Tag Archives: coconut oil

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits? Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease.

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have! If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

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Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

coronavirus_prevention

Something else to protect us from Coronavirus?

Today I’m going to talk about coconut oil. I had a stye in my eye and the only thing that worked to get rid of it was putting a few drops of coconut oil on it each night. No matter what else I tried, nothing was working. But the coconut oil did.

Continue reading

Beef and Broccoli

One of the problems I have noticed with sheltering in place is that I don’t have nearly the appetite that I normally have. Maybe it’s because of the lack of activity, certainly there’s no going out to eat not that I do that very often anyway. 

Continue reading

News You Can Use Week of August 3rd-9th

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 3rd-August 9th, 2015.

NEWS: Why Coconut Oil Trumps Vegetable Oil

Every time we cover research indicating that fat hurts your body, the immediate response is, “What about coconut oil?!” Now, we have a great answer for you: Yes, it is a better option than the fats you’ll usually find lurking in processed food, according to University of California, Riverside researchers. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 5 Ways to Celebrate Your Body Today

I know at times it’s tough to appreciate your body for its true brilliance and to celebrate all that it does for you. As I outline in Whole Body Intelligence, you may have concerns about how it looks, or you may not like how it performs in certain situations, or possibly not like it because of pain you feel from living in it. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 20 Names for Nasty MSG

Food manufacturers just love it when you can’t stop with a single serving. For them, it is the sound of cash registers ringing in sales. But what does this mean to us? It means that somehow the food is now in control. Somehow it has been manipulated to cause you to overeat. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 10 Reasons to Avoid Toxic High-Fructose Corn Syrup

High-fructose corn syrup is a sugar that begins as a corn starch and through processing becomes a very sweet syrup. Processing the corn converts glucose into fructose, creating a very concentrated sugar. While table sugar and HFCS have molecular similarities, the way the human body processes HFCS can lead to many health problems. High-fructose corn syrup is destroying both the bodies of humans and the honey bees. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Top Reasons to Avoid MSG: An Industry Secret Ingredient For Food Addiction

Most people have seen signs in Chinese and other restaurants proclaiming that their food is “MSG free” or a note on the menu letting diners know that is it possible to have their food prepared without monosodium glutamate. One of the big reasons that consumers became aware of this artificial ingredient that is widespread in the food industry is that there have been cases of people having severe – and sometimes even fatal – allergic reactions to it. Once a few horror story of diners going into anaphylactic shock in the middle of the meal reached the media, the public in general became much more aware of the potential threat that MSG can pose. However, as serious as the possibility for a reaction is, it is not the only danger of MSG. Read on to find out more about its role in food addiction and why the food industry continues to use it. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Dealing With Teens’ Weight and Shape Issues

“Dad, am I fat?” asked my daughter when she was 13 years old, as she stared at her middle in the mirror. I would sigh to myself, when I heard that often-repeated question. If I said no, she would tell me that I was lying because I’m her father. If I said yes, then I have sentenced her to the worst fate of adolescence — “fathood.” LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Art of Getting Sun

Listen to the full podcast HERE.

Reasons People Get Less Sun

  • Air conditioning – to avoid the hot sun
  • Air conditioning disease is the result of less vitamin D – China (March, 2011).
  • Increased use of multi-media indoors – TV, DVD, video games, and internet access
    • Teens increasingly indoors – especially dark skinned children
    • Problems of increased TV watching by toddlers (May, 2010).
    • Analysis of the time people spend outdoors (December, 2010).
  • More indoor jobs – more office workers, fewer farmers
    • Indoor jobs cities around the world: 30% in 1950, 70% in 2050
    • Urban residents had 2X less vitamin D – 2008
  • More people living in cities – where there is less Ultra Violet light (UV)
    • Air pollution reduces UV and thus vitamin D
    • UVB, which produces vitamin D, does not reflect off of buildings very well
  • People want whiter skin, especially women
    • May not burn from the sun if have enough vitamin D
  • Fear of skin cancer
    • Actually you can get enough vitamin D without getting much of a tan, much less get skin cancer
    • Most sunscreens increase the growth of skin cancer
    • Actually you get 1000X more cancer by not having the vitamin D
  • Less cholesterol – skin needs to produce vitamin D
    • Overview of Cholesterol and Vitamin D
    • Vitamin D bioavailability is associated with cholesterol (January 2011).
    • Eating less cholesterol is harmless other than it reduces vitamin D (June 2011).
  • More Obesity
  • Obese people need more vitamin D (2000)
    • Map of BMI increase (February 2011).
    • Obese people spend less time in the sun
    • Livers of those who are Obese do not function as well, and so do not provide as much vitamin D
  • More soft drinks – uses up Calcium And vitamin D
    • Surfers in Hawaii who drank large amount of cola soft drink had low levels of vitamin D
    • Too much fructose reduced both serum and active vitamin D in rats (April 2013).
    • HFCS consumes Magnesium needed by Vitamin D
  • Meat from factory farms – has far less vitamin D than from free-range farms
    • Eggs, chickens, sheep, pigs (500 IU/teaspoon of lard), farmed salmon has 4X less vitamin D than wild salmon
    • Wild game, which has been outdoors all of the time, has much more vitamin D – especially in the organ meats
  • Eating less fatty meat in an attempt to reduce cholesterol.
    • Fatty meat was discovered to have a liver-activated form of vitamin D in 2014
  • More drugs which consume or block vitamin D
    • Antiseizure, Prednisone, AIDS drugs, Orlistat, Questran, Dilantin, Phenobarbital, Rifampin, Steroids, Calcium channel blockers
    • Cholestyramine, Mineral Oil, St Johns wort
  • Use of polyunsaturated fats decreased bio-availablity of vitamin D
  • More windows
    • UVA from windows appears to destroy vitamin D
    • UVB (the one we need) is blocked by windows
    • More wall space devoted to windows in homes, offices, and public buildings
  • Increased salt consumption, which decreases Magnesium and Calcium
  • Fluoridated water decreases Magnesium – less vitamin D
  • Strong magnetic fields reduce vitamin D levels, perhaps from MRI
  • PCBs increase the chance of deficiency by 3%
  • Roundup (glyphosate) and it’s metabolites decrease vitamin D
  • Flame Retardants also retard active vitamin D
    • Flame Retardants were added to US clothing, mattresses, and cushions by 1980
    • Doubt that flame retardants are used in developing countries
  • Have a condition which Consumes vitamin D
    • Chemotherapy – (be careful, adding vitamin D increases the impact of some Chemo)
    • MS prevented AND treated by vitamin D, a mountain of evidence
  • Less liver eaten – which used to have large amounts of vitamin D

