount of trust in yourself. If, in the past, you’ve tried to develop a healthier relationship with food and failed, it might be difficult for you to trust that you will make better choices and succeed this time. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 3rd-9th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 3rd-9th!”

9 Sneaky Sources of GMOs

If you’re trying to avoid foods with genetically modified organisms (GMOs), you probably already keep a sharp eye out for foods made from corn, canola, and soy, all of which have had bacteria or genes inserted into their DNA to either produce or resist toxic pesticides. LEARN MORE

Obesity Around the Nation

Obesity rates in states around the country are beginning to slow, but the epidemic is still affecting the poor and minorities disproportionately, new research shows. LEARN MORE

Labeling GMOs Won’t Raise Food Prices (INFOGRAPHIC)

Here’s a stat that is likely scaring the pants of companies producing GMOs and the chemicals designed for use on them: 92 percent of Americans want GMOs labeled. LEARN MORE

Obesity Is Found to Gain Its Hold in Earliest Years

For many obese adults, the die was cast by the time they were 5 years old. A major new study of more than 7,000 children has found that a third of children who were overweight in kindergarten were obese by eighth grade. And almost every child who was very obese remained that way. LEARN MORE

5 Surprising Genetically Modified Foods

By now, you’ve likely heard about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the controversy over whether they’re the answer to world hunger or the devil incarnate. But for right now, let’s leave aside that debate and turn to a more basic question: When you go to the supermarket, do you know which foods are most likely to be—or contain ingredients that are—genetically engineered? LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Navigating Love: Understanding The Game Couples Play

d4503ef0d68b76188edbd01cfea20b86

On this week’s episode of the podcast I spoke with Malik Spencer, the author of “Navigating Love: A Roadmap for Building Healthy Relationships”. Listen to it HERE!

What We Covered:

1:02-Malik Spencer, Author of Navigating Love: A Roadmap for Building Healthy Relationships

1:58-Maji & Mongo

3:50-Malik Spencer Background

6:08-Navigating Love

7:26-A Sustainable Self

8:55-Selfish Attraction

9:58-Sustainable Attraction

11:57-Counterproductive Traits

15:37-Safe Space/Perceived Notions

16:10-Importance of Being Attracted To What’s Real

17:58-What Made You (Malik Spencer) Write This Book?

20:07-Relationship Rescue By Dr. Phil

22:10-Examples of Repeated Problems in Relationships

24:53-Problems With Infatuation

26:15-www.navigatinglove.com

27:58-Critical Thinking

28:42-Law of Unintended Consequences

30:56-Cognitive Dissonance

35:48-People Tend To Create/Conform a Reality

39:00-How Should Couples Be Using The Book?

42:48-Series of Rationalizations

44:10-There’s A Common Thread In Problems All Couples Face

45:40-What Is The Most Common Relationship Mistake?

46:58-4 Step Process For Addressing Conflicts

57:39-You Cannot Be In A Healthy Relationship Without Being Healthy

58:36-Purchase The Book “Navigating Love: A Roadmap For Building Healthy Relationships on Amazon

59:27-Topic For Next Week Is Sustainability

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers May be a Function of Food Pollution

Growing old is not easy in any culture, but it is particularly difficult for middle-aged women in the United States. Americans obsess about thinness and worship youthfulness. Joan Rivers’ tragic death last month was was a good example of the extremes to which women in American society will go in order to maintain these unrealistic ideals. Ms. Rivers is not alone. Remaining young and fit is getting harder all the time because of the food we eat. U.S. food is polluted with ingredients that attack the immune system, accelerate the aging process and drive obesity.

Aging is scary enough without a rapid decline in one’s health and an ever-expanding waistline. And that is exactly what Baby Boomers are experiencing today. As a result, they may be more at risk for specific eating disorders (EDs) such as Anorexia or Bulimia than in the past. This is consistent with the latest research showing a proliferation of eating disorders in the U.S. that includes older women.

In a survey conducted on the eatingdisorderpro.com website, with nearly 1000 participants, 1.2% reported that their symptoms began after the age of 50.

symptons of my eating disorder

Unlike European countries where women are viewed as sexy into middle age and beyond, U.S. women become invisible as they age. This puts them at even greater risk when it comes to EDs as they are less likely to be diagnosed or get treatment. Anorexia nervosa has the highest morbidity rate of any psychiatric illness with 10% mortality rate at 10 years of symptom duration and 20% at 20 years. Many Baby Boomers have had their disorders for more than 20 years. The longer the duration of the illness, the higher the risk of death.

In general, the population is aging. But living longer with chronic illnesses, especially the complications of obesity and EDs that are driven by food pollution, can and should be prevented. These problems not only rob us of our health, they rob us of our dignity. Ms. Rivers died in an ill-fated attempt to preserve the youthfulness of her voice. Too many women, especially those in midlife, are feeling the same desperation.

Awareness is key. Here are some Do’s and Don’ts:

Do Not Eat Do Eat/Cook With

  • GMO’s Organic whole foods
  • MSG Grass-fed beef, poultry and pork
  • Food additives Coconut oil, ghee and raw grass-fed butter
  • Sweeteners Wild Caught Fish
  • Grains
  • Pesticides

Eating clean nourishes the body, but it also nourishes the soul, and empowers us to take charge of our health and regain the vitality that we were meant to enjoy well into old age.

About Dr. Renae Norton
A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was a five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //edpro.wpengine.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton

Listen to the Podcast on Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers HERE.

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers

Joan-Rivers-br03

 

Yesterday, as a tribute to Joan Rivers, we talked about eating disorders among female baby boomers and how those numbers are rising. If you missed it yesterday you can tune in HERE!

What We Covered:

0:44- Increased Incidents of Eating Disorders among Female Baby Boomers

1:23- Male Eating Disorder Statistics

2:06- Joan Rivers Eating Disorder Background

3:00- The connection of the Biological Level and Psychological Level between Obesity and Eating Disorders

4:00- Why Food Pollution causes Disordered Eating

6:34- Pressures Facing Women 50+

8:37- Body Image Dissatisfaction in midlife has increased

9:55- What role does Obesity play in the rise of Eating Disorders?

11:55- National Eating Disorder Association Statistics

14:45- John Hopkins Mood Disorder Clinic Study

18:47- Most Important Signs of having an Eating Disorder

22:50- What Mental Healthcare and Medical Professionals Need

26:41- Autoimmune Disorders

28:18- Maji & Mongo Books

Links We Discussed

Eating Disorder Survey

Maji and Mongo Book Series

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – August 11-18 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 11 – August 18 2013!”

Girls With Anorexia Show Characteristics of Autism, Study Finds – Scientists studying girls with the eating disorder anorexia have found they show a mild echo of the characteristics of autism – a finding which could point to new ways of helping anorexics overcome their illness. Learn More.

Baby Formula May Increase Risk of Adult Obesity, Diseases, Study Says – Formula-fed babies may grow too quickly and may be more susceptible than breastfed babies to obesity and other chronic diseases later in life, a new study says. Learn More.

3 Ways Yoga Can Help Relieve Eating Disorders – A 2013 systematic review, published in Disability and Rehabilitation, reveals physical therapy including yoga can help patients suffering from anorexia and bulimia. Learn More.

Kids May Not Offset Extra Exercise at School – Children who exercise at school don’t make up for the extra effort by being less active at home, according to a new U.S. study that used accelerometers to track kids’ activity levels. Learn More.

Kids’ Chronic Stomach Pain Tied to Anxiety Disorders – Children with chronic or recurring stomach pain without a clear medical explanation were also more likely to have an anxiety disorder than those without stomach problems, in a new study. Learn More.

Internet-based Intervention For Eating Disorders in Adults: A Systematic Review – This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of internet-based interventions for the treatment of different eating disorders in adults. Learn More.

Picking or Nibbling: Frequency and Associated Clinical Features in Bulimia Nervosa, Anorexia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder – Picking or ribbling (P&N) is a newly studied eating behavior characterized by eating in an unplanned and repetitious manner in between meals and snacks. This behavior seems to be related to poorer weight loss outcomes after bariatric surgery for weight loss in severely obese patients, but clarification is still required regarding its value in other clinical samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of P&N across different eating disorder samples, as well as to examine its association with psychopathological eating disorder features. Learn More.

Sugar Love – A history of our love affair with sugar. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: How Eating Disorders are Changing with Maria Rago

Dr. Maria Rago

Join us on TUESDAY July 23 at 7 pm EST as we talk with Dr. Maria Rago, Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) and clinical director and founder of Rago and Associates Counseling Services. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE.

“Dr. Maria Rago is a licensed clinical psychologist for the last 20 years working as a specialist in eating disorders. She was clinical director of the Eating Disorders Program at Linden Oaks hospital at Edwards in Naperville IL for over 10 years, helping to make the program a national leader, including the creation of the innovative Arabella House, a residential group home for eating disorders treatment. Dr. Rago is also the founder of Rago & Associates Counseling Services, specializing in eating disorders and other important issues that people need help with. Dr. Rago loves to travel across the country to speak to college students and other groups about loving their body and eating without fear, and she is the author of, a book that speaks out against the literature that promotes restrictive eating and acceptance for only the thin. Dr. Rago is also proud to be the Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) the nation’s first eating disorders foundation, created in 1976.”

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Sign up to receive my FREE ‘Lifestyle’ eBook

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes: The Slender Trap – Lauren Lazar Stern

In this weeks episode we talked with Lauren Lazar Stern, author of The Slender Trap. We had a great talk about the use of art therapy in the treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, obesity, and binge eating disorder (BED).

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

7:00 – About Lauren Lazar Stern
8:10 – How Lauren Lazar Stern got started in the field of treating eating disorders
11:44 – What is “The Slender Trap”?
20:12 – What does an art therapy session for an individual with an eating disorder typically involve?
22:00 – Some patients tell me that they have had a negative experience with art therapy in residential treatment. Why would this be?
26:38 – What is more powerful, individual art therapy or group art therapy?
28:40 – What is the Expressive Arts Method?
30:33 – Caller Question – Is art therapy effective for obese patients? Do you have to be artistic to benefit from art therapy?
32:00 – Is art therapy something that patients just practive in their therapy sessions? Or do they practice it between sessions?
37:33 – When working with an individual with an eating disorder, do you consider yourself to be doing tradition therapy that integrates art therapy, or is art therapy the primary mode of treatment?
46:06 – Are there any negative aspects of art therapy?
53:45 – What is EMDR?

Links We Discussed

PERSONALIZED, SIGNED COPY of How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
The Norton Center Lifestyle eBook
APA Presentation – The Food Pollution/Addiction Model for Treating Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Systems Approach
The Benefits of Coconut Palm Sugar [infographic]
iTherapy
Lauren Lazar Stern’s Official Website
The Slender Trap by Lauren Lazar Stern
The Healing Memory Project

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Show Notes – Food Addiction with Dr. Vera Tarman

In this weeks episode we talked with addictions specialist Dr. Vera Tarman of addictionsunplugged.com. We talked about the science behind food addiction!

