Tag Archives: clean eating

What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

Is Amish chicken free range? Organic?

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken.  Look for 


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


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Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits?   Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. 

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have!  If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Quick and Easy Mushroom Soup Recipe

Mushroom Soup Recipe

I decided to make some mushroom soup with some chicken broth left over from a chicken that I baked. Since I’m doing keto and because I have all of my groceries delivered I was low on vegetables so the best I could do was cream of mushroom soup.  I didn’t even have an onion 🙁 but decided to have a go at it anyway.

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Keto Granola

Keto Granola

I made granola for the first time, And if I do say so myself, it is absolutely amazing! Truth be told, it is a keto granola. But I think anyone would enjoy it. It is both crunchy and chewy at the same time. Go figure! It is loaded with collagen, vitamin C, protein, and chocolate.

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The Food is at Fault!

The Blame Game

We tend to blame the victims of disordered eating, no matter what form it takes. Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Emotional Eating and Obesity are all assumed to be the result of poor choices and/or emotional disturbances that lead to over eating. Anorexia is often perceived as a choice the patient makes to achieve cosmetic improvements.

The eating problems plaguing Americans are the direct result of the deficiencies and toxins in the food supply and are not the result of implusive choices or vanity.

The Big Pharma complex, industrial farming, and the food and beverage industries, (I call them Big Pharma, Big Farming and Big Food or the 3 Big Pigs) have worked hard to convince us that our foods, beverages and drugs are safe as long as we take/eat them in moderation.

The issue is serious. The United States has the distinction of being the unhealthiest wealthiest country in the world today. So, how can a country with so many economic and natural resources not maintain healthy eating habits? The answer is simple and scary. Not only are the foods and drugs constructed by the 3 Big Pigs not safe, they are driving the catastrophic decline in the health of Americans and seriously decreasing the quality of life for millions of people.

Clean food heals the dysfunction and diseases caused by polluted foods. One of the reasons my patients get well is that they learn to trust food again by learning how to “eat clean.” Clean eating empowers them—it frees them from the slavery of addiction, and it calms the anxiety they have about eating. The more clean food they eat, the fewer cravings they have because the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight fluctuations stabilize in the presence of clean food. Under these circumstances my patients can learn new healthy eating patterns.

The sad thing is that most of the treatment for eating disorders completely ignores the role of food pollution during recovery. To highlight how important clean food is and how destructive therapies can be that ignore the problems with our food, I’m going to describe the experience of a young patient of mine (age 14) in a typical residential treatment program for eating disorders.

In the residential program MA was ingesting the majority of her calories in the form of Boost[1] as a behavioral consequence of refusing to eat. She was also being kept in bed, all day, every day, for 13 days in a row. Understand she was not being kept in bed because she was too medically unstable to be up and around; she was kept in bed because she refused to eat. Her parents, or their insurance company, were paying a small fortune for this “treatment.”

Her treatment with me began by giving her choices about her food. She could pick whatever she wanted, as long as it was clean and had the necessary nutrients for her to slowly regain her weight. She slowly but consistently has expanded her foods to include everything she needs to thrive while consistently gaining weight.

Here is her experience with my approach to eating disorder treatment:

 The Blame Game-2

Did I mention this patient is only 14? She wasn’t asked to write this, she felt compelled to. After having such a terrible experience in residential treatment and finally finding a treatment program that was really working for her she needed to express what was changing in her relationship with food.

Whether you are bingeing, purging, restricting or are addicted- I guarantee that polluted food is playing a part in your illness. The food is at fault!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

[1] These are the first 10 ingredients in Boost: water, sugar, corn syrup, milk protein concentrate, vegetable oil, (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn) soy protein isolate, and Carrageenan. The only ingredient that is not GMO or a form of processed L-Glutamine (MSG) which is highly addicting, is the water. (See Chapter _ Sources of Food Pollution)

 

Want to Lose Weight? Eat Clean and Get Some Sun!

The problem is polluted food. The solution is to avoid the polluted food. But that isn’t enough. You must also get out into the sun and find  foods rich in sulfur.

Let’s start with the clean eating.

Monsanto has changed the DNA of soybeans, corn, cotton, canola, and alfalfa by putting the insecticide DDT into it.  Bugs bite into the plant and the DDT splits their abdomens open.  It should go without saying then that DDT is not safe for human consumption.  Unfortunately though, we unknowingly consume a lot of it in this country,  through this type of DDT infused crop. You can be sure, that if you are eating a processed food, it goes without saying that it is probably from a genetically modified crop with some sort of DDT insecticide. Want to lose weight 1

Although we do not immediately suffer the same fate as the bug, we apparently do pay a price as the number of gastrointestinal disorders has increased significantly over the past twenty years in the U.S. Once DDT gets into our gut, it appears to stay there for good.

Many of patients I treat for disordered eating are driven by a tendency to eat too much processed and/or polluted food in an effort to cut back on fat. This results in gastrointestinal problems that result, such as bloating, constipation, and weight gain.

According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine regarding GE foods “…. it is clear that genetically engineered foods can pose serious risks to humans, domesticated animals, wildlife and the environment.” Although the role this problem plays in the field of eating disorders such as Anorexia, Bulimia and Binge Eating is not even on the radar of researchers, the impact that GE is having on the obesity epidemic is beginning to gain some traction.

Impact of GE Grains on Obesity and Other Eating Related Illnesses

Researcher and professor, Åshild Krogdahl, and her colleagues at the Norwegian Veterinary College, conducted a 10-year study to determine if eating genetically modified grain had any adverse effects on animals including rats, mice, fish and pigs. The work was a multi-national collaboration with researchers from Austria, Hungary, Ireland, Turkey and Australia. The results confirm the obvious:

  • According to the findings, feeding rats, mice, pigs and salmon genetically engineered feed causes obesity, along with significant changes in the digestive system and major organs, including the liver, kidneys, pancreas, genitals and more.want to lose weight 2
  • Animals fed genetically engineered Bt corn were less able to digest proteins due to alterations in the micro-structure of their intestines. This fact that “they were less able to digest proteins” has huge implications in that the biochemistry of amino acids is necessary for all life processes. It not only explains the rise in obesity, but may explain increases in many modern diseases that are currently on the rise and/or reaching epidemic proportions in the U.S. including diabetes, digestive disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, sexual dysfunction, sterility, asthma, and many more.
  • Perhaps the most important finding, from the perspective of what is and isn’t safe to eat, is the finding that the animals that ate fish that had been raised on GE grains also became obese and suffered the same gastrointestinal disturbances and immune disorders as those that werewant to lose weight 3 fed the grains directly.
  • Finally, the project did not just focus on weight gain but looked at the effects on organ changes too. Researchers found distinct changes to the intestines of animals fed GMOs compared to those fed non-GMOs. This confirms observations by other U.S. researchers. Significant changes occurred in the digestive systems of the test animals’ major organs including the liver, kidneys, pancreas, genitals and more.

The animals in this study were fed a diet of GE corn and soy, which contained toxic proteins from the bacteria Bt or Bacillus thuriengensis. As mentioned previously, Bt is an insecticide that works by killing larval insect pests which damage corn, soy, cotton, canola and other crops. By inserting and gene-stacking various Bt toxins, along with herbicide resistant gene sequences, the plants DNA is altered or genetically engineered for the specific purpose of killing the offending pests.

want to lose weight 4In essence, “The entire plant is made into a pesticide factory which is also resistant to herbicides..  Roundup, is such a product and is produced by  Monsanto…….It is the most popular herbicide used on herbicide tolerant  crops. [1]

In view of what we do know from these animal studies, there is a shocking lack of data on the effects of GE foowant to lose weight 5d on humans. There are very few studies to begin with, and as the American Academy of Environmental Medicine states,  Not a single human clinical trial on GEs has been published. A 2007 review of all published scientific literature on the “potential toxic effects/health risks of GE plants” revealed “that experimental data are very scarce” in general. The author of the review concludes his paper by asking, Where is the scientific evidence showing that GE plants/food are toxicologically safe, as purportedby the biotechnology companies?  Famed Canadian geneticist David Suzuki awant to lose weight 6nswers, “The experiments simply havent been done and we now have become the guinea pigs.”

Another researcher, Dr. David Schubert[2] agrees, “If there are problems, we will probably never know because the cause will not be traceable as many diseases take a very long time to develop.”  He postulates further,  “If GE foods caused immediate and acute symptoms, with a unique signatureperhaps then we might have a chance to trace the cause.

However, that is what happened during a US epidemic in the late 1980s with a genetically engineered brand of a food supplement, L-tryptophan. The disease was fast acting, deadly, and caused a unique and measurable change in the blood.  It still took more than four years to identify that an epidemic was occurring and what the source was. By then it had killed about 100 Americans and caused 5,000-10,000 people to fall sick or become permanently disabled.

No Data Is Data

As discussed earlier, there is almost no research being done for the express purpose of scientifically establishing the links between GE foods and the dramatic increase in the specific health problems that US citizens are experiencing in comparison to citizens in other countries where GE crops are regulated or prohibited. But what we do have to go on is the unprecedented downturn in the health of one of the wealthiest developed nations in the world and what we can predict for the future based upon studies on the effects of GE on animals. If, as the biotech and food industries would have us believe, GE is safe, why are there no studies showing this?

The Link Lack of Sun Exposure and Obesity

Our skin produces huge amounts of cholesterol sulfate, which is also water soluble and provides a healthy barrier against bacteria and other potentially disease-causing pathogens that might otherwise enter the body through the skin. Cholesterol sulfate can enter both fat cells and muscle cells with equal ease. Dr. Stephanie Seneff proposes that, because of this, cholesterol sulfate may be able to protect fat and muscle cells from glucose and oxygen damage, which is known as glycation or more commonly inflammation.

She also argues that when you’re deficient in cholesterol sulfate, your muscle and fat cells become more prone to damage, which subsequently can lead to glucose intolerance; a condition where your muscles cannot process glucose as a fuel. As a result, your fat cells have to store more fat in order to supply your muscles. The more damage, the more fat that accumulates.

Sulfur also plays an important role in glucose metabolism. She hypothesizes that if sufficient amounts of sulfur is available, it will act as a decoy to glucose, effectively diverting it to reduce the sulfur rather than glycating and causing damage. This would have the beneficial effect of reducing inflammation, as sugar (glucose) is highly inflammatory and wreaks havoc in your body.

What to Do

Dietary Sources of Sulfur

  1. Sulfur is derived almost exclusively from dietary protein, so eat fresh caught fish and organic grass-fed beef, and poultry
    1. Meat and fish are considered “complete” as they contain all the sulfur-containing amino acids you need to produce new protein. Needless to say, those who abstain from animal protein are placing themselves at far greater risk of sulfur deficiency.
  2. Coconut oil and olive oil also contain sulfur (and are ideal sources of healthful saturated fats too).
  3. Other dietary sources that contain small amounts of sulfur IF the food was grown in soil that contains adequate amounts of sulfur, include:
    1. Organic Pastured Eggs, Legumes, Garlic Onion, Brussel Sprouts, Asparagus, Kale, Wheat Germ
  1. Another reason that we gain weight is that any diet high in grains and processed foods is likely to be deficient in sulfur. It turns out that once whole foods are processed, sulfur is lost.
  2. Eating organic helps to insure that the soil is richer. Additionally, soils around the world are becoming increasingly sulfur-depleted, resulting in less sulfur-rich foods overall.
  3. Drink water, such as Fiji water, that has minerals still in it. Soft water is easier to use for cleaning, but Hard water also tends to contain more sulfur than soft water, which, according to Dr. Seneff, may be why people who drink soft water are at greater risk of developing heart disease.

In addition to making sure you’re getting high amounts of sulfur-rich foods in your diet, Dr. Seneff recommends soaking your body in magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) baths to compensate and counteract sulfur deficiency. She uses about ¼ cup in a tub of water, twice a week. It’s particularly useful if you have joint problems or arthritis.

[1]The Cornucopia Institute Obesity, Corn, GMOs July 24th, 2012 Brattleboro.com
Anthony Samsel.

[2] Dr. Schubert

Clean Ranch Dressing

For the Clean Eating Ranch Dressing Recipe, use all organic ingredients unless otherwise instructed

  • ½ cup Kalona Cottage Cheese (or any grass-fed)
  • 2/3 cup Kalona Sour Cream (or any grass-fed)
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder (or 2 tbsp diced onion)
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley (or 1 sprig fresh chopped)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried chives (or 1 tbsp fresh chopped)
  • 1/4 teaspoon Himalayan sea salt
  • 4 capfuls garlic juice
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup coconut crystals vinegar or any organic white vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper to taste

Directions:

Put all ingredients into blender and blend until creamy. Adjust spices. Dilute with water from the cottage cheese of sour cream cartons or use milk.

Makes  1 ¾ cups.

Nutrition (2 tbsp) – 44 calories, 4 g fat, 1 g protein, 1 g carbs

News You Can Use Week of July 20th-26th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 20th-July 26th, 2015.

NEWS: GMOs Are Dangerous to Our Health, According to Latest Independent Research

There has been a debate raging about GMOs for a long time now. On one side of the debate is the idea that genetic engineering is progress for humanity, and it is a natural extension of more traditional breeding techniques. The other side believes genetically modified foods are unsafe for human consumption and harmful to the environment. LEARN MORE

NEWS: “The Future of Food”—GMOs, Gene Patenting, and the Corporatization of Our Food Supply

The GMO food labeling movement has gained momentum over the past several years, passing labeling laws in three states. America’s awareness of the risks of genetically engineered (GE) foods and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to their health and the environment continues to expand. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Study Suggests Sugar Is Worse Than Salt for Blood Pressure

One out of every three US adults has high blood pressure (hypertension). If you’re among them, one of the first recommendations your physician probably gave you was to cut back on salt. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is the Sugar in Fruit Dangerous to My Health?

“Is Sugar Found In Fruit Bad? I heard bananas are bad for you because of the high amount of sugar, is this true?” LEARN MORE

NEWS: Relentless Cultural Pressures for Today’s Girls

Girls and women seem to be doing exceptionally well these days—many are excelling in school, in sports, and in their pursuit of advanced careers. The statistics are inspiring: LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use Week of July 6th-12th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of July 6th-July 12th, 2015.

NEWS: Radiation In Sunlight Reduces Weight Gain, Findings Independent of Vitamin D Research

Recent research supports the potential for sunlight to reduce the risk of excessive weight gain and also questions the effectiveness of vitamin D supplements to prevent obesity. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Dads: What’s Your Impact on Your Daughter’s Body Image?

If you read my previous blog, I discussed the importance of a mother’s influence on girls’ body image development. In this blog I will now focus on the importance of a father (or father figure) in a girl’s life and how he can also impact his daughter’s body image development in a powerful way. The bottom line is this: Dads, you make a significant difference in how your daughter will feel about her body and appearance, as well as her self-esteem.Consider some of the following strategies to help your daughter maintain a positive body image throughout her girlhood and adolescence: LEARN MORE

NEWS: 5 Ways to Measure the Fitness of Your Exercise Mindset

Open a magazine, turn on the television, glance at highway billboards or Internet ads and the message about fitness is clear as day: Exercise does a body good. But as a clinician who works regularly with people struggling with negative body image, disordered eating behavior (like extreme dieting or binge eating), and weight, I am compelled to add: Exercise does a body good, except when it doesn’t. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Moms: What Will Your Body Image Legacy Be?

I recently watched the video “Legacy,” part of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. As a mother of a 10-year-old daughter (and 12-year-old son), the video provided a vivid wakeup call about the daily influence I have on my daughter’s developing body image. The truth is that, whether we realize it or not, we are all passing along a body image legacy to our daughters. Our daughters are observing us, emulating our attitudes, and for better or worse, they are following our example. LEARN MORE

NEWS: An End to Fat-Phobia in America?

Every 5 years, the USDA publishes its Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The famous food pyramid, now turned into MyPlate, are some of the iconic symbols of these guidelines.  The dietary guidelines are the oracle for health professionals, the food industry, and to some extent, the actual public. LEARN MORE

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of June 29th-July 5th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 29th-July 5th, 2015.

NEWS: 13 Nutrients You Aren’t Eating Enough Of

You can’t depend on multivitamins to get the healthiest nutrients you need to thrive. In fact, University of Hawaii researchers looked at 180,000 men and women and found multivitamin users didn’t live any longer or have lower rates of cancer and heart disease than people who didn’t reach for the daily pills. Luckily, you can nourish your body, fight fatigue, and ward off disease by introducing the right nutrient-rich foods into your life. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Too Much Fat and Sugar Hurts Your Brain

A doughnut—the perfect storm of fat and sugar—may be the worst option at the breakfast bar, not just for your body, but also for your brain, suggests new research from Oregon State University. A high-fat and high-sugar diet led to decreased cognitive functioning in mice, the researchers found. Surprisingly, these changes in the brain appear to be mediated through the gut bacteria, a connection known as the gut-brain axis. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Obesity in America is on the Rise; Here’s What You Can Do to Protect Yourself

A recent article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association presents stark figures regarding America’s obesity challenges. Despite heightened awareness in the last few decades, overweight and obesity rates are still increasing. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How To Make Bread Healthy Again

At this point, most people understand the drawbacks of wheat and why it has to be limited or eliminated from the diet. It’s not that wheat in its pure and original form is bad in and of itself, but due to over consumption, hybridization, and a high gluten content, there is simply no other reasonable choice but to avoid it for many people. LEARN MORE 

NEWS: Farewell, Low-Fat: Why Scientists Applaud Lifting A Ban On Fat

There were plenty of tasty tidbits packed into the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee report that came out back in February. As we reported, the panel of nutrition experts that wrote the report said it was OK to eat an egg a day. The scientific evidence now shows it won’t raise the amount of LDL cholesterol – the bad kind of cholesterol — in your blood or raise the risk of heart disease. LEARN MORE

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Sun Life Diet-The Role Vitamin D Plays In Your Overall Health

This week I spoke about all of the health advantages of adding sunlight to your daily routine. Vitamin D plays a major role on your overall health! If you missed last night’s episode you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered:

1:10-Recap of the Sunshine Diet

3:41-Cholesterol Sulfate & Vitamin D3

5:05-UVB Lamp

6:04-Sunlight

6:59-EndoPAT Machine

7:55-Dr. Stephanie Seneff

9:35-Myths about The Sun, Cholesterol, & Vitamin D

9:58-Myth: Too Much Sun Is Unhealthy

10:59-Vitamin D Deficiency

11:12-Myth: The Most Likely Cause of Skin Cancer is Overexposure To The Sun

11:59-Omega 3 Fats

12:55-Omega 6 vs. Omega 3 Ratio

15:10-Myth: Sunburn or Skin Damage from The Sun Is What Causes Skin Cancer

16:35-Sun Bathing and Sun Burn are Detrimental to Health

18:15-Sunscreen Is Good for You and Should be Worn at all Times When Outdoors

19:15-Two Different Types of Sun Rays

20:44-What Would Happen If The Sun Went Out?

23:25-What The Sun Can Protect

24:50-Myth: Cholesterol Is Bad

25:17-Cholesterol Is The ‘Master Hormone’

25:50-Myth: LDL Cholesterol Is Bad

26:56-If I Have High Cholesterol, Taking A Statin Will Prolong My Life

27:33-Myth: High Cholesterol Causes Heart Attacks

28:35-Myth: High Cholesterol Causes Alzheimer’s

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. J Renae Norton
All rights reserved. Do not Distribute. Use only with Permission.

News You Can Use-Week of June 22nd-28th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 22nd-28th, 2015.

NEWS: Do You Have An Undiagnosed Eating Disorder?

An eating disorder is a time bomb waiting to go off—and it may be about to go off in your life. An eating disorder is a time bomb waiting to go off—and it may be about to go off in your life. Before you can do anything to defuse this bomb, you must first acknowledge its existence. Some of the most common eating disorders are anorexia, bulimia, binge eating and compulsive overeating. LEARN MORE

NEWS: FDA Finally Bans Artificial Trans-Fats, But Danger Still Lurks

This week, the FDA finally announced that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) are no longer classified as GRAS (generally regarded as safe). Therefore, these oils can no longer be used as ingredients in foods manufactured, sold or served in the US. LEARN MOVE

NEWS: General Mills Is Ditching Artificial Colors

General Mills, the company behind Technicolor cereals like Lucky Charms and Trix, has announced that it is getting rid of artificial colors in its breakfast cereals. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Parents’ Denial Fuels Childhood Obesity Epidemic

Not only was the 16-year-old boy 60 pounds overweight, but a blood test showed he might have fatty liver disease. At last, his mother took him to a pediatric weight management clinic in New Haven. But she did not at all like the dietitian’s advice. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is The New Whole Foods Label Better Than ‘Organic’?

Earlier this week, like any insufferable Brooklynite, I found myself in need of some baby spinach. A little pressed for time, I chose to forgo a run to my normal grocery store for a quick trip to my neighborhood bodega. LEARN MORE

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Homemade Mayonnaise

Homemade Mayonnaise
Ingredients:
4 egg yolks
1 egg
1 tsp dijon mustard
1 tsp sea salt
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp white pepper
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/3 cup olive oil
2/3 cup coconut oil (liquid)
Directions:
Combine egg yolks and egg in food processor and blend. Keep the processor blending while adding dijon mustard, sea salt, garlic powder, white pepper and lemon juice. After lemon juice is added, taste the mixture and season accordingly. Start the blending process again and start to very slowly add in the oil. It is extremely important to slowly add in the oils otherwise the egg yolk and oil will not mix.
Store the mayonnaise in an air-tight jar and keep refrigerated.

News You Can Use-Week of June 8th-14th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 8th-14th, 2015.

NEWS: 5 Gut-Friendly Foods to Help You Lose Weight

You eat avocados for your heart and fish for your brain, but are you feeding your gut? Your gut is more than just the food processing plant for your body—it has major implications for your appetite, your immune system, and even your mood. LEARN MORE

NEWS: What is Most Harmful to Your Nutritional Health?

Here’s an interesting survey conducted recently by Civic Science. Over 4300 adults were asked the following question: “Which of these do you feel is most harmful to your nutritional health?” LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is Your Child Eating Cancer-Causing Glyphosate For Breakfast? Most Likely, Yes

Although there aren’t any genetically modified oats on the marketplace today, that doesn’t mean we should run to stores with open arms, thankful that we’re eating healthy foods. The truth is, products containing oats are typically sprayed with the cancer-causing herbicide ingredient — you know, the one that a division of the World Health Organization recently deemed “probably carcinogenic to humans” — known as glyphosate. LEARN MORE

News: Is Facebook Making Us Hate Our Bodies?

It is estimated that Facebook had nearly 1.3 billion users in 2013. That translates to 1/6 of the world population. In North America, just under half of the population is on Facebook and 71% of adults who are online are on Facebook. A 2010 study revealed that teens spend more than 7 ½ hours per day online, and much of that time is spent on social media sites like Facebook. Social media has become ingrained into our way of life. But what is the emotional cost of our immersion in social media? Specifically, how does social media, like Facebook, impact how we feel about our bodies? LEARN MORE

 

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of May 25th-31st, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 25th-31st.

NEWS: The Body Image and Eating Disorder Tsunami

Negative body image and eating disorders constitute a not-so-silent Tsunami that are wreaking havoc in the lives of women and men today. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Melancholy of Anatomy: Excessive Weight and Depression

The complex relationship between weight and depressive disorders. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Whole Foods Market to Introduce New Store Format

Earlier this month, Whole Foods Market (WFM) disclosed its plan for a new store format, expected in early 2016. The new locations will be branded differently than existing WFM stores and cater to a more price conscious consumer. The average store will also be smaller (between  50-65% of the size of WFM stores). The as yet unnamed stores will carry a smaller variety of items and have a less polished format, according to WFM executives. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Make Your Food Last Longer Safely With These Food Storage Tips

Learning how to store food correctly is important for several reasons, whether it’s a matter of making fresh food last as long as possible or stockpiling food staples over a long period of time. LEARN MORE

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In a Nutshell: What You Need to Know About Cholesterol Problems

When we think of cholesterol, we often think of it as a bad thing. The reality is we cannot survive without cholesterol. There are a number of myths when it comes to cholesterol.

Myth: LDL cholesterol is bad.

Truth: LDL cholesterol isn’t all bad.  We need a balance of HDL and LDL for optimal health. The smaller the LDL particle size the more dangerous it is. So it is important to know the type of LDL that you have. The most important thing to know about LDL cholesterol is that it is more easily damaged. This is the critical issue when it comes to blood pressure and plaque build-up.

Myth: If I have high cholesterol, taking a statin will prolong my life.

Truth: Not only do statin drugs not prolong your life, they may shorten it and/or make you more susceptible to stroke, heart attack, Alzheimer’s, cancer, diabetes, etc.

Myth: High cholesterol causes heart attacks

Truth: It may actually be a deficiency of cholesterol, in the form of cholesterol sulfate, that causes heart attacks

Myth: High cholesterol causes Alzheimer’s.

Truth: The brain needs cholesterol for proper myelination. Dementia  actually appears to be driven by glycation (inflammation brought on by too much sugar) and lack of a certain type of cholesterol called B cholesterol.

Myth: Saturated fats cause high cholesterol

Truth: Saturated fats offer protection. Sugar is the culprit along with damaged fats.

In this article, I will explain how I personally doubled the arterial flow to my heart by sitting out in the sun! It took 8 weeks to go from poor to excellent. For the doubting Tom’s, check out the before and after EndoPat results below. Note the slight decrease in blood pressure as well.  The therapeutic range for the Endopat, a test that measures the functionality of the lining of the heart and blood vessels, is as follows:

 

<1.67             High Risk

1.67-2.09     Intermediate Risk

>2.1               Healthy

 

Interpreting the scores from the Itamar company:

 

Red Zone: Score of 1.68 and lower 

You do not have proper endothelial function and this could be an important signal of an imminent cardiac problem. This EndoScore may indicate the presence of disease and that an immediate evaluation and intervention may be needed, whether it is aggressive medical therapy or a medical procedure. It’s imperative that endothelial health be restored.

 

Yellow Zone: Score between 1.69 and 2 

Your endothelium is healthy and while you don’t have any additional risk, you are still not in the well-protected Green Zone.

It’s vitally important that you now take charge of your own health and do everything you can to improve your EndoScore. Good health depends of certain lifestyle choice you make that include what you eat, how active you are, whether or not you smoke, the precautions you take to avoid injuries and accidents, and how you deal with tension and anxiety. The choice is yours. Choose health!

 

Green Zone. Score between 2.1 and 3

Your endothelium is functioning optimally, and you have maximum protection. Keep up whatever it is that you are doing, because the foods that you have been eating and the physical activity you have been performing regularly have affected a number of risk factors implicated in vascular health and longevity, particularly blood cholesterol levels, hypertension, and obesity.[1]

Notice that my initial score was 1.48 and that 8 weeks later, it was 3.04. In the words of the makers of the equipment, this was an extraordinary improvement. Read on to ee how I accomplished this in such a short period of time and with no medication

dr nortons test results 321

 

Dr Nortons  test results 2

What is Cholesterol?

 Cholesterol is an organic molecule that is critical to the structure of all animal cells. It functions within the cell to protect the cell membrane and enable the cell to change shape and move about without a wall.  This is what differentiates us from plants and bacteria as they are restricted by their cell walls.

An Aside: Did you know that humans are only 10% human cells and 90% bacteria?  So maybe it is the cholesterol that makes it possible for the human 10% to manage the bacterial 90% of the human biogenome? I find this concept strangely intriguing. Go cholesterol!

Cholesterol Does It All

  • In the brain cholesterol:
    • makes up the myelin sheath that insulates against signal loss
  • In the heart cholesterol:
    • allows heart muscle to beat
  • In the membranes of all cells cholesterol:
    • promotes cell-cell communication
    • allows cells to move, and gives them permeability
    • prevents leaks in cells
    • protects cells from pathogens (microbes)
  • In the blood cholesterol:
    • makes up part of the lipoproteins (LDL, HDL)
    • is essential for protecting contents in the blood from oxidation (free radicals) and glycation (inflammation) during transport to cells and organs
  • Cholesterol is the precursor to of all steroid hormones, beginning with Pregnenolone. These hormones regulate:
    • blood sugar – Glucocorticoids
    • mineral balance and blood pressure – mineralcorticoids
    • sex hormones – testosterone, estrogen, etc
    • Vitamin D
    • Cortisone – the stress hormone
  • Cholesterol aids in the digestion of fats

The point is that cholesterol is critical to all of our biological functions

What Are the Actual Types of Cholesterol?

Cholesterol comes in the form of lipoproteins. The lipoproteins range from largest to smallest in density compared with the surrounding water. They are different sizes, and contain different proteins, because they have different jobs, depending upon where they end up.

Classification of lipoproteins according to density from low to high: chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL, VHDL (picture courtesy of medscape.com)

Classification of lipoproteins according to density from low to high: chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL, VHDL (picture courtesy of medscape.com)

 

  • Chylomicron is the biggest particle. It is produced in the gut and directly provides the fuel from fats to many different cells. But it also delivers fats to the liver, where the fats are sorted out and redistributed into smaller particles called lipoproteins, as well as to the heart and the muscles.
  • VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) is produced in the liver and carries fat, cholesterol, fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants to cells.
  • IDL (intermediate density lipoprotein) is a bit smaller than VLDL and carries similar to VLDL goods in smaller amounts.
  • LDL (low density lipoprotein) is what is left over after VLDL has delivered most of its content to the cells. It is called “bad cholesterol“ because it is easy to attack. While traveling, it gets hit by microbes, free radicals, toxins, and glucose (or the pollutants in our food and environment). So LDL is in the most fragile container and as such, the container most likely to be damaged, especially if there is a lot of glucose (sugar) floating around. This is what causes “inflammation”.
  • oxLDL (oxycholesterol) is LDL after being attacked and oxidized. Turns out, this is really the dangerous form of cholesterol.
  • HDL (high density lipoprotein) is the smallest particle, which is very robust and reliable. It literally saves cholesterol from turning into the damaged oxLDL. It also destroys pathogens by getting the pathogen to ingest it and then from inside the cell of the pathogen, the HDL destroys it. (Amazing, right?) It deserves the reputation for being the “good cholesterol”.
  • HDL-A1 – is the form of HDL that brings good cholesterol to the liver so it can be further distributed. It is produced when the cells in the skin made up of cholesterol sulfate, are exposed to the sun.
  • B – HDL – is the form of cholesterol that goes specifically to the brain.

Apoliproteins

So if you think of the Lipoproteins as the method of travel, you can think of the apoliproteins as their navigational system. The apoliproteins guide the lipoproteins to their intended target. The fats are attached to apoliproteins (apo’s) A, B, C, and E. HDL attaches to ApoA, LDL attaches to ApoB, VLDL attaches to Apo’s B and C, and IDL attaches to ApoE.

Chylomicron Structure

ApoA, ApoB, ApoC, ApoE (apolipoproteins); T (triacylglycerol); C (cholesterol); green (phospholipids) Diagram by Xvazquez

ApoA, ApoB, ApoC, ApoE (apolipoproteins); T (triacylglycerol); C (cholesterol); green (phospholipids) Diagram by Xvazquez

The lipoproteins are transported from the intestines to adipose, cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue by the chylomicrons.  The chylomicrons are 85-92% triglycerides, 6-12% phospholipids (the parts of the cell membrane that form lipid bilayers), 1-3% cholesterol and 1-2% proteins.

Phospholipid

By Ties van Brussel / www.tiesworks.nl[1]

By Ties van Brussel / www.tiesworks.nl[2]

In a good assessment you should be able to identify the following:

Total Cholesterol

Total cholesterol is a combination of the LDL, VLDL and HDL that is circulating in your blood. The ranges below don’t mean as much any more as they used to mean as it is not the total cholesterol, but the type of cholesterol that appears to be more predictive of vascular disease.

Range:

Optimal – <200

Moderate – 200-239

High        – > 240

HDL – High Density Lipoproteins

HDL is the one that scavenges around in the blood basically looking for damaged LDL cholesterol to remove. The higher your HDL level, the lower your risk for heart disease. Low levels increase the risk. 

Range:

Optimal – >60

At Risk  –  <40

It appears that the total number of HDL particles is not as important as the size. In other words, the larger the HDL particles, the more protection they offer. (This is the same relationship that we see in the LDL particles, in that the larger they are the less damage they cause. [3])

The ratio of large HDL to total HDL is measured using NMR spectroscopy methods. Five subfractions of HDL have been identified, from largest (and most protective) to smallest (and least protective). The types are: 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b and 3c. [4] This information is probably more important for research purposes given that none of the HDL is “bad”.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides store energy for future use. They are a type of fat (lipid) made from any calories the body doesn’t need to use right away after eating. So when we eat more than we need in one sitting, the body converts the excess into triglycerides, which are stored in the fat cells for later energy.  This is meant to be a temporary arrangement, the assumption being that when we need energy between meals, certain hormones will release triglycerides and supply the needed energy between meals.

If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, especially “poluted” calories like simple or processed carbohydrates and unhealthy fats, you may end up with high triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia).

Triglycerides are a much better indicator that we are eating too much of the wrong foods than total cholesterol. Very simply, triglycerides tell us that we are taking in more than we are burning off.

TIP: This is a strong argument for eating 5 or 6 times during the day, as in 3 smaller meals and 2 or 3 snacks, instead of 1 or 2 big meals. It is also a strong argument for getting enough exercise to burn off excess calories on a regular basis.

Cholesterol, on the other hand, is used to build cells and generate hormones. As long as we don’t damage the cholesterol through glycation (too much sugar) or oxidation (free radicals) and we have the help we need from the sun (see below) to properly utilize the cholesterol, we don’t have to worry about how much cholesterol we have on board.

Triglyceride Range:

Optimal         –           <150

Moderate     –           150-199

High               –           >200

LDL – Low Density Lipoptoteins

LDL is called “bad” cholesterol because it is easily damaged, which drives the body to form plaque in an attempt to fix it. Plaque build-up in the arteries can reduce blood flow and increase your risk of heart disease.

Photo Credit: //www.flickr.com/photos/42045498@N05/

Photo Credit: //www.flickr.com/photos/42045498@N05/

Traditionally, the ranges have been as follows:

 Range:

Optimal      –             <100

Moderate  –             100-129

At Risk        –              >129

However, this is an overly simplistic view. As mentioned above, there are actually 3 types of LDL, very small/small (VLDL), medium, and large diameter low-density particles. It turns out that the higher the number of very small and small LDL’s you have, the more at risk you are for atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries.)  This is because the smaller particles have a better chance of embedding themselves into the lining of the arteries and becoming plaque. The medium and large particles are fluffy and don’t stick.

In a Nutshell: For LDL and for HDL larger particles are better. For LDL, fewer particles (lower total LDL) is better, for HDL, more particles (higher HDL) is better.

Ranges:                                          Optimal      Moderate    Poor

LDL Particle Number        <1260         1260-1538   >1538

LDL Small                             <162              162-217        >217

LDL Medium                       <201             201-271        >271

HDL Large                            >9386         6996-9386   <6996

Researchers have identified two patterns of LDL, Pattern A and Pattern B. Pattern B, in which the size and density is smaller, equates to a higher risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) than does a pattern with more of the larger and less-dense LDL particles (Pattern A). As mentioned earlier, the smaller the particle, the easier it is to break through the cell wall, which is how plaque begins.

The test used to measure these subtypes is expensive and I would not recommend having it done unless you find that your LDL is high. At that point, knowing the particle size and the pattern is very important in terms of knowing what to do next.

Risk Category Ranges     

 Optimal                                    Moderate                                  High

          A                                             N/A                                           B

> 222.5                                         218.2 – 222.5                             <218.2

Another interesting relationship is that there is a correlation between higher triglyceride levels and higher levels of the smaller, dense, more “sticky” LDL particles.  Conversely lower triglyceride levels are correlated with higher levels of the larger, less dense, more “buoyant” LDL particles.[5]

Mercola Cholesterol

New theories about it’s role suggest that it is not TOO MUCH CHOLESTEROL, BUT NOT ENOUGH OF THE RIGHT CHOLESTEROL THAT CAUSES HEART DISEASE, CEREBRAL VASCULAR DISEASE AND DISEASES LIKE ALZHEIMER’s. Amyloid beta in the brain, and plaque in the arteries, appear to be adaptive responses resulting from a lack of sufficient levels of a form of cholesterol called cholesterol sulfate.

Cholesterol Sulfate

Perhaps the most critical form of cholesterol is one I had never heard of, and one, which has not received nearly enough attention, given the role it plays in heart disease and in our overall health. I am referring to cholesterol sulfate, a form of cholesterol made in the skin when it is exposed to the sun. It is needed in order for the heart to beat and it is also an integral part of neural transmission in the brain. That does seem pretty important: needed for the heart to beat and for the brain to work! Without these two functions we are either brain-dead or dead all over.

According to Dr. Stephanie Seneff[6], cholesterol sulfate supplies oxygen, sulfur, cholesterol, energy and negative charge to our tissues. As I mentioned earlier, it is cholesterol that separates us from plants and bacteria because our cells can communicate whereas nonhuman cells are unable to perform this function. But to do this, there has to be a membrane and it is cholesterol that allows the membrane to do its job.

Throughout the book we have talked about Leaky Gut, or the hyper-permeability of the gut. Cholesterol defines the permeability (fluidity) of  the body’s membranes. All of them. In this sense, you could say that cholesterol determines gut permeability, skin permeability and the integrity of any other barrier. It is the glue that holds us together. To summarize:

  • Cholesterol is the chief substance in the myelin sheath that insulates the nervous system so there are no short circuits. It is directly related to thinking learning and remembering
  • Cholesterol is key for digestion – it is a precursor to bile acids, which are needed for mixing fats and water together.
  • Cholesterol is the mother of all steroid hormones, including glucocorticosteroids, mineralocorticoids and sex hormones.
  • Cholesterol helps in managing blood sugar, blood pressure, mineral balance and everything steroid hormones do.
  • Cholesterol is a powerful protector against invaders – bacteria, protozoa, fungi, worms, viruses etc. It does this by first by creating a shield in the skin, in the gut, and in membranes. Second as a part of a trojan horse system known as HDL (high density lipoprotein ), and third as an antioxidant.
  • Cholesterol handles glucose by creating a system that prevents glycation, or the damaging of proteins.

A Perfect Design

So cholesterol is what we need to move, think and live. Getting it where it needs to be, or transporting it, is vitally important. How is it going to navigate through the body, which is 70% water, when it is not water soluble?

Since cholesterol is a fat, it has to have fats to transport it.  Unless it has a sulfate.  Attaching sulfate to cholesterol creates a molecule, which is both water and fat-soluble. The addition of sulfur allows cholesterol to travel with virtually no barriers. Once it gets inside the cell, it splits – cholesterol goes to do its magic in the membranes and sulfate goes to the cytoplasm.

But all of this magic depends upon getting enough cholesterol sulfate. Without the sulfate, cholesterol has to hitch a ride with a fat. The easiest fat is the one that is damaged, or LDL cholesterol. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t just the amount of LDL, but the quality of LDL, that causes plaque build-up.

To summarize, when it comes to vascular disease, cholesterol sulfate solves the problem of getting cholesterol to all the places it needs to be without raising the LDL (bad) cholesterol.

How Do We Obtain Cholesterol Sulfate?

To really understand how this works, you have to understand the connection between cholesterol, sulfur, and vitamin D from sun exposure. We call vitamin D a vitamin because we can’t produce it on our own. It is actually a type of hormone. We need sunshine in order to activate vitamin D, which is produced in the skin when it is exposed to sunshine. We also cannot produce cholesterol sulfate without the sun. In fact, they are produced together.

The process is as follows:

  1. The skin gets sulfur dioxide from the air and converts it into sulfate
  2. The sulfate converts energy into cholesterol sulfate when the skin is exposed to the sun
  3. The cholesterol sulfate eventually gets oxidized as a means of protecting us from UVB radiation. It then transforms into vitamin D3 sulfate.

 

Vitamin D3 is considered a steroid, as it carries numerous messages and even manages gene expression and cellular behavior. Once it is formed, it is transported to the liver. From there it is transported to the kidneys where it is activated. At this point it is in the form of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Vitamin D can also be activated in the immune system, prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and skin cells.

Ah Ha! So maybe this is why vitamin D deficiency appears to be involved in so many of the diseases that are currently on the rise, many of which are affecting these organs and systems!

Although the kidneys activate and release vitamin D into the bloodstream, the rest of the cells in the body can also activate vitamin D. Apparently each cell in the body regulates it’s own sunshine, activating it and discarding it as needed, while the bloodstream keeps a base level of inactivated vitamin D on hand at all times. The designer of this system covered all the bases. Truly amazing. Pure genius…..

The implications for testing vitamin D levels are that you should not test for activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D). The better test is the circulating inactive form of 25 hydroxy D. So when you test, order serum 25 (OH) D in case your doctor doesn’t know what to do.

Vitamin 25 hydroxy D Range:

Maximum level:    100 ng/ml (toxic above 150 ng/ml)

Optimal:                   50 to 70 ng/ml

Deficient:                 less than 50 ng/ml

 

What is the Difference Between Vitamin D3 Sulfate and Vitamin D3.  

There is a world of difference relative to cholesterol levels. Vitamin D3 sulfate, which is created in the skin upon exposure to the sun is a sophisticated water soluble and fat soluble traveler, meaning that it doesn’t need the transportation services of the LDL container. The non-sulfated Vitamin D3 version coming from a supplement or food has to use LDL cholesterol. Remember we said that plaque develops when the body is forced to get cholesterol sulfate from LDL cholesterol.

This explains so many things for me as well as for many of patients. For example, I supplemented for years with mega doses of vitamin D3. At first, my D levels went up, but I believe that eventually the system down-regulated, as they eventually dropped and would not budge. The reason I started supplementing in the first place was that my vitamin D levels suddenly started going down. What I realize now is that I had also stopped getting sunshine at the insistence of a somewhat controlling though loving close friend. This is when they started declining.

As one might expect given all of the above, I also saw my LDL cholesterol slowly rise for the first time in my life. A recent Endopat showed the beginning of plaque despite my pristinely clean eating, great triglycerides, fantastic HDLs and perfect blood pressure. I am now a very moderate sun worshiper again and will repeat the Endopat with the expectation of significant improvement. (It was my doctor’s suggestion that I consider a statin that prompted the research for this article.)

Another significant distinction of vitamin D sulfate is that it does not participate in calcium metabolism until after it unloads its sulfate. In other words, sulfation happens first when sulfate connects to cholesterol and then it converts to cholecalciferol ( Vitamin D3 ). This means that none of the supplemental D3 will get sulfated! Maybe that’s why it doesn’t work to supplement with vitamin D3, other than to raise vitamin D levels. It may have no effect on the disorders associated with vitamin D deficiency according to research in which it was administered to individuals with medical conditions associated with low vitamin D[7]. This actually may be giving people a false sense of security.

What is the difference between D2 and D3?

Vitamin D2 is the plant form and it works in a way that is similar to that of D3 with respect of calcium metabolism, as it cannot be sulfated either. D2 is what they use to “fortify’ the milk from which they removed the natural vitamin D. If you drink raw grass-fed milk you can get vitamin D3 sulfate naturally.  This appears to be the only food source.

But with complete disrespect to mother nature, we ruin the raw milk by pasteurizing it, killing the vitamin D3 sulfate. Then adding insult to injury we add fake vitamin D. Not only does the synthetic version not help, it actually  seems to confuse the vitamin D receptors (VDR)  which prevents us from absorbing vitamin D3 sulfate when it is available! This is consistent with the some of the observations of Trevor Marshall, in which he points out that supplementing with vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 down-regulates and interferes with the VDR receptor. Unfortunately, he loses me after that as he recommends avoiding all sources of vitamin D, including the sun.

The Solution

To cut to the chase, you can protect yourself from cerebral and cardio vascular disease, as well as many other illnesses, by spending a half-hour in the sun (or a few minutes with a UVB sunlamp) several times a week. It’s that simple.

We get cholesterol sulfate when the skin is exposed to sunlight, or a UVB light. Recall that vitamin D is not really a vitamin but a hormone that has become deficient in most Americans. Not coincidentally, for the past 25 years, people have avoided the sun like the plague, ergo less sun, less cholesterol sulfate, less vitamin D3 sulfate and more chronic illness. The chart below shows the % of increase in illnesses on the rise over the past decade. This time period coincides with the removal of the good fat and supplementation of the fake vitamin D in dairy foods.

Health Problems that have increased – The percentage of people with low vitamin D3 has also DOUBLED in a decade. % increase over  past 10 years
Diabetes 66 %
Overweight kids 150 %
Parkinson’s 110 %
Thyroid Cancer 80 %
Breast Cancer 110 %
Tuberculosis 100 %
Multiple Sclerosis 70 %
Autism 250 %
Ulcerative Colitis 210 %
Concussions 80 %
Traumatic Brain Injury 170 %
Pulminary Hypertension 88 %
Alzheimer’s 48 %
Hospitalizations – Food Allergy 260 %
C-Section 40 %
Peanut Allergy 40 %
ALS deaths 60 %
Knee injury (teen) 400 %
Chronic Disease in Children 70 %
Metabolic Syndrome 250 %
Bipolar Disorder – youth 4,400 %
Celliac 100 %
ADHD (LA schools) 230 %
Rickets-(UK 600 %) 500 %
IBD 200 %
Lyme Disease 300 %
Clostridium difficile (age > 85) 400 %
Sleep Apnea 200 %

Looking at it another way, Michael F. Holick, Ph. D., M.D.[8] points out that optimizing vitamin D levels to 50 ng/ml will lead to significant health benefits and disease prevention as follows:

  • Rickets, reduced by 100%
  • Osteomalacia, reduced by 100%
  • Cancers, all combined, reduced by 75%
  • Breast Cancer, reduced by 50%
  • Ovarian Cancer, reduced by 25%
  • Colon Cancer, reduced by 67%
  • Non-Hodgkins, reduced by 30%
  • Kidney Cancer, reduced by 67%
  • Endometrial Cancer, reduced by 35%
  • Type 1 Diabetes, reduced by 80%
  • Type 2 Diabetes, reduced by 50%
  • Fractures, all combined, reduced by 50%
  • Falls, women reduced by 72%
  • Multiple Sclerosis, reduced by 50%
  • Heart Attack, men, reduced by 50%
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease, reduced by 80%
  • preeclampsia reduced by 50%
  • Cesarean Section, reduced by 75%

What if all of the problems associated with Vitamin D3 deficiency are actually caused by a cholesterol sulfate deficiency? Whether or not this is the actual problem the solution is the same: Get exposure to the sun for a sufficient amount of time to activate cholesterol sulfate without damaging the skin. (It is just as effective to use a UVB  lamp for a few minutes.)

The Role of Cholesterol Sulfate in Plaque Formation

Throughout the book, we have talked about the role that damaged or polluted foods play in the declining health of Americans. It turns out that the lack of cholesterol sulfate combined with the body’s attempt to manage the damage from microbes, free radicals, toxins, and excess glucose may be what actually causes plaque to build up in the arteries, not an excess of cholesterol or the foods that contain cholesterol.

According to Dr. Stephanie Seneff, Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the plaque is an attempt by the immune system to save damaged lipoproteins, refurbish them and send them to the heart. Remember, the heart does not beat without cholesterol sulfate.

HDL has been dubbed the good guy because it brings cholesterol back to the liver. But according to Dr. Seneff, the real reason that HDL is so good for us is that it delivers cholesterol sulfate to the heart. And as long as there is enough sulfate in the system, HDL’s will turn the cholesterol into cholesterol sulfate.

But what happens when there is not enough cholesterol sulfate? When it is not available, the body employs another mechanism to increase it. By taking damaged LDL, and turning it into plaque, the beneficial HDL cholesterol can be separated out through a process involving homocysteine, since homocysteine is a source of sulfate. Thus the cholesterol sulfate needed by the heart and brain is made available. However, there is a side effect for this cure: homocysteine oxidizes cholesterol and the process itself causes plaque to build up over time.

Why does this happen? It’s kind of like leaky gut. When blood becomes deficient in sulfates, it loses its negative charge. The negative charge is important because it keeps cells in suspension. Without the negative charge, the sticky protective part of the cell, called the glycocalyx, becomes more permeable, and gaps develop that allow blood to seep into tissues. Blood clots form to plug the holes. Eventually, however, the clots block the artery and lead to cerebral and coronary vascular disease.

Statins to the Rescue, Right? Wrong!

Conventional medicine dictates the use of Statins to lower LDL cholesterol. Indeed, statins are the number 1 prescribed medicine in the U.S. But the chart below demonstrates what has happened since people started taking statins.

Congestive Heart Failure Rate Is Rising

statin chart

Clearly statins are not working. There is actually no research that shows statins prolong life. What they do is lower LDL cholesterol. In the short term, they can even prevent minor heart attacks. Over time, however, they deplete the heart muscle, brain, liver, and joints of needed cholesterol. What does work is more sulfur in the blood. The only individuals who should consider statins are those with a genetic predisposition to high HDL who do not produce cholesterol sulfate.

Let the Sun Shine

This is such an elegant and simple solution, just get more sun.

According to Dr. Seneff, there is “a complete inverse relationship between sunlight and cardiovascular disease – the more sunlight, the less cardiovascular disease.”  In a study involving 16,500 people, researchers looked at weather statistics and found a 60% increased risk of stroke for those with the lowest sun exposure.[9] In another study, 38,472 women selected in 1991-1992, aged 30-49 were monitored for 15 years. Looking at the frequency of sunbathing vacations and sunburn, the researchers found that increased sunburn frequency was associated with reduced all-cause mortality! Sunbathing vacations more than once a year also reduced risk to cardiovascular disease and mortality. [10]   Interestingly, this corresponds with the 30-fold increase in the use of sunscreen over the same time period. [11]

Food Sources of Sulfur

It turns out that the foods highest in cholesterol are often highest in sulfur. What a coincidence! I have said it once, and I will say it again. We are designed perfectly, if only we could resist the urge to improve upon the design.  (Of course, many of these so-called “improvements” are driven by the desire to take short cuts, while many others are driven by pure greed.)

All animal proteins contain plenty of methionine and cysteine, which are the two sulfur-containing amino acids. The best sources are:

  • Pastured organic eggs
  • Liver from grass-fed beef
  • Wild caught fish & shellfish
  • Inner organs of grass-fed animals

 

As mentioned earlier, the only food that contains cholesterol sulfate naturally, is raw milk. The only sulfonated amino acid is taurine.  Fish and shellfish contain the most taurine, which the body uses extensively in times of stress and intoxication. It stores huge amounts of taurine in the heart, the brain and the liver. (If you are a vegan, your best choice is garlic, onion, cabbage and sauerkraut. But you are still not getting the badly needed cholesterol and the CLA – conjugated linoleic acid.)

My favorite source of sulfur is of course bone broth. When the bones simmer for days the way I make bone broth, it is rich in various forms of sulfate, including chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate. And it tastes so much better than a vitamin supplement!

But one of my favorite ways of getting sulfate is being in the sun for a few minutes every day. How much sun you get depends upon many factors: skin color (genetics), time of day, and where you are in relation to the equator. If you are light- complexioned, especially if you are fair, less is more. Stay in the sun only enough for your skin to turn pink. If you are dark skinned, higher levels of melanin protect you better from skin damage. However, you may have to spend more time in the sun to convert the necessary vitamin D into cholesterol sulfate.

Another Ah ha: We all started out at the equator and had dark skin. The farther away we got from the equator, the lighter our skin became and the less melanin we needed to protect against UVB. Today, in the U.S. people of color have significantly higher rates of cancer (although the rates dropped for cancer in 2013 among African Americans) and heart disease.

“In a startling 2009 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that African-Americans have a much higher incidence of heart failure than other races, and it develops at younger ages. Before age 50, African-Americans’ heart failure rate is 20 times higher than that of whites, according to the study. Four risk factors are the strongest predictors of heart failure: high blood pressure (also called hypertension), chronic kidney disease, being overweight, and having low levels of HDL, the “good” cholesterol. Three-fourths of African-Americans who develop heart failure have high blood pressure by age 40.”[12]

When it comes to cancer, the picture is not much better.

“Despite……. declines….. death rates for all cancers combined remain 33% higher in black men and 16% higher in black women, compared to white men and women. African American men also have higher death rates for most of the major cancer sites (including lung, prostate, colon/rectum, liver, pancreas, and others). Notably, the higher overall cancer death rate in African American women compared to white women occurs despite lower incidence rates for all cancers combined and for breast and lung cancer.

Given the role that the sun plays, it may be even more important for the person of color to be in the sun, given that their skin naturally “screens” out the UVB rays. I cannot find good information on how much sun we should get other than that it varies for each of us and a general rule of thumb is enough for the skin to become “pink”. Obviously this will not be very helpful for the person of color. “Darkening” or checking for a ”tan” line might be a better indicator, but even those don’t sound right.

In general, too much sun ages the skin and burning can cause skin cancer. So proceed cautiously regardless of the color of your skin. Start slow and increase the amount of sun you get slowly over time. But get sun! In the meantime, monitor your vitamin D3 sulfate levels to be sure that sun exposure is working.

Another way to get limited amounts of sulfer through the skin is to use Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate). I use it frequently as an ex-foliant, after sitting in front of my near-infrared sauna or my UVB lamp. (The sauna fights gut bacteria and the UVB provides D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate.) Be careful with the Epsom salts, as you can over do it and end up drying out your skin.

Dr. Ron’s Ultra Pure makes an MSM line of body products including shampoos and conditioners that are awesome and a good source of sulfate. I use his MSM toner all over my body before putting on an organic body lotion from Intelligent Nutrients.

Glyphosate  

Throughout the book, we have talked about the dangers of foods that are not organic. One of the most dangerous herbicides is glyphosate—which is used on most conventional and genetically engineered food crops.  There is a great deal of data on the dangers of glyphosate. But according to Dr. Stenanie Seneff,  glyphosate is also a major problem  because it interferes with the enzymes responsible for activating vitamin D in the  liver and kidneys. She explains: “Glyphosate disrupts cytochrome p450 enzymes, which activate vitamin D. In addition, according to Dr. Seneff, the formation of cholesterol sulfate is also disrupted by glyphosate.

Without getting too technical, if you ingest too much glyphosate the red blood cells fall apart because they have lost their cholesterol sulfate. Remember, we said that cholesterol sulfate basically holds our cells together. The mechanism is called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which means that the red blood cells coagulate your blood because they have lost their form and function.

Solution: Eat Clean, Go Organic!

Homocysteine

High homocysteine levels is another phenomenon that is seldom discussed, but one that has been implicated in coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease and more. It is another example of a protective mechanism gone awry and it is becoming increasingly common.

Given the amount of damage that it does, it is surprising that it is rarely a topic of discussion. There is a very good reason: there is no medication that lowers homocysteine levels.  Consequently, the drug companies are not interested in educating the public of it’s dangers as they will not profit from doing so. We are left to our own devices on this one, which is probably a good thing.

Homocysteine Level Health Status
Below 6 units 10 percent of populationExtremely low risk for disease
6 to 8.9 units 35 percent of populationLow risk for disease, could be better
9 to 11.9 units 20 percent of populationSignificant risk for premature death from degenerative diseases
12 to 14.9 units 20 percent of populationHigh risk for premature death from degenerative diseases
15 to 19.9 units 10 percent of populationExtremely high risk category, at risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, cancer, or Alzheimer’s disease in the next ten to thirty years
Greater than 20 units Extremely high risk, right now, of heart attack and stroke.

Lowering Your Homocysteine Levels

There are several important supplements that can lower your homocysteine levels:

  • Folate
  • B2
  • B12
  • B6
  • Zinc
  • Trimethyglycine or TMG

It is also important to eat the following:

  1. Healthy fats like coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter, and olive oil
  2. Organic vegetables, especially dark green leafy vegetables – 50% of your diet if possible
  3. High quality protein – organic eggs, wild caught fish, grass-fed red meat, pastured pork, nuts and seeds in moderate amounts (1/2 cup per day)

Sound familiar?

Cut way back on:

  • Caffeinated drinks
  • Alcohol
  • Processed foods
  • Salt (use sea salt)
  • Sugar (consider Xylitol)

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Something that a lot of people are not aware of is that the liver turns fructose into fat. The live’s job is to make cholesterol. This is a complex process involving some 25 to 30-steps. When it has to stop to turn the fructose into fat, it severely hampers its ability to make cholesterol. This is an important issue in view of the excessive amount of HFCS consumed in the U.S.

There are two things you can do: First, avoid processed foods, which are loaded with HFCS; Second, substitute Xylitol as a sweetener. It has many health benefits and a low glycemic load.

Summary

To review: It is the microbes, toxins, free radicals, and high levels of glucose that damage the LDL, along with high levels of homocysteine that damage the arteries, and herbicides like Glyphosate that block vitamin D3 and cholesterol sulfate from activating, combined with a lack of cholesterol sulfate, and lack of vitamin D3 sulfate that leads to illness, especially vascular disease.

In a nutshell: The alleged benefits of vitamin D3 sulfate are also benefits of cholesterol sulfate, i.e. protection against cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and improved immune function.

To stay healthy: Get plenty of dietary sulfur, get regulated sun exposure, eat good fats, reduce your homocysteine levels by supplementing and avoiding foods that raise homocysteine levels, avoid herbicides like glyphosate by eating clean, and get plenty of rest.

[1] (6) Bonetti PO, Pumper GM, Higano ST, Holmes DR Jr., Kuvin JT,‫ Lerman A. Noninvasive Identification of Patients with Early Atherosclerosis by Assessment of Digital ReactiveHyperemia. 44: 2137-2141

[2] The copyright holder of this work allows anyone to use it for any purpose including unrestricted redistribution, commercial use, and modification.

[3] //www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35058896/ns/health-heart_health/t/bad-cholesterol-its-not-what-you-think/#.T4Gkub_Owrg

[4] “Small LDL and its clinical importance as a new CAD risk factor: a female case study”. Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing 17 (4): 167–73

[5] Warnick GR, Knopp RH, Fitzpatrick V, Branson L (January 1990). “Estimating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by the Friedewald equation is adequate for classifying patients on the basis of nationally recommended cutpoints”. Clinical Chemistry 36 (1): 15–9. PMID

[6] Seneff, S., Davidson, R., and Mascitelli, L. (2012). Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Medical Hypotheses, 8, 213-217.

[7]In studies where vitamin D was given as an intervention (treatment) to help prevent a particular ailment, it had no effect. The one exception was a decreased death risk in older adults, particularly older women, who were given vitamin D supplements. Gordon, S. (2013). Vitamin D supplements won’t help prevent disease: Review. Health Day. Retrieved from //consumer.healthday.com/

[8] Holick, M.F. (2010). The Vitamin D solution: A 3-step strategy to cure our most common health problems. New York: Hudson Street Press.

[9] Mozes,A. (2012). Health Day. RSS Feed.

[10] Yang et al. (2011). Ultraviolet exposure and mortality among women in Sweden. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 20(4):683-690.

[11] Schneider, A. (2010).  Study: many sunscreens may be accelerating cancer. Aol News. Retrieved from //www.aolnews.com/2010/05/24/study-many-sunscreens-may-be-accelerating-cancer

[12] DeSantis, C. (2013). Cancer statistics about African Americans released. American Cancer Society. Retrieved from //www.cancer.org/cancer/news/expertvoices/post/2013/02/04/cancer-statistics-about-african-americans-released.aspx

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. J Renae Norton
All rights reserved. Do not Distribute. Use only with Permission.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

News You Can Use-Week of May 11th-17th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of May 11th-17th.

NEWS: Understanding What Clean Eating Really Is

Nobody wants to eat dirty. It just sounds gross. But if you’re not eating cleanly, that may be your only option. So you may be wondering what it takes to take the dirt out of your diet and wash it off so you can dine on the clean diet you deserve. Well, wonder no more. LEARN MORE

NEWS: GMOs, Obesity, and World Hunger

While few would argue that fast food restaurant fare is healthy, North Americans are coming to the realization that the local grocery store contains just as many nutritional pitfalls and health perils. True – even for those who steer clear of packaged items, opting to only shop in the outer aisles of their supermarket. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Can Too Much Protein Be Harmful?

The average American consumes about 100 grams of protein a day, which is much higher than actually required by the body –  55-65 grams per day if you weigh 150 lbs. Could excess consumption of protein be deleterious to one’s health? LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of April 26th-May 3rd, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 27th-May 3rd.

NEWS: Ask Well: Do Microwaves Degrade Food Nutrients?

Are there any good quality studies regarding loss of nutrients due to heating (not cooking) food in a microwave? LEARN MORE

NEWS: What to Tell Your Daughter about Her Weight

I remember the first time I heard that I was going to have a baby boy.  There was a part of me that felt immediate relief that my baby wasn’t going to be a girl.  It was the part of me that spent hours each day as a researcher studying weight management, body image, and disordered eating.  I knew, with a son, that it was less likely that these issues would affect my child. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Kraft to Overhaul Mac & Cheese, Remove Artificial Dyes and Preservatives

Good news this week. On Monday, Kraft announced that it will be removing artificial ingredients from its iconic Mac and Cheese line of products in the US by January 2016. Changes in consumer awareness and a preference for more natural and healthy foods are forcing the largest food companies in America to improve their offering or see sales decline. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 8 Things to Know About the Humble Pea

Peas, of the legume family, are not a sexy food. They are, however, tasty and packed with nutrients. Here’s what you need to know: LEARN MORE

NEWS: Leaky gut syndrome, Candida, and autoimmune disease

Candida is not inherently bad, but when left unchecked, when it takes over the gut and is allowed to flourish, it will damage the intestinal wall. Then Candida, along with other microbes, will migrate outside of the intestinal tract and into the body, flourishing everywhere, fed by all the sugars and damaged cells that are also entering the bloodstream. The immune system will react to the Candida (and gluten, with those two similar proteins) as it should, fighting invading pathogens that do not belong in the blood. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use Week of April 20th-26th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 20th-26th.

NEWS: Who Approves the Safety of New Food Ingredients?

Is a new food ingredient safe until proven harmful? LEARN MORE

NEWS: 5 Foods that Reduce Stress and Anxiety, According to Research

With all the stress in life, wouldn’t it be nice to allow your body to de-stress on autopilot? Whether mental or physical stress, your body needs vital nutrients that support your nervous system, especially when facing challenges. Research shows the following five foods to be a perfect fit! LEARN MORE

NEWS: 10 Reasons Why You Should Consume More Cucumbers

Considered a veggie but technically a fruit related to melons, the cucumber is often an afterthought or garnish for most. Too bad. It’s not only a tasty addition to many foods and very hydrating with it’s 90-plus percent water content; cucumbers are packed with a load of health-benefiting nutrients too. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Does Thinking You Are Fatter Make You Fatter?

Adolescence is a vulnerable period for the onset of body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders. Many adolescents misperceive their body size; it is not uncommon for normal weight* adolescents to categorize themselves as overweight. What is the effect of this misperception of body size? Compared with normal weight teens who accurately perceive their weight, those who misperceive their weight as overweight are more likely to diet for weight loss, use extreme weight loss measures such as diet pills, laxatives, vomiting, or not eating for 24 hours or more, exercise more, spend more time using electronics (“screen time”), and are more prone to overeating. Many of these behaviors are linked with development of obesity. In “Body Weight Misperception in Adolescence and Incident Obesity in Young Adulthood” researchers investigated if normal weight teens that misperceived themselves as overweight were more likely to develop obesity over a 12-year period. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of April 13th-19th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 13th-19th.

NEWS: New Role For Attention-Deficit Drug In Battle Against Binge Eating

Whether it’s in a television show or a movie, Hollywood has treated binge eating as a joke, but for an estimated 1 to 5 percent of American adults who suffer from this threat to their health and their lives, there’s nothing funny about it.  Learn More

NEWS: Is Binge Eating A Mental Illness? 5 Facts About The Disorder You Should Know

You might think binge eating is just a thing college-aged stoners or recently dumped people do, but in many cases, regular binge eating is actually an eating disorder that needs to be treated. In fact, in 2010, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) released a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Eating Disorders, officially listing binge eating disorder (BED) as a mental illness. To be clear here: we’re not talking just occasional Sunday sessions of overeating at brunch or late night snacking (let’s face it, we all need those from time to time). In its clinically diagnosed form, binge eating is a secret demon that can feel unbeatable. LEARN MORE

NEWS: We Break Our Own Hearts

The brain’s job is to protect us. Binge eating is an example of the brain attempting to do this and having it go horribly awry. To protect us from the neurochemical deficits caused by negative emotions, one of the brain’s immediate solutions is to increase dopamine (the brain’s happy dance drug). Regrettably, this occurs in the old mammal brain—home of the fight-or-flight response. Here the mantra is: survive now ask questions later. This part of the brain does not think because in crises action, not thought, increase your survival chances. That’s why you can eat yourself into a fudge coma, while ignoring the thigh karma until you are wearing your skinny jeans as a headband.  When you are bingeing, your brain is surviving now by reaping the neurochemical rewards of eating to obviate the immediate threat of negative emotional states. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is It Time For A Warning Label On Sugar-Loaded Drinks?

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: We consume a lot more sugar than is good for our health. Because of this, the next generation of Americans will struggle with obesity and diabetes more than any other. The most obvious culprit is the added sugar in sodas and other sugary beverages, like sports drinks or teas. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How Much Sun Exposure Should I Get?

Question: My wife has had two melanomas removed and avoids the sun at all costs. But doesn’t she need to get at least a little sunlight for her health (i.e. vitamin D)? LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 30th-April 5th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 30th-April 5th.

Milk, Calcium, and Bone Health

Even if you live under a rock, you know that in the US the current recommendation for most of the population is to enjoy 3 servings of dairy a day, including milk. One of the most well funded and persuasive ad campaigns of the three decades has been the Got Milk campaign led by the National Dairy Council. Parents are encouraged to provide milk for their kids’ growing bones and schools serve milk with every meal. LEARN MORE

Why Sleepy Shopping May Lead to a Bigger Waistline

Imagine you just pulled an all-nighter studying for an important exam, worked a double shift through the night, or were up all night with your child who has the flu. The next morning, you find yourself hungry and suddenly remember the lone jar of mustard sitting in your fridge so you decide to stop at your local grocery store to stock up for the week. Stop! Step away from the automatic doors, maybe grab a healthy bite out, and embark on this mission afresh after getting some rest. LEARN MORE

Anorexia Affects More Men Than Previously Thought

Zachary Haines was 16 years old when a physical examination put his 5’7”, 230-pound body within the obese range.  Soon after, Zachary began working out and watching his diet, entering his junior year at high school 45 pounds lighter. LEARN MORE

4 Steps to End Emotional Eating

When Kami waltzed in the room, I cringed. She had her head held high, and offered me a firm, confident handshake and a brilliant smile. Dressed to the nines in a size two expensive summer dress and high heels, her persona screamed, “I am the Martha Stewart of Corporate America on a Weekend Getaway.” She was stunning, and looked more put together than I’ve ever felt in my whole life. LEARN MORE

Yes, You Can Get Addicted to Exercise

People are often astonished to discover exercise isn’t always a panacea. Because physical activity confers so many benefits to our muscles, bones, liver, heart, and brain—not to mention its powerful mood-boosting effects—the notion that it could be hazardous to our well-being may seem ridiculous. Unfortunately, for approximately 3 percent of the population, striving to stay fit does them more harm than good. LEARN MORE

What to Do When Organic Isn’t an Option

Whether you’re stuck in a food desert or have a tight food budget, you don’t need to be exposed to dangerous pesticides. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use- Week of March 23rd-29th, 2015

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 23rd-29th.

11 Reasons to Ditch Processed Foods

The Facts: Processed foods may seem like a deal in terms of convenience, but when you break down the cost, it’s generally cheaper—and way healthier—to make those same foods from scratch. For instance, a popular brand’s microwave bowl of chili costs $3.39 and includes harmful bisphenol A, fake food dye, and industrial meat raised using antibiotics, as well as other questionable additives. LEARN MORE

Bored, Blue or Blah? 4 Ways to Cope (Without Eating!)

Do you munch when you are bored?  Most of us do!  Here are some easy, scientifically researched ideas on how to beat boredom eating. LEARN MORE

Junk food industry fights against consumers’ right to know about added sugars in foods

Around 20 years ago, food labels were introduced to help Americans consume a healthier and more nutritious diet. Recently, the FDA looked at these labels and came up with a list of possible changes, which they felt were necessary to meet the needs of the American public and create more transparency regarding food. LEARN MORE

Diet Soda – Another Reason to Avoid

A new study shows a high correlation between diet soda intake and waist circumference in older Americans. Researchers followed 700 Americans over the age of 65 for over 10 years. The diet soda drinkers gained 3.2 inches in waist circumference, non-drinkers gained only 0.8 inches. LEARN MORE

How To Eat Clean (Without Going Crazy)

Like most people who care about eating healthfully, at one point or another, you’ve probably tried to stick to super-strict guidelines that effectively eliminated all pleasure and flexibility from your diet. How’d that work out? Chances are, not well. Unsurprisingly, joyless eating isn’t sustainable. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 16th-22nd

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 16th-22nd.

What is carrageenan?

Next time you’re scooping up some ice cream or yogurt, check the label. You may see something called carrageenan listed among the ingredients. Carrageenan is a natural food additive that is mired in some controversy. It’s used primarily to thicken and stabilize foods and is found in a range of products from chocolate milk to sour cream. LEARN MORE

Loneliness can be as deadly as obesity, study finds

For years America has been talking about the obesity epidemic, but a new study points to a more serious health issue that could reach epidemic proportions by 2030: isolation and loneliness. LEARN MORE

Kraft Singles – Fake Food, Faulty Endorsement

Kraft Singles, the decades old “cheese” slice product used in billions of sandwiches across that the nation, has the nutrition world abuzz with anger and surprise. Kraft Singles were to chosen to be the first product to receive a “Kids Eat Right” seal of approval, as part of a new product endorsement program by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). “Kids Eat Right” is an education program run by AND’s Foundation arm. LEARN MORE

5 Bread Ingredients You Absolutely Should Avoid 

Welcome to part 4 of our miniseries.In part 1, we provided ground rules for choosing healthy bread. In part 2, we defined whole grains and whole wheat. In part 3 we presented the most common ingredients used in bread. LEARN MORE

The Difference Between Whole Grains & Whole Wheat 

Wheat is just one type of grain. Others are oat, barley, spelt, kamut, rye, brown rice, and a few more. For making bread, wheat flour is the most popular and widely used grain. That is why you’ve heard and will continue to hear from us to look for 100% whole wheat when buying bread. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of March 9th-15th, 2015

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 9th-15th.

High Fructose Corn Syrup Now Labeled as Fructose or HFCS-90

The Corn Refiners Association is now labeling high fructose corn syrup as fructose. Packing on products such as General Mills Vanilla Chex cereal now states the product contains no high fructose corn syrup, while the ingredients list contains the simple word, “fructose.” This fructose is actually a manufactured sugar called HFCS-90, and is made up of 90% pure fructose. High fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, contains 42% or 55 percent fructose. Health issues relating to free fructose include diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, and liver failure. LEARN MORE

Reduced-Fat-Peanut-Butter Fail

Peanut butter is a great, nutritious food, and a staple in many American homes. It is high in calories, because peanuts are high in (healthy) fats. A 2-tablespoon serving of peanut butter has about 190 calories. LEARN MORE

Could Common Food Emulsifiers Be the Cause of Obesity?

Many foods sold in supermarkets today include additives from a family known asemulsifiers.  You may have noticed some popular emulsifiers when reading the ingredient list of your favorite foods: soy lecithin, polysorbate 80, and carrageenan to name just a few. LEARN MORE

Genes and Eating Disorders

Living in an eating disorder professional world and a culture that is certifiably nuts about its expectations regarding body size and shape, I push myself to read the latest research and whatever else comes to my “in box,” regarding eating disorders.  Staying relevant is the key in so many things… LEARN MORE

Fake Olive Oil: What You Need To Know New

You’d have to live in a cave to not have heard about the health benefits of olive oil. It’s a monounsaturated fat that is a major component of the Mediterranean diet and is believed to be a factor why people in that area of the world are some of the healthiest and long-lived. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of February 16th-22nd

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 16th-22nd.

7 Reasons to Eat More Fiber

Upping your fiber consumption could save your life. Every 10 gram-per-day increase in fiber is associated with a 10 percent decrease in risk of death, according to research published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. LEARN MORE

What Causes Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Leaky gut syndrome has no single cause, but some of the most common contributors are chronic stress, dysbiosis, environmental contaminants, gastrointestinal disease, immune overload, overuse of alcoholic beverages, poor food choices, presence of pathogenic bacteria, parasites and yeasts, and prolonged use of NSAIDs. Let’s discuss some of these one at a time. LEARN MORE

Top 10 protein-packed plants for survival and a healthy diet

As the price of grocery store meat continues to climb and as factory farming pollutes its quality, more people will be looking for alternative sources of protein. If one has the opportunity to raise chickens or rabbits for meat, then they already have an ongoing, self-sufficient survival food plan in place. If these options aren’t feasible, there are still plenty of alternative sources of protein in the natural world that don’t include eating grasshoppers or crickets. LEARN MORE

GMOs invade fruit industry: Apples, pears, cherries and peaches to all become unlabeled GMO

Genetically modified apples have been approved by the industry-corrupted USDA, a federal regulator that accomplishes for the biotech industry the same thing the FDA achieves for Big Pharma: unlimited profits, lax regulation and a ready willingness to accept fabricated “science” as fact. LEARN MORE

11 food rules you should ignore

Whether you fancy yourself a chef or barely know your way around the kitchen, there are plenty of culinary “facts” out there that are just plain fiction. Maybe you learned them from your mom or from your favorite cooking show — but the source doesn’t change the cold hard truth. Here are 11 food and cooking myths … busted! LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of February 9th-15th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 9th-15th.

How much sleep do you need? New guidelines may help.

There are new recommendations for how much time people should spend snoozing. The new guidelines, released by the National Sleep Foundation, include small changes to the recommended ranges for the amount of sleep that children and teens should get. Most of the new advice recommends wider sleep ranges than before. Now, there are also specific sleep ranges for young and older adults, as well as for middle-age adults. LEARN MORE

10 Tips When Buying Olive Oil

When shopping for olive oil, consumers are faced with a wide range of options. Multiple brands vie for attention through bottle and label design, brand building, and marketing claims. Here is what you need to know. LEARN MORE

How Much Are You Willing to Spend on Healthy Food?

There is a perception that healthy food is more expensive than the regular food. This is not entirely accurate. Healthy prepared food often costs more, but if you cook your own food, you do not need to pay an arm and a leg. Healthy eating requires more time and effort, which is something many people are not willing or able to invest. LEARN MORE

10 Tips to Stop The Diet-Binge Cycle and Re-claim Your Body

Despite what all those weight loss ads tell you, being able to fit into a size zero bikini should not be your greatest life accomplishment.  Nor will it help you achieve true happiness, inner peace, self-confidence or self-worth.  Yet our culture puts such an emphasis on appearance and thinness it’s difficult to not be swayed by society’s version of beauty and how the multi-billion dollar dieting industry tells you to look.  Young girls poring over images of their favorite celebrities get the message loud and clear; if you want to be successful, rich, or in a relationship with a good looking guy, start dieting. LEARN MORE

Should You Use a Fitness Tracker?

Nike, Fitbit, Polar, Soleus, Jawbone, Garmin, even LG—it seems many manufacturers are cashing in on the fitness tracker craze. If you don’t want to purchase a device, no worries, there’s an app for that! MyFitnessPal, RunKeeper, Diet Tracker, Fitter Fitness, Map My Fitness, Fitness Buddy, the list goes on…Are they useful? Sure! They are great for those who really have no idea how many calories they are burning during an activity or how many calories are in different foods they are eating. They can also really help those in need of a motivational tool to keep them going. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Cold Pressed Coconut Oil-How It’s Made

Coconut Oil has many uses and benefits. Whether you use it to cook with or in skin care products, you won’t go wrong! For a full list of benefits and ways to use coconut oil visit //www.making-healthy-choices.com. Watch the video below to see how cold pressed coconut oil is made!

How Cold Pressed Coconut Oil Is Made

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-212-8799 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com.

News You Can Use-Week of February 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 2nd-8th

Exercising May Not Be Enough to Ward Off Disease If You Sit All Day Long

Eating a healthy diet and exercising may not be enough to ward off disease if you spend most of your day sitting in a chair. This is a disheartening conclusion from a study published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine. LEARN MORE

One Simple Change to Increase Kids’ Fruit & Veggie Consumption

Here’s a hack to get schoolchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables during lunch: Schedule their meal to AFTER recess. LEARN MORE

How Words Shape Our Success (or Failure) in Weight Loss

When it comes to leading a healthy lifestyle and losing weight, psychology plays an important role. The way we relate to specific foods or to ourselves with respect to food can sometimes be painful and even harmful. LEARN MORE

8 Things You Should Never Say to Yourself About Food

Sometimes we’re our own worst enemy when it comes to food. Those little things that we say to ourselves before or after we eat may be doing more harm than we even realize. Do you need to re-language your food thoughts? LEARN MORE

Health Basics: How do MSG, artificial sweeteners and gluten cause fast weight gain?

People want that fast track to “fit,” but there’s a price to pay for tricking your body into losing weight, since tricks sometimes involve losing water weight and just postponing bad food habits. There is no fast track to losing weight, but there is a permanent way to achieve and maintain your ideal body weight. The first and most important step involves eliminating three major poisons that are commonly found in today’s “Big Food” industry — yes it’s your turn to turn the tables on Big Food and perhaps your big gut or “chunky” thighs, or maybe you’ve just got some “junk in the trunk” that you want to drop off. Let’s talk about the top three realms of FDA-approved carcinogens and why they drive so many people into obesity and compounded health misery. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Canola Oil-How It’s Made

How can an oil be organic and still be so dangerous? Below is an interesting video on canola oil and how it’s made. Did you know the FDA identified it as a pesticide?

How Canola Oil Is Made

 

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-212-8799 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com.

News You Can Use Week of January 26th-February 1st

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 26th-February 1st.

Understanding types of oatmeal

If you grew up ripping open a package of instant flavored oatmeal, adding boiling water, and having your breakfast ready in two minutes, the different types of oatmeal may be confusing. Oats processed for oatmeal come in a variety of forms. They’re all made from the same grain, but the way they’re processed can change the cooking time and the consistency of the oatmeal once it’s cooked. LEARN MORE

This is Why Carrots Are Sweeter in the Winter

Here is a great, albeit unintended, alignment of interests between carrots and humans. When it gets cold outside, carrots growing in the ground protect themselves from freezing by converting some of their starch into sugar. LEARN MORE

Sea Salt vs. Table Salt – The Truth

The other day I found myself standing in front of an array of gourmet sea salts, each packaged in a small plastic tub.  The labels were in different pastel colours and the font style was kinda hip looking, if you know what I mean.  Those packages were telling me that if I used sea salt, I’d be hip too, or cutting-edge, or a more “natural” cook. LEARN MORE

Baby formula is loaded with GMOs – Avoid these brands

A petition is circulating to persuade three of the top infant formula brands in the U.S. — Abbott Laboratories (Similac), Mead Johnson Nutrition (Enfamil) and Nestle (Gerber Good Start) — to stop using genetically modified (GM) ingredients in their baby products. Each of these powdered formulas is loaded with corn and soy byproducts, along with sugar, which means they are more than likely GM in nature and harming children. LEARN MORE

5 Lies From The Diet Industry

Now that our holiday indulgences are behind us, and 2015 is upon us, we’re all apt to want to lose a few pounds (or more!). So, where should we start? The problem is that the diets we often turn to don’t actually work. And, if they do work, they aren’t sustainable (do you really want to never eat carbs ever again?). Here is some of the science that refutes the diet industry scams we’re all tempted to fall for as we gear up to make this year our thinnest yet. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Snacks You And Your Body Will Love

 

On this week’s episode I shared some of my favorite snack recipes! These snacks are easy to make, they’re made with clean ingredients, and they’re all delicious!

If you missed it, you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered

1:50-One Of The Most Important Issues For People With Eating Disorders

2:50-Visit eatingdisorderpro.com for all of the recipes discussed today

3:43-Types of Snacks

5:20-Protein Bars

6:25-Protein Bar Ingredients

9:27-How To Make Protein Bars

11:30- 195 Cal, 19 Grams of Fat, 35 Grams of Carbs, 22 Grams of Protien, 5 Grams of Fiber

12:35- Gluten Free Brownie

12:48- Ingredients In Brownies

13:30- Importance of Dark Chocolate

15:35- How To Make Brownies

20:18- Fudge

20:50- Ingredients in Fudge

21:28- How To Make Fudge

24:35- Popcorn

25:15- How To Make Popcorn

26:55- Seasoned Nuts

27:03- How To Season the Nuts

30:53- Next Week’s Episode: Changing Your Complexion

31:57- Maji And Mongo Books

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Gluten-Free Brownies

 

Ingredients: (Use all organic)

5 ounces high quality 100% cocoa dark chocolate

½  cup organic coconut oil

½  coconut sugar

½ cup Norbu sugar

1/2 cup almond meal

1/4 cup sorghum flour

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 organic free-range eggs, beaten well with a fork

1 tablespoon bourbon vanilla*

 

Optional:

1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

Dark chocolate chips for the top

 

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line an 8×8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper.

Melt the dark chocolate and coconut oil in a saucepan over low heat, gently stirring. (Or melt in a microwave safe measuring cup and stir together to combine.)

In a mixing bowl whisk together the brown sugar, almond meal, sorghum flour, fine sea salt and baking soda. Make a well in the center and add the beaten eggs, vanilla extract and melted dark chocolate mixture. Beat on low-medium for two minutes, until the batter begins to come together. At first it will seem thin, like cake batter, but keep beating until it thickens and becomes smooth and glossy.

If you are adding nuts, stir in the nuts by hand and spread the batter into the prepared baking pan. Even out the batter with a silicone spatula.

Stud the top with some dark chocolate chips and press in slightly.

Bake in the center of a preheated 350ºF oven for 32 to 35 minutes, or until the brownies are set. The top will crack, like a flourless chocolate cake.

Cool on a wire rack; and remove the cooled brownies from the pan by gripping the foil edges and lifting the brownies out as a whole.

Chill for an hour before cutting. (Though warm and gooey is really divine, if you don’t mind them falling apart.)

Yield: 16 servings

*For chocolate-mint brownies use 1 teaspoon peppermint extract and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

News You Can Use Week of January 19th-25th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 19th-25th

What If All Nutrition Studies Are Based On Wrong Data?

A majority of nutrition studies, conclusions and recommendations are based on flawed data. The result is bad advice dispensed to the public. This is the conclusion of a paper titled Energy balance measurement: when something is not better than nothing, published in the International Journal of Obesity. LEARN MORE

High Fructose Corn Syrup More Toxic than Sugar … for Females

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the most despised ingredients in consumer health circles. The corn derived sweetener has replaced sugar in soft drinks as well as thousands of other foods and beverages since the 1980′s. HFCS has been blamed by some people for the rise in obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and a host of other maladies. LEARN MORE

The Truth About Coconut Water

Coconut water is a big business, raking in almost half a billion dollars in sales last year. Just 10 years ago, most Americans hadn’t even heard of coconut water. Today, coconut water is considered the natural and healthy alternative to sports drinks, but it comes with a hefty price tag. LEARN MORE

The top 10 “Big Food” health slogans and myths busted!

Like they say, if you hear something enough times, you start believing it, even if at first it sounds absurd. That’s how advertising for toxic products works, and Americans have been falling for it for generations. You may recognize some or all of these popular slogans, or you may not. It doesn’t really matter to Big Food, as long as you consume them. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Salted Coconuts


Ingredients

6 oz Macadamia nuts

6 oz. Walnuts

6 oz. Brazil nuts

Coconut Oil

Seasonings of your choice

Directions:

In the microwave warm

¼ cup coconut oil

Add:

Himalayan Pink Salt

Garlic powder (or your favorite spices)

Put into a Mason jar and add the nuts. Shake it up until nuts are well coated. Dump onto paper towels and salt nuts if more salt is needed. Put back into jar and refrigerate. Eat cold.

You can also use Norbu or coconut sugar in the coconut oil to make a sweet version. I still put in a little bit of salt.

Melt in Your Mouth High Protein Low Fat Fudge

fudge
Melt over very low heat:

2 4oz packages of SunSpire organic baking bar 100% unsweetened cacao

16 ounces of Nutiva coconut manna or Artisana Raw coconut butter

1 ½ cups XYLITOL sugar

1 cup shredded coconut – medium shred

1 cup shelled hemp seed Florettes

When well blended pour into silicone cupcake holders and freeze. Pop out of holders and store in freezer or refrigerator.

Alternatively, grease glass pan, pour in mixture and refrigerate until solid enough to cut into bars.

Must be kept cold until eaten.

The fat in this fudge is metabolized as almost pure energy as it is primarily a medium chain fat, which does not store as a fat but is used by the liver. So this fudge will give you a kick of energy and no guilt!

Gluten-Free Organic Protein Bars

Protein-Bars-wide
In a sauce pan over very low heat stir:

4 oz. 100% Sunspire dark chocolate bar

½ cup almond butter

½ cup cold pressed coconut oil

½ cup Norbu sugar and ½ cup honey or    coconut crystals (Or you can use only Norbu for zero calories from sugar)

 

In a mixing bowl toss:

1 cup hemp florets

1 cup shredded coconut

1 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup Naked Whey (Grass Fed Naked Whey Protein Powder)

½ cup raisins

½ cup mixed dry antioxidant fruits

Pour warm mixture into mixing bowl and toss with a fork until well mixed

 

Grease a glass pan with coconut oil and spread mix.

Freeze for 1 hour, long enough to be able to cut into bars

Refreeze and keep frozen until a few minutes before enjoying!

 

Per Serving:  Fat- 19    Calories- 195       Carbs- 35      Protein- 22     Fiber- 5    Net Carb- 30

 

 

 

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: New Years Resolutions And How To Keep Them

new years resolution image for newsletter

On this week’s episode I spoke about New Year’s Resolutions!

It is a new year, which means a new beginning. We all make new years resolutions and most of us keep them for maybe a month or two.  And then Feburary and March come around and we find ourselves going back to our old habits. Change is hard, but with the right tools and the right support stystem, change is possible. Listen in as I talk about New Years Resolutions and how it is possible to keep them. For I have hope in all of you and I want to help you make 2015 your year.

If you missed it, you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered

1:36-Traditions of New Years Eve in Other Cultures

3:52-The First People To Start Resolutions

8:20-Post-It Hope Jar

10:10-Early Roman Calendar

10:43-Modern Calendar

12:25-How Do You Keep New Year’s Resolutions?

13:48-Most Common New Year’s Resolutions

15:24-Baby Steps/Set Realistic Goals

18:09-Change One Behavior At A Time

19:14-Talk About Your Goals

20:12-Don’t Beat Yourself Up

23:25-Ask For Support

25:55-Next Week’s Topic: Healthy Snack Recipes

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone (513) 212-8799 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

News You Can Use-Week of January 5th-11th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 5th-11th!”

Ask Well: Wild Fish vs. Farmed Fish

I know eating farm-raised fish is not as healthy as eating wild-caught fish. But is eating farm-raised fish better than eating no fish at all? Also, how often is it advisable to eat farm-raised fish? LEARN MORE

Why You Should Sip Homemade Bone Broth Every Day

Bone broth is nothing new, but it’s suddenly very popular to have a daily mug’s worth. Here’s why. LEARN MORE

Think Thin High Protein Bars Reviewed: Think Highly Processed

There is no shortage of snack bar brands out there. A popular subcategory is the protein bar. They have become the darling of the weight loss crowd due to the magnetic pull of the beloved macro-nutrient protein, which helps with satiety. LEARN MORE

Tell Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz to stop fighting GMO labeling, start using non-GMO milk

Though this immensely popular coffee chain often tries to blend in with the health crowd, pretending to be environmentally and nutritionally conscious, the Starbucks Coffee Company is an active member of a food organization fighting to keep you and your family in the dark about genetically modified organisms (GMOs). LEARN MORE

How to Beat the Winter Blues

Amidst the joyful sleigh bells and twinkling lights, it’s easy to forget that there are plenty among us who aren’t feeling the same holiday cheer. This isn’t because they’re part Uncle Scrooge, part Grinch—it’s because they’re suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast-Are We Taking Too Much Vitamin D? W/ Wendy Myers

Wendy Meyers

On this week’s episode I spoke with Wendy Myers about the Marshall Protocol and the consumption of Vitamin D.

Wendy Myers is a CHHC (Certified Holistic Health Coach) and the founder, head writer and Chief Eating Officer of Live to 110. She is a certified holistic health and nutrition coach in Los Angeles, Ca, having attended the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York and graduated with a degree in Entrepreneurship from the University of Southern California.

If you missed it, you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered

1:20-Trevor Marshall/Marshall Protocol

1:40- Wendy Myer’s Background

2:30- What is Vitamin D Doing To Us?

5:32- Why Is The Immune System Failing?

6:07- Chronic Inflammation

10:44- Marshall Protocol

11:38- Vitamin D Is A Steroid

12:52- Many People Are Vitamin D Deficient

15:06- History of Vitamin D Deficiency

16:16- Immune System Is Failing For No Reason

19:30- Reduced Fat Foods

22:40- Wendy Myers

23:52- The Different Types Of Vitamin D

24:38- Cortisol

26:10- Infrared Sauna

32:35- Specific Examples of Health Improvements From The Infrared Sauna

36:18- Combination of Clean Eating & The Infrared Sauna

39:26- Purchase an Infrared Sauna at cs@liveto110.com or at liveto110.com

40:55- Who Should Avoid The Sauna?

44:30- How Often Should You Use The Infrared Sauna?

47:30- Yeast & Heat

50:00- Coffee Enema

51:44- Liveto110.com

53:16- Check out my article “The Missing Link” about Vitamin D and the Marshall Protocol On My Website: www.eating disorderpro.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

News You Can Use-Week of December 15th-21st

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 15th-21st!”

New Victims of Anorexia: Elementary Age Girls and 40 Somethings

Eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia are on the rise, and doctors who treat them here in Connecticut are seeing a dangerous trend. LEARN MORE

Selenium in broccoli and garlic boosts immune system, could help fight cancer

Most Natural News readers know that broccoli is a good cancer preventative. Not everyone knows that garlic is another good food to help stave off cancer cell reproduction. The compound or trace mineral selenium was isolated as the main cancer fighter, according to the latest research from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. LEARN MORE

Poor diet links obese mothers, stunted children

Obesity and malnutrition are often thought of as problems at opposite ends of the nutrition spectrum, but the study found that 6.7% of Egyptian mothers were obese and had stunted children. In these ‘double-burden’ households with obese mothers and stunted children, malnutrition is unlikely to be down to scarcity of food. LEARN MORE

Count chemicals, not calories

If you just can’t seem to lose weight, maybe even just those last 10 to 15 pounds you want to “shed,” perhaps it’s because your body is being “informed” with incorrect information about whether it’s hungry and whether it’s getting the proper nutrition. Maybe mixed signals are being sent in, over and over, so that your system doesn’t even know HOW to fix itself. Have you hit a “brick wall” with weight loss programs and systems? Start over right here. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of December 8th-14th!

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 8th-14th!”

Obesity Shortens Life By Eight Years, Warn Scientists

Obese young people could be shortening their lives by more than eight years and storing up a future of ill health, scientists have warned. LEARN MORE

Eating More Green Vegetables May Aid Heart Health, Reduce Risk Of Obesity, Diabetes

Eat your greens, they’re good for you.” This is statement that many of us heard as a child while pushing vegetables around the plate in disgust at dinner time. But it seems our parents may have had a point; three new studies reveal that a chemical called nitrate – found in green vegetables including spinach, lettuce and celery – may aid heart health and reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes. LEARN MORE

Maybe We Just Shouldn’t Ever Buy Grocery Store Chicken

The latest scandal in supermarket chicken comes from Canada. This time, a supermarket was reported to be re-labeling its chicken to have a later sell-by date, based on nothing more than a smell test. Should we maybe just stop buying supermarket chicken altogether? LEARN MORE

Is the Propellant in Pam Cooking Spray Harmful?

Do you use zero-calorie oil sprays? You know, of course, that they do contain some calories. FDA loopholes allow the manufacturers to round the calorie count down to 0. These oils-in-a-can also contain an ingredient you may be interested to learn more about: Propellant. LEARN MORE

Slow Down!

Common sense says if you eat slowly over the course of, say, a 20-minute meal, you’ll eat less than someone who eats quickly over the course of that same meal. This approach to healthier eating has been confirmed by a report published in a May 2014 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, wherein 22 studies on eating rate and calorie intake were reviewed. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Defining “Food Junkie” W/ Dr. Vera Tarman

Vera Tarman

On this week’s episode I spoke with Dr. Vera Tarman. Dr. Tarman is the author of Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction.

She is also the founder and spokesperson for Addictions Unplugged. Dr. Vera Tarman has focused her medical practice over the past 17 years on addiction treatment and recovery. Along with serving the addiction community through her own private practice, she has been the Medical Director at Renascent since 2006 and the Staff physician with Salvation Army Homestead since 2004.

If you missed it, you can tune in HERE.

What We Covered:

0:55- Dr. Vera Tarman, Author of Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction

1:43- Dr. Tarman’s Professional Background

2:20- Definition of Food Addiction

3:05- Signs of Food Addiction

7:06- Causes of Food Addiction

7:15- Below The Radar-Dr. Norton’s Book

9:15- Are People Born With Food Addiction?

12:11- Caller Joe

13:01- What Is The Solution For Food Addiction?

13:45- What Do You Abstain From?

15:00- How Do You Determine What To Eliminate?

16:22- Are Coconut Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup The Same?

18:24- Coconut Sugar and Norbu Sweetener

23:32- If You Have A Food Addiction, Will You Always Have One?

25:48- Ways To Overcome Food Addictions

30:26-Can You Become Addicted To Fruit?

32:53- Physical & Emotional Addiction

33:26- Definition of Addiction

39:06- Stages of Recovery

40:08- What Is The Number One Sign You’re Addicted To Something?

41:43- Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction

42:54- Contact Dr. Vera Tarman at addictionsunplugged.com 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

News You Can Use-Week of November 17th-23rd

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 17th-23rd!”

NEWS: 5 GMO-Free Thanksgiving Dessert Ideas

The food writer Michael Pollan once wrote, “Don’t eat anything your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” Sadly, most of the food that now adorns Thanksgiving tables, particularly the dessert table, wouldn’t meet that basic requirement: pumpkin from cans, “whipped topping” that contains more genetically modified corn- and soy-based ingredients than actual cream, artificially dyed pie filling, high-fructose-corn-syrup (aka “pecan”) pie. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Peanut Butter-10 Things to Know

November is National Peanut Butter Lover’s Month, so here are some interesting facts to celebrate. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 5 Freaky Stats About Added Sugar

You know the usual suspects when it comes to sugar: soda, candy, and, of course, your sugar bowl. But these obvious sugar sources might not be the biggest threat to your health: Sneaky sugars are. Sneaky sugars hide in foods that you wouldn’t think to look in, like wheat bread, “healthy” cereals, pasta sauce, frozen dinners, ramen noodle soup, salad dressings, ketchup, barbecue sauce, deli meat, and sausage. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Nothing fishy about health benefits of plant-based omega-3 fatty acid

Increasing the amount of omega-3s in your diet, whether from fish or flax, will likely decrease your risk of getting heart disease, according to Penn State nutritionists. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Obesity Is Tied To Pollutants

Exposure to secondhand smoke and roadway traffic may be tied to increased body mass index in children and adolescents, a new study suggests. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 10th-16th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 10th-16th!”

NEWS: Eating disorders in young children–how bad is it?

It’s hard to escape the media coverage of eating disorders in young children. The stories are usually framed around the growing numbers of young children (generally meaning pre-pubescent, typically 10 or 11 and under) that are presenting for treatment. The articles generally consist of a breathless assessment of how bad the situation is, with no small amount of blaming the media and a child’s increasing exposure to images of super-skinny models. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Labeling GMOs Won’t Raise Food Prices (INFOGRAPHIC)

Here’s a stat that is likely scaring the pants off of companies producing GMOs and the chemicals designed for use on them: 92 percent of Americans want GMOs labeled. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Miracle Food You’re Not Eating

The benefits of hemp are boundless. The wonder food balances your hormones, nourishes your skin and hair, calms post-workout inflammation, and relaxes your muscles. Once a mainstay crop in the United States, it’s also embedded in history: The Declaration of Independence was drafted on hemp, and early American flags were made of the durable, plant-based fabric. In the early 1900’s, one report declared 25,000 uses for hemp, everything from ropes and sails to linens and food. LEARN MORE

NEWS: FDA targets Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil

(NaturalNews) Relatively new to the food products market, Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, a Southern California-based family company famous for its organic, fair-trade pure castile soaps, has come under scrutiny by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for merely sharing with its customers the proven health benefits of eating extra-virgin coconut oil. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How Much Sugar Is Too Much? A New Tool Sheds Some Light

These days, sugar is pretty much everywhere in the American diet. A new initiative from the University of California, San Francisco spells out the health dangers of this glut of sugar in clear terms. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 3rd-9th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 3rd-9th!”

9 Sneaky Sources of GMOs

If you’re trying to avoid foods with genetically modified organisms (GMOs), you probably already keep a sharp eye out for foods made from corn, canola, and soy, all of which have had bacteria or genes inserted into their DNA to either produce or resist toxic pesticides. LEARN MORE

Obesity Around the Nation

Obesity rates in states around the country are beginning to slow, but the epidemic is still affecting the poor and minorities disproportionately, new research shows. LEARN MORE

Labeling GMOs Won’t Raise Food Prices (INFOGRAPHIC)

Here’s a stat that is likely scaring the pants of companies producing GMOs and the chemicals designed for use on them: 92 percent of Americans want GMOs labeled. LEARN MORE

Obesity Is Found to Gain Its Hold in Earliest Years

For many obese adults, the die was cast by the time they were 5 years old. A major new study of more than 7,000 children has found that a third of children who were overweight in kindergarten were obese by eighth grade. And almost every child who was very obese remained that way. LEARN MORE

5 Surprising Genetically Modified Foods

By now, you’ve likely heard about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the controversy over whether they’re the answer to world hunger or the devil incarnate. But for right now, let’s leave aside that debate and turn to a more basic question: When you go to the supermarket, do you know which foods are most likely to be—or contain ingredients that are—genetically engineered? LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Hummus

//whitneyinchicago.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/chipotle_hummus/

//whitneyinchicago.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/chipotle_hummus/

Ingredients:

16 ounce bag of frozen spinach or frozen kale.

16 ounce box of garbanzo beans

16 ounce carton of kalona cottage cheese or any 100% grass fed to cottage cheese full fat

1/4 cup garlic juice or garlic to taste garlic salt & garlic pepper to taste

Directions:

Nuke the frozen spinach or kale in the microwave and drain/press out all of the water

Mix all ingredients together into a food processor until creamy and smooth

Fats Explained: Where to Get Pastured Butter

butter

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Where to Get Pastured Butter

Pastured butter is an excellent source of CLA. To my knowledge, there are no American farms or cooperatives that are currently selling butter from 100% grass-fed cows. Although cheese from all-grass-fed cows is available from many suppliers, grass-fed butter cannot be found. Restrictive government regulations and lack of consumer awareness keep small-scale butter operations from being profitable.

An excellent source for all-grass-fed butter can be imported from Germany by the Allgau company. The butter is made from cows that are raised on pasture or grass silage, making it five times higher in CLA and also higher in vitamin E and beta carotene than commercial butter, whether organic or non-organic. It costs about twice as much as ordinary butter and about the same as organic butter. It is yellower than butter from cows raised in confinement, melts at a lower temperature, and has a terrific taste. You can purchase it online from igourmet.com.

Other options are to make your own butter, which isn’t nearly as difficult as it sounds. I’ve posted a recipe for butter here. You may also be able to convince your local supermarket to stock it, eliminating the high cost of shipping. Check this site out for grass-fed options – www.eatwild.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Making Healthy Eating Easy with Carmen Johnson

Carmen Johnson

Join us on TUESDAY September 3rd at 7:00 pm EST as we talk with Carmen Johnson about how to make healthy eating easy! We’ll be broadcasting live from The Norton Center for Eating Disorders in Cincinnati, Ohio! This episode is especially important if you suffer from anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, obesity, or binge eating disorder.

Carmen Johnson is a Board Certified Health Coach and founder and CEO of The Healthy Kids Revolution. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494You can tune in HERE.

“Carmen is the Founder & CEO of The Healthy Kids Revolution, which educates children and parents on the basics of creating true Cell Health through on-line group education and video tutorials.  Her Insane Body Science program has been sent to Yale Prevention Research Center for review and is impacting children & adults alike. Founder/CEO of Minding What Matter, Inc., Founder & President of Feed The Mind Foundation, Inc. a NC based Not-For-Profit aimed at combating childhood obesity in the under-served public schools, Vice-President of Charlotte Health’s Angels a Charlotte, NC based Health Coaches group formed to create and enhance sustainable wellness for individuals in the community, and Lead Child Nutrition Educator for Hydro One Beverage Company, Carmen continues to teach thousands of children & parents her methods of Healthy Eating Made Easy with great success! Because True Health begins with Healthy Cells!”

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Sugar: The Bad

high fructose corn syrup

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Bad

Commercially, fructose is derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn. This is where things get sticky. There are three important forms of commercially derived fructose:
  1. Crystalline fructose is a monosaccharide. It is usually created from cornstarch, but other starches such as rice and wheat can be used. In this method, corn is first milled to produce cornstarch, then processed to yield corn syrup, which is almost entirely glucose. The glucose obtained is treated with a series of enzymes to convert nearly all of it into fructose. The fructose is then allowed to crystallize, and is finally dried and milled to produce crystalline fructose.
  2. High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a mixture of glucose and fructose. It is made up of any of a group of corn syrups that have undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce the desired sweetness.
  3.  Sucrose, the third form, is a disaccharide compound made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. It is the organic compound commonly known as table sugar. A white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste, it is best known for its role as a food enhancer.
Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – Jan 3-10 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 3-10 2013!”

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Avoiding Neurotoxins

photo used under a creative commons license

“A neurotoxin is a substance which inhibits the functions of neurons. Neurons are found throughout the brain and nervous system, and the function of these unique cells is critical for a variety of tasks, ranging from autonomic nervous system jobs like swallowing to higher-level brain function. Neurotoxins can work in a variety of ways, with the danger of exposure varying, depending on the neurotoxin involved and the dosage.”

Neurotoxins can be found in nearly every processed food and beverage on grocery store shelves. This includes processed organic foods! The consumption of processed foods in the American diet are skyrocketing and shows no sign of slowing down. In 2010, Americans spent 90% of their food budget on processed foods! 1 out of every 4 Americans are sensitive to neurotoxic food additives, but only 1 out of 250 Americans know that their symptoms are a reaction to these additives. The most common neurotoxic food additives in processed foods in the United States include:

  • aspartame
  • autolyzed anything
  • barley malt
  • beef base
  • beef flavoring
  • beef stock
  • bouillon
  • broth of any kind
  • calcium caseinate
  • carrageenan
  • caseinate
  • chicken base
  • chicken broth
  • chicken flavoring
  • chicken stock
  • disodium anything
  • dough conditioner
  • flavoring
  • gelatin
  • gelatinized anything
  • glutamate
  • guar gum
  • hydrolyzed anything
  • kombu extract
  • l-cysteine
  • malt anything
  • malted anything
  • milk solids
  • monosodium glutamate
  • natural flavor
  • nutrasweet
  • pork base
  • pork flavoring
  • protein concentrate
  • protein extract
  • seasoned salt
  • seasoning
  • smoke flavoring
  • sodium caseinate
  • solids of any kind
  • soup base
  • soy extract
  • soy protein anything
  • soy sauce
  • spice
  • stock
  • textured protein
  • textured vegetable protein
  • umami
  • vegetable gum
  • whey anything
  • yeast extract
How can we best protect ourselves from neurotoxic food additives? The best way is to eat a clean diet which minimizes the consumption of processed foods. If you must eat processed foods, it is important to become educated on what food additives to avoid. Overwhelmed by the idea of eliminating processed foods from your diet? You don’t need to eliminate all processed foods at once. Just make it a goal to gradually eliminate more processed foods every time you go grocery shopping. Many of my patients find the website “100 Days of Real Food” to be an excellent source for recipes and tips on how to ditch the processed foods and switch to clean eating! Dallas and Melissa Hartwig, authors of “It Starts with Food” offer several free must-read resources. You can view them all HERE!
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Thanksgiving + An Intro to Food Addiction

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we talked about Food Addiction, we also had a special segment where we talked about how to eat healthier on Thanksgiving.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:00 – Introduction
5:15 – How much weight do we gain over the holidays?
6:30 – What is the real cause of “food coma”?
7:35 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part I)
12:47 – Caller Question – What is the Difference Between Food Cravings and Food Addiction?
23:30 – Comparison of the Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner versus a “Clean” Thanksgiving Dinner (Part II)
38:18 – Food Addiction – What is Addiction?
39:45 – Caller Question – Can you talk a bit more about spiritual addiction?
41:25 – Caller Question – How does Passive-Aggressive Behavior Relate to Food Addiction?
43:40 – Caller Question – How do you define passive-aggressive behavior? What kinds of things lead to passive-aggressive behavior?
48:05 – Characteristics of Addiction
53:18 – Food Addiction and Bulimarexia
55:56 – Food Addiction and Diabulimia

Links we discussed:

A Healthier Pumpkin Pie
Healthified Corn Bread Stuffing
Grassfed Whipped Cream
Grassfed, Organic Egg Nog
Smashed Potatoes

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Nutritional Benefits of Adzuki Beans

photo used under a creative commons license

While shopping at Whole Foods Market I discovered a “new to me” food, adzuki beans (pronounced “azuki”). I haven’t seen these beans in stores before, so I had to find out if adzuki beans have any health benefits over other beans. Here’s what I’ve found out!

Adzuki beans are grown in East Asia. They are traditionally used for both sweet and savory dishes in East Asia. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, adzuki beans are believed to clear toxins from the body, clear heat from the body, reduce abdominal fullness and swelling due to edema, disperse blood statis, and improve jaundice. Adzuki beans are also high in iron, making it a good food for those who suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Adzuki beans may also promote good spleen and stomach health. They also believed to improve “yang” energy; you may have low yang energy if you have low productivity, are indecisive, are depressed or overly emotional, are controlling, are overly introverted, you tend to hold on to things too long, or have stagnant energy.

Nutritionally, how do adzuki beans compare to other beans? In comparison to mung beans, adzuki beans contain:

– almost twice as much iron

– more than twice as much potassium

– about 25% more magnesium

– almost twice as much phosphorous

– almost 2.5 times more zinc

– about 2 times more copper

– about 2 times more manganese

Mung beans beat adzuki beans in three areas. Mung beans contain less sodium, more selenium, and more vitamin A.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Defensive Eating – Protecting Your Brain from the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

Protecting The Brain from the Effects of Neurotoxins

“O is for Occipital Lobe” by Eric on Flickr. Used under Creative Commons license.

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a chemical that food manufacturers add to their products to enhance flavor; it is a cheap way to make very low quality foods taste great. What food manufacturers don’t want us to know is that MSG is a neurotoxin. A neurotoxin is a chemical that has a degenerative effect on the brain and nervous system.

Consumed on a regular basis, MSG creates lesions in the hypothalamus part of the brain.  When this occurs, neurotoxins enter the brain and cause damage. The damage caused results in abnormal development such as obesity, impaired growth, sexual reproductive problems, sleep difficulties and emotional problems.

One source of MSG is derived from fermented sugar beets. Currently, thanks to a company called Monsanto, 90% of sugar beets in the United States today are genetically modified to contain the pesticide gene of Roundup. So, by ingesting MSG we also ingest a known carcinogen.

At first glance, it would seem that removing MSG from our diets would be easy. I mean, just look at the food label, and make sure the product doesn’t list “MSG” or “Monosodium Glutamate” in the ingredients list.  Nothing to it, right? In an ideal world, this would be the case. Unfortunately, if the ingredient is made up of less than 99% MSG, the food manufacturer doesn’t have to list MSG in the ingredients list. MSG can be “hidden” in our foods under more than 50 alternative names and forms including, autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, dry milk powder, dry milk protein, gelatin, glutamate, glutamic acid, hydrolyzed corn gluten, hydrolyzed soy protein, hydrolyzed wheat protein, monopotassium glutamate, monosodium glutamate, natrium glutamate, sodium caseinate, textured protein, yeast food, yeast nutrient, etc.

The best way to protect yourself from the neurological effects of MSG is adapt a lifestyle of “clean eating”. Clean eating involves eliminating all processed foods from our diet; a processed food is any food that comes in a bottle, box, bag, can, carton or shrink-wrap, as well as the vast majority of deli and restaurant foods. It is virtually impossible to avoid these foods your entire life; never eating in a restaurant is a somewhat unrealistic expectation in today’s society. So, what can we do to protect ourselves from the neurological effects of MSG when we are in situations where MSG is nearly impossible to avoid?

In 2008, Phytomedicine released a report for a study which explored the use of Red Clover to protect the brain from the effects of MSG. Red Clover contains phytoestrogenic isoflavones which can possibly protect the brain from glutamate toxicity. The study found that by taking Red Clover before consuming MSG, there was a significantly increased cell survival rate and significantly decreased release of cellular lactate dehydrogenase, an indicator of cell damage. You can supplement with Red Clover in a variety of forms (such as teas, tinctures, tablets, capsules, liquid extracts, and extracts), but a whole herb supplement is thought to be the most effective.

Another way to protect our brain from the effects of MSG, is to supplement with Pyruvate. Pyruvate produces energy in the brain. When energy is produced in the brain, the brain is protected against neurotoxicity. Pyruvate is available as a supplement in most health food stores.

Keep in mind, these supplements are good to use when you can’t avoid ingesting MSG. Obviously it is better to avoid MSG altogether, when possible. As I heard a health professional say “it’s like putting a helmet on your head so you can strike yourself with a sledgehammer.”

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

The phytoestrogenic isoflavones from Trifolium pratense L. (Red clover) protects human cortical neurons from glutamate toxicity. Occhiuto F, Sangla G, Samperi S, Palumbo DR, DePasquale R, Circosta C. Phytomedicine. 2008 Sep; 15(9):676-82.

Health Ranger interviews neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock on MSG and brain-damaging excitotoxins

Hidden Names for MSG

Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution

Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution

“For the past 10 years, I have noticed a connection between childhood obesity, eating disorders, and the increasing complications of both in my clinical work as well as in my research.  As part of my mission to shed light on these problems, particularly as they relate to US children, I find it important to provide both by readers and clients with relevant informative articles.”

In my radio interview “The Weight of Childhood Obesity” on the Underground Wellness show, I had the privilege of speaking to Sean Croxton’s listeners about my new children’s book ‘How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch!’. One of the callers to the radioshow asking for information on how to improve the quality of food served in their local schools. I recently discovered an program founded by Jamie Oliver, that is doing just that!

“More must be done to invest in an all-round food education for our kids; one that includes learning about where food comes from and how it’s grown as well as the hands-on experience of cooking in the classroom. I strongly believe that teaching our kids these life skills gives them the best start in life, for their own health, the health of their kids and their kids’ kids. And if our kids are also getting a tasty, nutritious meal at lunchtime, their prospects are even better. It’s been proven time and time again during the last five years that a healthy school meal improves a child’s ability to learn and do well at school. We can’t ignore that; we must continue to feed our children better, even better. We must invest in our kids; they are the future and they deserve it.”
-Jamie Oliver

Food Revolution was started by Jamie Oliver upon receiving thousands of letters from Americans that were worried about the quality of food their kids were being served at school and the risks associated with these foods; including obesity, diabetes, behavioral problems, and poor school grades. The mission of Food Revolution is to replace processed and junk food with freshly cooked meals that are made from fresh, locally sourced ingredients, cooked from scratch by properly trained cooks in well-equipped kitchens. Oliver points out the importance of not blaming the school cooks for the quality of food served in our schools. Budget restrictions limits the foods and kitchen tools they have access to, they are doing the best job they can do with the resources they’ve been provided.

In Jamie Oliver’s TED Talk, he discussed how Food Revolution improved food quality in a school in Huntington, West Virginia; at the time West Virginia was the unhealthiest state in America. He became an ambassador to the school cooks, helping them find local sustainable foods and arming them with additional training in the kitchen. He also worked with the children in the school, providing them with food education; currently the average American elementary school child only receives an average of 3.4 hours of food education per year….that’s less than most kids watch TV each day!

The Food Revolution website offers support, and many useful tools for parents and teachers that want to start a Food Revolution in their child’s school.  Be sure to visit the website at www. jamiesfoodrevolution.com to take advantage of the support and tools they provide.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 29-May 6 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 29 – May 6 2012!”

My Kid Likes Junk Food. And That’s Ok.
Obesity is Bankrupting America, Disease Costs Soar
Fast-food Diet Increases Risk of Depression by 50%
Losing Weight When Obese Can Prevent or Cure Diabetes, Whatever the Initial BMI, Study Suggests

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder and Obesity Therapy Tool: Eating Organic on a Budget

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has recently published a list of conventionally-grown produce that are highest in pesticide residue, and a list of conventionally-grown produce that are lowest in pesticide residue. Foods that are highest in pesticides should either be avoided or purchased organic; foods that are lowest in pesticides are not as necessary to purchase organic.

The foods that are highest in pesticide residue include:

  • Apples
  • Celery
  • Strawberries
  • Peaches
  • Spinach
  • Nectarines – imported
  • Grapes – imported
  • Sweet bell peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Blueberries  –  domestic
  • Lettuce
  • Kale/Collard greens
The foods that are lowest in pesticide residue include:
  • Onions
  • Sweet Corn – should be purchased organic, if you are concerned with GMOs
  • Pineapples
  • Avocado
  • Asparagus
  • Sweet peas
  • Mangoes
  • Eggplant
  • Cantaloupe – domestic
  • Kiwi
  • Cabbage
  • Watermelon
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Grapefruit
  • Mushrooms
You can download the EWG’s printable shopping guide at their website.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
//www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/

News You Can Use – April 8-15 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 8 – April 15 2012!”

Tree nut consumption lowers chronic disease risks and assists successful weight loss

The Definitive Guide to Traditional Food Preparation and Preservation

Brain Activity Gives Scientists Clues About Eating Disorders


Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 1-8 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 1 – April 8 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Recipe: Grassfed Whipped Cream

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

Rich in CLA, Snowville Whipped Cream  is one of my favorite guiltless pleasures. I use it in my “Grassfed Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping“, on a bowl of fresh fruit, and as a dip for bananas (I usually eat slightly green bananas, to lower the glycemic load).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Snowville Whipped Cream

Ingredients
1 cup Snowville Whipping Cream
1/4 cup organic powder sugar or Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals (Coconut Crystals will give more of a caramel taste)
1/2 tbsp pure vanilla

Directions
In a glass bowl, beat the cream and vanilla in a chilled non-reactive bowl with a whisk or an electric mixer just until they hold a loose peak.
Add the sugar, beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not too overbeat!
Refrigerate, up to four hours.

Makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)
Calories – 190
Fat – 19 grams
Protein – 0 grams
Carbs – 6 grams

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com

Characteristics of The Traditional Diet (as discovered by Dr. Weston A Price)

Dr Weston A Price

Dr Weston A Price

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Born in 1870, Weston A. Price was a dentist that was known for his discoveries in the relationship between nutrition, dental health, and physical health. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Price traveled to remote parts of the word that were virtually unaffected by western civilization to determine what type of diet was necessary to attain optimal health. Price found fourteen groups of people ranging from inhabitants of remote Swiss Valleys, South Sea Islanders and Eskimos that had perfect dental health, beautiful facial structure, excellent physical development, and virtually no degenerative diseases.

Price analyzed the diets of all fourteen groups of people and made a great discovery: although each groups varied greatly, dependent on geographic location, all the diets had some definite commonalities. All of their diets were the exact opposite of the “politically correct” nutrition standards, and of the guidelines set out in the food pyramid that is published by the USDA. Specifically, all of their diets:

  • Contained no refined or denatured foods or ingredients (refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, white flour, canned foods, pasteurized/homogenized lowfat milk products, refined/hydrogenated vegetable oils, protein powders, artificial vitamins, food additives and colorings.)
  • Contained some sort of animal product, typically the entire animal was consumed (muscle meat, organs, bones, fats). Bones were consumed in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths
  • Had 4 times more minerals and water-soluble vitamins then that of that found in the Standard American Diet (SAD), and 10 times more fat-soluble vitamins from animal sources (Vitamin A, D and K2)
  • Contained some cooked foods, but all traditional cultures ate at least a portion of their animal foods raw (raw dairy, etc)
  • Incorporated foods that were high in food enzymes and beneficial bacteria from lacto-fermented foods.
  • Included grains, seeds and nuts that were prepared by soaking, sprouting, fermenting or naturally leavening to neutralize anti-nutrients
  • Contained between 30%-80% fat calories, only about 4% of these coming from naturally occurring polyunsaturated oils. The remaining fats were in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Had an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids
  • Contained some salt
  • Made provisions for the health of generations to come. Pregnant women and children were provided with additional nutrient-rich animal foods

So, how can we integrate some of Weston A. Price’s findings into our diets? Here are some things that the Weston A. Price Foundation suggests you can do – keep in mind that while it may be difficult and in some cases unrealistic to follow all these guidelines 100% of the time, anything that you can integrate into your diet will offer health benefits.

  • Eat whole, unprocessed foods
  • Eat meat and animal products from grass-fed animals, which are rich in CLA
  • Eat wild-caught fish and shellfish from unpolluted water
  • Eat full fat dairy products (raw or fermented when available) from grass-fed cows
  • Use animal fats, specifically butter liberally
  • Use traditional vegetable oils only. This includes extra virgin olive oil, expeller-expressed sesame oil, small amounts of expeller-expressed flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil
  • Supplement with Cod Liver Oil
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, when possible)
  • Use properly prepared whole grains, legumes and nuts (soaked, sprouted or sour leavened)
  • Make fermented foods a regular part of your diet (examples include – kefir, miso, kimchee, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, sour cream – Bubbie’s brand of sauerkraut and pickles are properly fermented)
  • Incorporate bone broth into your diet on a regular basis
  • Use filtered water for cooking and drinking
  • Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and a small amount of expeller-expressed flax oil.
  • Use natural sweeteners in moderation (raw honey, maple syrup, maple sugar, date sugar, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder)
  • Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals
  • Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel
  • Use only natural, food-based supplements
  • Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light
  • Think positive thoughts and practice forgiveness

Let’s Connect!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: The Weston A Price Foundation www.westonaprice.org

Scrambled Eggs with Onions + Peppers

eating disorder recovery recipes

This recipe serves: 4
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes

INGREDIENTS
1 teaspoon coconut oil
1/2 cup diced organic red bell pepper
4 tablespoons diced organic Vidalia onion
4 large organic, pastured, eggs
salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons chopped parsley

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat the oil in an 8″ non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat.
2. Add the peppers and onions to the pan and cook for about 2 minutes. Remove the vegetables and set aside. Wipe the pan clean so that it can be reused for the eggs.
3. Whisk the eggs with the salt and pepper until well blended.
4. Pour the eggs and vegetables into the frying pan and stir constantly over low heat with a rubber spatula. When the eggs begin to get firm, add the parsley and continue stirring.
5. When the eggs have reached the desired degree of doneness, put them on warm plates and serve immediately.

NUTRITION INFO (per serving)
Calories 84
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Protein 7 g
Total Carbohydrate 3 g
Dietary Fiber 1 g
Sodium 113 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 54%
Percent Calories from Protein 33%
Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 14%

Grilled Tomato Salsa

//www.flickr.com/photos/ginnerobot/

//www.flickr.com/photos/ginnerobot/

This recipe makes: 2 cups

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 ripe organic plum tomatoes, cored

1 medium organic vidalia onion, peeled and sliced into 1/2-inch slices

1 jalapeño pepper

1/2 cup chopped, fresh cilantro leaves

Salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon coconut sugar, or to taste

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to high.

2. Grill the whole tomatoes and whole jalapeño on all sides until they are evenly charred. Grill the onion slices until they are lightly charred on both sides. Cut the jalapeño in half and remove the seeds.

3. Place the tomatoes, seeded jalapeño, onion, and cilantro in a blender and puree. Season with salt, pepper and sugar. Chill.

The salsa can be made ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 2 tablespoons

Calories 11

Protein 0 g

Total Carbohydrate 3 g

Dietary Fiber 1 g

Sodium 40 mg

Total Fat 0 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Percent Calories from Fat 8%

Percent Calories from Protein 13%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 78%

Chilled Artichokes with Champagne Vinaigrette

//summertomato.com

//summertomato.com

This recipe serves: 2

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 40 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 large artichokes

2 teaspoons Champagne vinegar

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon finely chopped shallots

1 tablespoon macadamia nut oil

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Slice about 1 inch off the top of each artichoke and trim the stems. Remove the tough outer leaves and trim any sharp, thorny leaf tips with scissors.

2. Put about 2 inches of water in a large pot, insert a rack or steamer basket into the pot and bring the water to a boil. Meanwhile, prepare an ice bath.

3. Place the artichokes on the rack (stem end down) and steam uncovered, until the bottom is tender and the outer leaves can be pulled off easily, about 30 to 40 minutes.

4. Remove the artichokes with a large spoon and plunge them into the ice bath. Drain and refrigerate until serving time. Turn the artichokes upside down and leave them upside down in the refrigerator so that all of the water drains from the leaves. The artichokes can be cooked in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

5. In a small bowl, whisk the Champagne vinegar and lemon juice together. Add the shallots and slowly whisk in the oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. The vinaigrette can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

6. Serve the artichokes with a little bowl of vinaigrette to dip the leaves in.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 artichoke with vinaigrette

Calories 185

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Protein 3 g

Total Carbohydrate 27 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 360 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 35%

Percent Calories from Protein 7%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 58%

Turkey Vegetable Meatloaf

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

INGREDIENTS

1 lb organic ground turkey

1 lb grassfed beef

½ organic onion, diced

½ bag organic frozen spinach leaves

½ cup organic old fashioned oatmeal or ½ cup cooked quinoa

1 can drained organic garlic and basil diced tomatoes (MSG Free)

¼ cup Organic BBQ sauce (MSG Free)

2 organic, pastured eggs

2 tsp garlic juice

1 tsp bourbon smoked paprika

Pinch of red pepper, sea salt, garlic salt, and garlic pepper

2 tbs coconut oil

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Sauté tomatoes, onion, spinach, herbs and spices in 2 tablespoons of coconut oil. Let cool.

In a large bowl, mix 2 eggs and meats until they are combined (use wide pronged fork).

Add sautéed ingredients.

Grease 2 small pans with coconut oil.

Bake at 325 for 40 minutes.

Then, pour ¼ cup BBQ sauce on top and bake for another 5-10 minutes.

NUTRITION INFO

Calories: 257

Fat: 10.7 g

Carbohydrates: 9.8 g

Protein: 29 g

Springtime Pilaf with Asparagus and Salmon

//www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/

//www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/

This recipe serves: 6

Preparation time: 35 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 salmon fillets about 1 inch thick (1 ½ lbs.), broiled

1 tablespoon coconut oil

2 ½ cups (1-inch) diagonally cut asparagus

2 cups cooked brown rice (properly prepared)

1 ½ cup fresh or frozen organic, peas, thawed

½ cup bone broth

2 tablespoons parsley, chopped

2 tablespoons fresh chives, chopped

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the broiler. Place salmon on a broiler pan coated with coconut oil.

2. Broil 8 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Remove from the oven and set aside.

3. In a large skillet add the oil and asparagus. Cook the asparagus over medium-high heat until tender, stirring occasionally.

4. Stir in the rice, peas, and broth.

5. Cook for 1 minute before adding the salmon, parsley, and remaining ingredients. Cook 2 minutes or until thoroughly heated.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1/6 recipe

Calories 257

Protein 27 g

Total Carbohydrate 20 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 95 mg

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Cholesterol 85 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 26%

Percent Calories from Protein 42%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 32%

Pineapple Barbecued Shrimp Skewers

//www.flickr.com/photos/clotee_allochuku/

//www.flickr.com/photos/clotee_allochuku/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup organic barbecue sauce (MSG Free)

1/2 cup pineapple juice

2 tablespoons lime juice

2 tablespoons chopped, fresh cilantro leaves

1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 ripe pineapple, peeled, cored and sliced into 2-inch chunks

4 metal or bamboo (soaked in water) skewers

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a mixing bowl, combine the barbecue sauce, pineapple juice, lime juice and cilantro. Pour half of the pineapple-barbecue sauce mixture into a resealable bag, add the shrimp and marinate for 15 to 30 minutes. (Reserve the remaining sauce mixture for basting and serving.)

2. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

3. Remove the shrimp from the marinade, discarding the leftover marinade. Skewer the shrimp and pineapple onto the skewers. Grill the skewers on both sides until the shrimp are just cooked through, about 3 to 4 minutes per side. While the skewers are cooking, brush them with some of the reserved sauce.

4. Serve the skewers with the extra pineapple-barbecue sauce for dipping.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1/4 pound of shrimp plus pineapple

Calories 201

Total Fat 2 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Protein 25 g

Total Carbohydrate 2 g

Dietary Fiber 0 g

Sodium 276 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 9%

Percent Calories from Protein 48%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 43%

Marinade/Infusion for Meat, Fish, Poultry and Pork Tenderloins

//www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/

//www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/

I tend to stick with organic and/or free range protein and stay away from farm-raised fish and livestock that has been given antibiotics or hormones. I also stick with the tenderloins as they have the least amount of overall fat, and no trans fat.

INGREDIENTS

½ cup olive oil

1 tsp. Garlic juice

Garlic Pepper (MSG Free)

Salt

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Mix this up in a small bowl and swish the piece of meat/fish or turkey in it until covered. Freeze, let sit in fridge for a few hours, or use immediately.

When I make this infusion for fish, I substitute Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos for salt.

Grilled Pomegranate Chicken with Cucumber Relish Recipe

//www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 cup peeled, seeded and chopped organic cucumber

1 cup chopped fresh organic tomatoes

1/4 cup diced organic red onion

1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves

zest and juice of 1 lemon

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

4 boneless, skinless, organic chicken breasts, about 4 to 6 ounces each

2 tablespoons pomegranate juice concentrate

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon coconut palm sugar

1/2 cup grassfed greek yogurt

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a mixing bowl, combine the cucumber, tomato, red onion, mint, lemon zest and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper and refrigerate.

2. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

3. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Grill the chicken on one side for 6 minutes, turn, brush with pomegranate juice concentrate and continue grilling until the chicken is cooked through.

4. In a small dish, combine the cinnamon and sugar. Brush the cooked chicken with more pomegranate juice and sprinkle it with cinnamon-sugar mixture.

5. Serve the chicken with a large spoonful of cucumber relish and an optional dollop of yogurt or sour cream.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 1 chicken breast with relish (without yogurt)

Calories 276

Total Fat 9 g

Saturated Fat 2 g

Protein 32 g

Total Carbohydrate 16 g

Dietary Fiber 2 g

Sodium 96 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 27%

Percent Calories from Protein 48%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 24%

Grilled Eggplant Roll-Ups Stuffed with Goat Cheese

food.unl.edu/localfoods/discover-seasonal-cooking

food.unl.edu/localfoods/discover-seasonal-cooking

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 cups organic spinach leaves washed

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

8 slices eggplant, sliced lengthwise about 1/4″ thick

1/4 cup organic goat cheese

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

8 strips roasted red bell peppers, cut 1/4″ wide

For the sauce:

1 tablespoon coconut oil

1 tablespoon chopped shallots

1/4 cup fresh, chopped organic tomatoes

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to medium and the oven to 350°F.

2. Heat 1 teaspoon of the coconut oil in a skillet. Add the spinach and a pinch each of salt and pepper and toss in the pan for about 1 minute. Remove from the pan and let cool.

3. Brush the eggplant slices with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, taking care not to overcook.

4. Mix the goat cheese and parsley together. Season with salt and pepper. Shape the cheese into 8 cork-sized pieces.

5. To assemble: On the top of each slice of eggplant, place a strip of pepper, a few leaves of spinach, and a “cork” of cheese. Begin with the wide end of the eggplant and roll toward the narrow end. Place on a lightly oiled cookie sheet, seam side down.

6. Warm the roll-ups in the oven until thoroughly heated, about 8 to 10 minutes, longer if they have been refrigerated. While the roll-ups are warming, make the sauce.

For the sauce:

1. Heat the coconut oil in a small skillet over low heat. Add the shallots and cook until soft and translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the balsamic vinegar. Add the tomatoes and toss for 1 minute. Bring to a boil. Remove from the heat.

2. Place 2 roll-ups on each plate. Spoon sauce over the top and serve.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 2 roll-ups

Calories 213

Total Fat 16 g

Saturated Fat 4 g

Protein 5 g

Total Carbohydrate 14 g

Dietary Fiber 5 g

Sodium 232 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 65%

Percent Calories from Protein 9%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 26%

Linguine with Chicken, Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Basil, and Pine Nuts

//www.flickr.com/photos/71284893@N00/

//www.flickr.com/photos/71284893@N00/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 pound boneless, skinless organic chicken cutlets, cut into strips

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons *coconut oil

2 cloves organic garlic, minced

1/4 cup dry white wine

1 cup sun-dried tomatoes, rehydrated and sliced

1 cup chicken bone broth

1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped

1/4 cup toasted pine nuts

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3/4 pound Jovial Foods Einkorn Linguine

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil for the pasta.

2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the coconut oil in a large nonstick skillet over high heat and sauté the chicken on both sides until it is golden brown. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Transfer the chicken to a warm plate and keep warm.

3. Turn the heat to medium and quickly add the wine to the pan, stir with a wooden spoon to release any caramelized bits that may be stuck to the bottom and cook until the wine has almost completely evaporated.

4. Add the sun-dried tomatoes and the chicken broth and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the basil, pine nuts and lemon juice.

5. Meanwhile, cook the pasta (in the boiling water) until it is al dente, about 9 to 11 minutes. Drain and toss with the sun-dried tomato mixture.

6. Divide the pasta among the serving plates and arrange the chicken on top.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: pasta with 4 ounces of chicken

Calories 528

Total Fat 15 g

Saturated Fat 2 g

Cholesterol 66 mg

Sodium 385 mg

Total Carbohydrate 58 g

Dietary Fiber 5 g

Protein 40 g

Percent Calories from Fat 25%

Percent Calories from Protein 31%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 44%

Butternut Squash Hash

Butternut Squash

starr-070730-7821-plant-Cucurbita_pepo-butternut_squash-Foodland_Pukalani

 

INGREDIENTS

1 heaping cup shredded organic butternut squash

2 tbsp. chopped organic onion

1/4 tsp. onion powder

1/4 tsp. garlic powder

Dash ground cumin

Dash salt and pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Spread the shredded squash out between 2 layers of paper towels.

Press down to absorb as much of the moisture from the squash as possible.

Repeat if necessary, until no more water an be removed.

Toss squash shreds with onion powder, garlic powder, cumin, salt and pepper.

Bring small to medium pan greased with coconut oil to high heat.

Add mixture to the pan and cook for 2 minutes.

Flip shreds with a spatula and cook for another 2 minutes or so.

NUTRITION INFO

1 serving = 1 cup

Calories: 85

Fat: 1g

Carbohydrates; 20g

Fiber: 3g

Sugar: 5g

Protein: 2g

Basil Pesto

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

INGREDIENTS

2 cups firmly packed fresh, organic basil leaves

¼ cup organic walnuts or pine nuts

3 cloves garlic

¾ cup grated, organic Parmesan or Romano Cheese (without enzymes, this could be MSG)

½ cup macadamia nut oil

Salt & Pepper To Taste

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

In a food processor, chop the basil, nuts, garlic and cheese.

With machine running,  stream the oil in slowly through the feed tube.

Process until the
 oil is blended in and pesto is smooth.

Season to taste with salt & pepper.
 Refrigerate or freeze.

Makes about 1 ½ cups

Chicken and Vegetable Kebabs

totalnoms.com

totalnoms.com

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts (organic pastured), cut into 1 inch cubes

2 small organic red onions, peeled and cut into eighths

2 medium organic zucchini, cut into 3/4-inch half rounds

2 organic red bell peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces

1/2 pound medium-sized organic mushrooms

18 metal or bamboo (soaked in water) skewers

2 tablespoons coconut oil

Salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

Juice of 1 lemon

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to medium-high. Thread 6 of the skewers with chicken and 12 with vegetables. Brush the chicken and vegetables with oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

2. Grill the skewers until the chicken is cooked through, about 10 to 12 minutes, and the vegetables are tender, about 8 minutes.

3. Squeeze the lemon juice over the skewered chicken, just prior to serving.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 chicken, 2 vegetable kebabs

Calories 219

Protein 29 g

Total Carbohydrate 13 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 79 mg

Total Fat 6 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Percent Calories from Fat 25%

Percent Calories from Protein 52%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 23%

Zucchini Salad with Tomatoes and Basil Vinaigrette

//www.flickr.com/photos/roseannadana/

//www.flickr.com/photos/roseannadana/

This recipe serves: 6

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 large organic zucchini, cut into half-circles about 1/2 inch thick

1 large organic yellow squash (or 2 small), cut into half-circles about 1/2 inch thick

2 teaspoons organic dijon mustard (MSG Free)

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon finely chopped organic shallots

1 tablespoons macadamia nut oil

2 tablespoons freshly chopped, organic basil

salt to taste

1 large fresh organic tomato, diced

freshly ground black pepper

Cooking Instructions

1. Place about 2 inches of water in a large pot, insert a rack or steamer basket into the pot and bring the water to a boil. Steam the zucchini and squash in the basket for about 3 minutes, or until their colors turn bright. Remove the basket and run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Set aside.

2. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the dijon mustard, red wine vinegar and lemon juice together. Add the shallots and slowly whisk in the oil and basil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. (The vinaigrette can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.)

3. Gently toss the zucchini and squash in the vinaigrette with the tomatoes and serve at room temperature or chilled.

Nutrition Info

Serving Size: 3/4 cup salad with vinaigrette

Calories 50

Total Fat 3 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Cholesterol 0 mg

Sodium 145 mg

Total Carbohydrates 6 g

Dietary Fiber 2 g

Protein 2 g

Percent Calories from Fat 44%

Percent Calories from Protein 13%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 43%

Spinach, Honey Tangerine and Cashew Salad

//www.flickr.com/photos/77568040@N08/

//www.flickr.com/photos/77568040@N08/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

For the vinaigrette:

2 teaspoons Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos

4 teaspoons fresh lime juice

2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots

4 teaspoons macadamia nut oil

Salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

For the salad:

4 tablespoons coarsely chopped, unsalted cashews

2 1/2 cups fresh, organic spinach, cleaned and torn into bite-sized pieces

2 honey tangerines, peeled and sectioned

Instructions

For the vinaigrette:

1. Place all the ingredients in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Shake well.

2. Add the salt and pepper to taste.

For the salad:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Spread the cashews on a baking sheet and toast in the oven until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

3. Place the spinach in a bowl and toss with the vinaigrette.

4. Transfer the dressed spinach leaves to a serving plate.

5. Arrange the tangerine sections on top and sprinkle with the cashews.

Nutrition Info

Serving Size: 2/3 cup salad

Calories: 131

Protein: 3 g

Total Carbohydrate: 13 g

Dietary Fiber: 3 g

Sodium: 184 mg

Total Fat: 9 g

Saturated Fat: 1 g

Percent Calories from Fat 56%

Percent Calories from Protein 7%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 37%

Raw Broccoli Salad

//thestonesoup.com/blog/2011/08/the-easiest-way-to-save-time-in-the-kitchen-and-eat-more-vegetables/

//thestonesoup.com/blog/2011/08/the-easiest-way-to-save-time-in-the-kitchen-and-eat-more-vegetables/

Ingredients

4 cups organic broccoli florets or broccolini

1/4 cup organic red onion, minced

2 tablespoons coconut sugar

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

2 tablespoons homemade mayonnaise

2 tablespoons sunflower seeds, roasted and salted

3 tablespoons seedless organic raisins

Instructions

Discard Broccoli stems and finely chop florets. Set aside.

Place remaining ingredients into a meduim mixing bowl. Mix well.

Add broccoli. Toss until coated.

Chill until ready to serve.

Serves 6

Nutrition Info (per serving): 90 calories, 5 g fat, 3 g protein, 10 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Cranberry Walnut Quinoa Salad

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

INGREDIENTS

1 cup quinoa

1 cup dried organic cranberries

1 cup canned beets, drained & chopped

1 cup organic walnuts, chopped

¼ cup green onions, sliced

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

1 ½ tbsp macadamia nut oil

4 cloves organic garlic, minced

½ tsp salt

¼ tsp pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Combine quinoa with 2 cups of water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and continue cooking until all liquid is absorbed (per package directions).

In a medium bowl, combine cooked quinoa, dried cranberries, beets, walnuts and green onions until well mixed.

In a small bowl, whisk the balsamic vinegar, macadamia oil and garlic until well blended.

Pour over quinoa mixture and toss until well blended. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Chill in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before serving.

Makes 10 servings

NUTRITION INFO

One Serving:

Calories: 239

Fat: 10.7

Protein: 4.5

Carbohydrates: 33.7

Baby Greens with Grilled Turkey, Cranberries + Roasted Shallot Vinaigrette

//www.flickr.com/photos/rusvaplauke/

//www.flickr.com/photos/rusvaplauke/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

For the roasted shallot vinaigrette:

1 shallot

drizzle of coconut oil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon organic Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon macadamia nut oil

2 tablespoons bone broth

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1/2 tablespoon freshly chopped chives

freshly ground black pepper

For the grilled turkey:

4 organic, pastured, turkey cutlets, (about 4 ounces each)

2 teaspoons coconut oil

salt and pepper to taste

For the green salad:

8 cups fresh organic baby greens, washed

1/2 cup dried cranberries

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

For the roasted shallot vinaigrette:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. With the skin on, cut the shallot in half lengthwise.  Grease a baking sheet with coconut oil. Drizzle the shallot with a bit of the coconut oil and place them on the baking sheet cut side down.

3. Roast in the oven until the shallot is very soft, about 20 to 30 minutes.

4. When the shallot is cool enough to handle, remove the skin and the root end. Puree the shallot and salt in a food processor.

5. Add the mustard and puree. Add the vinegar by the tablespoon, pureeing after each addition.

6. With the motor running, add the macadamia nut and stock slowly through the feed tube.

7. Stir in the chives and pepper. Adjust the salt and pepper to taste.

For the grilled turkey:

1. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

2. Rub the cutlets with coconut oil and season with salt and pepper.

3. Grill the turkey for about 4 to 6 minutes each side, depending on the thickness until the turkey is cooked through.

4. Remove the turkey from the grill and place on a cutting board to rest. Cut the turkey into strips.

For the green salad:

1. Place the turkey strips in a mixing bowl, add the cranberries and half of the vinaigrette.

2. Place the lettuce in a separate salad bowl and toss it with the remaining vinaigrette.

3. Arrange the turkey and cranberry mixture on top.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 1 turkey cutlet with salad

Calories 283

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Protein 36 g

Total Carbohydrate 17 g

Dietary Fiber 4 g

Sodium 317 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 24%

Percent Calories from Protein 52%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 25%

Sweet Nutty Raisin Snacks

Coconut Crystals

This recipe serves: 16

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups organic rolled oats

1 organic, pastured egg

1 organic, pastured egg white

1 cup Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals, packed

1 tablespoon *coconut oil

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2/3 cup raisins

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1 tablespoon Jovial Food Einkorn flour

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat the oven to 350° F. Spread the oats on a baking sheet and toast, stirring occasionally until oats are browned, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.

2. Reduce the oven to 325° F. Cover an 8 by 11-inch baking pan with foil and then spray with butter or coconut oil.

3. Whisk the egg, egg white, brown sugar, oil, cinnamon, salt and vanilla extract together in a large bowl.

4. Stir in the oats, raisins, pecans and flour.
 Make it a team effort and let your kids do this step.

5. Let your kids spread the batter in the prepared pan.

6. Bake until golden brown about 30 to 35 minutes.

7. Remove the pan from the oven and place it on a wire rack to cool.

Slice into 16 bars and serve.

This recipe can be made ahead and stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 bar

Calories 81

Protein 2 g

Total Carbohydrate 12 g

Dietary Fiber 1 g

Sodium 52 mg

Total Fat 3 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Percent Calories from Fat 30%

Percent Calories from Protein 11%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 59%

Melon Kebabs with Yogurt Dipping Sauce

photo used under creative commons license

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 cup Snowville 6% plain yogurt

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

1 tablespoon coconut palm sugar (or to taste)

1 teaspoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1 1/2 cups cubed seedless watermelon (about 1 inch cubes)

1 1/2 cups cubed cantaloupe (about 1 inch cubes)

1 1/2 cups cubed honeydew (about 1 inch cubes)

8 metal or bamboo skewers (soaked in water)

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a small mixing bowl, stir the yogurt, lime juice, sugar and cilantro together.

2. Transfer the yogurt mixture to a small serving dish, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

3. Thread the cubes of watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew melon onto the skewers.

4. Serve the melon kebabs with the yogurt dipping sauce.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 2 kebabs

Per Serving: 120 calories, 3 g fat, 4 g protein, 20 g carbs, 2 g fiber

 

Banana Nut Bread

photo used under creative commons license

This recipe serves: 18
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Baking time: 55 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4-5 ripe bananas, mashed
1 ¾ cup coconut sugar
3 tablespoons Snowville whipping cream
3 tablespoons coconut oil
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups Jovial foods Einkorn flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
2 cups organic walnuts, chopped

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Mash bananas with fork and put into mixing bowl.

2. Add melted butter, eggs, sugar, and cream. Beat well.

3. Add dry ingredients and stir until blended. Add nuts (Break half nuts in two) and mix well.

4. Place into 2 small greased bread pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 55 minutes.

Serves 18.

NUTRITION INFO – 225 calories, 10 g fat, 4 g protein, 27 g carbs, 2 g fiber