Get 40X more vitamin D from grass-fed beef liver

  • Less Magnesium in foods – Magnesium is needed to utilize vitamin D (as well as build bones)
    • Magnesium and vitamin D deficiencies
    • Magnesium deficiency epidemic is similar to the Vitamin D epidemic
    • Reasons: use of artificial fertilizers, refining grains removes almost all of their Magnesium
  • More seniors
    • Seniors get 4X less vitamin D from the sun than youths (less Cholesterol in skin) *
    • Seniors tend to be outdoors less – get sick – vicious cycle
    • Seniors do not activate vitamin D as well (in liver, kidney, skin, etc)
    • More cataract surgery – leads to avoiding bright light
  • Excessive clothing (burka, nun habit, . . .) Worse farther from equator
  • Have a condition which prevents Adsorption in the gut
    • Bariatric Surgery, Colon Cancer, IBD UC and CD, Crohn’s
    • Gluten Intolerance, Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis
    • Fat malabsorption syndromes from 1985
  • Have a condition which prevents conversion to active vitamin D
    • Kidney vicious cycle
    • HIV both prevents conversion and consumes vitamin D
  • Have a condition which requires more vitamin D – or time in the sun
    • Pregnancy- Need more vitamin D – Before , During, and After
    • Dark Skinned people need more sun to absorb vitamin D
    • Surgery and trauma
  • Lactose Intolerance or Vegan
  • Vitamin D in US milk wrong (Vitamin D2)
  • Reduces Calcium intake, needed to build bones, prevent Myopia, prevent cardiovascular disease
  • Health reasons to avoid sun (other than skin cancer) burn easily – redhead, etc – there are alternatives
  • If avoiding sun you need to supplement with vitamin D
  • Work long hours or night shift. Long hours reduced vitamin D by 8%
  • Live far from equator even more of a problem if the region is also cloudy (Washington State, Scotland)
  • 10X more SAD in Seattle than Miami
  • DDT and some other pesticides in our bodies reduce the vitamin D perhaps 3ng
  • Smoking reduces Calcium, which reduces vitamin D

What to Do?

What it boils down to is that the sun is not just good for us, it is vital to our survival and good health. For example, in one study, 38,472 women selected in 1991-1992, aged 30-49 were monitored for 15 years. Looking at the frequency of sunbathing vacations and sunburn, the researchers found that increased sunburn frequency was associated with reduced all-cause mortality! Sunbathing vacations more than once a year also reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality.[1] Finally in another study involving 16,500 people, researchers looked at weather statistics and found a 60% increased risk of stroke for those with the lowest sun exposure.[2]

Steps You Can Take To Get More Sun

  1. Get regular sun and learn how to monitor your vitamin D3 levels.

In general burning is a bad idea as it can lead to skin cancer. There are many other variables to take into consideration when sunbathing. One is skin type.

According to the Vitamin D Council Parameters of Vitamin D3 Sulfate

Skin TypeSkin colorSkin characteristics
IWhite; very fair; red or blond hair; blue eyes; frecklesAlways burns, never tans
IIWhite; fair; red or blond hair; blue, hazel, or green eyesUsually burns, tans with difficulty
IIICream white; fair; with any eye or hair color; very commonSometimes mild burn, gradually tans
IVBrown; typical Mediterranean Caucasian skinRarely burns, tans with ease
VDark Brown; mid-eastern skin typesVery rarely burns, tans very easily
VIBlackNever burns, tans very easily

There are other factors as well, which can affect the amount of vitamin D your body makes from exposure to the sun. These are:

  • The amount of skin you expose. The more skin you expose, the more vitamin D you can produce.
  • How old you are. As you get older, your skin has a harder time producing vitamin D.
  • Whether you’re wearing sunscreen. Sunscreen blocks a lot of vitamin D production and it has also been implicated in skin cancer.
  • The altitude you’re at. The sun is more intense on top of a mountain than at the beach. This means you make more vitamin D the higher up you are (at higher altitudes).
  • Whether it is cloudy. Less UVB reaches your skin on a cloudy day and your skin makes less vitamin D.
  • Air pollution. Polluted air soaks up UVB or reflects it back into space. This means that if you live somewhere where there is lots of pollution, your skin makes less vitamin D.
  • Being behind glass. Glass blocks all UVB, so you can’t make vitamin D if you’re in sunlight, but behind glass. In fact, light coming through glass has been shown to be more cancerous.

 

Given all of the variables, it can get complicated. For example:

  • At noon in Miami, an individual with skin type III would probably need about 6 minutes of exposure to the sun to make 1,000 IU of vitamin D in summer and 15 minutes in winter.
  • Someone with skin type V would probably need around 15 minutes in summer and 30 minutes in winter.
  • At noon in Boston during summer, an individual with skin type III would probably need about 1 hour of exposure to the sun to make 1,000 IU of vitamin D.
  • Someone with skin type V would probably need about 2 hours of exposure.
  • During the winter months in Boston, it’s not possible for anyone to make vitamin D from the sun, no matter their skin ty

Amount of Sunlight for People of Color

Did You Know?

We all started out at the equator and had dark skin. The farther away we got from the equator, the lighter our skin became and the less melanin we needed to protect against the potentially burnng rays of UVB. Today, in the U.S. people of color have significantly higher rates of cancer (although the rates dropped for cancer in 2013 among African Americans) heart disease and obesity.

If you are a person of color, the research says you will need up to 5 times more exposure as the melanin in your skin “protects” you from the sun.

“In a startling 2009 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that African-Americans have a much higher incidence of heart failure than other races, and it develops at younger ages. Before age 50, African-Americans’ heart failure rate is 20 times higher than that of whites, according to the study. Four risk factors are the strongest predictors of heart failure: high blood pressure (also called hypertension), chronic kidney disease, being overweight, and having low levels of HDL, the “good” cholesterol. Three-fourths of African-Americans who develop heart failure have high blood pressure by age 40.”[3]

 

When it comes to cancer, the picture is not much better.

 

“Despite……. declines….. death rates for all cancers combined remain 33% higher in black men and 16% higher in black women, compared to white men and women. African American men also have higher death rates for most of the major cancer sites (including lung, prostate, colon/rectum, liver, pancreas, and others). Notably, the higher overall cancer death rate in African American women compared to white women occurs despite lower incidence rates for all cancers combined and for breast and lung cancer.

Just recently, the new data have emerged showing that African Americans have the highest rate of obesity.[4]

  • African American women have the highest rates of being overweight or obese compared to other groups in the U.S. About four out of five African American women are overweight or obese.
  • In 2011, African Americans were 1.5 times as likely to be obese as Non- Hispanic Whites.
  • In 2011, African American women were 80% more likely to be obese than Non-Hispanic White women.
  • In 2007-2010, African American girls were 80% more likely to be overweight than Non-Hispanic White girls.

While rates are climbing for the population at large for all of these diseases, the fact that they are climbing faster among people of color is another important data point reinforcing the importance of sunshine as a means of prevention. Research is needed to determine whether there are differences in incidence among people of color in other parts of the world, i.e. does the incidence go down for them in warmer climbs.

  1. Get the app DMinder. It works out all of the details using our location and time of year/day and weather conditions. You program it with supplements, amount of time and time of day you are in the sun and it keeps a running tally of your level of vitamin D3.
  1. Take vacations that involve the sun. Go camping, zip-lining, canoeing, or skiing
  1. Take up a sport that is played outdoors. Tennis, golf, bike riding or roller blading are all good for you as they are low impact and/or high intensity interval (HIIT) types of activities and they can be done outdoors
  1. Get up with the sun – or as early as possible. Your body produces more melatonin if you get early morning sunlight. The more melatonin the better you sleep at night.
  1. Limit the time you spend using electronics. Read don’t watch – fall asleep with a book and not the TV. Write don’t text. When was the last time you actually wrote a letter to someone. It is amazingly gratifying. If you are addicted to surfing the net, set a limit, using an alarm (ok the one on your phone) and stick to it.
  1. Volunteer for Habitat or community activities that take place outdoors. There is something about working with a group of people and being outdoors that is so inspiring.
  1. If you work 3rd shift, consider changing shifts. It is that bad for you. Change jobs if changing shifts is not an option. Really, it is that bad for your health.
  1. If you live in the city, get out of it every chance you get. City dwellers get less sun.

10. Get your vitamin D3 levels checked regularly.

  1. Invest in a UVB lamp. I have a UVB lamp that appears to provide significantly more vitamin D3 in a much shorter period of time than being in the sun even under optimal conditions.

Standing about 14 inches from the light bulbs, according to the meter, I can obtain 500 I.U. of vitamin D3 in 1 minute. I am currently using the lamp on 9 locations; front and back of lower legs; front, back and sides of thighs; front, back and sides of torso. I do not expose my face or neck. I get about 5,000 I.U. in about 10 minutes.

When I lay in the sun, I expose the front and back of my entire body in a bathing suit for half an hour to an hour. I am getting about 7,000 to 10,000 according to my DMinder. I also garden and do so with arms and legs exposed but this is usually early morning or dusk when the UVB radiation is at it’s lowest.

Does Supplementation of Vitamin D3 Work?

It is not clear if supplementation works. One study showed that the problems associated with vitamin D3 deficiency do not improve even if the serum levels of vitamin D3 go up with supplementation. (citation) This make sense, as we will see in chapter _, in that the supplemented D3 never becomes sulfated. It is the sulfur that appears to have all of the health benefits, for the cholesterol and the vitamin D3. I have concluded that I need all three, the sun, the UVB lamp and the supplement along with foods rich in vitamin D3 and cholesterol.

Vitamin D3 Toxicity

Another question is whether or not you can take too much vitamin D3. Toxicity is more likely to occur if the dose goes over 10,000 I.U. according to most authorities. The guidelines are still being revised by many agencies in view of the epidemic of vitamin D3 deficiencies.

Another problem when it comes to supplementing is vitamin D2. It can actually be harmful as it blocks the absorption of vitamin D3. Please do not take it as a supplement. Note that it is vitamin D2 that is put into fortified milk, fortified cheese, fortified cereal…., well everything that has been fortified basically.

There are some people who should not even take vitamin D3 supplements.

Who Should and Should Not Get Vitamin D BTR Show 722

Here are the recommendations from some organizations in the United States on how much vitamin D3 to take:

Recommended daily intakes from various organizations:

Vitamin D CouncilEndocrine SocietyFood and Nutrition Board
Infants1,000 IU/day400-1,000 IU/day400 IU/day
Children1,000 IU/day per 25lbs of body weight600-1,000 IU/day600 IU/day
Adults5,000 IU/day1,500-2,000 IU/day600 IU/day, 800 IU/day for seniors

Summary

Not only is the sun good for us as long as we do not burn the skin, it is a life-saver. We will also see how the foods that have been kissed by the sun heal the body, block or prevent disease and sustain us well into old age.

[1] Yang et al. (2011). Ultraviolet exposure and mortality among women in Sweden. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 20(4):683-690.

[2] Mozes,A. (2012). Health Day. RSS Feed.

[3] DeSantis, C. (2013). Cancer statistics about African Americans released. American Cancer Society. Retrieved from //www.cancer.org/cancer/news/expertvoices/post/2013/02/04/cancer-statistics-about-african-americans-released.aspx

[4] Source: : CDC, 2013. Health United States, 2012. Table 68. //www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus12.pdf [PDF | 9.64MB]

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

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Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Sign Up For The Eating Disorder Pro Newsletter

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

Copyright © 2015 by Dr. J Renae Norton
All rights reserved. Do not Distribute. Use only with Permission.

