Tag Archives: Bulimia

Diabulimia

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

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Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

Positive Effects of Shelter In Place

I wasn’t able to blog yesterday because I got involved in a yard project. I wanted to expand my patio by a few feet so that I could move the table and chairs into a corner and make more room for a glider for Moli and I to sit on during  these gorgeous spring afternoons and evenings. It was tricky because I didn’t have any two by fours and it involved building up the side of the patio in order to level it out and accommodate a chair.

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One Of My Favorite Supplements

Today I’m going to talk about one of my favorite supplements, Resveratrol.  Talk about the fountain of youth! Resveratrol just may be it. 🙂 

Resveratrol
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Friday, April 22, 2020

This Is going to be a short post… Not to complain, but I’ve been working all freaking day on a new PowerPoint.   My eyes are falling out of their sockets, my butt hurts and my knees are stiff.  

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Change can be a good thing!

Hot Tea

I was devastated!  How was I going to work out? How was I going to get any research or writing done on my books? Who would make my tea? How could I start my day seeing patients without this respite that was such an important part of my morning , my life? It is literally what motivated me to get up every morning…

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The Best Vitamin C

In our newsletter this week we talked about the importance of vitamin C. 

View Newsletter Here

In this blog I want to give you some ideas about how to source the best vitamin C. The best vitamin C comes from Kakadu Plum from Australia or Camu Camu from the Amazon Rainforest.

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The Food is at Fault!

The Blame Game

We tend to blame the victims of disordered eating, no matter what form it takes. Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Emotional Eating and Obesity are all assumed to be the result of poor choices and/or emotional disturbances that lead to over eating. Anorexia is often perceived as a choice the patient makes to achieve cosmetic improvements.

The eating problems plaguing Americans are the direct result of the deficiencies and toxins in the food supply and are not the result of implusive choices or vanity.

The Big Pharma complex, industrial farming, and the food and beverage industries, (I call them Big Pharma, Big Farming and Big Food or the 3 Big Pigs) have worked hard to convince us that our foods, beverages and drugs are safe as long as we take/eat them in moderation.

The issue is serious. The United States has the distinction of being the unhealthiest wealthiest country in the world today. So, how can a country with so many economic and natural resources not maintain healthy eating habits? The answer is simple and scary. Not only are the foods and drugs constructed by the 3 Big Pigs not safe, they are driving the catastrophic decline in the health of Americans and seriously decreasing the quality of life for millions of people.

Clean food heals the dysfunction and diseases caused by polluted foods. One of the reasons my patients get well is that they learn to trust food again by learning how to “eat clean.” Clean eating empowers them—it frees them from the slavery of addiction, and it calms the anxiety they have about eating. The more clean food they eat, the fewer cravings they have because the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight fluctuations stabilize in the presence of clean food. Under these circumstances my patients can learn new healthy eating patterns.

The sad thing is that most of the treatment for eating disorders completely ignores the role of food pollution during recovery. To highlight how important clean food is and how destructive therapies can be that ignore the problems with our food, I’m going to describe the experience of a young patient of mine (age 14) in a typical residential treatment program for eating disorders.

In the residential program MA was ingesting the majority of her calories in the form of Boost[1] as a behavioral consequence of refusing to eat. She was also being kept in bed, all day, every day, for 13 days in a row. Understand she was not being kept in bed because she was too medically unstable to be up and around; she was kept in bed because she refused to eat. Her parents, or their insurance company, were paying a small fortune for this “treatment.”

Her treatment with me began by giving her choices about her food. She could pick whatever she wanted, as long as it was clean and had the necessary nutrients for her to slowly regain her weight. She slowly but consistently has expanded her foods to include everything she needs to thrive while consistently gaining weight.

Here is her experience with my approach to eating disorder treatment:

The Blame Game-2

Did I mention this patient is only 14? She wasn’t asked to write this, she felt compelled to. After having such a terrible experience in residential treatment and finally finding a treatment program that was really working for her she needed to express what was changing in her relationship with food.

Whether you are bingeing, purging, restricting or are addicted- I guarantee that polluted food is playing a part in your illness. The food is at fault!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

[1] These are the first 10 ingredients in Boost: water, sugar, corn syrup, milk protein concentrate, vegetable oil, (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn) soy protein isolate, and Carrageenan. The only ingredient that is not GMO or a form of processed L-Glutamine (MSG) which is highly addicting, is the water. (See Chapter _ Sources of Food Pollution)

 

News You Can Use: Week of March 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 2nd-8th.

Boys’ quest for ‘perfect body’ fuels rise in eating disorders

A significant rise in the number of boys and young men suffering from eating disorders has contributed to a worrying 30pc jump in reports of the illness in Ireland, new figures obtained by the Sunday Independent reveal. LEARN MORE

Feeling Stuck in Your Battle Against an Eating Disorder?

Imagine a kind of eating disorder treatment where how many times you binged or purged, or how much weight you gained this week, or how well you stuck to your meal plan was not important. LEARN MORE

Why the “Eat Less, Move More” Approach Often Fails

If you want to lose weight, the solution is simple: Eat less and move more, right? Everyone one knows that. But eating less and moving more is a lot easier for some people than others. It is easiest for people who are in the normal weight range and have perhaps gained a few pounds over the holidays. New research explains why this approach often fails with obese individuals. And why some calories are better than others when seeking to lose weight. LEARN MORE

Mothers, Daughters and Food

The mother-daughter relationship is a strong and storied one, both celebrated and disparaged. From the moment a pregnant woman knows she’s having a daughter—in my case, not until she was born—she begins to imagine passing on a lifetime’s worth of female experience to her child. A daughter naturally feels more known to a mother, especially in the early years before she fully develops her own personality. We delight in dressing them adorably in part because they reflect our own, younger, cuter selves. We are as proud of their accomplishments as if they were our own, and it can be difficult not to superimpose our own desires onto the dreams we have for them. We imagine that they will “be there” for us even when they are adults with their own families. A daughter is forever, as the adage says. LEARN MORE

3 Myths About Eating Disorders Debunked

In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, this month’s blog post is dedicated to briefly discussing three common misconceptions surrounding eating disorders (ED) and hopefully raising awareness about these disorders more generally. Eating disorders can be devastating illnesses, but with help, recovery is possible. If you are struggling with symptoms of an eating disorder, please reach out to someone you trust and consider treatment. If you know someone who is showing signs of an eating disorder, consider reaching out to let them know that you care and encourage them to seek help. Contact information for the anonymous National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) helpline is listed at the bottom of this article. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Eat Clean

News You Can Use-Week of February 23rd-March 1st

NEWS: ‘I Had No Idea’ It’s National Eating Disorders Week

Next week is National Eating Disorders Week, with the theme of “I Had No Idea” for 2015. Many people who are aware of eating disorders may not think they have one, but the campaign seeks to educate people on healthy methods of managing weight along with empowerment activities that help individuals embrace positive qualities in themselves as opposed to an unrealistic ideal. Murray State’s Women’s Center Director Abigail French discusses events at Murray State University for the awareness week, Tuesday and Wednesday. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Eating Disorders Awareness Week reminds students of epidemic

Leah Nash developed an eating disorder when she was just 14 years old. For the next six years, she lived miserably, confined to a cage of anorexia nervosa. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Eating Disorder Many Women Don’t Know They Have

Binging on food has become an acceptable cliché these days—think gorging on Ben & Jerry’s after a breakup. Few of us equate bouts of overeating with anorexia or bulimia. But just like them, binge eating can be an eating disorder, and it’s going to be on more people’s radars in upcoming months. An awareness campaign kicked off this week, with tennis great Monica Seles leading the way. As she revealed at an event, “Binge eating disorder was as tough as any moment on the tennis court.” LEARN MORE

NEWS: 8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victim hood, and victory versus defeat. LEARN MORE

NEWS: I Had No Idea

This Monday marks the start of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an annual national campaign to raise awareness around eating disorders. If you don’t have an eating disorder (and I’m deeply, truly glad for you if you’ve never experienced one), and if you don’t know anyone who has an eating disorder (you do, I promise, but you might not be aware of it), you might think this campaign has nothing to do with you. LEARN MORE

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 23rd-March 1st.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use Week of January 19th-25th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 19th-25th

What If All Nutrition Studies Are Based On Wrong Data?