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

3:40 – About Dr. Tarman
4:45 – What is food addiction? How did you becomes interested in becoming a specialist in food addiction?
6:38 – What are the signs that someone is a food addict?
11:38 – Is there a relationship between food addiction, obesity, and/or eating disorders?
13:50 – There’s an article on your blog entitled “Are we dieting ourselves into obesity?”. What do you mean by this?
20:10 – What impact does food addiction have on recovery from drug and alcohol addiction?
21:55 – Caller Question – What does an addiction-free diet look like?
33:10 – What is the three-part brain model?
36:39 – What role do dopamine, seratonin, and endorphins play in food addiction? What are symptoms of low neurochemical levels?
42:05 – What is the most successful treatment for food addiction?

Links We Discussed

Addictions Unplugged
Anorexia, Addiction, and the Three-Part Brain Model
How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com | amazon.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
Dangerous Liaisons: Comfort and Food – Understanding Food Addiction DVD

 

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – December 12-19 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 12-December 19 2012!”

Is the childhood obesity trend on the decline?If these are soft drinks, what are hard drinks?

Introducing a New Treatment Tool for Patients and Clinicians

Seeing and (Not) Believing in Anorexia

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Food Pollution: Eating Disorders and Obesity

photo used under a creative commons license

In this week’s episode we discussed the effects of Food Pollution on Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

5:25 – The Systems Involved in Regulation of Appetite, Fat Storage, Weight Loss, Weight Gain, and Food Addiction
6:10 – What is Leptin?
6:24 – White Adipose Tissue (WAT) and Triglycerides
9:07 – The Effects of Food Pollution on the Weight Management System
10:57 – The Starvation Hormone – Leptin
11:40 – What drives Leptin Levels?
12:56 – Leptin Resistance
13:50 – Caller Question – How can I find out what my leptin levels are?
17:00 – Leptin Resistance
19:00 – The Effects of Food Additives and GMOs on Leptin
20:28 – Leptin and Anorexia
21:22 – The Effects of Anorexia and Obesity on the Endocrine System
22:46 – Cortisol
24:02 – Leptin and Anorexia
25:14 – Ghrelin: The Hunger Hormone
27:45 – Anorexia and Ghrelin – The Effects of High Ghrelin Levels on Treatment
30:44 – Bulimia and Ghrelin
32:10 – Obesity and Ghrelin
32:40 – Neuropeptide YY (PYY)
34:10 – Obesity and PYY
35:37 – PYY and Mood
35:55 – Regulating PYY through Diet and Exercise
38:55 – How to Regulate Leptin Levels

Links We Discussed
Leptin
Ghrelin
Peptide YY

Show Summary

The Weight Management System

In order to understand the role that food additives, genetically engineered organisms (GE’s), sweeteners, and neurotoxins play in the current epidemic of obesity and ED’s we must first understand the systems involved in appetite/hunger, fat storage, weight loss/gain and food addictions. There are three primary hormones involved in appetite/hunger regulation: Leptin, Ghrelin, Peptide YY.

Leptin

Leptin, which is a peptide hormone, was discovered by scientists in 1994. It is found in gastric tissue and placenta but is most abundant in white adipose tissue (WAT) otherwise known as body fat. WAT is composed mainly of adipocytes (fat cells) that store energy in the form of triglycerides during times of nutritional abundance. During times of nutritional deprivation, fat cells release the triglycerides (fat) into the blood stream to provide energy for the body. If there is too much fat in the form of triglycerides, it is stored in different places, such as the hips or belly, in case it is needed later. It also accumulates in the arteries, causing coronary artery disease.

In general, the amount of WAT, or body fat, is determined by the balance between energy intake and energy output. While it is partly influenced by genetic factors, it is driven primarily by environmental factors, such as the amount and/or type of food eaten.

It is damaged by food additives that are neurotoxic or addictive and by environmental carcinogens and obesegens.
Under normal conditions, this system is carefully regulated so that WAT mass remains constant and close to a well defined ‘set point’ for each individual. The set point, which is designed to keep the body at a healthy weight, is part of a feedback loop that maintain homeostasis.

Disruptions of this steady state that are caused by damage to the systems involved, can lead to chronic decreases or increases in the quantity of WAT mass. Decreased amounts of WAT are associated with periods of dieting, malnutrition, as in the case of ED’s, Anorexia. During these periods, the healthy body sends a message to the brain to increase food intake and decrease energy output. Increased amounts of WAT are present with obesity. Under these conditions, leptin sends a message to the brain to inhibit food intake and increase energy expenditure. In this sense, leptin acts as a long-term regulator of optimal body weight. It has been dubbed the “starvation hormone” because it’s primary function is to keep us from eating too little or exerting too much, and thus avoid starving to death.

Leptin levels are driven by the amount of adipose tissue one has under normal conditions. While the system works well to keep weight at optimal levels, it becomes less and less effective the more (or in the case of Anorexia, the less) adipose tissue there is. In the case of excess weight, the farther one is from the optimum, or set point, the stronger the signal to decrease food intake and increase energy output.

However, there appears to be a threshold for leptin levels, such that when they get too high or remain too high for too long, the brain no longer registers or recognizes them. This is called Leptin resistance, and it’s very much like insulin resistance. When this happens, the brain no longer senses changes in leptin levels. Instead, it perceives, that the body is in a state of starvation.

As a result, the individual experiences the need to increase food intake and decrease energy expenditure, regardless of how much excess fat they actually have on board. This causes more weight gain, and more adipose tissue, which results in more Leptin resistance, which in turn results in more weight gain. This is an example of a classic vicious cycle.

In the case of Anorexia, leptin levels are too low, due to the lack of WAT or fat cells, so that the individual is leptin deficient. The message from the brain is the same as it was for the obese patient that was leptin resistant, eat more, exert less, but for a different reason. In this case, the individual actually is starving to death. Unfortunately, in the case of the Anorexic individual, whose fear of gaining weight is overwhelming, the response to feeling hungry is to eat even less, causing more weight loss, which triggers more hunger which leads to more fear, and we have another vicious cycle.

Fasting, food intake, exercising, awakening, and psychosocial stressors cause the body to release cortisol. Cortisol is released in a highly irregular manner with peak secretion in the early morning, which then tapers out in the late afternoon and evening. Energy regulation and mobilization are two critical functions of cortisol. Cortisol regulates energy by selecting the right type and amount of substrate (carbohydrate, fat or protein) that is needed by the body to meet the physiological demands that is placed upon it. Cortisol mobilizes energy by tapping into the body’s fat stores (in the form of triglycerides) and moving it from one location to another, or delivering it to hungry tissues such as working muscle. Under stressful conditions, cortisol can provide the body with protein for energy production through gluconeogenesis, the process of converting amino acids into useable carbohydrate (glucose) in the liver.

Additionally, it can move fat from storage depots and relocate it to fat cell deposits deep in the abdomen. Cortisol also aids adipocytes (baby fat cells) to grow up into mature fat cells. Finally, cortisol may act as an anti-inflammatory agent, suppressing the immune system during times of physical and psychological stress. The implications are that when you are stressed, you store more belly fat and are more susceptible to disease because your immune system is on vacation.

Leptin levels can also be high for individuals with anorexia. However, in this case it is because triglyceride levels are too high due to liver damage and/or anorexia-induced hormone disruptions.

Ghrelin

Ghrelin, discovered in 1999 by scientists, is known as “the hunger hormone”. Produced in the stomach and pancreas, Ghrelin stimulates the appetite for the purpose of increasing the intake of food and promoting the storage of fat. When Ghrelin levels are high, we feel hungry. After we eat, Ghrelin levels fall and we feel satisfied.

Leptin and Ghrelin have a “teeter-totter” relationship. When leptin levels rise, ghrelin levels fall. Likewise, when ghrelin levels rise, leptin levels fall.

Whereas leptin acts as a long-term regulator of body weight, Ghrelin, on the other hand, is a fast-acting hormone that operates as a meal-initiation signal for short-term regulation of energy balance. There are distinct abnormalities in the production of Ghrelin among obese and eating disordered individuals. Part of the problem may be high levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, which is often seen with very low leptin levels. of Chronic stimulation is seen in clinical scenarios with chronic high cortisol levels and very low leptin levels. The more improper signaling that occurs, the more the incretin hormones agouti and ghrelin become disconnected from their master controller, leptin. The gasoline for this reaction is a chronic elevated cortisol. The longer it occurs, the more these abnormal signals are wired for in the person’s brain. This is what makes their treatment so difficult.

Those with anorexia tend to have high levels of ghrelin, which causes them to feel hungry. The sense of hunger is an extremely frightening feeling for most individuals suffering from Anorexia. So much so that they believe that they will never be able to relate normally to food, fearing that once they start eating they will never be able to stop. However, Grehlin levels normalize with weight restoration in individuals that refeed on a clean diet. For those that refeed using traditional refeeding protocols, Grehlin levels are likely to worsen as are Leptin levels. The result is increases hunger, increased fear and more restricting.

Among those with bulimia, Ghrelin does not respond as strongly when food is eaten, which could contribute to binge eating as the individual suffering from Bulimia does not “get full” even if they have overeaten. In the past, the assumption has been that there may be a predisposition in the Bulimic individual that “causes” this reactio and drives this disorder. However, it is possible that the toxins found in most of the foods in the U.S. may be changing brain chemistry in such a way that drives Bulimia.

Obese individuals tend to have low levels of Ghrelin, probably because they are Leptin Resistant, since Leptin and Ghrelin are inversely related. Research also shows that Ghrelin levels are higher after an individual loses weight, causing an increase in appetite, which may make it even more difficult to maintain weight loss for obese individuals.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released.

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

1. Eat a balanced diet. Be sure to eat foods that are high in protein, and remember to consume organic fruits vegetables. Even though you are resistant to leptin, you should still consume the proper nutrients.

2. Eat six time a day, on a schedule. If you have leptin resistance, you do not realize when you have eaten enough. To overcome this problem, create a set schedule of when to eat. It is best to have three meals each day. You should eat in the morning, the afternoon and the evening.

3. Create a food diary. In order to organize your schedule, create a food diary of the three meals and three snacks each day and the foods you will have during those meals. This method will help you to make sure that you are consuming a variety of foods. Also, by organizing your meals, you can make sure that you are not consuming an excess of food at a given meal.

4. Do not eat late at night. After you have your evening meal, do not eat anything else. If you eat before bedtime, you will feel uncomfortable, and any excess fat will have a less likely chance of being burned.

5. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you to improve your metabolism, as well as increase your energy. To keep track of your exercise routine, write down the time of day that you will exercise on your schedule.

6. Understand the role of protein tyrosine phosphates 1B, or PTP 1B, in leptin resistance. When PTP 1B is expressed to a high extent, it blocks the signaling of leptin. A possible way to overcome leptin resistance is to inhibit the PTP 1B. Talk to your doctor about the progress of this research.

7. Learn what is happening in your body. If you are leptin resistant, your own body is essentially sabotaging your efforts at weight control. In the first place, your brain is not receiving signals to cease eating when fat stores accumulate, and you’ll find yourself hungry despite knowing rationally that you should be full. To balance your body’s chemistry, you’ll need to regulate yourself mentally since your body can’t do it for you. This will take consistent determination and will power.

8. Exercise even when your body tells you to quit. When the body becomes leptin resistant, it becomes accustomed to high levels of the chemical in the blood. A little weight loss can trigger a decrease in leptin, making your appetite larger and affecting your metabolism negatively. Even though the body has plenty of fat stores to burn, the muscles cease to do so in response to decreasing leptin. You may not see results quickly because of this, and you may find yourself particularly exhausted by exercise. Do it anyway, because you can’t correct leptin resistance without reaching a healthy weight.

9. Take irvingia gabonensis supplements. Irvingia gabonensis is a plant species whose fruit has been shown in medical studies to correct leptin resistance. In fact, one study showed that individuals taking 150 mg of the supplement twice a day showed marked improvements in body composition after just 10 weeks. This natural supplement is not thought to have any side effects, although longitudinal studies are ongoing.

10. Work with a trainer or accountability partner. The hardest part of overcoming leptin resistance is that you go through the rigors of exercise and the self-discipline of a healthy diet without any encouragement from your body. You’ll probably feel tired and hungry on a frustratingly frequent basis. Until you have reached and maintained a healthy weight, though, your body will never regain the ability to function properly with regard to body composition. Having a consistent ally in your pursuit will help you stay strong in the lowest points when your brain is receiving signals to eat more and exercise less in response to decreasing leptin in the blood. The fight will be hard, but overcoming these signals will help you live a longer, more fulfilling life.

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – October 22-29 2012

News You Can Use


“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 22-October 29 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – October 8-15 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of October 8-October 15 2012!”

Exclusive: Nestle to cut sugar and salt in breakfast cereals

Labeling Works! Trans Fat Consumption Down 75% in 10 Years

Don’t celebrate yet, but a grassroots victory against GMO deception is now inevitable

When you peel an orange, don’t throw away the white part under the skin: Bioflavonoids help fight cancer and obesity

Anorexia Nervosa: Not Just For Women!

Exercise May Lead to Better School Performance for Kids With ADHD

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – September 18-25 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 18-September 25 2012!”

French Study Finds Tumours in Rats Fed GM Corn

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Aug 21-28 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 21-28 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Why Rapid Weight Gain Decreases Treatment Success Rates

At many inpatient eating disorder treatment centers patients with anorexia nervosa are required to restore their weight quickly; I’ve had patients that were forced to gain 20 pounds in 21 days! Not coincidentally, 21 days was the amount of time that managed care would cover. There are numerous reasons as to why gaining weight this quickly actually sets the patient up for relapse. Let’s look at what gaining weight at a rapid rate does to leptin levels.

In the malnourished, underweight anorexic, leptin levels are typically very low, due to low fat reserves. Usually, leptin levels reach normal levels during weight restoration. However, when weight is gained too quickly, leptin levels rise too quickly and may exceed the normal range. Of course this has the opposite effect needed for refeeding and individuals experience suppressed appetite and suppressed energy expenditure. As a result, it becomes increasingly difficult for the patient to eat, often interfering with the refeeding process. Many of the patients who have had this experience, were told, in effect, that they were at fault, or “not trying”. The reason that this happens is that not enough practitioners know about Leptin and the role that it plays in re-feeding. For someone who already has control issues, this is an extremely painful and often damaging experience.

At the Norton Center, our anorexic patients are helped to restore their weight slowly, but steadily. This, along with other important nutritional factors, plays a major role in our high success. It is important to note that many treatment programs use weight gain at the conclusion of treatment as the measure of success. This is a distortion in as much as the 20 pound weight gain is often gone in a matter or months, and sometimes in a matter of weeks. We measure success as weight gain that is maintained for a at least one year post treatment. Currently, our success rates for those patients that remain in treatment is about 90%; in comparison, many inpatient treatment centers experience a much lower success rate, or about 30 to 40%.

How Low Leptin Effects the Physical Complications and Behaviors Typical of Anorexia Nervosa

Low leptin plays a significant role in many of the physical complications and behaviors that are typically associated with anorexia nervosa; amenorrhea, hypothyroidism, hypercortisolism, osteopenia, immune changes, and increased physical activity.

Leptin levels of less than 1.85 µg suggests amenorrhea and subnormal luteinizing hormone (a hormone that stimulates ovulation) in women with anorexia nervosa. As leptin levels normalize through weight restoration, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be activated. Not all patients with anorexia nervosa resume menses upon weight restoration.

The majority of women with anorexia nervosa exhibit osteopenia. Low leptin levels are also associated with a reduction in bone formation rate. Although there are other endocrine changes that contribute to osteopenia, low leptin levels appear to play a significant role.

Individuals with anorexia nervosa, often experience a compromised immune system. This could also be due, in part to low leptin levels although most of the compromised immunity is due to increased cortisol levels. Cortisol is the hormone that we associate with stress. Patients who are gaining weight too rapidly, are under considerably more stress, and may also be experiencing increased cortisol levels

Finally, up to 80% of patients with Anorexia Nervosa tend to engage in excessive physical activity. It is believed that there is an inverse correlation between food intake and physical activity during the weight loss phase. In other words, the lower the leptin levels, the more drive there is to exercise excessively, which causes more weight loss or less weight gain. One study demonstrated that patients reported a decreased feeling of restlessness or hyperactivity (need to exercise) as leptin increased during the refeeding/weight restoration phase of treatment.

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: Monteleone P. Di Lieto A. Castaldo E, et al. Leptin functioning in eating disorders. CNS Spectrums. 2004;9:523–529. [PubMed]

Neuroendocrine System Changes: Anorexia vs. Normal Starvation

Whether a person experiences normal starvation or starvation through anorexia, the neuroendocrine system tries to adapt. Below is a comparison of the changes to cholecystokin, leptin, serotonin, dopamine, neuropeptide YY, ghrelin, galanin, and norepinephrine in normal starvation, anorexia, and in post-recovery from anorexia.

Neuroendocrine Changes - Anorexia, Normal Starvation

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Source:

Guisinger, Shan (2009). Is Anorexia Addictive? [powerpoint slides]. Retrieved from //www.shanguisinger.org/2009/08/is-anorexia-addictive-hbes-berlin/

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show – The Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we discussed: The Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Links we discussed:

Maji and Mongo: How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch

Full Text Transcript

Good Evening! Welcome to Eating Disorder Pro. I’m Dr. Renae Norton and I’ll be your host. This is our very first blog talk radio show. Our debut. Our maiden voyage, as it were. So I’m sure there’ll be some mistakes, a few dead silences, accidental hang-ups. Just don’t change that channel. Because we have good content show here and something worth hearing if you are struggling with disordered eating.

Our topic this evening is going to be the connection between obesity and eating disorders in the U.S. So if you have been struggling with an eating disorder, if you’ve been in and out of treatment, and nothing works, you’re still bingeing, purging or restricting you’ve come to the right place. Maybe you are on that roller coaster that many of us have been on of losing and gaining weight, and you can’t figure out what you are doing wrong. You’ve come to the right place. Maybe you have a child that can’t stop eating, or maybe you have a child that is terrified of food. Whatever the problem, if it has to do with eating, you are right where you should be!

So log on, tune in and call in. The number, by the way, is 646-378-0494.

I think it’s probably a good idea to start with a little bit about me. I’m a clinical psychologist with a specialty in family treatment and neuropsychology. I’ve been in practice for the last 25 years and have specialized in the treatment of eating disorders almost exclusively for the past ten years. I’d appreciate if you’d visit my website at www.eatingdisorderpro.com.

Be sure to check out my latest book called “How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch!”. It is the first of a series of books for children designed to interest them in a healthier lifestyle. Maji, who is a very healthy little dog, meets Mongo and takes him under his wing. When they meet Maji is very active and Mongo is pretty much a couch potato. Maji patiently gets Mongo to move out of his comfort zone and off the couch. Eventually Mongo finds the healthy part of himself and the two have great adventures together. Check it out by going to my website.

As far as the content for this evening’s show, much of it is result of research that I am doing for another more serious book, coming out in the Fall called “Cycles of Shame”. “Cycles of Shame” looks at the epidemic of obesity that we have in the United States, the expanding eating disorder population, and the role that food, or more specifically, food addiction plays in both problems. That’s right, I said ‘food addiction’. Our foods in the United States are polluted with MSG, GMO’s (or genetically modified ingredients) neurotoxins, obesogens, carcinogens and allergens. And they are killing us! Perhaps you think that I’m exaggerating? Consider a few statistics –

  • Obesity is epidemic in the US and has reversed a 20-year trend of longer life expectancy especially for today’s children.
  • If the present rate of obesity continues, the entire population will be obese by the year 2030.
  • Likewise, eating disorders such as anorexia are growing reaching new segments of the population, primarily younger children (sometimes cases with children that are only 6 years of age), middle-aged women and many more men. It used to be that only about 5% of the eating disorder population was men, this has moved up recently to about 10%. I think it’s actually continuing to move. The important thing about these new groups is they were relatively unaffected by eating disorders in the past. It’s very significant that they are getting worse.

So, how do we compare to other developed nations?

One thing to think about is whether this is just us or whether this is something that is happening around the world. In fact, it really is mostly just us. Other countries are getting fatter, eating disorders are pretty much a phenomenon of the United States. They are a phenomenon of other countries, but only when they become westernized or in other words, start eating our food.

What’s happening in our country that’s different than in other countries, is that our food is essentially polluted and its taking a terrible toll on the populous.

The United States life expectancy is 42nd in the world, lagging behind almost all other developed nations. In the 1990’s the U.S. was in 11th place. That’s a tremendous difference, a huge difference

Infant Mortality – In 1960, the U.S. had the 12th lowest infant mortality rate in the world. In 2008 we were in 34th place. One of the variables that significantly impacts infant mortality rates is the nutritional status of the mother during pregnancy.

Health Care – It isn’t that we are ignoring health care. We pay more for it than any other country in the world. In the United States, we spend on average $6,714. This is more than twice the average for individuals in any other country, unfortunately. A sizeable portion of the overall health care spending in the U.S. is directly or indirectly related to obesity and its many complications.

So, what is causing this? Why is this happening in the United States and not in other countries? Part of the problem is definitely our culture. Pop culture plays a significant role. There are several factors that may be contributing to these problems. Pop culture weighs in by glamorizing extreme thinness, while simultaneously promoting excessive, often gluttonous eating.

Most people who overeat assume that they are entirely at fault. To begin with, they ignore the fact that our culture puts a lot of pressure on them. We are also bombarded with advertisements extolling the virtues of foods that are actually extremely dangerous. We are not clued in that the foods are dangerous. We are pretty much clueless when it comes to the safety of or food supply. It’s sort of a cultural myth that “the government protects us from dangerous substances”, because of that we assume that it’s our fault that there is something wrong with us. “Maybe it’s my metabolism, maybe I’m just lazy”.

The self-blame and shame that follows drive yo-yo dieting, bingeing followed by purging, and restricting followed by overeating or bingeing. That puts us in a frame of mind that makes the problem significantly worse. The behaviors that we’re talking about and the pressures people in the United States are under are the opposite of reality.

Despite the fact that scientists and public interest groups point to the escalation of toxic additives in the U.S. food supply as a major contributing factor in our declining health, the warnings go unheeded.