Cold Pressed Coconut Oil-How It’s Made

Coconut Oil has many uses and benefits. Whether you use it to cook with or in skin care products, you won’t go wrong! For a full list of benefits and ways to use coconut oil visit //www.making-healthy-choices.com. Watch the video below to see how cold pressed coconut oil is made!

How Cold Pressed Coconut Oil Is Made

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-212-8799 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com.

Homemade Toothpaste

Ingredients
  • 5 tbsp Calcium powder
  • 3 tbsp Xylitol Powder
  • 4 tbsp Coconut Oil (room temperature)
  • 1 tbsp Organic Baking Soda (optional)
  • 2 tbsp Bentonite Clay
  • 3 tbsp Distilled Water
  • 20-30 Drops Essential Oils (Cinnamon, Peppermint, Etc.)
  • 20-30 Trace Minerals
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients in a food processor
  2. Once smooth, add the Bentonite Clay, mix by hand (do not use a metal spoon, use plastic or metal spoon)
  3. Store in small BPA squeezable tube

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-212-8799 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use: March 10-17 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 10 – March 17 2013!”

Five powerful ways coconut oil boosts brain function and protects against disease

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Clean Eating Recipe: Coconut Oil Mayonnaise

clean mayonnaise recipe

Coconut Oil Mayonnaise

4 eggs yolks (room temperature)
2 tbsp + 2 tsp macadamia nut oil
1 1/2 c cold-pressed, unrefined coconut oil
2 tbsp + 2 tsp white wine vinegar
lemon juice (from 1/2 lemon)
garlic salt + salt (to taste, I use a total of about 1 tsp of both salts combined)

In food processor, add egg yolks, blend.
After completely processed, with processor still running, stream in macadamia nut oil slowly.
After blended add in coconut oil (1/2 c at a time), blending.
Add in white wine vinegar, lemon juice, garlic salt and salt. Blend.

Makes about 2 cups, or 32 servings (1 tbsp)

Nutrition (approx. 1 tbsp): 110 calories, 12 g fat, 0 g protein, 0 g carbs

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Show Notes – Dr. Bruce Fife, The Coconut Oil Miracle

In this weeks episode we talked with Dr. Bruce Fife, author of The Coconut Oil Miracle. We had a great talk about the health benefits of coconut oil!

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In this episode we covered:

5:25 – Coconut oil contains a lot of saturated fat. Isn’t saturated fat unhealthy?
7:45 – Won’t increasing the amount of fat in my diet cause weight gain?
8:10 – What are the advantages of coconut oil?
11:10 – How can coconut oil cause weight gain in underweight individuals and weight loss in overweight individuals?
12:40 – How does coconut oil help in the treatment of malnutrition?
14:55 – Why does coconut oil have a positive impact on dementia and alzheimers?
19:05 – What is the recommended dose of coconut oil?
19:40 – Is there a relationship between homocysteine and coconut oil?
22:00 – What other diseases, disorders, problems can people expect to see improvement in with coconut oil supplementation?
28:12 – What brand of coconut oil do you recommend?
30:03 – Can you talk about the effects of coconut oil on arthritis?
31:10 – Do you have any tips on cooking with coconut flour?
34:18 – Why is coconut oil used in infant formulas?
38:24 – Coconut Oil Cooking Tips.
44:22 – What advice would you give to those suffering from an eating disorder or obesity when it comes to coconut oil?
46:05 – How does coconut oil affect cholesterol?

Links We Discussed

PERSONALIZED, SIGNED COPY of How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream (grass-fed)
Jovial Foods Einkorn Pasta
Snowville Creamery (grassfed milk)
The Coconut Research Center
The Coconut Oil Miracle by Dr. Bruce Fife
Coconut Cures by Dr. Bruce Fife
The Norton Center Lifestyle eBook

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Coconut Oil and Dementia

photo used under a creative commons license

It is predicted that by the year 2050 that 15,000,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. Is there anything we can do to protect ourselves from this diagnosis? I recently read an article by Dr. Mary Newport called “What If There Was a Cure for Alzheimers and No One Knew?” that gives some hope!

In 2003, Dr. Newport’s 53-year-old husband was diagnosed with progressive dementia. By 2008, he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease after an MRI showed shrunken areas within his brain. Her husband began to experience periods when the effects of the disease were extreme, but would also experience days when the effects were more tolerable.

Dr. Newport began looking for medical research studies for her husband to participate in. There were two in particular that she was interested in; one involved a vaccination, the other involved medication. She researched the medication used in the study and found that the “promising” ingredient in the medication was medium-chain triglyceride oil. She had her husband supplement with coconut oil on a daily basis. Before starting the coconut oil, she asked her husband to draw a clock. She had him complete the same task after 14 days of coconut oil supplementation and after 37 days of coconut oil supplementation. These were the resulting illustrations:

Coconut Oil and Dementia

After 60 days of supplementing with coconut oil, changes in her husband were pretty significant. He is able to happily walk into the kitchen each morning, engage in conversation and tell jokes. His tremor was became barely noticeable, his concentration and focus had improved greatly. On a trip to visit family, her husband’s interaction with relatives had changed significantly in comparison to their visit the year before. He recognized people by name, his facial expressions were more animated, he was more involved in conversations, he understood jokes immediately, he was able to speak in sentences. Due to atrophy is his brain he will never be completely “normal”, but the improvements that have been made since starting supplementation with coconut oil have been amazing. Her husband currently takes 7 teaspoons of coconut oil twice per day.

Why does coconut oil have this effect on individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease? When we ingest coconut oil, the liver converts it into ketone bodies instead of storing it as fat. These ketone bodies are then available to be used by the brain for energy when glucose is not available. Typically, we do not have ketone bodies available for energy unless we have been starving for days or are eating a very low carbohydrate diet. Neurons in some areas in the brain of those with Alzheimer’s Disease are unable to use glucose for energy because of insulin resistance. These neurons eventually end up dying off even before symptoms of the disease appear. When these neurons have ketone bodies available for energy they may be able to stay alive and function.

Alzheimer’s Disease is now being referred to by some as Type III Diabetes. A study completed by Dr. Suzanne de la Monte of Rhode Island Hospital found that diabetes is associated with several neuronal factors that are associated with dementia. Alzheimer’s Disease progresses when insulin resistance develops within the brain. When this occurs lipid metabolism is prevented, resulting in a build up of lipids in the brain. This build-up results in an increase in inflammation as well as the appearance of dementia symptoms. When an individual with Alzheimer’s Disease supplements with coconut oil, inflammation begins to decrease, the brain can better absorb cholesterol. This results in improved neural function.

For more information about coconut oil and dementia, be sure to readthe award-winning book “Stop Alzheimer’s Now! How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson’s, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders” by Dr. Bruce Fife

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

What If There Was a Cure for Alzheimers and No One Knew?

Alzheimer’s is really just ‘type-3’ diabetes, new research shows

The Skinny on Fat [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we talked about dietary fat. Is a low-fat diet really as healthy as we are led to believe? Are all fats bad? What types of fats should we avoid? What types of fats are the healthiest?

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In this episode we covered:

0:00 – Introduction
3:40 – Saturated Fat: Coconut Oil
5:28 – What are Saturated Fatty Acids?
5:45 – What are Unsaturated Fatty Acids?
6:05 – Is Saturated Fat Unhealthy?
6:45 – Short-chain, Medium-chain, Long-chain, and Very long-chain Fatty Acids
7:40 – Caller Question – What is healthier butter or margarine?
12:40 – Short-chain, Medium-chain, Long-chain, and Very long-chain Fatty Acids
17:54 – Sources of Saturated Fat
18:54 – What oils are the healthiest?
19:20 – What is the role of fatty acids?
19:55 – What are Trans-Fats, Partially Hydrogenated Oils?
20:52 – Caller Question – What is healthier skim milk or whole milk?
27:40 – What are some sources of trans-fats?
28:25 – What are some other names for trans-fats?
29:17 – Why are trans-fats used?
30:05 – Food labelling – Low Fat, Fat Free, Reduced Fat, Light, Lean, Extra Lean
33:30 – How to choose healthy milk
36:40 – What are the best cooking oils?

Links we discussed:

The Benefits of Butter
CLA and Trans-fats
Cooking Oils, Explained.
The Disadvantages of Low Fat Milk.
How to Choose Healthy Milk.
Free Lifestyle Handbook.
The Best Source for Fermented Cod Liver Oil.

Show Summary

Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. (A triglyceride is a combination of a glycerol and 3 fatty acids) Saturated fatty acids are chains of carbon atoms that are fully “saturated” with hydrogen. They have no double bonds. Unsaturated fat consists of fatty acids that do have double bonds.

So, Fatty acids that have double bonds are known as unsaturated. Fatty acids without double bonds are known as saturated. For many years we were told that saturated fats were dangerous and that fats like canola oil were good for us….wrong!

Fatty Acids also differ in length.

Fatty acid chains differ by length as well as in saturation. This is important because most of us have been told that saturated fat is bad and that unsaturated fat is good. In fact, the length of the fat may be even more important.

Length is categorized as short to very long

  • Short Chain fatty acids (SCFA) are (always saturated) fatty acids tails of fewer than six carbons. Found mostly in butter fat from cows or goats.(microbes good for immune systems)
  • (MCFA) are fatty acids tails of 6–12 carbons, which can form medium-chain triglycerides. Found in coconut fat
  • Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) (Saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated) are fatty acids with tails 13 to 21carbons. Found in beef, olive oil, black current oil
  • Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) (Highly unsaturated) are fatty acids with tails longer than 22 carbons. Found in Fish oil (EPA, DHA) very important in the functioning of the nervous system.

Short and Medium chain fatty acids do not store as fat in human beings, whereas, long and very long chain fatty acids do.

Unlike other fatty acids, MCFA are absorbed directly from the intestines into the portal vein and sent straight to the liver where they are, for the most part, burned as fuel much like a carbohydrate. In this respect they act more like carbohydrates than like fats.2

Other fats require pancreatic enzymes to break them into smaller units. They are then absorbed into the intestinal wall and packaged into bundles of fat and protein called lipoproteins. These lipoproteins are carried by the lymphatic system, bypassing the liver, and then dumped into the bloodstream, where they are circulated throughout the body. As they circulate in the blood, their fatty components are distributed to all the tissues of the body. The lipoproteins get smaller and smaller, until there is little left of them. At this time they are picked up by the liver, broken apart, and used to produce energy or, if needed, repackaged into other lipoproteins and sent back into the bloodstream to be distributed throughout the body. Cholesterol, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and polyunsaturated fat are all packaged together into lipoproteins and carried throughout the body in this way.

In contrast, medium and short-chain fatty acids are not packaged into lipoproteins but go straight to the liver where they are converted into energy. Ordinarily they are not stored to any significant degree as body fat.

Short and Medium-chain fatty acids produce energy. Other dietary fats produce body fat.

Various fats contain different proportions of saturated and unsaturated fat. Examples of foods containing a high proportion of saturated fat include animal fats such as cream, cheese, butter, and ghee; suet, tallow, lard, and fatty meats; as well as certain vegetable products such as coconut oil, cottonseed oil, palm kernel oil, chocolate, and many prepared foods. Although cottonseed oil is high in saturated fat, it should be avoided due to the fact that it is genetically modified.

In particular, heart and skeletal muscle prefer fatty acids. The brain cannot use fatty acids as a source of fuel; it relies on glucose or ketone bodies.

Trans fats

Trans fats (or trans fatty acids) are created in an industrial process that adds hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid. Another name for trans fats is “partially hydrogenated oils.” Look for them on the ingredient list on food packages.

Trans fats raise your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels and lower your good (HDL) cholesterol levels. Eating trans fats increases your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. It’s also associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Trans fats can be found in many foods – but especially in fried foods like French fries and doughnuts, and baked goods including pastries, pie crusts, biscuits, pizza dough, cookies, crackers, and stick margarines and shortenings. You can determine the amount of trans fats in a particular packaged food by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel. You can also spot trans fats by reading ingredient lists and looking for the ingredients referred to as “partially hydrogenated oils.”

Small amounts of trans fats occur naturally in some meat and dairy products, including beef, lamb and butterfat. It isn’t clear; though, whether these naturally occurring trans fats have the same bad effects on cholesterol levels as trans fats that have been industrially manufactured.

Companies like using trans fats in their foods because they’re easy to use, inexpensive to produce and last a long time. Trans fats give foods a desirable taste and texture. Many restaurants and fast-food outlets use trans fats to deep-fry foods because oils with trans fats can be used many times in commercial fryers.

What exactly does Low Fat Mean?

Fat Free – Less than 0.5g of fat per serving

XX% Fat Free – Must also meet the low fat claim (below)

Low Fat – 3g or less per serving; or 3g per 100g for a meal or main dish, and 30% of total calories or less

Reduced Fat – 25% less fat than food it is being compared to

Low Saturated Fat – 1g or less and 15% or less of calories from saturated fat

Light/Lite – 50% less fat or one-third fewer calories than the regular product

Lean – Less than 10g of fat, 4.5g of saturated fat and 95mg of cholesterol per 100g of meat, poultry or seafood

Extra Lean – Less than 5g of fat, 2g of saturated fat and 95mg of cholesterol per serving and per 100g of meat, poultry or seafood.

Low Cholesterol – 20mg or less per serving and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Cholesterol Free – Less than 2mg per serving and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Less Cholesterol – 25% or less than the food it is being compared to, and 2g or less saturated fat per serving

Low Calorie – 40 calories or less per serving

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Feb 19-26

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of February 19-26”

Former McDonald’s executives to start healthy fast-food chain

Raw Milk Movement Takes Hits From Courts, Health Officials

Can Gardening Help Troubled Minds Heal?

Harvard study: Pasteurized milk from industrial dairies linked to cancer

Babies fed solid foods more likely to develop healthy eating habits

Coconut oil may be able to reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease

Getting Kids to Eat Veggies

Active video games don’t mean kids exercise more

Interactive Infographic – Obesity Rates by Country

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Coconut Oil and Malnutrition

It’s a great honor to have Dr. Bruce Fife as a guest writer today. Dr. Fife was kind enough to write about some of the effects of coconut oil on malnutrition. Dr. Fife is an internationally recognized expert on the health and nutritional benefits of coconut oil and all coconut products. He operates the ‘Coconut Research Center’, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to educating the public and medical community about the many benefits of coconut and palm products. He has authored many books, including: ‘The Coconut Oil Miracle’, ‘The Palm Oil Miracle’, ‘Coconut Lover’s Cookbook’, ‘Eat Fat, Look Thin’ and most recently ‘Stop Alzheimer’s Now’. These books are highly recommended reads, and can be purchased at Amazon.com, and Piccadilly Books.

Coconut Oil Can Help Prevent Malnutrition

By: Dr. Bruce Fife

Coconut oil can be an excellent way to increase the nutritional content of foods and improve nutrient absorption. Coconut oil is different from other fats and oils because it is made primarily of a unique group of fats known as medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). Most all others fats in our diet are composed of long chain triglycerides (LCTs).

One of the advantages of MCTs over the more common LCTs is their speed and efficiency in digestion. MCTs digest very quickly, with minimal effort and stress placed on the body. LCTs require pancreatic digestive enzymes and bile in order to break down into individual fatty acids. MCTs, on the other hand, break down so quickly that they do not need pancreatic digestive enzymes or bile, thus reducing stress and conserving the body’s enzymes. The digestive systems of those people with malabsorption problems often have a difficult time digesting LCTs. Not so with MCTs. Consequently, MCTs provide a superior source of energy and nutrition than do LCTs.

The difference in the way MCTs are digested is of great interest in medicine because it provides a means by which a number of medical conditions can be successfully treated. Replacing a portion of the LCTs normally found in the diet with MCTs has allowed doctors to successfully treatment of a variety of malabsorption syndromes including defects in fat digestion and absorption, pancreatic insufficiency, liver and gallbladder disorders, defects in protein metabolism, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease. MCTs can even, speed recovery after intestinal surgery.

Because of MCTs are digested more efficiently, they also improve the absorption of other nutrients. As far back as the 1930s researchers noticed that adding coconut oil to foods enhanced the food’s nutritional value. For example, researchers at Auburn University studied the effects of vitamin B-1 deficiency in animals given different types of fats. Vitamin B-1 deficiency leads to a fatal disease called beriberi. When rats were given a vitamin B deficient diet, coconut oil was effective in preventing the disease. Coconut oil doesn’t contain vitamin B-1. So how did coconut oil prevent a vitamin B-1 deficiency? Coconut oil made what little of the vitamin that was in the diet more biologically available, thus preventing the deficiency disease.

A number of studies have found similar effects. Coconut oil improves the absorption of not only the B vitamins but also vitamins A, D, E, K, beta-carotene, lycopene, CoQ10, and other fat soluble nutrients, minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and some amino acids—the building block for protein. Adding coconut oil to vegetables can increase the absorption of beta-carotene, lycopene, and other nutrients as much as 18 times!

What this means is that if you add coconut oil to a meal, you will get significantly more vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients out of the food than if you used soybean oil, canola oil, or another oil, or if you used no oil at all. Simply adding coconut oil to a meal greatly enhances the food’s nutritional value.

This fact has led researchers to investigate its use in the treatment of malnutrition. For example, coconut oil, mixed with a little corn oil, was compared with soybean oil for the treatment of malnourished preschool-aged children in the Philippines. The study involved 95 children aged 10-44 months who were 1st to 3rd degree malnourished. The children were from a slum area in Manila. The children were given one full midday meal and one afternoon snack daily except Sundays for 16 weeks. The food fed to the children was identical in every respect except for the oil. Approximately two-thirds of the oil in their diet came from either the coconut oil/corn oil mix or soybean oil. The children were allocated to one of the two diets at random: 47 children received the coconut oil diet and 48 children the soybean oil diet. The children were weighed every two weeks and examined by a pediatrician once a week. At the start of the study the ages, initial weight, and degree of malnutrition of the two groups as a whole were essentially identical.

After the 16 weeks, results showed that the coconut oil diet produced significantly faster weight gain and improvement in nutritional status compared to the soybean oil diet. A mean gain of 5.57 pounds after four months was recorded for the coconut oil group, almost twice as much as the weight gain of the soybean oil groups of 3.27 pounds.

Coconut oil or MCTs is included in all hospital infant formulas. Premature infants whose digestive systems are not fully matured have a difficult time digesting most fats. However, they can handle MCTs. When coconut oil is added to their formula they grow faster and have a higher survival rate. Adults also benefit with the addition of coconut oil. For this reason, coconut oil or MCTs are also included in the feeding formulas given to hospital patients of all ages. When MCTs are added to nutritional formulas, patients recovering from surgery or illness recover faster.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

Why is Coconut Oil Good For You?

We have been brain-washed into believing that saturated fat is bad for us. I have always had trouble with this idea because both of my sets of grandparents were dairy farmers whose diets were heavy in delicious saturated fats. None of them had a weight problem, nor did any of their 15 children. Indeed, my maternal grandmother never weighed more than 90 pounds soaking wet, even after a dozen or so children! She and my mother loved buttermilk (yuck), put heavy cream in everything, and slathered toast with homemade butter. I can still remember the mouthwatering poached our eggs mom made by poaching them in butter and milk.Speaking of the milk that we drank growing up, it had to have the cream skimmed off the top. This we used to make our own version of “ice cream”. We lived between Kings Mills and Loveland, Ohio back then, close to Landen Farms. (This was when it was still an actual farm, now it is a subdivision.) My mother was no fan of the milkman and his homogenized/pasteurized dairy products! So she drove to Landen for milk, eggs and butter several times a week. Old habits die hard.My grandparents are all gone. Some died young, some reached old age, but none were overweight by today’s standards. My mother is also gone. She died very young of a rare form of lymphoma, but was also a normal weight all her life despite what would be considered today a diet very high in saturated fat. Every once in a while when I put the unsweetened apple butter on my whole grain or pumpernickel toast, I remember how mom used to butter her toast with regular full-fat butter, then put on a layer of peanut butter and then top it off with a liberal amount of apple butter! Scrumptious!Just one more walk down memory lane; if you happened to catch the John F. Kennedy special that aired on HBO this winter, you may have noticed, as I did, how different everyone looked. At first I thought they all looked like concentration camp victims because they seemed so thin. Then I realized, they were all a normal weight and I’m just not accustomed to seeing so many people in one place that are a normal weight. For example, I am sitting in the Barnes & Nobel bookstore in the Sycamore Center mall, which is north of Cincinnati, Ohio, a pretty typical Midwest city. Of the 17 people within eyesight, 4 are a normal weight, and the rest range from overweight to morbidly obese. What’s my point? I would be willing to bet that most of the people that I can see, whether or not they are overweight, do not drink whole milk or eat real butter. And I’m not even sure you can buy buttermilk anymore, so I’m almost positive they’re not drinking that. (Thank Goodness! Sorry mom.) I would also be willing to bet that at least a sizeable proportion of the overweight individuals I can see try to avoid saturated fats. If I’m correct, it isn’t working. So maybe saturated fats are not the problem.

It turns out that the best fat we could be eating is coconut fat and it is definitely a saturated fat. I use it for all baked goods, popcorn (yum) and anything else I am frying. I have also recently switched to whole organic butter and whole milk, to avoid MSG, both of which have saturated fat, with no adverse effects so far, although I don’t use a lot of either. I actually haven’t ever completely avoided saturated fats, as too many of the foods I love are made with them, such as chocolate, goat or swiss cheese not to mention the occasional steak. I do avoid trans fats and only eat beef, fowl and pork that are organic and free range.

So what really determines whether or not a fat is good for you?

We know that trans fat raises your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol and lowers your “good” (HDL) cholesterol and that this increases your risk of heart disease. What you may not know is that it’s another man-made, or genetically modified substance that is added to our food, especially the foods we eat as snacks and breakfast foods to preserve the food’s shelf life. Some shortenings and margarines are very high in trans fat.

Until very recently, it was added to commercial baked goods, such as crackers, cookies and cakes, and many fried foods, such as doughnuts and french fries, without notice to the consumer. Presently, it must be designated as part of the nutritional information on the package. Our government has made it clear that these things have to be apparent to us so that we can avoid them, right? Not quite. Food manufacturers can still secretly add them to any food and state on the package that the food is “trans fat free” as long as the amount is below .5% per serving. How often do you eat one serving of a snack food?

I can’t help wondering how this negotiation went.

The FDA says,This stuff is really bad and causes terrible diseases that cost people their lives and ups the cost of health care. Consumers have to be notified!”

And the food manufacturers say, “That’s not fair, it will cost us a fortune in terms of shorter shelf life. Our profits will go down.” And the FDA says,Oh, ok, you can put it in and not mention it, as long as it is below .5%.” Seriously?

Why Is Coconut Oil So Good For You? It’s a Saturated Fat, Right?

We’ve been told for the past 20 years that it is the saturation of the fat molecule that matters. There are saturated fats, which we try to avoid, and the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats that we try to include. But there is another less well-known system of classification that is based on the length of the carbon chain within each fatty acid. In this system there are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). Coconut oil is composed predominately of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), also known as medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). The vast majority of fats and oils in our diets, 98% to 100%, whether they are saturated or unsaturated, or come from animals or plants, composed of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). Both the saturated and unsaturated fat found in meat, milk, eggs, and plants (including most all vegetable oils) are composed of LCFA.

While we have been led to believe that all saturated fatty acids are bad for us, the MCFA from the coconut, which is a saturated fat, has health benefits that rival those of fish oil, or omega-3 fats. In general, they do not raise cholesterol, but actually protect against heart disease. They also help to lower the risk of both atherosclerosis and they can be a significant weight loss aid.

To read the history and learn of the many other benefits of the mighty coconut and it’s healing oil check out Coconut Secret and the Coconut Research Center. For a somewhat biased, but interesting article on saturated fats in general see this article “The Truth About Saturated Fat” from T-Nation.

If you aren’t already confused enough about fat, let’s really get into it. Omega-3’s also come in short- and long-chain varieties. The short-chain form, which is alpha-linolenic acid, is found in flaxseed oil (53%), canola oil (11%), English walnuts (9%), and soybean oil (7%). The long-chain, or marine omega-3’s are found mainly in fish and shellfish. Compared with their plant Omega 3 counterparts, the marine long chain Omega 3’s have two advantages; Firstly, they are highly unsaturated. Secondly, they are excellent sources of low fat protein. Bottom line, they are critical to our neurological well being. Fish oil, when combined with exercise, is the only thing presently known to prevent Alzheimer’s.

So How Does it Work?

Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) found in plant and animal fat are not easily absorbed by the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and require pancreatic enzymes and bile salts to break them down so that they can be absorbed by the intestine. Next, the long chain fatty acids must go through a complicated process through which they are delivered to a variety of tissues, including adipose, cardiac and skeletal tissue, and are then transported to the liver, and are finally oxidized for energy use. This is how all saturated fat, unsaturated fat, and cholesterol that consists of long chain fatty acids (almost all of your dietary fat) is transported throughout the body.

In contrast, medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil are absorbed by the GI tract with ease, they do not require any pancreatic enzymes to break them down, which means less work for your pancreas. Next, medium chain fatty acids are transported through the blood stream, directly to the liver, where they go directly into mitochondria and are immediately oxidized for energy. Medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil do not get packaged into lipoproteins, and do not get transported to a variety of tissues and are not stored as body fat, they go directly to the liver and are metabolized for energy.

The bottom line is that medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil produces almost exclusively energy, whereas, long chain fatty acids found in all other dietary fats produce body fat (and some energy).

Coconut Oil Boosts Energy

Because the medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil are easily and rapidly transported into the mitochondria, unlike long chain fatty acids, they are immediately used for energy, which “heats up” the body and increases metabolism. Several animal studies and clinical studies have proven that ingestion of coconut oil increases metabolism and decreases body fat both in animal studies performed on mice, and humans. Rats that were fed a diet consisting of medium chain fatty acids had less subcutaneous fat, a visibly evident decrease in overall body fat, and increased metabolism and increased thermogenesis.[1]

The energy burst that is produced by medium chain fatty acids is also important for athletic endurance. In one study, researchers tested the physical endurance of mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids vs. those fed a diet high in long chain fatty acids for six weeks. The mice were subjected to a swimming endurance test, where they had to swim against a current, every other day. The mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids continually performed better then the others and displayed a much higher physical endurance.[2] These studies in mice provide us with evidence that medium chain fatty acids increase metabolism and promote the loss of fat while providing a burst of energy that increases physical endurance. Yes, this boost in energy means you feel less lethargic, and it can help you feel less tired as you perform daily activities.

Coconut Oil Decreases Body Fat

Numerous studies have shown that coconut oil clearly has an effect on men and women very analogous to what has been demonstrated in other mammalian animal models: it increases metabolism and decreases overall body fat. For example, healthy men and women were administered either medium chain fatty acids or long chain fatty acids in addition to a diet similar in fat, protein, and carbohydrates for 12 weeks. Throughout the 12 weeks, individuals that took medium chain fatty acids had significantly less body weight and, specifically, body fat[3].

It Gets Even Better!

Not only do you store less body fat, studies have shown that medium chain fatty acids also increase the oxidation of long chain fatty acids that are already in your body, tucked away in your love handles! So not only does it prevent weight gain, it aids in weight loss.[4] Similar to the animal studies, medium chain fatty acids also boost energy production in humans by speeding up metabolism.[5] Finally, for those with cholesterol problems, this study found that people with high triglyceride levels who were given medium chain fatty acids for eight weeks had a 14.5% decrease in their triglyceride levels! [6]

Bottom line: for those of you that have completely lost focus:

1. Coconut oil, which is a medium chain fatty acid, is metabolized by a different process than long chain fatty acids, this process expedites use as energy instead of storage.

2. Because the body has to preferentially burn the fat off, it ramps up the metabolism by increasing thermogenesis.

3. This ramping up of the metabolism then proceeds to not only burn off coconut oil, but long chain fatty acids pre-existing the consumption of coconut oil.

4. These effects have been demonstrated both in animal studies, and more importantly, human studies as well.

 


[1] (Lipids 22 (6): 442-444).
[2] (Journal of Nutrition 125 (3):531-9)
[3] (The Journal of Nutrition 131 (11): 2853-2859)
[4] (International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 24 (9): 1158-1166)
[5] (Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental 38 (7): 641-648)

[6] (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 63 (7): 879-886).

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

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Quinoa Pancakes

Quinoa Pancakes

Photo courtesy of www.laurawendlingFDN.com

Ingredients

1 cup cooked quinoa
3/4 cup Jovial Foods Einkorn Flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 large egg, plus 1 large egg white (organic, pastured)
1 tbsp unsalted grassfed butter, melted
1/4 cup Snowville or Traders Point whole milk
2 tbsp coconut nectar or maple syrup

Directions
In a medium bowl, whisk together quinoa, flour, baking powder and salt.
In another bowl, whisk together egg, egg white, butter, milk, syrup until smooth.
Add egg mixture to quinoa mixture, whisking til combined.

In a non-stick skillet, melt a little coconut oil over medium to medium-high heat.
Drop batter by heaping tablespoonful into the skillet.
Cook until bubbles appear on top, approximately 2 minutes.
Flip cakes and cook until golden brown on underside, 1-2 minutes.

Serve with maple syrup, fresh fruit or preserves.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Can be made ahead of time. Freeze cooked pancakes between sheets of waxed paper in zip-top bags, up to 1 month. Reheat in toaster.

Nutrition Info (per pancake)
73 Calories
2 g Fat
2.5 g Protein
12 g Carbs
0.5 g Fiber