A majority of nutrition studies, conclusions and recommendations are based on flawed data. The result is bad advice dispensed to the public. This is the conclusion of a paper titled Energy balance measurement: when something is not better than nothing, published in the International Journal of Obesity. LEARN MORE

High Fructose Corn Syrup More Toxic than Sugar … for Females

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the most despised ingredients in consumer health circles. The corn derived sweetener has replaced sugar in soft drinks as well as thousands of other foods and beverages since the 1980′s. HFCS has been blamed by some people for the rise in obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and a host of other maladies. LEARN MORE

The Truth About Coconut Water

Coconut water is a big business, raking in almost half a billion dollars in sales last year. Just 10 years ago, most Americans hadn’t even heard of coconut water. Today, coconut water is considered the natural and healthy alternative to sports drinks, but it comes with a hefty price tag. LEARN MORE

The top 10 “Big Food” health slogans and myths busted!

Like they say, if you hear something enough times, you start believing it, even if at first it sounds absurd. That’s how advertising for toxic products works, and Americans have been falling for it for generations. You may recognize some or all of these popular slogans, or you may not. It doesn’t really matter to Big Food, as long as you consume them. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

You News You Can Use-Week of December 29th-January 4th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 29th-January 4th!”

NEWS: Understanding Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder where people become concerned about their weight. They try to prevent weight gain and may starve themselves to achieve this. Anorexia nervosa is not about weight, but mostly an unhealthy way to cope with emotional problems. Thinness to them equates to self-worth. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 3 Reasons Diet Food is Making You Fat

There is no shortage of food products geared towards the weight loss market. After all, 50 million Americans will start (or restart) a weight loss diet next week. Catering to this large demographic has become a key strategy for many food companies. There’s only one problem with these foods. They don’t work. LEARN MORE

NEWS: About Those Vegetables in Kids’ Snacks

Every parent’s dream is a kid who eats her veggies. For various reasons (avalanche of ads for less healthy foods, poor adult role models, nothing fresh available when needed, etc.), the real thing is often a tough sell. Wouldn’t it be great to sneak veggies into a snack? LEARN MORE

NEWS: Mushrooms and onions contain immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients

Plants have had to evolve through various environmental stressors and have developed very sophisticated systems to protect them from predators and the elements. These complex systems offer humans unique survival advantages through reducing oxidative stress and improving immune system coordination. Mushrooms and onions are packed full of immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding eating disorders and how they are treated

In the early part of the 20th century, Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, proclaimed: “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin.” Cut to 2014, and that philosophy is alive and well and perpetuated in society—fueled in part by the media’s emphasis on youth and beauty. But in reality, too thin can be life threatening. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Navigating Love: Understanding The Game Couples Play

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On this week’s episode of the podcast I spoke with Malik Spencer, the author of “Navigating Love: A Roadmap for Building Healthy Relationships”. Listen to it HERE!

What We Covered:

1:02-Malik Spencer, Author of Navigating Love: A Roadmap for Building Healthy Relationships

1:58-Maji & Mongo

3:50-Malik Spencer Background

6:08-Navigating Love

7:26-A Sustainable Self

8:55-Selfish Attraction

9:58-Sustainable Attraction

11:57-Counterproductive Traits

15:37-Safe Space/Perceived Notions

16:10-Importance of Being Attracted To What’s Real

17:58-What Made You (Malik Spencer) Write This Book?

20:07-Relationship Rescue By Dr. Phil

22:10-Examples of Repeated Problems in Relationships

24:53-Problems With Infatuation

26:15-www.navigatinglove.com

27:58-Critical Thinking

28:42-Law of Unintended Consequences

30:56-Cognitive Dissonance

35:48-People Tend To Create/Conform a Reality

39:00-How Should Couples Be Using The Book?

42:48-Series of Rationalizations

44:10-There’s A Common Thread In Problems All Couples Face

45:40-What Is The Most Common Relationship Mistake?

46:58-4 Step Process For Addressing Conflicts

57:39-You Cannot Be In A Healthy Relationship Without Being Healthy

58:36-Purchase The Book “Navigating Love: A Roadmap For Building Healthy Relationships on Amazon

59:27-Topic For Next Week Is Sustainability

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers May be a Function of Food Pollution

Growing old is not easy in any culture, but it is particularly difficult for middle-aged women in the United States. Americans obsess about thinness and worship youthfulness. Joan Rivers’ tragic death last month was was a good example of the extremes to which women in American society will go in order to maintain these unrealistic ideals. Ms. Rivers is not alone. Remaining young and fit is getting harder all the time because of the food we eat. U.S. food is polluted with ingredients that attack the immune system, accelerate the aging process and drive obesity.

Aging is scary enough without a rapid decline in one’s health and an ever-expanding waistline. And that is exactly what Baby Boomers are experiencing today. As a result, they may be more at risk for specific eating disorders (EDs) such as Anorexia or Bulimia than in the past. This is consistent with the latest research showing a proliferation of eating disorders in the U.S. that includes older women.

In a survey conducted on the eatingdisorderpro.com website, with nearly 1000 participants, 1.2% reported that their symptoms began after the age of 50.

symptons of my eating disorder

Unlike European countries where women are viewed as sexy into middle age and beyond, U.S. women become invisible as they age. This puts them at even greater risk when it comes to EDs as they are less likely to be diagnosed or get treatment. Anorexia nervosa has the highest morbidity rate of any psychiatric illness with 10% mortality rate at 10 years of symptom duration and 20% at 20 years. Many Baby Boomers have had their disorders for more than 20 years. The longer the duration of the illness, the higher the risk of death.

In general, the population is aging. But living longer with chronic illnesses, especially the complications of obesity and EDs that are driven by food pollution, can and should be prevented. These problems not only rob us of our health, they rob us of our dignity. Ms. Rivers died in an ill-fated attempt to preserve the youthfulness of her voice. Too many women, especially those in midlife, are feeling the same desperation.

Awareness is key. Here are some Do’s and Don’ts:

Do Not Eat Do Eat/Cook With

  • GMO’s Organic whole foods
  • MSG Grass-fed beef, poultry and pork
  • Food additives Coconut oil, ghee and raw grass-fed butter
  • Sweeteners Wild Caught Fish
  • Grains
  • Pesticides

Eating clean nourishes the body, but it also nourishes the soul, and empowers us to take charge of our health and regain the vitality that we were meant to enjoy well into old age.

About Dr. Renae Norton
A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was a five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //edpro.wpengine.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton

Listen to the Podcast on Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers HERE.

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers

Joan-Rivers-br03

 

Yesterday, as a tribute to Joan Rivers, we talked about eating disorders among female baby boomers and how those numbers are rising. If you missed it yesterday you can tune in HERE!

What We Covered:

0:44- Increased Incidents of Eating Disorders among Female Baby Boomers

1:23- Male Eating Disorder Statistics

2:06- Joan Rivers Eating Disorder Background

3:00- The connection of the Biological Level and Psychological Level between Obesity and Eating Disorders

4:00- Why Food Pollution causes Disordered Eating

6:34- Pressures Facing Women 50+

8:37- Body Image Dissatisfaction in midlife has increased

9:55- What role does Obesity play in the rise of Eating Disorders?

11:55- National Eating Disorder Association Statistics

14:45- John Hopkins Mood Disorder Clinic Study

18:47- Most Important Signs of having an Eating Disorder

22:50- What Mental Healthcare and Medical Professionals Need

26:41- Autoimmune Disorders

28:18- Maji & Mongo Books

Links We Discussed

Eating Disorder Survey

Maji and Mongo Book Series

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: September 30 – October 7 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 30 – October 7 2013!”

Binge Eating Twice as Common as Bulimia [Study] – Women who binge eat are less likely to get married while men who binge eat are more likely to struggle with finding — and keeping — a job, says a new study in the Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences journal. The study shows both men and women, however, will experience long-lasting effects, such as depression, on par with those living with bulimia. People who struggle with binge eating are also more likely to experience more days where they’re unable to work or participate in regular activities. Learn More.

Heart Doctors Call for Help for Severely Obese Kids – Rates of overweight and obesity in U.S. children and teens may be leveling off, but kids at the extreme – the severely obese – are still swelling in numbers and need attention, according to a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA). Learn More.

New York Times Reporter Michael Moss Talks About Food Addiction – “We can reduce our addiction to salt, fat and sugar,” New York Times reporter Michael Moss said Thursday. Moss was the first speaker in the 2013 Springfield Public Forum speakers series held at Springfield Symphony Hall. “I would encourage people to do simple cooking,” Moss added, and rely less on ready made convenience foods from the supermarket. Learn More.