We have a tendency to “blame the victim”. So, what this refers to is that the individual with the problem is often blamed for having the problem. This is really unfortunate because it’s very difficult for someone who is blamed for the problem (especially if they accept the blame) to solve the problem under these circumstances. The upshot of “blaming the victim” is that those seeking treatment for obesity and eating disorders are often stigmatized, the may be disenfranchised, managed care may cost them.

In the industry today, it’s not uncommon for people that are obese to be excluded from their managed care policies. Perhaps they are excluded for anything that has to do with their obesity or weight problem. This is definitely “blaming the victim” and disenfranchising people who need help. By disenfranchising, their condition gets worse and expenses go up.

We really have a problem with affordable or available treatment, of course this increases relapse rates. Often, the anorexic patient is allowed one inpatient stay. After that, if she needs residential care again, she pays for it out of pocket. A month of residential stay can cost as much as $30,000, that’s usually prohibitive for most families.

The misplaced blame that “it’s the way we eat” makes it very difficult to find real solutions to the problems that people have today.

Another problem, another thing that is part of our culture is that treatment ignores or is often ignorant of the role of safe nutrition. In general, most of the treatment we get in this country is for the symptoms. Often treatment incorporates pharmaceutical remedies, some of which make the symptoms even worse.

In a nutshell, treatment does not recognize the role that food additives play in obesity and eating disorders. They damage parts of the endocrine system that are responsible for healthy weight management.

Because treatment uses in incorrect underlying assumption, the focus is always on the relative amounts of food; the number of calories, or the relative amounts of fat, carbs and protein. It rarely looks at the quality of the food that we should be looking at. That frame of reference often prevents people from actually recovering from their eating disorders. A good example would be: if you suffer from anorexia and you are in a residential treatment program, it’s very possible that the food that you would eat during the refeeding phase has so many toxins, obesogens, allergens and sweeteners that they actually do more damage than good. Likewise, for people that are dieting, the severe reduction in calories during the diet impacts your metabolism in a way that is suppressed, getting slower and slower. This results in “normal” eating causing rapid weight gain.

In future programs, we’ll be talking about what happens to the endocrine system depending on the types of food we are eating and what the endocrine system does. It actually tries to do many adaptive things that are actually maladaptive.

There are also “new” eating disorders on the horizon that are very troublesome. The one that worries me most that I’ve been seeing the most of in my private practice is a combination of anorexia and bulimia, known as bulimarexia. Bulimarexia is very troubling because if there is such thing as the “best of both worlds” it’s the “worst of both worlds”. The complications of bulimarexia are significant and often life threatening, more so than anorexia. Anorexia is currently the most life threatening emotional disorder one can have. Bulimarexia, which again is not on the radar of most practitioners, is popping up frequently. We don’t really seem to know what to do with it, how it is happening, why it is happening, let alone know how to help people overcome it or recover. I think there is a direct link between bulimarexia and the food that we are eating in this country presently.

Finally, last but not least, in terms of how our culture plays in these problems there is very little applied research. In the research that is available, it’s very unclear that certain food additives damage parts of the brain responsible for weight management. However, the very obvious indicators that there is a problem are being ignored. There is very little research demonstrating the safety of GMOs, yet in the United States you can barely buy a food that doesn’t have a genetically modified ingredient. But, that’s another show for the future. We’ll be talk about what that means, how it impacts obesity, how it impacts eating disorders. So stay tuned for that one.

The main problem , or saddest thing, is what is happening right now to children in the country, they pay the biggest price. There is an epidemic of obesity among U.S. children. It is not uncommon today for a child to leave the pediatrician’s office with a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart condition or joint deterioration. These diseases, are things our grandparents used to get. Right?

It’s crazy what we are seeing with little children. We have the fattest children in the world. We are the only country in the world right now that has obese infants. If you want to know, it’s because food additives target children’s foods. Just as an example, I have a can of Gerber Goodstart baby formula. Let me read some of the ingredients. Ok, the first one is “corn maltodextrin”. First of all, it’s GMO. Second of all, it’s MSG. “Vegetable Oil”, we have “palm” (that’s good), “soy” (that’s bad), “coconut” (that’s good), “safflower” and “sunflower” (those are both bad). Then we have “enzymatically hydrolyzed soy protein isolate”, that’s MSG. Then we have “sucrose”, that’s not good. We finally get to a relatively “good” ingredient; we have some “calcium” here, but only 2%. What we’re talking about here is that out of the first ten ingredients or so, seven or eight of them are either GM or some form of MSG. MSG is a neurotoxin; GMOs cause all kinds of endocrine problems including obesity.

We have some major problems when it comes to the foods we are feeding our children. The result is they are the first generation in many, many years to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. They are the fattest children in the world, they are tied only with Scotland.

So what is causing this mess? A list of things we’ll be talking about in the future are:

  • Food Addiction
  • GMOs
  • MSG and the impact it has on obesity
  • Healthy vs Unhealthy Fats
  • Grass-fed animal protein versus grain-fed animal protein.

Be sure to catch us when we are reviewing these topics. The call-in number tonight is 646-378-0494.

For this evening, suffice it to say, the missing link for many is the role that food additives play. Most Americans assume that foods in the U.S. are safe. WRONG! We have been led to believe that we are the problem and that the reason we are having all of these problems is that we are lazy, or glutinous or uninterested in being healthy. WRONG! Finally we believe that our children are spoiled which is why they fall on the floor frothing at the mouth when they don’t get Chicken McNuggets. WRONG AGAIN!

For the past 40 years, there has been an escalation of substances known for their neuro-toxic, obesogenic, diabetic, carcinogenic, addictive and allergic impact added to the American food supply for the simple reason that these things increase profits for the food industry. Scientists convincingly demonstrate that these additives damage the systems that regulate appetite, fat storage and weight gain or weight loss.

The fact is that they are highly addictive, they cause food cravings, binge eating, food obsessions, weight gain, weight loss, allergies and some of the worst chronic illnesses of our time. The problem is that they are everywhere!

Food additives and/or GMO ingredients are found in 95% of processed foods in the U.S. A processed food is any food that comes in a bottle, box, bag, can, carton or shrink-wrap, as well as the vast majority of deli and restaurant foods. So, pretty much everything we are eating, unless we are eating a fruit or vegetable, frying up a chicken breast, or maybe having some fish. Dangerous additives are more common, and found in higher quantities in children’s foods. This is a serious problem for our future generations.

The problem is that most people don’t know what they are, let alone how dangerous they are. And then there is the issue of finding foods without them. It’s tricky; however it’s really worth it. When you do find the foods that don’t have food additives in them, you are going to discover some amazing things. First of all, the foods are absolutely delicious. What you will discover is that it’s very easy to maintain the correct weight. How can that be?

  • For one thing, when you are eating foods that are not toxic, your blood sugar levels will stabilize. This means it will be hard to gain weight; unless you are anorexic, in which case your weight gain will be slow and steady.
  • Your cravings will disappear, since you will be extinguishing the food addictions you have developed unknowingly.
  • Your allergies will improve or go away.
  • For those of you who think you are gluten intolerant (and so many people today do), you may discover that you are not, that you are allergic to GMO’s or herbicides and insecticides. It’s interesting, I have a patient that was certain that she was gluten-intolerant. She went to Italy, where there are no GMOs. She ate the pasta and the bread (because she was in Italy) and had no allergic reactions whatsoever. Likewise, I have many patients that thinking they have dairy allergies. When I turn them onto whole milk that is from an A2 casein grassfed or pastured cow, they have no allergic reaction. What’s more delicious than a glass of whole milk, or whipped cream that you can put blueberries in? One of my obese patients (who has lost well over 100 pounds at this point) said that the most significant, positive thing about this approach was the fact that he was able to eat homemade whipped cream and strawberries every night before bed.
  • Your immune system will improve because it will no longer be under attack.

I have patients that come in today that are bulimarexic or anorexic that are losing their teeth, are having kidney failure and losing their hair. In the last 2 years, on three different occasions, I’ve had patients with no teeth. In one case, it wasn’t even possible for her to have implants because she had no jaw left. I also have patients at a very young age that have such severe osteoporosis that they suffer from kyphosis. That isn’t something that any one should experience anyone should experience. The reason they are experiencing these things at such a young age is because not only are they anorexic, but the foods they do eat are loaded with dangerous food additives, one of which is a sweetener.

For those of you that are guzzling down those diet soft drinks, you really need to find some substitutes. If you go to my website (www.eatingdisorderpro.com), you will find a lot of really good suggestions in handouts and articles on my blog. One drink, for example, that I think is exceptionally good is a drink by a company called “Q”. There’s a “Q Cola” a “Q Gingerale” and, for those of you who like a good vodka and tonic, there’s “Q Tonic” and it’s excellent. They only have 16 grams of carbohydrates.

What impact does obesity have on us? We know for the adult there is depression, reduced earning power, infertility and isolation are common among adults who are obese. It’s very difficult if not impossible for people to travel, very difficult for the morbidly obese to go to restaurants and to the movies. But what about individuals who have been obese since they were 3 or 4, and end up with Type II Diabetes by the time they are 10 or 11? What are the developmental issues at risk for such individuals? What are the implications for our society? Where does this leave us in comparison to other countries in the world that aren’t having these problems?

What impact are we seeing with eating disorders? Eating disorders also take a toll on life expectancy. For example, females between the ages of 15 and 24 who suffer from anorexia have the highest mortality rate for that age range. Studies have also shown that the risk for early death is twice as high for anorexic’s that purge.

Presently, the prevalence of purging anorexics or bulimarexics is on the rise. That particular type of eating disorder is a perfect example of what happens when you take someone who is afraid of eating and expose her to foods that are addictive. She can’t resist the impulse to eat these addictive foods. Unfortunately, she often learns to eat them when she is in a residential treatment center. Once this happens, she is at her wit’s end to know what to do and ends up purging. These are the patients I see with such horrendous complications; liver failure, cirrhosis of the liver, kidney failure, calcium problems (bones shattering, being unable to keep their teeth in their mouth) and endless horrible things like that. This new disorder appears to be driven by food addictions and/or intense food cravings, both of which have increased with the increase in food additives that we see in the American diet.

There seems to be a connection between the variables driving the epidemic of obesity, the changing demographics of eating disorders, and the escalating medical complications in both populations. Just as an example (aside from the fact that we are being subjected to food additives that are extremely dangerous), another connection is being obese as a child puts one at greater risk for being anorexic, or bulimarexic, later in life.

Today 17% of U.S. children between the ages of 2 and 19 are obese according the Center for Disease Control, that’s a scary scenario. By implication many more children may be at risk for developing an eating disorder in the future. A history of childhood obesity also makes recovery less likely for those suffering from anorexia or bulimarexia. They tend to be much more frightened of the refeeding process and has a much higher likelihood of relapse.

Not only is the general public unaware of the impact that food additives may be having on their health or the health of their children, especially when it comes to disordered eating, but practitioners also appear to be fairly in the dark. This is unacceptable. Americans can’t help that they are basically being sold a bill of goods about the safety of our foods. Practitioners should have a higher standard to meet.

There is research documenting the role that food additives are having on weight regulatory systems in the body, yet this connection is not yet on the radar of a lot of practitioners, which may help to explain why recovery rates for obesity and eating disorders are so low. It’s really not uncommon today, if you have anorexia, to have your physician or if you end in the ER to have the physician to ask you a question like “Why are you doing this to yourself?” This tends to be experienced as very judging for most people in that situation, it’s just not helpful.

What are the recovery rates for these problems? Not great. For example, recovery rates across treatment modalities for those with anorexia and bulimia are only about 50% at best. They drop to 30% for treatment that relies primarily upon residential care. For those who are obese, or overweight, the failure rate is even higher, in as much as 95% percent of all those who try to lose weight by dieting alone fail. Finally, when one considers that yo-yo dieting is a significant risk factor for developing an ED and that approximately 41% of the U.S. population is on a diet at any given time; the outlook is dismal at best.

Why is this happening here and not in other countries? In a nutshell other countries regulate these additives or prohibit them altogether. The pollution of the American food supply is a silent but deadly problem. It is also comes at a high cost.

It is silent because the American public buys products assumed to be safe that are anything but safe. The average citizen is simply not aware that Citric Acid, Malted Barley, or Natural Flavorings are neurotoxins.

Likewise, most people assume that buying a food that is certified “organic” is safe. But organic foods are not necessarily safe, in as much as the FDA allows unsafe additives to be put into the vast majority of processed foods, including those that are “organic.”

If you want to be sure that your food is safe, it must say 100% organic. If it doesn’t, it’s not necessarily safe. It if says “USDA Certified Organic”, it will be 95% safe, but can still contain 5% GMO ingredients, MSG and other unhealthy additives. If it says it is made with “organic ingredients” it doesn’t mean anything; it could have anything in it. We have to be very careful, and that’s the point. Why do we have to be careful? Why do we have to mistrust a label? The reason is simple: If we don’t mistrust the label we are likely putting ourselves in danger.

The pollution of our food supply is deadly because it results in decreased life expectancy, premature infant mortality, and the mortal complications of ED’s and obesity. The toxification of the U.S. food supply is costly because it contributes to the increased incidence of the most costly diseases of our time, including obesity and its complications, various types of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

These problems have long-term implications, as the largest and most profitable market targeted for dangerous food additives is children’s food, beginning with infant formula. Not surprisingly, childhood obesity in the U.S. is epidemic, beginning with obese infants. This is a first in our history and does not occur in other countries.

There are a number of things that you can do to protect yourself; you can find help for what to do on our website. There are also other organizations that are watching out for you, those are watch-out groups. It would be very helpful and worth your while for you to search these out if you haven’t already. Again, we have a list of resources and places you can find good information that you can trust.

[Caller Question] I have a question. I was wondering what is more dangerous: anorexia, bulimia or obesity?

[Dr. Norton] That’s a very good question. Let’s take obesity first. Most people don’t die from obesity; they die from the complications of obesity. I guess I could say that about anorexia as well and also about bulimia. This is a very good question because the answer is changing. It used to be that you didn’t start to become obese until middle age, and then you might die from some of the complications like heart disease, perhaps type II diabetes. However, with obesity beginning in childhood and infancy we don’t really know what it’s going to do. We know that it has lowered life expectancy of children presently for the first time in several decades. At this point, I would have to pick obesity as being the most dangerous. I can tell you that since bulimarexia doesn’t really have a diagnosis; we aren’t really tracking it, but at some point I’m sure we will. At that point, I am thinking it’s going to be viewed as a more lethal disorder. So, I’m not sure if I really answered your question.

[Call dropped]

Please tune in next Tuesday at 7 pm. We’ll be doing some show notes, of course. We’ll make sure you have access to those. Please visit www.eatingdisorderpro.com, and be sure to check out the ‘Maji and Mongo’ book. Please look for ‘Cycles of Shame’ that will be coming out in the Fall. Thank you very much to those of you that joined us tonight.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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Anorexia, Addiction and the Three-Part Brain Model

The Three-Part Brain Model

The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction as “a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations. This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors.

Addiction is characterized by inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response. Like other chronic diseases, addiction often involves cycles of relapse and remission. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, addiction is progressive and can result in disability or premature death.”

To understand addiction, it is important to understand the three-part brain model. The first and most important part of the brain is the lower part of the brain, the brain stem. The brain stem regulates life sustaining activities such as telling us to breath, getting our digestion going and regulating heart rate.

The next most important part of the brain is the middle part of the brain, the limbic system. The limbic system is responsible for emotional, instinctual, and motivational-based functions. It gets us to do things that will keep us alive. The middle part of the brain is the non-thinking part of the brain that instinctually and reactively gets us away from pain or draws us toward pleasure (such as sex, food, sleep, exercise etc) which is a life-sustaining principle.

The third and final part of the brain is top part of the brain, the cortex. The cortex is the thinking part of the brain. It gives the ability to appreciate art, literature and other people. Additionally, it is responsible for our social skills, judgment, insight, and other executive functions of the brain. The cortex also moderates emotions and instincts which are there to keep our lives going.

In a perfect system, all three parts of the brain will work together in balance. When a problem occurs, such as addiction or an eating disorder the limbic system becomes manipulated or overbalanced. What was initially a perfect system actually begins to work against us; the middle part of the brain overpowers the top part of the brain. When the middle part of the brain becomes aroused by feelings such as hunger, anger, loneliness, or tiredness we lose our sense of willpower and reasonable thinking; which resides in the front part of the brain.

The middle part of the brain is home to the nucleus accumbens. The nucleus accumbens is the reward pathway of the brain; anything that makes us feel good involves the nucleus accumbens. Three of the neurochemicals that pass through the nucleus accumbens include dopamine, serotonin, and endorphin. Dopamine is the neurochemical that makes us want or desire something; serotonin is the neurochemical makes us feel relaxed and satisfied; endorphin is the neurochemical that protect us from feeling physical or emotional pain.

I recently spoke to addictions specialist Dr. Vera Tarman who described how this relates to the brain of an individual with anorexia. When an individual is suffering from anorexia they experience a dopaminergic euphoria. He or she experiences a ‘high’, as they obsess about food; similar to how a drug addict would experience over their drug of choice. When the anorexic becomes increasingly hungry, the limbic system produces extra dopamine. As the person becomes hungrier, the reward value of food heightens. This is the body’s attempt to entice the person to eat, to nourish itself. The anorexic does not eat food, but as he or she gets hungrier, she instead anticipates food – in the food preparation, in the food obsessions, in how she or he ‘plays’ (but does not eat) the food. As the anorexic individual becomes more and more hungry, the dopamine high builds and builds. It’s important to note that as soon as the anorexic does eat, the high stops completely. Anorexics resist food the same way as the drug addict resists withdrawal from their drug.

Sources:

Human Brain and Skeleton Photo from office.microsoft.com Clip Art and Image Library (Under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License) Source: knol.google.com

American Society of Addiction Medicine. (April 19 2011). Definition of Addiction. American Society of Addiction Medicine. Retrieved July 18 2012, from //www.asam.org/for-the-public/definition-of-addiction.

Dr. Vera Tarman (personal communication, July 11, 2012)

Croxton, S. (Host) (2012, May 23). Understanding Food Addiction with Dr. Vera Tarman [Podcast]. Underground Wellness. California: Blog Talk Radio. Retrieved May 24 2012, from //www.blogtalkradio.com/undergroundwellness/2012/05/23/understanding-food-addiction-w-dr-vera-tarman

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use! June 3 – 10 (part ii)

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – June 3-10 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of June 3 – 10 2012!”

Anxious Girls’ Brains Work Harder

Are ‘Healthier’ Fast-Food Kids’ Meals Actually Healthy?

Tired? Sleep Deprivation May Affect Your Food Choices and Anxiety Levels

City Kids Have More Food Allergies, New Study Finds

Why Do Some People Blame Themselves for Everything?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity and Our Food Supply

Fooducate

I was recently asked by the folks at Fooducate to write an article for their blog readers about how eating real (clean) food helps those with eating disorders overcome their challenges. It was such an honor to be able to share my work with their readers!

Be sure to visit the Fooducate blog to read my article “The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity and Our Food Supply

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 1-8 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 1 – April 8 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Feb 5 – 12 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of February 5-12 2012!”

8 Creepy Mystery Ingredients in Fast Food

More American Using Mobile Devices at Grocery Stores

Trans fat levels drop in US Adults

Is Adding Fiber to Food Really Good for Your Health?

Research Team Delves Into the Roots of Hunger and Eating

Mindful Eating as a Way to Fight Bingeing

HFCS Explained: Here’s Why It’s Far More Dangerous to Your Health than Table Sugar

Walnuts Help Protect Against Prostate Cancer, Osteoperosis and CHD

Neotame the next Aspartame? FDA doesn’t require labeling of the latest sweetener from Monsanto.

New Lavender Oil Clinically Proven to Relieve Occasional Anxiety

‘Hunger Hormone’ Could Help Chemo Patient
for more info on this Hunger Hormone, check out this article

With no firm science, sleep standards are slipping

How Healthy is Coconut Water?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – January 15 – 22

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 12-22 2012”

Obama says NO to WhiteHouse.gov petition to legalize raw milk at federal level
Popular orange juices flavored with secret “flavor packs” not listed on the label
New scientific study links bee deaths to pesticides
Watching ‘The Biggest Loser’ may increase anti-fat attitudes
A randomized controlled trial of adjunctive family therapy and treatment as usual following inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa adolescents
Children Diet To Keep Off Pounds And Ward Off Bullying, Survey Says
Good Intentions Ease Pain, Add to Pleasure
Mindful Eating Restaurant Study

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

iTherapy – Integrating the iPhone into Therapy

iPhone Therapy

photo used under creative commons license

I recently read an article by Dr. Weissman of the Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis that introduced the concept of using an iPhone in the treatment of anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder.

Times are changing faster than ever. Technological advances, such as the introduction of the iPhone, have drastically changed the way we communicate and perform everyday activities. We can easily observe our everyday lives via the video and photo component of the iPhone. Weissman believes that this component of iPhone technology could be an effective tool in the treatment of the body dysmorphia that often accompanies anorexia.

Many of my patients that are in treatment for anorexia also experience some level of body dysmorphia; they see an obese person looking back at them in the mirror even though they are drastically underweight. Today, body dysmorphia is typically treated through psychotherapy, nutritional support and medication. For some patients, these approaches have limited success rates.

When a patient talks to me about the “obese person” that they see in the mirror, I often introduce a body image exercise involving “photo-therapy”. I ask the patient to take a photograph of themselves and bring it to their next treatment session. Oftentimes, when the patient returns and we talk about the photograph, the same body that was once described as being “fat” and “obese” is now described as being “underweight” and “malnourished”.

Weissman explains that when an anorexic patient looks in the mirror, their self perception is instantly fused with a distorted body image. The brain is so overwhelmed by this distortion, that it cannot process the image of the “real” body. The brain becomes trapped in this optical illusion, this distorted view. In contrast, when an anorexic patient sees his or her self in a photograph, the brain first acknowledges that there is a person in the photograph, it then focuses on the physicality of the photographed person. The brain then sends the message to the patient that they are the person in the photograph.

Integrating iPhone Therapy into the treatment of anorexia could definitely be a powerful tool in overcoming the body dysmorphia associated with anorexia. Based upon psychotherapy techniques developed by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann in Principles of Intensive Psychotherapy I, the steps below are Weissman’s suggested approach to integrating the iPhone into treatment:

  1. Patient and therapist look at patient in the mirror. Patient describes what they see.
  2. Therapist takes a photograph of the patient with iPhone. Patient describes what s/he sees.
  3. Therapist and patient discuss the differences between the description of the patient in the mirror and the patient in the photograph.
  4. A photograph of the patient standing beside the therapist is taken. Patient describes the image of the therapist. If the patient see distortion in the therapists image, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the therapist.
  5. Patient describes image of self. If patient sees distortion, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the patient.

Weissman points out the importance of the therapist not correcting the distorted view of the patient. If the patient does experience distortion in the photograph, the therapist should remind the patient that they both agreed on the description of the image of the therapist in the same photograph. It is necessary that the therapist and patient try to come to an agreement on the description of the patient.

Weissman predicts that utilizing this iPhone exercise will lead to an eventual reduction in the amount of distortion that the patient experiences when looking in the mirror. A combination of iPhone Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and nutritional counseling may lead to the patient gaining the important ability to maintain a healthy weight with little outside assistance. If the therapist successfully teaches the patient to be able to independently perform this exercise on a regular basis, there could be a drastic drop in relapse rates.

Sources: “Photo-Therapy: A Promising Intervention in Anorexia Nervosa?”

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Jan 9 – 16 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 9-16 2012”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. To view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles, use the search feature to search on the topic of your choice.”

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
//news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
//jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
//www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
//www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
//www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
//ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Your Health in the News – Dec 12 – 19

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of December 12-19 2011.”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Your Health In The News – Nov 27 – Dec 4

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of November 27-December 4 2011”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

This is the second part of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”. This series is designed to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, whether it’s weight loss or weight restoration. “Appetite Hormones 101” will be made up of three articles that describe the major appetite hormones: leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY.

Ghrelin

Ghrelin, discovered in1999 by scientists, is known as “the hunger hormone”. Produced in the stomach and pancreas, Ghrelin stimulates the appetite with the purpose of increasing the intake of food and promoting the storage of fat. So when Ghrelin levels are high, we feel hungry. After we eat, Ghrelin levels fall and we feel satisfied.

Leptin and Ghrelin have a “teeter-totter” relationship. When leptin levels rise, ghrelin levels fall. Likewise, when ghrelin levels rise, leptin levels fall.

Ghrelin levels are highest right before eating meals and lowest right after eating meals.

Leptin, acts on regulatory centres in the brain to inhibit food intake and increase energy expenditure, acting as a long-term regulator of body weight. Whereas Ghrelin is a fast-acting hormone that operates as a meal-initiation signal for short-term regulation of energy balance.

There are distinct abnormalities in the production of Ghrelin among obese and eating disordered individuals. Those with anorexia tend to have high levels of ghrelin which often normalize with weight restoration. Among those with bulimia, Ghrelin does not respond as strongly when food is eaten, which could contribute to binge eating as the individual suffering from Bulimia does not “get full” even if they have overeaten. Obese individuals tend to have low levels of Ghrelin, probably because they are Leptin Resistant, since Leptin and Ghrelin are inversely related. Research also shows that Ghrelin levels are higher after an individual loses weight, which may make it more difficult to maintain weight loss.

There are several easy things we can do to help manage ghrelin levels:

  • Eat a diet high in good quality protein (organic, grass-fed, free range etc. when possible)
  • Get an adequate amount of sleep
  • Practice meditation and relaxation techniques to reduce everyday stress
  • Drink plenty of water, since ghrelin levels are affected by thirst
  • Avoid processed fructose (especially high fructose corn syrup)

Although these things can make irregular ghrelin levels tolerable, the best way to normalize ghrelin levels is to address the root cause head on. In most cases, irregular ghrelin levels can be corrected by committing to living a healthier lifestyle through exercise, healthy dietary choices, weight restoration (for the anorexic individual), or weight loss (for the obese individual).

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Medscape News – Sibling hormone to appetite-boosting ghrelin has opposite effects, raising hopes for a new obesity treatment – //www.medscape.com/viewarticle/538867

WiseGEEK – What Is Ghrelin? – //www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ghrelin.htm

Journal of Pediatrics – Ghrelin levels in obesity and anorexia nervosa: effect of weight reduction or recuperation – //www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(03)00737-6/abstract

Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin

This series is designed to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, whether it’s weight loss or weight restoration. “Appetite Hormones 101” will be made up of three articles that describe the major appetite hormones: leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY.

Leptin

Leptin, discovered by scientists in 1994, is also known as the “starvation hormone”. According to leptin expert, Dr Robert Lustig, leptin sends a signal to our brains that fat cells have enough stored energy to engage in normal metabolic processes. Every individual has an optimal level of leptin, which is thought to be determined genetically. When leptin levels are below optimal levels, the brain receives a message to conserve energy because the body is in a state of deprivation. When this occurs, the brain sends a message to the body that it is hungry (in an attempt to get the individual to eat) so that leptin levels can be restored to an optimal level.

Leptin levels are typically high in obese individuals and low in severely underweight/malnourished individuals. When leptin levels are too high, the individual experiences leptin resistance.

When an individual becomes leptin resistant, the body prevents leptin from passing through the blood brain barrier, which also prevents the brain from receiving the signal that leptin levels are at an optimal level. Instead, the brain senses that the body is in a state of starvation, and the individual becomes hungry. Leptin levels go up as a result.

High triglyceride levels also contribute to the prevention of leptin passing through the blood brain barrier. Triglyceride levels are often high in obese individuals as a result of poor dietary choices. In the individual with anorexia, triglyceride levels are often high because of liver damage and anorexia-induced hormone disruption.

If you think that you may be suffering from Leptin Resistance, there are several things that you can do.

  • Get plenty of sleep. Lack of sleep disrupts many hormonal processes, including leptin levels.
  • Avoid non-fruit sources of fructose. Studies show that fructose raises triglyceride levels, blocking leptin from crossing the blood brain barrier.
  • Avoid lectins, (carbohydrate-binding proteins that are found in most plants, particularly seeds and tubers such as cereal crops, potatoes, and beans) especially those from cereal grains (rice, wheat, barley, corn and oats) as they tend to bind to leptin receptors, preventing leptin binding. This intensifies the affect of leptin resistance.
  • Cook and supplement with healthy fats, like coconut oil. Coconut oil lowers triglyceride levels, increases metabolism, and promotes healing in the gut (and liver for those recovering from anorexia).
  • Eat a high protein, low carb diet and stay active! Diet and exercise have the greatest effect on overcoming leptin resistance.

Sources:

BMC Endocrine Disorders – “Agrarian diet and diseases of affluence – Do evolutionary novel dietary lectins cause leptin resistance?” (//www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/5/10)

Mark’s Daily Apple – “A Primal Primer: Leptin” (//www.marksdailyapple.com/LEPTIN/)

The Fat Resistance Diet – “Leptin Resistance”

Live Strong – “High Cholesterol Levels in Anorexia” (//www.livestrong.com/article/86767-high-cholesterol-levels-anorexia/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton.

News You Can Use

There is so much information in the news about our health these days, that it can become quite overwhelming. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and my readers, I’ve decided to start a new weekly series. This series will highlight some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to me. With no further ado, here is your weekly health news summary for the week of October 9th-16th. Enjoy!

The Health Benefits of Raw Cheese

Eat your fruits and veggies and improve your memory

Eating Disorders a New Front in Insurance Fight

The Latest Class Action Lawsuit Against General Mills

Healthier Foods Earn Healthier Profits

The Dangers of Transfats

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Norton Center Video – Eating Disorder Therapy in Cincinnati

Coconut Oil and Malnutrition

It’s a great honor to have Dr. Bruce Fife as a guest writer today. Dr. Fife was kind enough to write about some of the effects of coconut oil on malnutrition. Dr. Fife is an internationally recognized expert on the health and nutritional benefits of coconut oil and all coconut products. He operates the ‘Coconut Research Center’, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to educating the public and medical community about the many benefits of coconut and palm products. He has authored many books, including: ‘The Coconut Oil Miracle’, ‘The Palm Oil Miracle’, ‘Coconut Lover’s Cookbook’, ‘Eat Fat, Look Thin’ and most recently ‘Stop Alzheimer’s Now’. These books are highly recommended reads, and can be purchased at Amazon.com, and Piccadilly Books.

Coconut Oil Can Help Prevent Malnutrition

By: Dr. Bruce Fife

Coconut oil can be an excellent way to increase the nutritional content of foods and improve nutrient absorption. Coconut oil is different from other fats and oils because it is made primarily of a unique group of fats known as medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). Most all others fats in our diet are composed of long chain triglycerides (LCTs).

One of the advantages of MCTs over the more common LCTs is their speed and efficiency in digestion. MCTs digest very quickly, with minimal effort and stress placed on the body. LCTs require pancreatic digestive enzymes and bile in order to break down into individual fatty acids. MCTs, on the other hand, break down so quickly that they do not need pancreatic digestive enzymes or bile, thus reducing stress and conserving the body’s enzymes. The digestive systems of those people with malabsorption problems often have a difficult time digesting LCTs. Not so with MCTs. Consequently, MCTs provide a superior source of energy and nutrition than do LCTs.

The difference in the way MCTs are digested is of great interest in medicine because it provides a means by which a number of medical conditions can be successfully treated. Replacing a portion of the LCTs normally found in the diet with MCTs has allowed doctors to successfully treatment of a variety of malabsorption syndromes including defects in fat digestion and absorption, pancreatic insufficiency, liver and gallbladder disorders, defects in protein metabolism, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease. MCTs can even, speed recovery after intestinal surgery.

Because of MCTs are digested more efficiently, they also improve the absorption of other nutrients. As far back as the 1930s researchers noticed that adding coconut oil to foods enhanced the food’s nutritional value. For example, researchers at Auburn University studied the effects of vitamin B-1 deficiency in animals given different types of fats. Vitamin B-1 deficiency leads to a fatal disease called beriberi. When rats were given a vitamin B deficient diet, coconut oil was effective in preventing the disease. Coconut oil doesn’t contain vitamin B-1. So how did coconut oil prevent a vitamin B-1 deficiency? Coconut oil made what little of the vitamin that was in the diet more biologically available, thus preventing the deficiency disease.

A number of studies have found similar effects. Coconut oil improves the absorption of not only the B vitamins but also vitamins A, D, E, K, beta-carotene, lycopene, CoQ10, and other fat soluble nutrients, minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and some amino acids—the building block for protein. Adding coconut oil to vegetables can increase the absorption of beta-carotene, lycopene, and other nutrients as much as 18 times!

What this means is that if you add coconut oil to a meal, you will get significantly more vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients out of the food than if you used soybean oil, canola oil, or another oil, or if you used no oil at all. Simply adding coconut oil to a meal greatly enhances the food’s nutritional value.

This fact has led researchers to investigate its use in the treatment of malnutrition. For example, coconut oil, mixed with a little corn oil, was compared with soybean oil for the treatment of malnourished preschool-aged children in the Philippines. The study involved 95 children aged 10-44 months who were 1st to 3rd degree malnourished. The children were from a slum area in Manila. The children were given one full midday meal and one afternoon snack daily except Sundays for 16 weeks. The food fed to the children was identical in every respect except for the oil. Approximately two-thirds of the oil in their diet came from either the coconut oil/corn oil mix or soybean oil. The children were allocated to one of the two diets at random: 47 children received the coconut oil diet and 48 children the soybean oil diet. The children were weighed every two weeks and examined by a pediatrician once a week. At the start of the study the ages, initial weight, and degree of malnutrition of the two groups as a whole were essentially identical.

After the 16 weeks, results showed that the coconut oil diet produced significantly faster weight gain and improvement in nutritional status compared to the soybean oil diet. A mean gain of 5.57 pounds after four months was recorded for the coconut oil group, almost twice as much as the weight gain of the soybean oil groups of 3.27 pounds.

Coconut oil or MCTs is included in all hospital infant formulas. Premature infants whose digestive systems are not fully matured have a difficult time digesting most fats. However, they can handle MCTs. When coconut oil is added to their formula they grow faster and have a higher survival rate. Adults also benefit with the addition of coconut oil. For this reason, coconut oil or MCTs are also included in the feeding formulas given to hospital patients of all ages. When MCTs are added to nutritional formulas, patients recovering from surgery or illness recover faster.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens – Part II

Whole Foods

As discussed yesterday in the first installment of “What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens“, Whole Foods Market is taking steps to make us more aware of products containing obesogens. Yesterday, we discussed their use of obesogen-free take-out containers, and changes that are being made in their “Cleaning Supply Aisle”. What else is Whole Foods Market doing?

Whole Foods Market is also helping us make more informed choices when it comes to personal care products. They clearly label products that they have rated “premium” or “organic” body products. All of these products had to meet a strict set of criteria, set by Whole Foods Market. They have banned the use of over 400 chemicals in the personal care products they sell. Whole Foods implemented this rating system because there are few government standards set in regards to what the word “natural” means when it came to body care products.

◦ “Premium Body Care Products” do not contain parabens, polyproylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, sodium lauryl sulfates or sodium laureth sulfates. The only permissable “fragrances” will be those made from “natural essential oils” and “components of natural essential oils”.

◦ “Organic Body Care Products” will meet all the requirements of “Personal Body Care Products”, but will also be required to meet other standards. These products are the highest quality products available.

▪ If a company labels their product “organic”, the product must contain at least 95% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a company claims their product is “Made with Organic X”, the product must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a product is labeled “Contains Organic X”, the products must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet NSF/ANSI 305 standards

Whole Foods Market is making many positive advances in their product packaging. According to their website, they have done more than any US retailer when it comes to keeping the customer informed and taking the actions needed to find safe packaging alternatives. Some of the advances they have made include:

◦ They use Polyethylene Terephthalate (PETE) in packaging for their ‘private label’ products, when possible. PETE is a plastic that is not known to leach any carcinogenic or hormone- disruptive chemicals.

◦ They have banned child cups, baby bottles, and individual refillable water bottles that are made of polycarbonate plastic.

◦ When there are safe alternatives to packaging containing BPA, Whole Foods Market uses that alternative.

◦ They are putting pressure on their current suppliers to switch to BPA-free packaging.

It doesn’t stop here! Whole Foods Market is continually doing research to do everything they can to go completely BPA free. They hear us when we tell them we are concerned about the use of BPA, they are on our side. I feel relief that they are thoroughly investigating all of their options, instead of making an uneducated change.

The standards set by Whole Foods Market are helping us make more informed purchases. They are allowing our voices to be heard in telling the industry that we want full disclosure of the substances that we are allowing in our households, that we want non-toxic cleaning products!

Sources:

Whole Foods Market – Products (//wholefoodsmarket.com/products/)

Inhabitat – EATware Compostable Food Containers (//inhabitat.com/compostable-containers-by-eatware/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What You Need to Know In Order to Help Your Obese or ED Patient

Eating Disorder Research

photo used under creative commons license


Research has clearly established a relationship between neurotoxins such as MSG, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sweeteners Splenda and NutraSweet and the current epidemic of obesity. I believe that there is also a relationship between these neurotoxins and the proliferation of eating disorders in the US. For example, research has shown that patients suffering from Anorexia as well as those who are obese, suffer from a condition called leptin resistance.
1 ,2 Further, this condition appears to be a function of the type and amount of neurotoxin ingested. In my practice, when I have helped those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, and Bulimarexia and obesity eliminate such neurotoxins from their re-feeding regimens, recovery time has shortened and the likelihood of relapse has decreased significantly. (I am in the process of publishing these anecdotal results and have also applied for several grants to research this relationship experimentally in greater depth.)

Treatment of obesity and eating disorders is negatively impacted for the uninformed treating professional i.e. re-feeding is a nightmare for those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder and Obesity when the role of these neurotoxins is not taken into consideration. Thus, to the degree that their impact on the eating habits of individuals suffering from ED’s and obesity is not understood, or worse, ignored, treatment is less likely to succeed, and in many cases, more likely to make the problem worse. For help on refeeding contact me directly. Also check out all of the blog articles on this site. 3

For the past 40 years food additives, known to have neurotoxic effects, especially in children, have been added to the American food supply because they were profitable. These additives include MSG, sweeteners Aspartame and Aceulfame, (Splenda and NutraSweet) growth-enhancing hormones, and pesticides that are incorporated into the DNA of crops like soybeans. The amount of these neurotoxins added to our food has increased enormously since their introduction. For example, since 1948 the amount of MSG doubled every decade. By 1972 over 262,000 metric tons were being added. (Whetsell, 1993)[1] Today it is impossible to determine the actual amounts of the various neurotoxins that are added to the U.S. food supply, as the additives are effectively unregulated by the FDA or any other regulatory agency. As a result, they can be added in ways which make them difficult, if not impossible, to quantify.

Besides being difficult to quantify, the additives are very difficult for the average consumer to identify, as they can be called such innocuous names as “citric acid” “malted barley” and “natural flavoring”! Even for individuals who are well-informed, and therefore know what to look for, it is still a daunting task to try and avoid them. Presently, they are in 90 to 95% of all packaged, bottled, and/or processed foods, including organic and/or foods that are marketed as “healthier” choices.

Perhaps the most alarming issue is that food manufacturers target children’s foods for inclusion of these additives. In the U.S. to day, 1 in 3 children are obese. Many will remain that way for life. We are one of the only countries in the world to have children who suffer from Type II Diabetes, which heretofore has been a disorder of middle adulthood. The connection between childhood obesity and an eating disorder such as Anorexia, for example, is that a history of premorbid obesity increases the risk of the development and decreases the likelihood of recovery from the disorder.

1 J Lab Clin Med. 2002 Feb;139(2):72-9.Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation.

2 Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental [1997, 46(12):1384-9]Neuropeptide Y, galanin, and leptin release in obese women and in women with anorexia nervosa.

3 Other resources: //dorway.com/ //www.drkaslow.com/html/leptin_and_amylose.html www.msgtruth.org/obesity.htm

 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Survey Results – The Positive Effects of Residential Treatment For Eating Disorders Are Minimal!

Eating Disorders Survey

photo used under a creative commons license

In analyzing the current results from my survey regarding the effects residential treatment has had on individuals taking the survey, only 16% acknowledged that residential treatment had a positive impact on their disorder. Over half of the respondents said that minimal changes resulted from residential treatment, and that, “my relationship with food did not improve during or after treatment and I still have the same symptoms.” Finally, a whopping 70% (combining the last four categories) stated that their eating disorder either worsened or that they developed another eating disorder after receiving residential treatment!

If you have not yet taken the survey please do!

*These results are based upon 260 responses.

Let’s Connect!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Grocery Shopping – Simple Task or Time Consuming Nightmare?

grocery shopping eating disorder anxiety

I don’t know of many people who actually enjoy the mundane task of going grocery shopping but for those who suffer from an eating disorder it can be an absolute nightmare. For them going to the grocery can be time consuming, mentally exhausting and costly. Check the results we collected from Dr. Norton’s Online Survey concerning grocery shopping.

  • 75.2% debate whether or not to purchase each particular item
  • 44.4% find themselves fantasizing about binging on certain foods while grocery shopping
  • 30.1% spend more than they can afford on food

These statistics, which are from a sample of over 125 respondents, are good examples of why Dr. Norton provides the service of shopping coach.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

BULIMAREXIA, DID YOU KNOW?

Bulimarexia Treatment Cincinnati

BULIMAREXIA – An eating disorder that has the characteristics of both Anorexia and Bulimia. The person affected by this disorder will cycle between the restricting habits that are associated with Anorexia and the bingeing and purging characteristics of Bulimia. This eating disorder is very dangerous and is physically and emotionally damaging.

After reviewing the data from Dr. Norton’s online survey we found that Bulimarexia had the largest population of those who took the survey.

  • 38% identified themselves as having Bulimarexia
  • 25% identified themselves as having Anorexia
  • 12.5% identified themselves as having Bulimia
  • 10.8% identified themselves as Emotional Eaters
  • 13.3% identified themselves as Obese

Why Bulimarexia Is So Dangerous

1. The fact that it is not a recognized diagnosis yet so many people suffer from it causes a serious problem for the therapist/physician and creates a serious gap in treatment.

2. The cycle of binging and restricting is very dangerous and can cause many serious health problems such as decreased bone density, loss of menses (difficulty conceiving), tooth decay and kidney damage just to name a few.

3. Bulimarexia often goes undetected or thought of as “just a phase”. For example a parent might notice their child’s decreased food intake and some weight loss but just as they start to take notice of this the child cycle’s into the binging component of this disorder. The parent is relieved to see their child eating again and their previous concerns are dismissed.

If you are in the Cincinnati area and are seeking treatment for your eating disorder, whether it be anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or bulimarexia, there is help! You can set up a consultation with me by calling 513.205.6543.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder as Addiction

Refeeding, A Step at a Time

Refeeding, A Step at a Time

Re-feeding: What is Normal?

The central and most difficult issue to be dealt with in the treatment of serious eating disorders is the issue of re-feeding and/or the establishment of a healthy relationship with food. The degree to which the patient can do this determines her success in conquering her disorder. The problem is that “normal” eating is a very complicated phenomenon, let alone the intricacies of re-feeding. This is one of the reasons that the “cure” rate for eating disorders is so low.

In some ways, it is more difficult to treat a severe eating disorder than it is to treat alcoholism or drug addiction. There is no such thing as cold turkey when it comes to eating. We have to eat every day, preferably 5 or 6 times a day. Likewise we cannot avoid the situations that trigger maladaptive eating behavior like the alcoholic or drug addict can do in an attempting to recover from their addictions. We eat for many reasons, under many different circumstances. We eat when we are hungry, not hungry, starving or full. We eat to socialize, to celebrate and to mourn. We eat to reward, nurture or punish ourselves. We eat when we are procrastinating, trying to relax or as part of a “working” breakfast/lunch/or dinner. We eat when we are happy, sad, mad, or for some of us, whenever we feel emotional.

Dieting Doesn’t Work

An equally important part of eating is the whole “not eating” thing, also known as “dieting”. Ninety-five % of US women believe that they are overweight and 65% of the general population diets. The dieting mind-set is so well ingrained in our society that some 5 and 6 year olds are worrying about how many calories and how much fat is in their Lunchables. Indeed, so many people in the US are dieting that it is a 93 billion dollar a year industry. There are hundreds of “diets”, diet workshops and diet programs, the vast majority of which fail. In fact, without exercise, 95% of all diets fail.

So why do so many people do it? We try to lose weight out of fear, vanity, pride or guilt or we may diet to feel stronger, more disciplined, superior and/or healthier, or we may just diet because everyone else seems to be doing it. The combination of being bombarded with advertisements to eat along side strong media pressure to be thin is constant in our culture.

EatingDisorders

All of the above behavior comes under the heading of “normal” eating. For those whose eating problems have risen to the level of a disorder, eating triggers feelings such as euphoria, guilt, shame and intense anxiety. Those suffering from Bulimia or Bulimarexia (restricting, binging and purging or just restricting and purging) engage in mindless eating or bingeing to numb or distract themselves from stressful situations or unhappy thoughts and memories.

Purging by vomiting or abuse of laxatives can last hours, keeping the individual up late into the night or causing her to miss work or school when she cannot resist the impulse to binge and purge during the day. One patient recently described a nightmarish scene in which she could not purge into her toilet because it was broken and so took a chance on using the tub drain as she showered. Unfortunately, the food would not go down that drain either. In horror she continued to vomit into the tub until she was standing in a foot of water thick with vomit. It took her and her mother hours to scoop the vomitous water out with buckets, which they then had to carry to another bathroom and flush down another toilet. The unbelievable part? Though repulsed by the mess, she was astonished and secretly impressed by the amount of vomit that she was able to produce!

Once she has binged (or simply eaten something she is uncomfortable eating) the need to purge is often so compelling that it goes beyond all reason, as in the case above. However this is a temporary “fix”. The purging gives the individual a temporary “high” followed by feelings of guilt and anxiety and a determination not to repeat the experience. Unfortunately this leads to restricting, which eventually leads to bingeing and the cycle begins again.

Sounds like drug and alcohol addiction, doesn’t it? Eating disorders are very much like other addictions, i.e. they are part of a classic addictive cycle. This includes an increase in tension, which the addict believes can only be relieved by the “fix”. In most addictions, relief from the fix is of shorter and shorter duration before the cycle begins again. This is what is known as a very vicious cycle.

Though not as obvious, the individual suffering from Anorexia is also an addict of sorts, i.e. she restricts to overcome feelings of inferiority, helplessness and hopelessness and to make herself feel in control. Often, she can only be proud of herself when she is pushing starvation to the extreme. This is her “fix”. Many of my patients describe the feeling of being able to function or stay alive on as few calories as possible as a “high”. Indeed there is scientific evidence that fasting does cause the release of endorphin’s, which do make us feel good. Not coincidentally, they report to the same part of the brain that drugs and alcohol do.

To summarize, even “normal” eating behavior can be stressful. Disordered eating takes over the individual’s life, much like alcoholism and drug addiction take over the addict’s life, robbing her of her relationships, her independence, her health and in far too many cases, her life. The mortality rate for eating disorders is higher than that of any other psychological disturbance.

Unfortunately, eating disorders are less likely to be understood as addictions, and more likely to elicit a judging stance from the general public, families and even a surprisingly high proportion of treating professionals. It seems as though the more serious the disorder, the more likely it is to be viewed as an attempt at getting attention or being manipulative.

Take, for example, the Cincinnati physician that said to one of our very attractive patients suffering from Bulimarexia, “You’re beautiful and you’re rich. You have it all. You should be counting your blessings. Why would you want to do something as stupid as refusing to eat?”

But the topper might be the psychiatrist that had another very attractive patient stand up at her first appointment so that he could “assess” her physique and make the following brilliant observation “Yup, you have breasts, hips and thighs. In other words you have curves, what’s the problem?” Individuals such as this often view Anorexia and Bulimia or Bulimarexia as vanity issues.

What Causes An Eating Disorder?

The causes are complicated and for most of the people suffering from an eating disorder, not the result of one factor, but many. The well-known causes are societal pressures to be thin, peer pressure, a major set-back at a critical point in the individual’s life, such as a loss or a traumatic event, childhood disturbances and/or dysfunctional family relationships, etc. However, there are also bio-physiological issues that play a significant role, although they tend to be poorly understood.

Many eating disorders are driven by cravings that are part of a classic addictive cycle, which may actually be perpetuated by food industry profits. In the early 70’s, the food industry discovered that high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) was much less expensive than sucrose. This was primarily because it was much sweeter. So, in it went into our foods, everything from baby food to hot dog buns and cigarettes! They ultimately took it out of most of the baby food, but it is still in the cigarettes, just in case cigarettes aren’t addictive enough without the sugar!

In Cincinnati, there are many fast food establishments still using HFCS’s in their buns, including; Arby’s, Blimpie, Burger King, Chick-fil-A, Dairy Queen, Jack in the Box, KFC, McDonald’s, Subway, and Taco Bell. You’re not safe at the Cincinnati Kroger’s either, or any of the major grocery chains for that matter, since it is actually harder to find foods at the supermarket without HFCS’s, than it is to find foods with it. For example, there are no less than 10 teaspoons of HFCS’s in a single 12 once can of soda. Likewise they are found in almost all snacks, dairy products, condiments, canned goods, cereals, bread, even supplements and vitamins. In total, the average American eats 83 pounds of corn syrup a year plus 66 pounds of sucrose, for a total of 149 pounds of refined sugars.

What does that mean in terms of unnecessary weight gain? Well let’s do the math: We have 159,360 calories from the corn syrup, and 102,168 from the sucrose totaling 261,528 calories per year from sugar. If it takes 3500 calories more than you use in a given period of time to gain 1 pound, that means that unless you work it off, you could gain 75 lbs/year from ingesting sugar you don’t need and probably don’t realize you are eating. To avoid gaining weight from the HFCS’s added to processed foods, the average person would have to run a total of 438 hours per year or 8 hours per week. The net/net of all of the above is to avoid processed foods, i.e. if it didn’t have a face (meat, poultry, fish, fowl) or come out of the ground (fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes), think twice about eating it. (The exception would be dairy products, such as yogurt, soft European cheeses, and milk. The lower fat varieties of these foods are very good for you, especially when they are lactose free.)

Sugar and Eating Disorders

Sugar Cubes

photo used under creative commons license

What does HFCS have to do with eating disorders? For starters, sugar has recently been shown to be the main culprit in insulin resistance, which is the precursor to obesity. In this country, obesity has become the nation’s most critical health problem. Ultimately it leads to such chronic diseases as Type II diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. These diseases are threatening to dismantle our entire health care system because of their increased incidence and skyrocketing cost of treatment.

Binge eating, bulimia, and bulimarexia are basically sugar addictions, as most individuals suffering from these disorders binge on simple carb’ s (highly refined foods that are often loaded with HFCS’s). Simple carbohydrates convert to sugar in the blood stream. Research has shown that sugar is as addictive as alcohol and/or cocaine.

Recovery from a food addiction (eating disorder) requires a basic understanding of the addictive nature of food and a commitment to replace the offending food(s) with something equally satisfying but less addictive. Otherwise you find yourself in a perpetual and very vicious cycle of restricting or deprivation (dieting) followed by the onset of withdrawal symptoms (food cravings, obsessive thoughts) a build up of anxiety and behaviors designed to quiet the beast, (bingeing, cutting, compulsive spending, binge drinking) and possibly efforts to compensate (purging with vomiting, excessive exercising, abuse of laxatives and/or diet pills). This leads to guilt and a profound sense of failure, which is followed by renewed determination to stop the cycle by not “eating so much” which is a euphemism for restricting or dieting, at which point the cycle begins again.

Unfortunately, many in an effort to avoid the offending food(s) restrict too much and end up avoiding the foods that could break the cycle, proteins or complex carbohydrates i.e. low fat meats, cheeses and fish or fresh fruits and vegetables. Instead they eat foods that actually contribute to the food addiction and cause the cycle to begin again. For example, so many of my patients avoid all protein because of their fear of fat and eat simple carbs, like pretzels or diet soft drinks when they are in restricting, dieting or “being good”. Or worse, they eat candy that has no fat, like jellybeans, thinking that this is a safer snack than a piece of chocolate or a handful of nuts. The chocolate, especially if it’s dark chocolate, does have some fat, but it has fewer sugars than a bag of jellybeans and, because it is dark chocolate, it has antioxidants. And the nuts have a good deal of fiber, which means that they usually have a glycemic load of 0. (This means that they do not enter the blood stream as a sugar and therefore do not contribute to a sugar addiction, which is the primary culprit in the weight gain that leads to obesity).

The jelly beans, on the other hand, and even the diet drink, make the problem much worse because they enter the blood stream almost immediately as glucose, adding to the sugar addiction, which in turn drives more binging behavior. They also have dyes and additives and no nutritional value. The real kicker however, is the long term negative impact that carb loading followed by purging or restricting has on ones’ metabolism, i.e. it slows it down to such a degree that it is almost impossible for the individual suffering from bulimia to eat normally without gaining weight. Until she understands which foods and supplements will stimulate her metabolism instead of suppressing it, she is stuck in this terrible self-perpetuating vicious cycle.

Once she understands how delicious real food can be and how much more of it she can eat without fear of gaining weight if she is exercising and supplementing, she has begun the journey toward a healthy relationship with food and the end of her eating disorder. But this requires courage, patience and lot’s of support from family, friends and allied professionals.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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ADHD and Incidence of Eating Disorders

ADHD and eating disorders

Eating Disorders Common In ADHD Girls: Compulsive Behavior Tied To Body Image Problems

Girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are more likely to have an eating disorder, a new study said. “Adolescent girls with ADHD frequently develop body-image dissatisfaction and may go through repeating cycles of binge eating and purging behaviors that are common in bulimia nervosa,” said University of Virginia psychologist Amori Yee Mikami.

ADHD is thought to be three times more common in boys than girls, so researchers are still learning its long-term effects on girls. But eating disorders are 10 times more common in girls. “Our finding suggests that girls may develop a broader range of problems in adolescence than their male counterparts,” Mikami said. She said girls often go undiagnosed and untreated for ADHD, which could increase the risk of eating disorders. “As they get older, their impulsivity may make it difficult for them to maintain healthy eating and a healthy weight, resulting in self-consciousness about their body image and the binging and purging symptoms,” she said.

The results are based on a study of 228 girls in the San Francisco Bay area; 140 had ADHD. “An additional concern is that stimulant medications used to treat ADHD have a side effect of appetite suppression, creating a risk that overweight girls could abuse these medicines to encourage weight loss, though we have not yet investigated that possibility,” Mikami said. The findings appeared in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. Note: if you treat both eating disorders and ADHD, then consider joining our sister organization at www.addreferral.com

Source:

UVA Today – Adolescent Girls with ADHD Are at Increased Risk for Eating Disorders

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton.