Tag Archives: eating disorder recovery

Hempseed Florets

Looking for a substitute for grains? Here you go!

I don’t think there’s a better substitute for grain than hempseed florets. I like them as a morning cereal or as a substitute for rice at dinner.  They are loaded with protein, 10 grams per 3 tablespoons. They also have 15 g of polyunsaturated fat, the good fat, and finally and best of all, they have effectively one carbohydrate.

I usually use the hempseed florets as a cold cereal in the morning. They’re perfect on a keto diet! I put berries on top, some cinnamon and heavy cream. If I’m not doing keto, I use coconut or almond milk. I like this warm as well as cold.

Another great way to use hemp seed florets is in place of rice. When I use it as a rice substitute, I heat it up in water or I sauté it with onions and celery. For the sauté, use a tablespoon of coconut oil and a half cup of diced celery and onion. Sauté celery and onion until translucent then add the hemp seed florets last. Season to taste. I use adobo seasoning on mine. Hempseed is the perfect complement to any meat or dish that you would normally serve with rice.

For more information on the health benefits of Hempseed florets be sure to check out the newsletter entitled Hemp as a Super Food.

View Newsletters Page

Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. We are located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Diabulimia

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

Continue reading

Keto Granola

Keto Granola

I made granola for the first time, And if I do say so myself, it is absolutely amazing! Truth be told, it is a keto granola. But I think anyone would enjoy it. It is both crunchy and chewy at the same time. Go figure! It is loaded with collagen, vitamin C, protein, and chocolate.

Continue reading

Fats Explained: Where to Get Pastured Butter

butter

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Where to Get Pastured Butter

Pastured butter is an excellent source of CLA. To my knowledge, there are no American farms or cooperatives that are currently selling butter from 100% grass-fed cows. Although cheese from all-grass-fed cows is available from many suppliers, grass-fed butter cannot be found. Restrictive government regulations and lack of consumer awareness keep small-scale butter operations from being profitable.

An excellent source for all-grass-fed butter can be imported from Germany by the Allgau company. The butter is made from cows that are raised on pasture or grass silage, making it five times higher in CLA and also higher in vitamin E and beta carotene than commercial butter, whether organic or non-organic. It costs about twice as much as ordinary butter and about the same as organic butter. It is yellower than butter from cows raised in confinement, melts at a lower temperature, and has a terrific taste. You can purchase it online from igourmet.com.

Other options are to make your own butter, which isn’t nearly as difficult as it sounds. I’ve posted a recipe for butter here. You may also be able to convince your local supermarket to stock it, eliminating the high cost of shipping. Check this site out for grass-fed options – www.eatwild.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Non-essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5, Omega-7, Omega-9

Macadamia Nuts

photo used under a creative commons license

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Non-essential Polyunsaturated Omega-5 Fatty Acid

While Omega-5s are polyunsaturated like Omega-3 and Omega-6, they are not considered essential, i.e. our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. Omega 5s from healthy sources are believed to have a positive effect on weight, cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5’s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to their phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA).

Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • Full-fat/grass-fed dairy
  • Tropical oils (unrefined, cold-pressed coconut and palm kernel)
  • Saw palmetto
  • Wild-caught salmon
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pomegranate seeds or unrefined, cold-pressed pomegranate oil

Non-Essential Monounsaturated Fatty Acids, Omegas 7, & 9

The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. 

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-7 Fatty Acids have been shown to have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a role in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA).

Common food sources are:

  • Grass-fed/Grass-finished meat
  • Full-fat, grass-fed dairy
  • Wild caught salmon
  • Sea buckthorn berries
  • Macadamia nuts

Polyunsaturated Non-essential Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked to healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA).

Natural sources of good Omega-9s include:

  • Olives
  • Expeller pressed olive oil
  • Avocado
  • Grass-fed/grass-finished meat
  • Sprouted nuts

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Avocado Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

Omega-3, 5 & 6 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fats while Omega-7 and Omega-9 fatty acids are mono-unsaturated fats.  The name “Omega” indicates how far from the end of the molecule (i.e. the omega position is the last letter in the Greek alphabet) the first double bond occurs. In an Omega-3 fat it occurs on the third carbon atom from the end of the molecule, in an Omega-5 it occurs 5 from the end of the molecule and so on.

Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 Fatty Acids

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also referred to as Essential Fatty Acids; i.e. fats that our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of producing. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with: 

  • Regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • Transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • Managing proper kidney function
  • Dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • Regulating muscles and reflexes
  • Positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

Good sources of Omega 6 Fatty Acids are:

  • Olive Oil
  • Nuts
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Avocado
  • Flaxseed & Flaxseed Oil
  • Chia Seeds
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Acai Berries

Balancing Polyunsaturated Essential Omega 6 and Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega-6 and omega-3 fats need to be eaten in balance. Americans consume far too many omega-6 fatty acids, and far too little omega-3 fatty acids. The ideal balance between Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty acids would be 1:1. Experts estimate that Americans eat anywhere from 15:1 to 50:1 Omega 6 to Omega 3. So it isn’t the quantity of these polyunsaturated oils which governs the harm they do, but the relationship between them.  Obesity, free radical production, the formation of age pigment, blood clotting efficiency, inflammation, immunity from disease, and level of energy are all responsive to the ratio of unsaturated fats to saturated fats. The higher this ratio is, the greater the probability of harm there is.

When they are out of balance, we are susceptible to disease, whereas when we maintain a proper balance, we maintain and even improve our health. Some research is beginning to show that omega-6s and omega-3s only have a beneficial effect if you consume balanced amounts of both, so this ratio is not something to ignore. Since the Western diet supplies plenty of omega-6, you will probably have to focus on increasing your omega-3s from the list above.

In our next blog post, we’ll be talking about Non-Essential Fatty Acids – Omega-5s, Omega-7s, Omega-9s

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: It’s Not About the Food with Esther Kane

Esther Kane Eating Disorders

Join us on Wednesday August 7 at 7 pm EST as we speak with Esther Kane, author of “It’s Not About Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies“. We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. You can tune in HERE!

Here’s a bit of background info on our guest….

“Esther grew up in the inner city of Toronto and began her work there counselling and facilitating groups for women of all ages and backgrounds who were struggling with chemical dependencies and food/body images issues. After obtaining her Bachelor of Social Work at Ryerson in 1996 at the age of 25, she moved to British Columbia and continued her work as a therapist. In 1998, she obtained her Masters in Social Work from UBC. Her graduating research on Jewish Women and Body Image was published in the Journal of Collaborative Therapies shortly thereafter.

For over a decade, she has worked as a therapist and group facilitator with individuals and families for social service agencies and in private practice while also completing an intense 2-year training program in Multigenerational Family Systems Therapy at Pacific Coast Family Institute in Vancouver.

Esther Kane, is author of “It’s Not About the Food: A Woman’s Guide to Making Peace with Food and Our Bodies”. She is currently working on her fourth book, “How to Midwife Your Midlife in a Youth-Obsessed Culture”, which will help women navigate midlife in a healthy and empowering way.”

_______

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Fats Explained: Saturated and Unsaturated Fats

fats explained

Whether you suffer from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Obesity, emotional eating, or have problems with weight management due to restricting or overeating, you need to know about what fats do in your body once and for all. In other words whether you are obese, underweight or a normal weight, if you are having problems regulating food intake in healthy ways, this series on fat is a must.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats were unhealthy, and that they were the root cause of the epidemics of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol in our society. What we know today is that saturated fats are not the problem. It is the polluted and/or processed version of saturated fats along with the overabundance of processed unsaturated fats that are causing the problems. Saturated fats such as grass-fed animal fats and coconut oil, which is mostly a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) along with unsaturated Omega 3 fats and the naturally occurring trans-fat CLA, are exceptionally good, indeed, healing for the body. Whereas man-made trans-fats and vegetable or seed fats that have been hydrogenated are literally killing us.

So in a nutshell:

Good Fat = saturated grass-fed animal fat, coconut fat (medium chain fatty acid) and unsaturated Omega 3 fats, especially those from natural sources such as flax seed, salmon, walnuts and leafy greens. (See next in series for complete list)

Bad Fat = Unsaturated trans-fats, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated vegetable and seed fats that have been heated and/or hydrogenated.  Corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oils should be avoided either because they are innately unhealthy or because of the manner in which they have been processed.

Types of Fats

There are several ways to categorize fats: Saturated or unsaturated; Mono or polyunsaturated; Trans or non-transfat; and Short chain (SCFA), Medium chain (MCFA) and Long chain (LCFA). Among the monounsaturated and the polyunsaturated fats there are the Omega fats, which are divided into Essential (Omegas 3 and 6) and Non-Essential (Omega 5, 7, and 9) fatty acids.

Saturated vs Unsaturated Fat

Most fats are either saturated or unsaturated. There are over a dozen saturated fats, but we mainly consume Butyric, Palmiric, Myristic, Lauric and Stearic saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, also called the Omegas 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated and either essential or non-essential.

When an oil is saturated, it means that the molecule has all the hydrogen atoms it can hold.  Unsaturated means that there are spaces between some of the hydrogen atoms. This can be a problem, because opening the structure of the molecule makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals.

Free radicals damage healthy cells.  When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals through the process of hydrogenation, the cells in the oil age, and the oils can become rancid. Not only are they capable of becoming rancid in the jar in which they are stored, they may also become rancid in our bodies, which contributes to various cancers including skin cancer. In contrast, unrefined cold-pressed coconut oil, which is primarily a saturated medium chain fatty acid, does not become rancid, and never needs refrigeration, assuming that its structure has not been damaged by processing. (Always buy unrefined, cold-pressed nut and seed oils instead of the refined version.)

Characteristics of Healthy Saturated Fats

Saturated fats from grass-fed, raw or lightly pasteurized dairy (milk, cream, butter, cheese, cottage cheese) grass-fed/grass-finished beef, pastured pork and poultry (that are fed non-GMO grains and are usually organic) coconut and palm kernel oil and cacao have the following health benefits:

  • Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of cell membranes. They give cells their necessary stiffness and integrity.
  • Saturated fats play a vital role in the health of bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of dietary fats should be saturated.
  • Saturated fats lower lipoprotein – A substance in the blood that indicates proneness to heart disease.
  • Saturated fats protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins.
  • Saturated fats enhance the immune system.
  • Saturated fats are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids. Specifically, omega-3 essential fatty acids are better retained in the tissue when the diet is rich in saturated fats.

Unsaturated Fats (for the geeks)

Unlike the saturated fats that have a single bond between carbon atoms, monounsaturated fats have a single double bond between carbon atoms while polyunsaturated fats have two or more double bonds between carbon atoms. Unsaturated fats are primarily made up of the Omega fatty acids 3,5,6,7, and 9. (Trans-fats are also unsaturated. Stay tuned for our article on Trans Fats.)

Stay tuned for part 2 of this four part series.  In Part 2 we’ll talk about Omega Fatty Acids.

Updated on Aug 5 2013.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Source: The Skinny on Fats