The High Fructose Corn Syrup Addiction – Yes, a teaspoon of sugar may help the medicine go down. Take 12 and it is a good bet that you are on the road to needing more medicine. The average American consumes about 12 teaspoons of high fructose corn syrup daily. That’s nearly 55 pounds per year! Learn More.

Researchers Discover Brain Circuit that Controls Overeating – When a particular circuit in the brain is stimulated, it causes mice to voraciously gorge on food even though they are well fed, and deactivating this circuit keeps starving mice from eating, a new study shows. The findings suggest that a breakdown within this neural network could contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors, the researchers said, although more work is needed to see whether the findings are also true of people. Learn More.

Readers Beware: Hidden GMO Ingredient Found in Cheese, Even from Grass-Fed Cows – Many people enjoy cheese, but its getting harder to find high-quality GMO-free cheeses. As many readers already know, most dairy cows are fed GMO feed, but what few people may know is that even cheese derived from grass-fed cows may be contaminated with GMOs. Learn More.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: How Eating Disorders are Changing with Maria Rago

Dr. Maria Rago

Join us on TUESDAY July 23 at 7 pm EST as we talk with Dr. Maria Rago, Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) and clinical director and founder of Rago and Associates Counseling Services. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE.

“Dr. Maria Rago is a licensed clinical psychologist for the last 20 years working as a specialist in eating disorders. She was clinical director of the Eating Disorders Program at Linden Oaks hospital at Edwards in Naperville IL for over 10 years, helping to make the program a national leader, including the creation of the innovative Arabella House, a residential group home for eating disorders treatment. Dr. Rago is also the founder of Rago & Associates Counseling Services, specializing in eating disorders and other important issues that people need help with. Dr. Rago loves to travel across the country to speak to college students and other groups about loving their body and eating without fear, and she is the author of, a book that speaks out against the literature that promotes restrictive eating and acceptance for only the thin. Dr. Rago is also proud to be the Executive Vice President of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) the nation’s first eating disorders foundation, created in 1976.”

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Diabulimia – Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri


Diabulimia - Dr. Goebel-Fabbri

Join us tomorrow March 5 at 7 pm as we talk to Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri about Diabulimia! We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494 or by email (drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com). For more information on Diabulimia be sure to read this article we posted last week! Here’s some background information about Dr. Goebel-Fabbri from the Joslin Diabetes Center:

Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist at Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her role at Joslin integrates teaching, research and treatment focused on disordered eating behaviors in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Her work covers the spectrum of eating problems from food and insulin restriction to binge eating and obesity.

Dr Goebel-Fabbri has lectured at local and national academic conferences and presented her work in peer-reviewed journals. She is involved in NIH-funded multi-center clinical research focused on non-surgical weight loss strategies for improved health outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

Women with type 1 diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop an eating disorder as the general public. The symptoms of eating disorders specific to this population include insulin omission and insulin underdosing (skipping or reducing necessary insulin injections to control weight).

Research indicates that insulin omission and reduction increase the risk of long-term microvascular and macrovascular medical complications of diabetes—such as nerve damage, kidney disease, cardiac disease and eye disease—and may also increase mortality rates.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the relationship between diabetes and eating disorders. In her own studies and in collaboration with others, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri seeks to better understand how eating disorders affect long-term medical complications in women with diabetes and what types of interventions might help improve health outcomes in these high-risk patients.

In collaboration with Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N., Dr. Goebel-Fabbri completed a 12-year follow-up of a cohort of 470 female Joslin patients with type 1 diabetes. This study investigates the natural course of insulin omission and underdosing as a means of weight loss over time.

The study also examines how these behaviors affect psychological and functional health, quality of life, diabetes-related distress, diagnoses of eating disorders and long-term complications of diabetes.

In the future, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri hopes to undertake a treatment outcome study to determine whether interventions specifically tailored to treat issues related to insulin omission and other eating disorders in women with type 1 diabetes can improve overall health outcomes in this population.

People with type 2 diabetes also appear to be at higher risk of developing eating disorders, particularly binge eating. It remains unclear whether the binge eating leads to weight gain and type 2 diabetes, or if events occur in another order. Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is the chief psychologist for WhyWAIT, a Joslin program created expressly to address the unique weight-management needs of people with type 2 diabetes. A multidisciplinary clinical research team is studying the effectiveness of this program for delivery in routine diabetes care.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri serves as the Behavioral Consultant to the Joslin team of the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study, a multicenterclinical trial, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), that examines the impact of weight loss and physical activity on cardiac outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes.

She is also the supervising Behavioral Psychologist to the Joslin team of the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study, a multicenter research trial funded by NIDDK. This project aims to improve medical and behavioral treatments for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes: The Slender Trap – Lauren Lazar Stern

In this weeks episode we talked with Lauren Lazar Stern, author of The Slender Trap. We had a great talk about the use of art therapy in the treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, obesity, and binge eating disorder (BED).

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In this episode we covered:

7:00 – About Lauren Lazar Stern
8:10 – How Lauren Lazar Stern got started in the field of treating eating disorders
11:44 – What is “The Slender Trap”?
20:12 – What does an art therapy session for an individual with an eating disorder typically involve?
22:00 – Some patients tell me that they have had a negative experience with art therapy in residential treatment. Why would this be?
26:38 – What is more powerful, individual art therapy or group art therapy?
28:40 – What is the Expressive Arts Method?
30:33 – Caller Question – Is art therapy effective for obese patients? Do you have to be artistic to benefit from art therapy?
32:00 – Is art therapy something that patients just practive in their therapy sessions? Or do they practice it between sessions?
37:33 – When working with an individual with an eating disorder, do you consider yourself to be doing tradition therapy that integrates art therapy, or is art therapy the primary mode of treatment?
46:06 – Are there any negative aspects of art therapy?
53:45 – What is EMDR?

Links We Discussed

PERSONALIZED, SIGNED COPY of How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
The Norton Center Lifestyle eBook
APA Presentation – The Food Pollution/Addiction Model for Treating Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Systems Approach
The Benefits of Coconut Palm Sugar [infographic]
iTherapy
Lauren Lazar Stern’s Official Website
The Slender Trap by Lauren Lazar Stern
The Healing Memory Project

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Show Notes – Food Addiction with Dr. Vera Tarman

In this weeks episode we talked with addictions specialist Dr. Vera Tarman of addictionsunplugged.com. We talked about the science behind food addiction!

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In this episode we covered:

3:40 – About Dr. Tarman
4:45 – What is food addiction? How did you becomes interested in becoming a specialist in food addiction?
6:38 – What are the signs that someone is a food addict?
11:38 – Is there a relationship between food addiction, obesity, and/or eating disorders?
13:50 – There’s an article on your blog entitled “Are we dieting ourselves into obesity?”. What do you mean by this?
20:10 – What impact does food addiction have on recovery from drug and alcohol addiction?
21:55 – Caller Question – What does an addiction-free diet look like?
33:10 – What is the three-part brain model?
36:39 – What role do dopamine, seratonin, and endorphins play in food addiction? What are symptoms of low neurochemical levels?
42:05 – What is the most successful treatment for food addiction?

Links We Discussed

Addictions Unplugged
Anorexia, Addiction, and the Three-Part Brain Model
How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com | amazon.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
Dangerous Liaisons: Comfort and Food – Understanding Food Addiction DVD

 

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Food Pollution: Eating Disorders and Obesity

photo used under a creative commons license

In this week’s episode we discussed the effects of Food Pollution on Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

5:25 – The Systems Involved in Regulation of Appetite, Fat Storage, Weight Loss, Weight Gain, and Food Addiction
6:10 – What is Leptin?
6:24 – White Adipose Tissue (WAT) and Triglycerides
9:07 – The Effects of Food Pollution on the Weight Management System
10:57 – The Starvation Hormone – Leptin
11:40 – What drives Leptin Levels?
12:56 – Leptin Resistance
13:50 – Caller Question – How can I find out what my leptin levels are?
17:00 – Leptin Resistance
19:00 – The Effects of Food Additives and GMOs on Leptin
20:28 – Leptin and Anorexia
21:22 – The Effects of Anorexia and Obesity on the Endocrine System
22:46 – Cortisol
24:02 – Leptin and Anorexia
25:14 – Ghrelin: The Hunger Hormone
27:45 – Anorexia and Ghrelin – The Effects of High Ghrelin Levels on Treatment
30:44 – Bulimia and Ghrelin
32:10 – Obesity and Ghrelin
32:40 – Neuropeptide YY (PYY)
34:10 – Obesity and PYY
35:37 – PYY and Mood
35:55 – Regulating PYY through Diet and Exercise
38:55 – How to Regulate Leptin Levels

Links We Discussed
Leptin
Ghrelin
Peptide YY

Show Summary

The Weight Management System

In order to understand the role that food additives, genetically engineered organisms (GE’s), sweeteners, and neurotoxins play in the current epidemic of obesity and ED’s we must first understand the systems involved in appetite/hunger, fat storage, weight loss/gain and food addictions. There are three primary hormones involved in appetite/hunger regulation: Leptin, Ghrelin, Peptide YY.

Leptin

Leptin, which is a peptide hormone, was discovered by scientists in 1994. It is found in gastric tissue and placenta but is most abundant in white adipose tissue (WAT) otherwise known as body fat. WAT is composed mainly of adipocytes (fat cells) that store energy in the form of triglycerides during times of nutritional abundance. During times of nutritional deprivation, fat cells release the triglycerides (fat) into the blood stream to provide energy for the body. If there is too much fat in the form of triglycerides, it is stored in different places, such as the hips or belly, in case it is needed later. It also accumulates in the arteries, causing coronary artery disease.

In general, the amount of WAT, or body fat, is determined by the balance between energy intake and energy output. While it is partly influenced by genetic factors, it is driven primarily by environmental factors, such as the amount and/or type of food eaten.

It is damaged by food additives that are neurotoxic or addictive and by environmental carcinogens and obesegens.
Under normal conditions, this system is carefully regulated so that WAT mass remains constant and close to a well defined ‘set point’ for each individual. The set point, which is designed to keep the body at a healthy weight, is part of a feedback loop that maintain homeostasis.

Disruptions of this steady state that are caused by damage to the systems involved, can lead to chronic decreases or increases in the quantity of WAT mass. Decreased amounts of WAT are associated with periods of dieting, malnutrition, as in the case of ED’s, Anorexia. During these periods, the healthy body sends a message to the brain to increase food intake and decrease energy output. Increased amounts of WAT are present with obesity. Under these conditions, leptin sends a message to the brain to inhibit food intake and increase energy expenditure. In this sense, leptin acts as a long-term regulator of optimal body weight. It has been dubbed the “starvation hormone” because it’s primary function is to keep us from eating too little or exerting too much, and thus avoid starving to death.

Leptin levels are driven by the amount of adipose tissue one has under normal conditions. While the system works well to keep weight at optimal levels, it becomes less and less effective the more (or in the case of Anorexia, the less) adipose tissue there is. In the case of excess weight, the farther one is from the optimum, or set point, the stronger the signal to decrease food intake and increase energy output.

However, there appears to be a threshold for leptin levels, such that when they get too high or remain too high for too long, the brain no longer registers or recognizes them. This is called Leptin resistance, and it’s very much like insulin resistance. When this happens, the brain no longer senses changes in leptin levels. Instead, it perceives, that the body is in a state of starvation.

As a result, the individual experiences the need to increase food intake and decrease energy expenditure, regardless of how much excess fat they actually have on board. This causes more weight gain, and more adipose tissue, which results in more Leptin resistance, which in turn results in more weight gain. This is an example of a classic vicious cycle.

In the case of Anorexia, leptin levels are too low, due to the lack of WAT or fat cells, so that the individual is leptin deficient. The message from the brain is the same as it was for the obese patient that was leptin resistant, eat more, exert less, but for a different reason. In this case, the individual actually is starving to death. Unfortunately, in the case of the Anorexic individual, whose fear of gaining weight is overwhelming, the response to feeling hungry is to eat even less, causing more weight loss, which triggers more hunger which leads to more fear, and we have another vicious cycle.

Fasting, food intake, exercising, awakening, and psychosocial stressors cause the body to release cortisol. Cortisol is released in a highly irregular manner with peak secretion in the early morning, which then tapers out in the late afternoon and evening. Energy regulation and mobilization are two critical functions of cortisol. Cortisol regulates energy by selecting the right type and amount of substrate (carbohydrate, fat or protein) that is needed by the body to meet the physiological demands that is placed upon it. Cortisol mobilizes energy by tapping into the body’s fat stores (in the form of triglycerides) and moving it from one location to another, or delivering it to hungry tissues such as working muscle. Under stressful conditions, cortisol can provide the body with protein for energy production through gluconeogenesis, the process of converting amino acids into useable carbohydrate (glucose) in the liver.

Additionally, it can move fat from storage depots and relocate it to fat cell deposits deep in the abdomen. Cortisol also aids adipocytes (baby fat cells) to grow up into mature fat cells. Finally, cortisol may act as an anti-inflammatory agent, suppressing the immune system during times of physical and psychological stress. The implications are that when you are stressed, you store more belly fat and are more susceptible to disease because your immune system is on vacation.

Leptin levels can also be high for individuals with anorexia. However, in this case it is because triglyceride levels are too high due to liver damage and/or anorexia-induced hormone disruptions.

Ghrelin

Ghrelin, discovered in 1999 by scientists, is known as “the hunger hormone”. Produced in the stomach and pancreas, Ghrelin stimulates the appetite for the purpose of increasing the intake of food and promoting the storage of fat. When Ghrelin levels are high, we feel hungry. After we eat, Ghrelin levels fall and we feel satisfied.

Leptin and Ghrelin have a “teeter-totter” relationship. When leptin levels rise, ghrelin levels fall. Likewise, when ghrelin levels rise, leptin levels fall.

Whereas leptin acts as a long-term regulator of body weight, Ghrelin, on the other hand, is a fast-acting hormone that operates as a meal-initiation signal for short-term regulation of energy balance. There are distinct abnormalities in the production of Ghrelin among obese and eating disordered individuals. Part of the problem may be high levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, which is often seen with very low leptin levels. of Chronic stimulation is seen in clinical scenarios with chronic high cortisol levels and very low leptin levels. The more improper signaling that occurs, the more the incretin hormones agouti and ghrelin become disconnected from their master controller, leptin. The gasoline for this reaction is a chronic elevated cortisol. The longer it occurs, the more these abnormal signals are wired for in the person’s brain. This is what makes their treatment so difficult.

Those with anorexia tend to have high levels of ghrelin, which causes them to feel hungry. The sense of hunger is an extremely frightening feeling for most individuals suffering from Anorexia. So much so that they believe that they will never be able to relate normally to food, fearing that once they start eating they will never be able to stop. However, Grehlin levels normalize with weight restoration in individuals that refeed on a clean diet. For those that refeed using traditional refeeding protocols, Grehlin levels are likely to worsen as are Leptin levels. The result is increases hunger, increased fear and more restricting.

Among those with bulimia, Ghrelin does not respond as strongly when food is eaten, which could contribute to binge eating as the individual suffering from Bulimia does not “get full” even if they have overeaten. In the past, the assumption has been that there may be a predisposition in the Bulimic individual that “causes” this reactio and drives this disorder. However, it is possible that the toxins found in most of the foods in the U.S. may be changing brain chemistry in such a way that drives Bulimia.

Obese individuals tend to have low levels of Ghrelin, probably because they are Leptin Resistant, since Leptin and Ghrelin are inversely related. Research also shows that Ghrelin levels are higher after an individual loses weight, causing an increase in appetite, which may make it even more difficult to maintain weight loss for obese individuals.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released.

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

1. Eat a balanced diet. Be sure to eat foods that are high in protein, and remember to consume organic fruits vegetables. Even though you are resistant to leptin, you should still consume the proper nutrients.

2. Eat six time a day, on a schedule. If you have leptin resistance, you do not realize when you have eaten enough. To overcome this problem, create a set schedule of when to eat. It is best to have three meals each day. You should eat in the morning, the afternoon and the evening.

3. Create a food diary. In order to organize your schedule, create a food diary of the three meals and three snacks each day and the foods you will have during those meals. This method will help you to make sure that you are consuming a variety of foods. Also, by organizing your meals, you can make sure that you are not consuming an excess of food at a given meal.

4. Do not eat late at night. After you have your evening meal, do not eat anything else. If you eat before bedtime, you will feel uncomfortable, and any excess fat will have a less likely chance of being burned.

5. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you to improve your metabolism, as well as increase your energy. To keep track of your exercise routine, write down the time of day that you will exercise on your schedule.

6. Understand the role of protein tyrosine phosphates 1B, or PTP 1B, in leptin resistance. When PTP 1B is expressed to a high extent, it blocks the signaling of leptin. A possible way to overcome leptin resistance is to inhibit the PTP 1B. Talk to your doctor about the progress of this research.

7. Learn what is happening in your body. If you are leptin resistant, your own body is essentially sabotaging your efforts at weight control. In the first place, your brain is not receiving signals to cease eating when fat stores accumulate, and you’ll find yourself hungry despite knowing rationally that you should be full. To balance your body’s chemistry, you’ll need to regulate yourself mentally since your body can’t do it for you. This will take consistent determination and will power.

8. Exercise even when your body tells you to quit. When the body becomes leptin resistant, it becomes accustomed to high levels of the chemical in the blood. A little weight loss can trigger a decrease in leptin, making your appetite larger and affecting your metabolism negatively. Even though the body has plenty of fat stores to burn, the muscles cease to do so in response to decreasing leptin. You may not see results quickly because of this, and you may find yourself particularly exhausted by exercise. Do it anyway, because you can’t correct leptin resistance without reaching a healthy weight.

9. Take irvingia gabonensis supplements. Irvingia gabonensis is a plant species whose fruit has been shown in medical studies to correct leptin resistance. In fact, one study showed that individuals taking 150 mg of the supplement twice a day showed marked improvements in body composition after just 10 weeks. This natural supplement is not thought to have any side effects, although longitudinal studies are ongoing.

10. Work with a trainer or accountability partner. The hardest part of overcoming leptin resistance is that you go through the rigors of exercise and the self-discipline of a healthy diet without any encouragement from your body. You’ll probably feel tired and hungry on a frustratingly frequent basis. Until you have reached and maintained a healthy weight, though, your body will never regain the ability to function properly with regard to body composition. Having a consistent ally in your pursuit will help you stay strong in the lowest points when your brain is receiving signals to eat more and exercise less in response to decreasing leptin in the blood. The fight will be hard, but overcoming these signals will help you live a longer, more fulfilling life.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Nov 12-21

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 12-November 21 2012!”

Rising obesity strains Europe’s shrinking health budgets

“Exposure” to U.S. may raise immigrants’ obesity risk

Big rise in Americans with diabetes, especially in South

Pepsi Launches Fat Blocking Soft Drink in Japan

GMO Giant Finally Found Guilty!- French Court Rules Against Monsanto in groundbreaking, chemical poisoning case

New Bulimia Treatment Developed

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Effects of Macronutrient Intake on Binge Eating and Satiety in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder

Macronutrient Ratios

Photo Credit: greggavedon.com – Creative Commons

Research shows that diets that are high in protein may reduce the frequency of binge eating episodes in individuals with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) or Binge Eating Disorder (BED).

Eighteen women with Bulimia Nervosa or Binge Eating Disorder participated in a five-week study to determine if macronutrient ratio affected the frequency of binge-eating episodes. The study was completed in two phases, one phase was a high-protein phase, one phase was a high-carbohydrate phase; both phases were separated with a one-week “washout” phase. Each participant was provided with a two-week supply of high-protein supplementation, and a two-week supply of high-carbohydrate supplementation. The 280-calorie high-protein supplement contained 75.47% protein, 10.31% carbohydrates, and 14.23% fat; the 280-calorie high-carbohydrate supplement contained 0% protein, 67.3% carbohydrates, and 1.33% fat. The supplements were taken one hour before meals. Participants were required to keep a food diary for the duration of the study.

After each two-week phase, each participant was required to fast overnight and then consumed one 420-calorie supplement of the same composition of the supplement given throughout the phase. Three hours after consuming the supplement, each participant was placed in a private room and presented with a buffet of foods that were typical of both meals and binges. The buffet consisted of a wide variety of foods with varied macronutrient ratios; examples include cheese, cake, cookies, bread, potato chips, ice cream, fruit, vegetables, meat, eggs, fish, beans, and peanut butter.

Upon completion of the study, it was determined that the frequency of binge eating episodes were 62% lower during the high-protein phase than during the high-carbohydrate phase. Three hours after high-protein supplementation, participants reported a greater sense of fullness and a reduced sense of hunger; they also consumed 21% less food than they did during the high-carbohydrate phase. It was also noted that participants gained a significant amount of body weight during the high-carbohydrate phase, while body weight during the high-protein phase was stable. The researchers hypothesize that a diet high in protein may protect both eating disordered individuals and non-eating disordered individuals from overeating or binge-eating.

Why did the episodes of binge-eating decrease during the high-protein phase? The researchers believe that when participants consumed the high-protein supplement there was an increased release of the satiety agents CCK and glucagon. When CCK and glucagon is increased, satiety signals are improved or restored. When this occurs, participants were less likely to binge on high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods. By not binge eating on high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods there was inherently an increased proportion of protein in the participant’s diet.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Source:

Latner, J.D., Wilson, G.T., (2004), Binge Eating and Satiety in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder: Effects of Macronutrient Intake, Int J Eat Disord 2004 Dec;36(4):402-15.

The Science Behind Overeating

Many of my clients and readers who are seeking treatment for Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, or Bulimia ask the question “Why do I overeat?” There are numerous factors that drive us to overeat. But first let’s identify the five main types of overeating; compulsive overeating, impulsive overeating, impulsive-compulsive overeating, anxious overeating and emotional overeating. The following are possible causes, and ways to decrease the tendency to overeat.

The Science Behind Overeating

Compulsive Overeating

Compulsive Overeaters tend to obsess over food and are compelled to eat with very little self-control. The condition characterized by low serotonin in the brain, which causes the portion of the brain known as the Anterior Cingulate Gyrus to overwork. The Anterior Cingulate Gyrus is the portion of the brain that is responsible for allowing us to move from thought to thought, co-operate, and see errors; it’s the brain’s gear-shifter. An overactive anterior cingulate gyrus can be caused by genetics, emotional trauma, or poor diet.

Your serotonin levels may be too low if you get thoughts stuck in your head, you worry excessively, you are easily upset, you obsess over food, or you tend to be a night time eater. Serotonin can be raised through aerobic exercise, and supplements (5HTP, saffron, inositol, vitamin B6).

Impulsive Overeating

Impulsive Overeaters often have good intentions when it comes to eating good foods, but have a hard time controlling urges when they see a not-so-healthy food.

Impulsive Overeating is characterized by low dopamine in the brain. Low dopamine decreases the function of the portion of the brain known as Pre-Frontal Cortex. The Pre-Frontal Cortex is the front third of the brain, responsible for allowing us to focus, control impulses, to be emotional organizers and planners, be empathetic and insightful, and to learn from our mistakes. You can think of it as the “then what?” part of your brain; if I eat this, then what will happen? If I say this, then what will happen?

When the function of the Pre-Frontal Cortex is decreased (either through injury or a condition like ADD), it makes it very difficult to think ahead, to focus, etc. Functionality of the Pre-Frontal Cortex is improved by raising dopamine levels. Dopamine may be raised through aerobic exercise and supplements (L-tyrosine, green tea extract, ginseng, rhodiola).

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeaters constantly think about food and have a difficult time controlling themselves around food. This condition is characterized by low dopamine and serotonin. Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating is commonly seen in those suffering from eating disorders, as well as children and grandchildren of alcoholics.

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating can be improved by increasing both dopamine and serotonin. This can be accomplished through aerobic exercise and supplements (5HTP and L-Tyrosine in the right proportions).

Anxious Overeating

Anxious Overeaters typically use food in an attempt to alleviate feelings of anxiety and fear.

Anxious Overeating is common in those with overactive Basal Ganglia. The Basal Ganglia is a large collection of cells that are located deep within the brain. It’s the portion of the brain that integrates thought with movement; clapping our hands when we’re excited, jumping when we’re frightened.

Symptoms of overactive Basal Ganglia include anxiety, nervousness, tension, the tendency to predict the worst, the tendency to use food as a way to medicate, and physical symptoms of stress (headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome etc). Functionality of the Basal Ganglia can be improved through hypnosis, meditation, learning to correct negative thinking patterns, limiting alcohol and caffeine consumption, assertiveness training, and supplements (gaba and magnesium).

Emotional Overeating

Emotional Overeaters tend to use food to alleviate feelings of negativity and hopelessness.

Emotional Overeating is characterized by low levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in the brain. Low levels of these neurotransmitters cause the Deep Limbic System to become overactive. The Deep Limbic System sets our emotional tone; when it’s working at a normal level we tend to be more hopeful and positive.

You may have low levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine if you experience a lot of negative thoughts, are sad or depressed, have trouble sleeping, and/or experience a lack of motivation. These neurotransmitters can be increased though aerobic exercise, learning to replace automatic negative thoughts with healing, rational thinking, and supplements (fish oil, DHEA, S-adenosyl methionine aka SAMe).

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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Sources:

KNOW YOUR BRAIN: One Size Does Not Fit Everyone — Targeted Interventions Just For You

Amen, D. G., & M.D., F. (2012). Change your brain, change your body, use your brain to get and keep the body you have always wanted. Three Rivers Press.

News You Can Use – July 22-29 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 22-29 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity and Our Food Supply

Fooducate

I was recently asked by the folks at Fooducate to write an article for their blog readers about how eating real (clean) food helps those with eating disorders overcome their challenges. It was such an honor to be able to share my work with their readers!

Be sure to visit the Fooducate blog to read my article “The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity and Our Food Supply

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. To view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles, use the search feature to search on the topic of your choice.”

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
//news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
//jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
//www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
//www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
//www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
//ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens – Part II

Whole Foods

As discussed yesterday in the first installment of “What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens“, Whole Foods Market is taking steps to make us more aware of products containing obesogens. Yesterday, we discussed their use of obesogen-free take-out containers, and changes that are being made in their “Cleaning Supply Aisle”. What else is Whole Foods Market doing?

Whole Foods Market is also helping us make more informed choices when it comes to personal care products. They clearly label products that they have rated “premium” or “organic” body products. All of these products had to meet a strict set of criteria, set by Whole Foods Market. They have banned the use of over 400 chemicals in the personal care products they sell. Whole Foods implemented this rating system because there are few government standards set in regards to what the word “natural” means when it came to body care products.

◦ “Premium Body Care Products” do not contain parabens, polyproylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, sodium lauryl sulfates or sodium laureth sulfates. The only permissable “fragrances” will be those made from “natural essential oils” and “components of natural essential oils”.

◦ “Organic Body Care Products” will meet all the requirements of “Personal Body Care Products”, but will also be required to meet other standards. These products are the highest quality products available.

▪ If a company labels their product “organic”, the product must contain at least 95% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a company claims their product is “Made with Organic X”, the product must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a product is labeled “Contains Organic X”, the products must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet NSF/ANSI 305 standards

Whole Foods Market is making many positive advances in their product packaging. According to their website, they have done more than any US retailer when it comes to keeping the customer informed and taking the actions needed to find safe packaging alternatives. Some of the advances they have made include:

◦ They use Polyethylene Terephthalate (PETE) in packaging for their ‘private label’ products, when possible. PETE is a plastic that is not known to leach any carcinogenic or hormone- disruptive chemicals.

◦ They have banned child cups, baby bottles, and individual refillable water bottles that are made of polycarbonate plastic.

◦ When there are safe alternatives to packaging containing BPA, Whole Foods Market uses that alternative.

◦ They are putting pressure on their current suppliers to switch to BPA-free packaging.

It doesn’t stop here! Whole Foods Market is continually doing research to do everything they can to go completely BPA free. They hear us when we tell them we are concerned about the use of BPA, they are on our side. I feel relief that they are thoroughly investigating all of their options, instead of making an uneducated change.

The standards set by Whole Foods Market are helping us make more informed purchases. They are allowing our voices to be heard in telling the industry that we want full disclosure of the substances that we are allowing in our households, that we want non-toxic cleaning products!

Sources:

Whole Foods Market – Products (//wholefoodsmarket.com/products/)

Inhabitat – EATware Compostable Food Containers (//inhabitat.com/compostable-containers-by-eatware/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What You Need to Know In Order to Help Your Obese or ED Patient

Eating Disorder Research

photo used under creative commons license


Research has clearly established a relationship between neurotoxins such as MSG, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sweeteners Splenda and NutraSweet and the current epidemic of obesity. I believe that there is also a relationship between these neurotoxins and the proliferation of eating disorders in the US. For example, research has shown that patients suffering from Anorexia as well as those who are obese, suffer from a condition called leptin resistance.
1 ,2 Further, this condition appears to be a function of the type and amount of neurotoxin ingested. In my practice, when I have helped those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, and Bulimarexia and obesity eliminate such neurotoxins from their re-feeding regimens, recovery time has shortened and the likelihood of relapse has decreased significantly. (I am in the process of publishing these anecdotal results and have also applied for several grants to research this relationship experimentally in greater depth.)

Treatment of obesity and eating disorders is negatively impacted for the uninformed treating professional i.e. re-feeding is a nightmare for those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder and Obesity when the role of these neurotoxins is not taken into consideration. Thus, to the degree that their impact on the eating habits of individuals suffering from ED’s and obesity is not understood, or worse, ignored, treatment is less likely to succeed, and in many cases, more likely to make the problem worse. For help on refeeding contact me directly. Also check out all of the blog articles on this site. 3

For the past 40 years food additives, known to have neurotoxic effects, especially in children, have been added to the American food supply because they were profitable. These additives include MSG, sweeteners Aspartame and Aceulfame, (Splenda and NutraSweet) growth-enhancing hormones, and pesticides that are incorporated into the DNA of crops like soybeans. The amount of these neurotoxins added to our food has increased enormously since their introduction. For example, since 1948 the amount of MSG doubled every decade. By 1972 over 262,000 metric tons were being added. (Whetsell, 1993)[1] Today it is impossible to determine the actual amounts of the various neurotoxins that are added to the U.S. food supply, as the additives are effectively unregulated by the FDA or any other regulatory agency. As a result, they can be added in ways which make them difficult, if not impossible, to quantify.

Besides being difficult to quantify, the additives are very difficult for the average consumer to identify, as they can be called such innocuous names as “citric acid” “malted barley” and “natural flavoring”! Even for individuals who are well-informed, and therefore know what to look for, it is still a daunting task to try and avoid them. Presently, they are in 90 to 95% of all packaged, bottled, and/or processed foods, including organic and/or foods that are marketed as “healthier” choices.

Perhaps the most alarming issue is that food manufacturers target children’s foods for inclusion of these additives. In the U.S. to day, 1 in 3 children are obese. Many will remain that way for life. We are one of the only countries in the world to have children who suffer from Type II Diabetes, which heretofore has been a disorder of middle adulthood. The connection between childhood obesity and an eating disorder such as Anorexia, for example, is that a history of premorbid obesity increases the risk of the development and decreases the likelihood of recovery from the disorder.

1 J Lab Clin Med. 2002 Feb;139(2):72-9.Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation.

2 Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental [1997, 46(12):1384-9]Neuropeptide Y, galanin, and leptin release in obese women and in women with anorexia nervosa.

3 Other resources: //dorway.com/ //www.drkaslow.com/html/leptin_and_amylose.html www.msgtruth.org/obesity.htm

 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Survey Results – The Positive Effects of Residential Treatment For Eating Disorders Are Minimal!

Eating Disorders Survey

photo used under a creative commons license

In analyzing the current results from my survey regarding the effects residential treatment has had on individuals taking the survey, only 16% acknowledged that residential treatment had a positive impact on their disorder. Over half of the respondents said that minimal changes resulted from residential treatment, and that, “my relationship with food did not improve during or after treatment and I still have the same symptoms.” Finally, a whopping 70% (combining the last four categories) stated that their eating disorder either worsened or that they developed another eating disorder after receiving residential treatment!

If you have not yet taken the survey please do!

*These results are based upon 260 responses.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Connection Between Leptin Levels and Eating Disorders

Leptin

image used under a creative commons license

Recently the Division of Endocrinology at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine performed a study on the connection between Leptin levels and eating disorders. Leptin is a peptide hormone neurotransmitter produced by fat cells and involved in the regulation of appetite. It signals your brain when you’ve eaten enough and stimulates you to burn more calories. In order to span a full range of human body weights for their investigation, the analysts, examined serum leptin levels in anorexic, bulimic, obese, and control individuals.

Compared to the analysis generated from non-anorexic patients, patients with anorexia nervosa were found to have much higher serum leptin levels values. In effect, having leptin levels so high is contributory to a blunted physiologic response to being underweight and consequently builds resistance to dietary treatment. Simply put, they have too many of these leptin hormones being sent to the brain that are saying, “You are full.” Therefore, anorexic patients repel the need to consume enough of the nutrients their body realistically needs to function properly.

On the other hand, what this study found in bulimic patients when compared to non-bulimic patients is the opposite effect. Bulimic patients were found to have much lower leptin levels. This deficiency of leptin hormones is usually caused by a form of Leptin resistance and this contributes to the patients food-craving behavior. The Leptin resistance found in most bulimic patients comes from a chemical surge located in the pleasure center of our brain. This chemical surge overrules leptin’s messages that are trying to tell the bulimic patient “your tank is full.” So in other words, there is a chemical battle going on inside a bulimic patients brain. The leptin hormones are trying to tell the defense to kick in and protect them against overeating but at the same time, in a much louder voice, the pleasure center of the brain is saying, “No! Pass those cookies this-a-way.”

When examining leptin levels in most obese people, it was found that they actually have high leptin levels. However, their bodies usually cannot respond to these leptin hormones because they have another form of leptin resistance. Instead of leptin messages being rejected and overruled by the pleasure center of the brain (like the type of resistance indicated in most bulimic patients), obese patients cells’ have completely stopped accepting leptin messages all together. Therefore, they do not receive any message from their leptin hormones that would be telling them to stop eating.

Essentially, regulating your leptin levels and defeating leptin resistance plays a large role in overcoming an eating disorder. Foods that are high in sugar or additives such as high fructose corn syrup and MSG should be avoided because these ingredients excited the pleasure center of your brain making it much more difficult to respond to your leptin hormones. So basically, the more foods you consume with these ingredients, the louder the voice saying, “Pass those cookies this-a-way,” will become and the softer the voice saying, “You are full!” will become. Also, your cells become more sensitive and responsive to leptin when you exercise and build muscle!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

The National Center for Biotechnology Information – Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation (//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11919545)

 

Grocery Shopping – Simple Task or Time Consuming Nightmare?

grocery shopping eating disorder anxiety

I don’t know of many people who actually enjoy the mundane task of going grocery shopping but for those who suffer from an eating disorder it can be an absolute nightmare. For them going to the grocery can be time consuming, mentally exhausting and costly. Check the results we collected from Dr. Norton’s Online Survey concerning grocery shopping.

  • 75.2% debate whether or not to purchase each particular item
  • 44.4% find themselves fantasizing about binging on certain foods while grocery shopping
  • 30.1% spend more than they can afford on food

These statistics, which are from a sample of over 125 respondents, are good examples of why Dr. Norton provides the service of shopping coach.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

BULIMAREXIA, DID YOU KNOW?

Bulimarexia Treatment Cincinnati

BULIMAREXIA – An eating disorder that has the characteristics of both Anorexia and Bulimia. The person affected by this disorder will cycle between the restricting habits that are associated with Anorexia and the bingeing and purging characteristics of Bulimia. This eating disorder is very dangerous and is physically and emotionally damaging.

After reviewing the data from Dr. Norton’s online survey we found that Bulimarexia had the largest population of those who took the survey.

  • 38% identified themselves as having Bulimarexia
  • 25% identified themselves as having Anorexia
  • 12.5% identified themselves as having Bulimia
  • 10.8% identified themselves as Emotional Eaters
  • 13.3% identified themselves as Obese

Why Bulimarexia Is So Dangerous

1. The fact that it is not a recognized diagnosis yet so many people suffer from it causes a serious problem for the therapist/physician and creates a serious gap in treatment.

2. The cycle of binging and restricting is very dangerous and can cause many serious health problems such as decreased bone density, loss of menses (difficulty conceiving), tooth decay and kidney damage just to name a few.

3. Bulimarexia often goes undetected or thought of as “just a phase”. For example a parent might notice their child’s decreased food intake and some weight loss but just as they start to take notice of this the child cycle’s into the binging component of this disorder. The parent is relieved to see their child eating again and their previous concerns are dismissed.

If you are in the Cincinnati area and are seeking treatment for your eating disorder, whether it be anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or bulimarexia, there is help! You can set up a consultation with me by calling 513.205.6543.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder as Addiction

Refeeding, A Step at a Time

Refeeding, A Step at a Time

Re-feeding: What is Normal?

The central and most difficult issue to be dealt with in the treatment of serious eating disorders is the issue of re-feeding and/or the establishment of a healthy relationship with food. The degree to which the patient can do this determines her success in conquering her disorder. The problem is that “normal” eating is a very complicated phenomenon, let alone the intricacies of re-feeding. This is one of the reasons that the “cure” rate for eating disorders is so low.

In some ways, it is more difficult to treat a severe eating disorder than it is to treat alcoholism or drug addiction. There is no such thing as cold turkey when it comes to eating. We have to eat every day, preferably 5 or 6 times a day. Likewise we cannot avoid the situations that trigger maladaptive eating behavior like the alcoholic or drug addict can do in an attempting to recover from their addictions. We eat for many reasons, under many different circumstances. We eat when we are hungry, not hungry, starving or full. We eat to socialize, to celebrate and to mourn. We eat to reward, nurture or punish ourselves. We eat when we are procrastinating, trying to relax or as part of a “working” breakfast/lunch/or dinner. We eat when we are happy, sad, mad, or for some of us, whenever we feel emotional.

Dieting Doesn’t Work

An equally important part of eating is the whole “not eating” thing, also known as “dieting”. Ninety-five % of US women believe that they are overweight and 65% of the general population diets. The dieting mind-set is so well ingrained in our society that some 5 and 6 year olds are worrying about how many calories and how much fat is in their Lunchables. Indeed, so many people in the US are dieting that it is a 93 billion dollar a year industry. There are hundreds of “diets”, diet workshops and diet programs, the vast majority of which fail. In fact, without exercise, 95% of all diets fail.

So why do so many people do it? We try to lose weight out of fear, vanity, pride or guilt or we may diet to feel stronger, more disciplined, superior and/or healthier, or we may just diet because everyone else seems to be doing it. The combination of being bombarded with advertisements to eat along side strong media pressure to be thin is constant in our culture.

Eating Disorders

All of the above behavior comes under the heading of “normal” eating. For those whose eating problems have risen to the level of a disorder, eating triggers feelings such as euphoria, guilt, shame and intense anxiety. Those suffering from Bulimia or Bulimarexia (restricting, binging and purging or just restricting and purging) engage in mindless eating or bingeing to numb or distract themselves from stressful situations or unhappy thoughts and memories.

Purging by vomiting or abuse of laxatives can last hours, keeping the individual up late into the night or causing her to miss work or school when she cannot resist the impulse to binge and purge during the day. One patient recently described a nightmarish scene in which she could not purge into her toilet because it was broken and so took a chance on using the tub drain as she showered. Unfortunately, the food would not go down that drain either. In horror she continued to vomit into the tub until she was standing in a foot of water thick with vomit. It took her and her mother hours to scoop the vomitous water out with buckets, which they then had to carry to another bathroom and flush down another toilet. The unbelievable part? Though repulsed by the mess, she was astonished and secretly impressed by the amount of vomit that she was able to produce!

Once she has binged (or simply eaten something she is uncomfortable eating) the need to purge is often so compelling that it goes beyond all reason, as in the case above. However this is a temporary “fix”. The purging gives the individual a temporary “high” followed by feelings of guilt and anxiety and a determination not to repeat the experience. Unfortunately this leads to restricting, which eventually leads to bingeing and the cycle begins again.

Sounds like drug and alcohol addiction, doesn’t it? Eating disorders are very much like other addictions, i.e. they are part of a classic addictive cycle. This includes an increase in tension, which the addict believes can only be relieved by the “fix”. In most addictions, relief from the fix is of shorter and shorter duration before the cycle begins again. This is what is known as a very vicious cycle.

Though not as obvious, the individual suffering from Anorexia is also an addict of sorts, i.e. she restricts to overcome feelings of inferiority, helplessness and hopelessness and to make herself feel in control. Often, she can only be proud of herself when she is pushing starvation to the extreme. This is her “fix”. Many of my patients describe the feeling of being able to function or stay alive on as few calories as possible as a “high”. Indeed there is scientific evidence that fasting does cause the release of endorphin’s, which do make us feel good. Not coincidentally, they report to the same part of the brain that drugs and alcohol do.

To summarize, even “normal” eating behavior can be stressful. Disordered eating takes over the individual’s life, much like alcoholism and drug addiction take over the addict’s life, robbing her of her relationships, her independence, her health and in far too many cases, her life. The mortality rate for eating disorders is higher than that of any other psychological disturbance.

Unfortunately, eating disorders are less likely to be understood as addictions, and more likely to elicit a judging stance from the general public, families and even a surprisingly high proportion of treating professionals. It seems as though the more serious the disorder, the more likely it is to be viewed as an attempt at getting attention or being manipulative.

Take, for example, the Cincinnati physician that said to one of our very attractive patients suffering from Bulimarexia, “You’re beautiful and you’re rich. You have it all. You should be counting your blessings. Why would you want to do something as stupid as refusing to eat?”

But the topper might be the psychiatrist that had another very attractive patient stand up at her first appointment so that he could “assess” her physique and make the following brilliant observation “Yup, you have breasts, hips and thighs. In other words you have curves, what’s the problem?” Individuals such as this often view Anorexia and Bulimia or Bulimarexia as vanity issues.

What Causes An Eating Disorder?

The causes are complicated and for most of the people suffering from an eating disorder, not the result of one factor, but many. The well-known causes are societal pressures to be thin, peer pressure, a major set-back at a critical point in the individual’s life, such as a loss or a traumatic event, childhood disturbances and/or dysfunctional family relationships, etc. However, there are also bio-physiological issues that play a significant role, although they tend to be poorly understood.

Many eating disorders are driven by cravings that are part of a classic addictive cycle, which may actually be perpetuated by food industry profits. In the early 70’s, the food industry discovered that high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) was much less expensive than sucrose. This was primarily because it was much sweeter. So, in it went into our foods, everything from baby food to hot dog buns and cigarettes! They ultimately took it out of most of the baby food, but it is still in the cigarettes, just in case cigarettes aren’t addictive enough without the sugar!

In Cincinnati, there are many fast food establishments still using HFCS’s in their buns, including; Arby’s, Blimpie, Burger King, Chick-fil-A, Dairy Queen, Jack in the Box, KFC, McDonald’s, Subway, and Taco Bell. You’re not safe at the Cincinnati Kroger’s either, or any of the major grocery chains for that matter, since it is actually harder to find foods at the supermarket without HFCS’s, than it is to find foods with it. For example, there are no less than 10 teaspoons of HFCS’s in a single 12 once can of soda. Likewise they are found in almost all snacks, dairy products, condiments, canned goods, cereals, bread, even supplements and vitamins. In total, the average American eats 83 pounds of corn syrup a year plus 66 pounds of sucrose, for a total of 149 pounds of refined sugars.

What does that mean in terms of unnecessary weight gain? Well let’s do the math: We have 159,360 calories from the corn syrup, and 102,168 from the sucrose totaling 261,528 calories per year from sugar. If it takes 3500 calories more than you use in a given period of time to gain 1 pound, that means that unless you work it off, you could gain 75 lbs/year from ingesting sugar you don’t need and probably don’t realize you are eating. To avoid gaining weight from the HFCS’s added to processed foods, the average person would have to run a total of 438 hours per year or 8 hours per week. The net/net of all of the above is to avoid processed foods, i.e. if it didn’t have a face (meat, poultry, fish, fowl) or come out of the ground (fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes), think twice about eating it. (The exception would be dairy products, such as yogurt, soft European cheeses, and milk. The lower fat varieties of these foods are very good for you, especially when they are lactose free.)

Sugar and Eating Disorders

Sugar Cubes

photo used under creative commons license

What does HFCS have to do with eating disorders? For starters, sugar has recently been shown to be the main culprit in insulin resistance, which is the precursor to obesity. In this country, obesity has become the nation’s most critical health problem. Ultimately it leads to such chronic diseases as Type II diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. These diseases are threatening to dismantle our entire health care system because of their increased incidence and skyrocketing cost of treatment.

Binge eating, bulimia, and bulimarexia are basically sugar addictions, as most individuals suffering from these disorders binge on simple carb’ s (highly refined foods that are often loaded with HFCS’s). Simple carbohydrates convert to sugar in the blood stream. Research has shown that sugar is as addictive as alcohol and/or cocaine.

Recovery from a food addiction (eating disorder) requires a basic understanding of the addictive nature of food and a commitment to replace the offending food(s) with something equally satisfying but less addictive. Otherwise you find yourself in a perpetual and very vicious cycle of restricting or deprivation (dieting) followed by the onset of withdrawal symptoms (food cravings, obsessive thoughts) a build up of anxiety and behaviors designed to quiet the beast, (bingeing, cutting, compulsive spending, binge drinking) and possibly efforts to compensate (purging with vomiting, excessive exercising, abuse of laxatives and/or diet pills). This leads to guilt and a profound sense of failure, which is followed by renewed determination to stop the cycle by not “eating so much” which is a euphemism for restricting or dieting, at which point the cycle begins again.

Unfortunately, many in an effort to avoid the offending food(s) restrict too much and end up avoiding the foods that could break the cycle, proteins or complex carbohydrates i.e. low fat meats, cheeses and fish or fresh fruits and vegetables. Instead they eat foods that actually contribute to the food addiction and cause the cycle to begin again. For example, so many of my patients avoid all protein because of their fear of fat and eat simple carbs, like pretzels or diet soft drinks when they are in restricting, dieting or “being good”. Or worse, they eat candy that has no fat, like jellybeans, thinking that this is a safer snack than a piece of chocolate or a handful of nuts. The chocolate, especially if it’s dark chocolate, does have some fat, but it has fewer sugars than a bag of jellybeans and, because it is dark chocolate, it has antioxidants. And the nuts have a good deal of fiber, which means that they usually have a glycemic load of 0. (This means that they do not enter the blood stream as a sugar and therefore do not contribute to a sugar addiction, which is the primary culprit in the weight gain that leads to obesity).

The jelly beans, on the other hand, and even the diet drink, make the problem much worse because they enter the blood stream almost immediately as glucose, adding to the sugar addiction, which in turn drives more binging behavior. They also have dyes and additives and no nutritional value. The real kicker however, is the long term negative impact that carb loading followed by purging or restricting has on ones’ metabolism, i.e. it slows it down to such a degree that it is almost impossible for the individual suffering from bulimia to eat normally without gaining weight. Until she understands which foods and supplements will stimulate her metabolism instead of suppressing it, she is stuck in this terrible self-perpetuating vicious cycle.

Once she understands how delicious real food can be and how much more of it she can eat without fear of gaining weight if she is exercising and supplementing, she has begun the journey toward a healthy relationship with food and the end of her eating disorder. But this requires courage, patience and lot’s of support from family, friends and allied professionals.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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ADHD and Incidence of Eating Disorders

ADHD and eating disorders

Eating Disorders Common In ADHD Girls: Compulsive Behavior Tied To Body Image Problems

Girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are more likely to have an eating disorder, a new study said. “Adolescent girls with ADHD frequently develop body-image dissatisfaction and may go through repeating cycles of binge eating and purging behaviors that are common in bulimia nervosa,” said University of Virginia psychologist Amori Yee Mikami.

ADHD is thought to be three times more common in boys than girls, so researchers are still learning its long-term effects on girls. But eating disorders are 10 times more common in girls. “Our finding suggests that girls may develop a broader range of problems in adolescence than their male counterparts,” Mikami said. She said girls often go undiagnosed and untreated for ADHD, which could increase the risk of eating disorders. “As they get older, their impulsivity may make it difficult for them to maintain healthy eating and a healthy weight, resulting in self-consciousness about their body image and the binging and purging symptoms,” she said.

The results are based on a study of 228 girls in the San Francisco Bay area; 140 had ADHD. “An additional concern is that stimulant medications used to treat ADHD have a side effect of appetite suppression, creating a risk that overweight girls could abuse these medicines to encourage weight loss, though we have not yet investigated that possibility,” Mikami said. The findings appeared in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. Note: if you treat both eating disorders and ADHD, then consider joining our sister organization at www.addreferral.com

Source:

UVA Today – Adolescent Girls with ADHD Are at Increased Risk for Eating Disorders

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton.