Tag Archives: Eating Disorders

Diabulimia

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

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Keto Granola

Keto Granola

I made granola for the first time, And if I do say so myself, it is absolutely amazing! Truth be told, it is a keto granola. But I think anyone would enjoy it. It is both crunchy and chewy at the same time. Go figure! It is loaded with collagen, vitamin C, protein, and chocolate.

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The Food is at Fault!

The Blame Game

We tend to blame the victims of disordered eating, no matter what form it takes. Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Emotional Eating and Obesity are all assumed to be the result of poor choices and/or emotional disturbances that lead to over eating. Anorexia is often perceived as a choice the patient makes to achieve cosmetic improvements.

The eating problems plaguing Americans are the direct result of the deficiencies and toxins in the food supply and are not the result of implusive choices or vanity.

The Big Pharma complex, industrial farming, and the food and beverage industries, (I call them Big Pharma, Big Farming and Big Food or the 3 Big Pigs) have worked hard to convince us that our foods, beverages and drugs are safe as long as we take/eat them in moderation.

The issue is serious. The United States has the distinction of being the unhealthiest wealthiest country in the world today. So, how can a country with so many economic and natural resources not maintain healthy eating habits? The answer is simple and scary. Not only are the foods and drugs constructed by the 3 Big Pigs not safe, they are driving the catastrophic decline in the health of Americans and seriously decreasing the quality of life for millions of people.

Clean food heals the dysfunction and diseases caused by polluted foods. One of the reasons my patients get well is that they learn to trust food again by learning how to “eat clean.” Clean eating empowers them—it frees them from the slavery of addiction, and it calms the anxiety they have about eating. The more clean food they eat, the fewer cravings they have because the systems that regulate eating behaviors and weight fluctuations stabilize in the presence of clean food. Under these circumstances my patients can learn new healthy eating patterns.

The sad thing is that most of the treatment for eating disorders completely ignores the role of food pollution during recovery. To highlight how important clean food is and how destructive therapies can be that ignore the problems with our food, I’m going to describe the experience of a young patient of mine (age 14) in a typical residential treatment program for eating disorders.

In the residential program MA was ingesting the majority of her calories in the form of Boost[1] as a behavioral consequence of refusing to eat. She was also being kept in bed, all day, every day, for 13 days in a row. Understand she was not being kept in bed because she was too medically unstable to be up and around; she was kept in bed because she refused to eat. Her parents, or their insurance company, were paying a small fortune for this “treatment.”

Her treatment with me began by giving her choices about her food. She could pick whatever she wanted, as long as it was clean and had the necessary nutrients for her to slowly regain her weight. She slowly but consistently has expanded her foods to include everything she needs to thrive while consistently gaining weight.

Here is her experience with my approach to eating disorder treatment:

The Blame Game-2

Did I mention this patient is only 14? She wasn’t asked to write this, she felt compelled to. After having such a terrible experience in residential treatment and finally finding a treatment program that was really working for her she needed to express what was changing in her relationship with food.

Whether you are bingeing, purging, restricting or are addicted- I guarantee that polluted food is playing a part in your illness. The food is at fault!

-Dr. Norton

#GetSunEatCleanBeWell

 

[1] These are the first 10 ingredients in Boost: water, sugar, corn syrup, milk protein concentrate, vegetable oil, (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn) soy protein isolate, and Carrageenan. The only ingredient that is not GMO or a form of processed L-Glutamine (MSG) which is highly addicting, is the water. (See Chapter _ Sources of Food Pollution)

 

News You Can Use-Week of June 1st-7th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 1st-7th, 2015.

NEWS: Eating Disorders Affect Adults, Too

Autumn lost so much to an eating disorder that lasted nearly 40 years. The job she could not perform. The friends who drifted away. The energy to do the activities she loved. The ability to have children. LEARN MORE

NEWS: What Are The Healthiest Cooking Oils?

The average consumer today is spoiled for choice when it comes to cooking oils. Most stores (including health food stores) in the West tend to be packed with oils of various colors, tastes and origins, and it can be difficult to distinguish the healthy ones from the unhealthy ones. LEARN MORE

NEWS: McDonald’s Stops Reporting Monthly Sales to Hide Plummeting Fast Food Business

Anti-GMO activists and those who advocate for organic foods have a lot to be happy about regarding the recent decision by fast food retailer giant McDonald’s to stop publishing its traditional monthly revenue reports. Their decision has everything to do with the fact that more Americans are now making better food choices. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Reasons Not to Shop the Store Perimeter Exclusively

You’ve probably heard this advice before – if you want to eat healthy, buy food only from the store perimeter. The perimeter is where you’ll find fresh produce, dairy, eggs, meat, and fish. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Obesity May Be Tougher on Male Immune Systems Than Females

With the risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for men than women, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets. They found that the difference may lie in the tendency of males to produce higher levels of white blood cells that encourage inflammation, which contributes to the negative health consequences of obesity such as insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. LEARN MORE

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of April 6th-12th, 2015

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 6th-12th.

Between sunscreen and indoor lifestyles, bodies crave vitamin D

Tammi Leader Fuller, 55, is outdoors most of the time, running her Malibu, Calif.-based sleepover camps for grown-ups. Yet, she knows she does not get enough of D, the “sunshine vitamin,” because it requires ultraviolet rays to be absorbed. LEARN MORE

Scientists Discover Why You Should Mix Different Lettuces Together

There’s nothing quite as disappointing as looking at your lunch and thinking, “Another salad. Yawn.” While we love leafy greens, a boring bowl of monochromatic leaves isn’t the best way to go, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The reseachers discovered that different-colored lettuces have different, yet complementary, antioxidant effects. LEARN MORE

A Scientific Explanation for Food Cravings

Do you ever get food cravings? An irresistible urge to eat a specific food that leads to a bad mood or even physical pangs of hunger? LEARN MORE

Raw Milk – The Pros and Cons

In real food circles, people are encouraged to consume unprocessed, whole foods. Yet even seemingly unprocessed food that we buy at the supermarket has gone through some changes. For example, the organic milk you buy at Whole Foods is not exactly what came out of a cow, because it has been pasteurized – treated by high heat to kill off potentially lethal microorganisms. That’s why some people swear by raw milk. LEARN MORE

All People With Eating Disorders Are Underweight, Right?

As a clinical psychologist with an expertise in eating disorders, people frequently tell me stories about their experiences with eating and weight. Some tell painful stories of watching loved ones deal with severe symptoms. Some express their own struggles around dieting and body image. Some describe trying to treat patients. And some just ask questions. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use: Week of March 2nd-8th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of March 2nd-8th.

Boys’ quest for ‘perfect body’ fuels rise in eating disorders

A significant rise in the number of boys and young men suffering from eating disorders has contributed to a worrying 30pc jump in reports of the illness in Ireland, new figures obtained by the Sunday Independent reveal. LEARN MORE

Feeling Stuck in Your Battle Against an Eating Disorder?

Imagine a kind of eating disorder treatment where how many times you binged or purged, or how much weight you gained this week, or how well you stuck to your meal plan was not important. LEARN MORE

Why the “Eat Less, Move More” Approach Often Fails

If you want to lose weight, the solution is simple: Eat less and move more, right? Everyone one knows that. But eating less and moving more is a lot easier for some people than others. It is easiest for people who are in the normal weight range and have perhaps gained a few pounds over the holidays. New research explains why this approach often fails with obese individuals. And why some calories are better than others when seeking to lose weight. LEARN MORE

Mothers, Daughters and Food

The mother-daughter relationship is a strong and storied one, both celebrated and disparaged. From the moment a pregnant woman knows she’s having a daughter—in my case, not until she was born—she begins to imagine passing on a lifetime’s worth of female experience to her child. A daughter naturally feels more known to a mother, especially in the early years before she fully develops her own personality. We delight in dressing them adorably in part because they reflect our own, younger, cuter selves. We are as proud of their accomplishments as if they were our own, and it can be difficult not to superimpose our own desires onto the dreams we have for them. We imagine that they will “be there” for us even when they are adults with their own families. A daughter is forever, as the adage says. LEARN MORE

3 Myths About Eating Disorders Debunked

In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, this month’s blog post is dedicated to briefly discussing three common misconceptions surrounding eating disorders (ED) and hopefully raising awareness about these disorders more generally. Eating disorders can be devastating illnesses, but with help, recovery is possible. If you are struggling with symptoms of an eating disorder, please reach out to someone you trust and consider treatment. If you know someone who is showing signs of an eating disorder, consider reaching out to let them know that you care and encourage them to seek help. Contact information for the anonymous National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) helpline is listed at the bottom of this article. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Eat Clean

News You Can Use-Week of February 23rd-March 1st

NEWS: ‘I Had No Idea’ It’s National Eating Disorders Week

Next week is National Eating Disorders Week, with the theme of “I Had No Idea” for 2015. Many people who are aware of eating disorders may not think they have one, but the campaign seeks to educate people on healthy methods of managing weight along with empowerment activities that help individuals embrace positive qualities in themselves as opposed to an unrealistic ideal. Murray State’s Women’s Center Director Abigail French discusses events at Murray State University for the awareness week, Tuesday and Wednesday. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Eating Disorders Awareness Week reminds students of epidemic

Leah Nash developed an eating disorder when she was just 14 years old. For the next six years, she lived miserably, confined to a cage of anorexia nervosa. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Eating Disorder Many Women Don’t Know They Have

Binging on food has become an acceptable cliché these days—think gorging on Ben & Jerry’s after a breakup. Few of us equate bouts of overeating with anorexia or bulimia. But just like them, binge eating can be an eating disorder, and it’s going to be on more people’s radars in upcoming months. An awareness campaign kicked off this week, with tennis great Monica Seles leading the way. As she revealed at an event, “Binge eating disorder was as tough as any moment on the tennis court.” LEARN MORE

NEWS: 8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victim hood, and victory versus defeat. LEARN MORE

NEWS: I Had No Idea

This Monday marks the start of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an annual national campaign to raise awareness around eating disorders. If you don’t have an eating disorder (and I’m deeply, truly glad for you if you’ve never experienced one), and if you don’t know anyone who has an eating disorder (you do, I promise, but you might not be aware of it), you might think this campaign has nothing to do with you. LEARN MORE

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of February 23rd-March 1st.

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

You News You Can Use-Week of December 29th-January 4th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 29th-January 4th!”

NEWS: Understanding Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder where people become concerned about their weight. They try to prevent weight gain and may starve themselves to achieve this. Anorexia nervosa is not about weight, but mostly an unhealthy way to cope with emotional problems. Thinness to them equates to self-worth.LEARN MORE

NEWS: 3 Reasons Diet Food is Making You Fat

There is no shortage of food products geared towards the weight loss market. After all, 50 million Americans will start (or restart) a weight loss diet next week. Catering to this large demographic has become a key strategy for many food companies. There’s only one problem with these foods. They don’t work. LEARN MORE

NEWS: About Those Vegetables in Kids’ Snacks

Every parent’s dream is a kid who eats her veggies. For various reasons (avalanche of ads for less healthy foods, poor adult role models, nothing fresh available when needed, etc.), the real thing is often a tough sell. Wouldn’t it be great to sneak veggies into a snack? LEARN MORE

NEWS: Mushrooms and onions contain immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients

Plants have had to evolve through various environmental stressors and have developed very sophisticated systems to protect them from predators and the elements. These complex systems offer humans unique survival advantages through reducing oxidative stress and improving immune system coordination. Mushrooms and onions are packed full of immune-enhancing polysaccharides and phytonutrients. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding eating disorders and how they are treated

In the early part of the 20th century, Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, proclaimed: “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin.” Cut to 2014, and that philosophy is alive and well and perpetuated in society—fueled in part by the media’s emphasis on youth and beauty. But in reality, too thin can be life threatening. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of December 22nd-28th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of December 22nd-28th!”

NEWS: Cooper Connection: Coping with holiday stress

For many, the holiday season is a time filled with friends, family and festivities.

But while the holidays can be a time for family traditions and celebrations, it can leave others feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Even the most seasoned party-goer can get weary. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How to Choose Eggnog

Christmas is almost here and it’s time for Eggnog! Have you ever wondered what’s inside? LEARN MORE

NEWS: How To Do Christmas Better

Dressing up isolation as peacefulness. Maintaining, on this one potentially exceptional day of the year, immovable exercise, work, and food routines, noting deviations as tiny as a few calories. Being emotionally disconnected. Registering others’ sadness and incomprehension, but not really caring. Giving the false name of ‘celebrating what is’ to a bleak new absence of pressure to make anything else possible. Being aware of the perversity of the physical and mental state of anorexia. Not even trying, beyond a single crumb of Christmas icing, to bridge the gulf separating that awareness from action. Suffocating natural appetites with the sheer force of determination not to feel them. Feeling satisfaction at the danger of bulimia averted. Looking forward to another year and another vista of absolute unchanging predictability. LEARN MORE

NEWS: 84% of Vegetarians and Vegans Return to Meat. Why?

One of my daughters recently asked me for suggestions on types of meat she might enjoy. I was shocked. A vegetarian for nearly 18 years, she has always found meat, well, icky. In retrospect, I should not have been surprised about her new interest in carnivory. After all, as a researcher, I have studied vegetarians who return to meat. But I never figured she would join the ranks of ex-vegetarians, so I asked her to jot down a few words about why she originally gave up the consumption of flesh and why she now feels compelled to change her veggie ways. Here’s what she wrote…. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Understanding eating disorders and how they are treated

In the early part of the 20th century, Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, proclaimed: “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin.” Cut to 2014, and that philosophy is alive and well and perpetuated in society—fueled in part by the media’s emphasis on youth and beauty. But in reality, too thin can be life threatening. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 24th-30th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 24th-30th!”

How To Avoid A Thanksgiving Day Meltdown

The season of food-centered parties and gift-giving starts with a bang with Thanksgiving dinner. The annual meal comes with high expectations, as relatives and friends anticipate a multi-course feast. LEARN MORE

Food Addiction: Retraining Your Brain To Eat Healthy

Why are so many of us hopelessly addicted to fatty and sugary foods that we know are bad for us? Why do we never get the same cravings for fruit, vegetables or brown rice that we do for chocolate, crisps and chips? LEARN MORE

Surviving Thanksgiving

Each year, as the holidays approach, we go into a panic. How will I survive Thanksgiving? There is the thought of spending time with family, the pressure of creating a perfect holiday meal, and the guilt over the 51 million turkeys that will sacrifice their lives for the occasion. But amidst all of these other pressing concerns, there is one that stands out above the rest in the national panic: How will I stick to my diet? My advice is simple. Don’t. LEARN MORE

Adolescent Girls and ‘Not-Quite’ Eating Disorders

These girls, aged 12 to 15, never crossed the line into fulleating disorders. In fact, they became healthy young women with normal-enough eating. Siena switched from a vegetarian diet to a gluten-free one, to one that involved lots of raw vegetables. Bella rarely ate much in front of her friends, though her weight tended to run a little higher than one might expect. Meagan dieted on and off, though never with much persistence. Caroline obsessed about being “fat” so often that her friends began to eye-roll.Kendra went through a phase of only eating “healthy” foods, fearing sweets and junk. LEARN MORE

Trust Yourself

You know if what you’re doing or what you’re thinking is good for you or bad for you. It’s up to you to point yourself in the right direction. To do that, you have to place a tremendous amount of trust in yourself. If, in the past, you’ve tried to develop a healthier relationship with food and failed, it might be difficult for you to trust that you will make better choices and succeed this time. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

News You Can Use-Week of November 10th-16th

 

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of November 10th-16th!”

NEWS: Eating disorders in young children–how bad is it?

It’s hard to escape the media coverage of eating disorders in young children. The stories are usually framed around the growing numbers of young children (generally meaning pre-pubescent, typically 10 or 11 and under) that are presenting for treatment. The articles generally consist of a breathless assessment of how bad the situation is, with no small amount of blaming the media and a child’s increasing exposure to images of super-skinny models. LEARN MORE

NEWS: Labeling GMOs Won’t Raise Food Prices (INFOGRAPHIC)

Here’s a stat that is likely scaring the pants off of companies producing GMOs and the chemicals designed for use on them: 92 percent of Americans want GMOs labeled. LEARN MORE

NEWS: The Miracle Food You’re Not Eating

The benefits of hemp are boundless. The wonder food balances your hormones, nourishes your skin and hair, calms post-workout inflammation, and relaxes your muscles. Once a mainstay crop in the United States, it’s also embedded in history: The Declaration of Independence was drafted on hemp, and early American flags were made of the durable, plant-based fabric. In the early 1900’s, one report declared 25,000 uses for hemp, everything from ropes and sails to linens and food. LEARN MORE

NEWS: FDA targets Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps for sharing health benefits of coconut oil

(NaturalNews) Relatively new to the food products market, Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, a Southern California-based family company famous for its organic, fair-trade pure castile soaps, has come under scrutiny by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for merely sharing with its customers the proven health benefits of eating extra-virgin coconut oil. LEARN MORE

NEWS: How Much Sugar Is Too Much? A New Tool Sheds Some Light

These days, sugar is pretty much everywhere in the American diet. A new initiative from the University of California, San Francisco spells out the health dangers of this glut of sugar in clear terms. LEARN MORE

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Food Pollution and the Role It Plays In Our Health

Presentation3

Food Pollution is very serious and is not a topic we should take lightly. Click on the links below to learn how the pollution in our food plays a role in eating disorders, obesity, premature aging, and escalating mortality rates in the U.S.

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD POLLUTION

WELLNESS PRESENTATION OBESITY

WELLNESS PRESENTATION DISEASES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION EATING DISORDERS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION THE CAUSE

WELLNESS PRESENTATION GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOODS

WELLNESS PRESENTATION MSG AND OTHER ADDITIVES

WELLNESS PRESENTATION FOOD ADDICTION

 

About Dr. Renae Norton

A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //www.EatingDisorderPro.com

Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers May be a Function of Food Pollution

Growing old is not easy in any culture, but it is particularly difficult for middle-aged women in the United States. Americans obsess about thinness and worship youthfulness. Joan Rivers’ tragic death last month was was a good example of the extremes to which women in American society will go in order to maintain these unrealistic ideals. Ms. Rivers is not alone. Remaining young and fit is getting harder all the time because of the food we eat. U.S. food is polluted with ingredients that attack the immune system, accelerate the aging process and drive obesity.

Aging is scary enough without a rapid decline in one’s health and an ever-expanding waistline. And that is exactly what Baby Boomers are experiencing today. As a result, they may be more at risk for specific eating disorders (EDs) such as Anorexia or Bulimia than in the past. This is consistent with the latest research showing a proliferation of eating disorders in the U.S. that includes older women.

In a survey conducted on the eatingdisorderpro.com website, with nearly 1000 participants, 1.2% reported that their symptoms began after the age of 50.

symptons of my eating disorder

Unlike European countries where women are viewed as sexy into middle age and beyond, U.S. women become invisible as they age. This puts them at even greater risk when it comes to EDs as they are less likely to be diagnosed or get treatment. Anorexia nervosa has the highest morbidity rate of any psychiatric illness with 10% mortality rate at 10 years of symptom duration and 20% at 20 years. Many Baby Boomers have had their disorders for more than 20 years. The longer the duration of the illness, the higher the risk of death.

In general, the population is aging. But living longer with chronic illnesses, especially the complications of obesity and EDs that are driven by food pollution, can and should be prevented. These problems not only rob us of our health, they rob us of our dignity. Ms. Rivers died in an ill-fated attempt to preserve the youthfulness of her voice. Too many women, especially those in midlife, are feeling the same desperation.

Awareness is key. Here are some Do’s and Don’ts:

Do Not Eat Do Eat/Cook With

  • GMO’s Organic whole foods
  • MSG Grass-fed beef, poultry and pork
  • Food additives Coconut oil, ghee and raw grass-fed butter
  • Sweeteners Wild Caught Fish
  • Grains
  • Pesticides

Eating clean nourishes the body, but it also nourishes the soul, and empowers us to take charge of our health and regain the vitality that we were meant to enjoy well into old age.

About Dr. Renae Norton
A family practice psychologist for more than 20 years, Dr. Norton specializes in the treatment of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, and the consequences of disordered eating. She’s been featured by NPR, CNN and was a five-time guest on Oprah. She coaches individuals and organizations via Skype worldwide. Visit: //edpro.wpengine.com

Dr. J. Renae Norton

Listen to the Podcast on Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers HERE.

 

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use-Week of September 29th-October 5th

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 29tb-October 5th, 2014!”

5 Vices Every Woman Should Have

I’ve lived a lot of my life as a “should-er”…Heck, I even wrote a book advocating these “should’s.” But I’m noticing something as I work with more and more women. These “should’s,” which have a place in our lives, can become rigid and–worse–they can disconnect us from our intuitive instinctual natures. When we become too disciplined with our spiritual and wellness regimes, we end up stuffing the very source of our true power: our feminine intuition. LEARN MORE

Threat Grows From Liver Illness Tied To Obesity

Despite major gains in fighting Hepatitis C and other chronic liver conditions, public health officials are now faced with a growing epidemic of liver disease that is tightly linked to the obesity crisis. LEARN MORE

Latinas and Eating Disorders

About 10% of Americans struggle with eating disorders. But among Latinos, this disease often goes underreported and undiagnosed. And some evidence suggest that Latinos might be more susceptible. LEARN MORE

 

For Boys With Eating Disorders, Finding Treatment Can Be Hard

Last year, Kathy Noyes began to notice that her 12-year old son, Jonathan, was eating more than usual. She caught him eating late at night. She found empty peanut butter jars and chip and cookie bags stashed around the house. LEARN MORE

 

Should I Refrigerate My Peanut Butter (Or Any Nut Butter)?

Peanut, almond, and cashew butters are not only tasty, they are good source of healthy unsaturated fats. These fats are susceptible to rancidity as a result of oxidation, and that’s why manufacturers recommend refrigeration. LEARN MORE

 

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Eating Disorder Pro Podcast: Eating Disorders Among Female Baby Boomers

Joan-Rivers-br03

 

Yesterday, as a tribute to Joan Rivers, we talked about eating disorders among female baby boomers and how those numbers are rising. If you missed it yesterday you can tune in HERE!

What We Covered:

0:44- Increased Incidents of Eating Disorders among Female Baby Boomers

1:23- Male Eating Disorder Statistics

2:06- Joan Rivers Eating Disorder Background

3:00- The connection of the Biological Level and Psychological Level between Obesity and Eating Disorders

4:00- Why Food Pollution causes Disordered Eating

6:34- Pressures Facing Women 50+

8:37- Body Image Dissatisfaction in midlife has increased

9:55- What role does Obesity play in the rise of Eating Disorders?

11:55- National Eating Disorder Association Statistics

14:45- John Hopkins Mood Disorder Clinic Study

18:47- Most Important Signs of having an Eating Disorder

22:50- What Mental Healthcare and Medical Professionals Need

26:41- Autoimmune Disorders

28:18- Maji & Mongo Books

Links We Discussed

Eating Disorder Survey

Maji and Mongo Book Series

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes: Making Healthy Eating Easy with Carmen Johnson

Carmen Johnson - Making Healthy Eating Easy

On this week’s episode we spoke with Carmen Johnson about how to make healthy eating easy! If you missed the episode, I’d definitely recommend you listen, especially if you suffer from anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, obesity, or binge eating disorder.

In this episode we covered:

3:05 – About Carmen Johnson. Read more HERE.
5:10 – Carmen Johnson’s Story – How she became interested in health and nutrition.
7:05 – What kind of success are you having? What trends are you seeing in the health of America’s children?
8:22 – The daily sugar limit for children and adults.
11:20 – What kind of response do you get from parents when you are teaching about health and nutrition?
13:40 – How do our bodies respond to sugar alcohols, such as Xylitol?
17:10 – Caller Question: How does Xylitol compare to other sugars and sweeteners? Where can you purchase Xylitol? What are some healthier alternatives to sugary drinks/soda?
29:00 – Your program, Insane Body Science, has been sent to Yale Prevention Research Center for review. Talk to us a bit about this.
31:00 – Do you experience a lot of parents that allow their kids to drink diet soft drinks?
36:30 – What is Neotame? Are there any dangers to incorporating Neotame into our diets?
37:35 – The drawbacks of baby formula.
39:45 – Hidden names for artificial sweeteners. What should we look for on food labels?
40:12 – What sugars/sweeteners are the healthiest? Read more about the benefits of coconut palm sugar here.
40:25 – What food products should we avoid? Misleading food labels. Read more here.
40:44 – Is fruit juice healthy or should we avoid it?
43:20 – Mortality Rates in the United States.
49:30 – Food additives in baby formula (MSG, artificial sweeteners, high fructose corn syrup).
51:40 – The three simple rules of healthy eating.
54:50 – The importance of eating healthy fats, the disadvantages of low fat diets.

Links we mentioned:

Maji and Mongo Book Review
Insane Body Science – How is too much sugar bad for my body? [Children’s Education Video]
Insane Body Science – You mean I should eat good fats? [Children’s Education Video]
Insane Body Science – Why toxins are bad for my body? [Children’s Education Video]
Hydro One Beverages
Reed’s Gingerale
Coconut Secret – Coconut Crystals and Coconut Nectar
Cultures for Health – Water Kefir Grains
The Healthy Kids Revolution
Nutrition Detectives – Dr. David Katz
Sweet Misery – A Poisoned World (documentary about Aspartame)
Back To School“Lunch Box Ready” Training Call!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes – The Diet Cure with Julia Ross

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License

In this weeks episode we had a great conversation with Julia Ross, author of “The Diet Cure” and “The Mood Cure“.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on BlogTalkRadio

In this episode we covered:

2:49 – About Julia Ross.
4:19 – How did you get interested in the field of eating disorders and addiction?
6:00 – What is the cause of the increase of food addiction?
12:40 – What natural approaches do you use to help people with food addiction?
19:30 – What are the symptoms of hypothyroid?
23:40 – What can people do about hypothyroid?
24:40 – What are bioidentical hormones?
27:00 – Caller Question: How do you know what diet is best? There are so many options!
35:43 – Is there any sort of survey or questionnaire that people can take to find out what types of food they should be eating based on where their ancestors originated from?
38:00 – How can people determine if they have a neurotransmitter deficiency?
42:30 – Is there any danger that if you are naturally supporting serotonin that dopamine will be depleted?
46:40 – What brand of amino acids do you recommend?
47:40 – What book should listeners read first, “The Diet Cure” or “The Mood Cure”?
49:16 – What is your favorite patient success story?
52:00 – What do people need to do in addition to amino acid therapy in order to be successful in overcoming food addiction?

Links We Discussed

The Diet Cure
The Mood Cure

Notes:

Be sure to check out my blog article on Amino Acid Therapy for more insight on supporting serotonin and dopamine naturally. Opinions of different podcast guests sometimes vary, so be sure to talk with your physician before starting any amino acids.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 21-28 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of April 21 – April 28 2013!”

Psychiatric insurance approval takes time in ERs

Increased wait-list time predicts dropout from outpatient enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders

Environmental expert: GMO farming causes one billion people to go hungry

Seven great food substitutions for common food allergens

7 Things You Need to Know about GMOs

Do You Want to Know What Is In Your Food? Tell Congress to Support the New Federal Labeling Bill

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes: Female Athlete Triad Syndrome with Dr. Kelly Austin

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License

In this weeks episode we talked with we talked about Female Athlete Triad Syndrome with Dr. Kelly Austin, a Naturopathic Doctor and clinical director of two practices in San Diego.

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

0:33 – Caller Question – We’re talking about Female Athlete Triad Syndrome, is there a similar syndrome that affects males?
4:30 – What are the symptoms of the male form of Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
5:28 – About Dr. Kelly Austin
7:44 – What is Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
8:20 – Have you seen more osteoporosis and osteopenia in patients in the last 5-10 years?
10:30 – What causes Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
12:29 – Does Female Triad Athlete Syndrome affect females involved in certain sports more than others?
14:04 – Are there things that coaches could do differently that might help prevent Female Triad Athlete Syndrome?
17:28 – What role does the endocrine system play in Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
20:03 – What are some signs that a woman has Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
21:10 – What is an appropriate range of body fat for women?
22:51 – If an individual presents with Female Athlete Triad Syndrome, what treatment is most successful?
27:56 – What kind of lifestyle changes do you recommend for individuals with Female Athlete Triad Syndrome?
40:46 – Is Female Athlete Triad Syndrome reversible?

Links We Discussed

nHealth Wellness Center

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Female Athlete Triad Syndrome – Dr. Kelly Austin

Join us on Tuesday March 19 at 7 pm EST as we talk with Dr. Kelly Austin about Female Athlete Triad Syndrome! We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494. Tune in HERE!

About Dr. Austin

Dr. Kelly Austin received her degree in naturopathic medicine from the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine in 2004. She practiced in Canada for several years before relocating to San Diego. She has spent the majority of her career working in corporate settings helping the employees establish a healthy lifestyle, as well as lecturing for government agencies. She is currently the clinic director of two practices in San Diego, California.

Dr. Austin has a special focus on hormone (endocrine) metabolism and lifestyle medicine. She has a passion for teaching patients how all the hormones work together to ensure optimal health. Dr. Austin teaches her patients lifestyle changes that will stick for life and reverse and prevent chronic illness. Through addressing the underlying causes, she works with her patients to provide them with the most up to date research.

Dr. Austin’s special interests also include clinical nutrition, eating disorders, weight management, and mental health. She is a DAN! Doctor and sees many patients with Autism and Down Syndrome. She is also a certified fitness instructor helping many people achieve their health & fitness goals.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

The Eating Disorder Pro Podcast – Diabulimia – Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri


Diabulimia - Dr. Goebel-Fabbri

Join us tomorrow March 5 at 7 pm as we talk to Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri about Diabulimia! We’ll be taking your questions LIVE at 646-378-0494 or by email (drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com). For more information on Diabulimia be sure to read this article we posted last week! Here’s some background information about Dr. Goebel-Fabbri from the Joslin Diabetes Center:

Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist at Joslin Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her role at Joslin integrates teaching, research and treatment focused on disordered eating behaviors in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Her work covers the spectrum of eating problems from food and insulin restriction to binge eating and obesity.

Dr Goebel-Fabbri has lectured at local and national academic conferences and presented her work in peer-reviewed journals. She is involved in NIH-funded multi-center clinical research focused on non-surgical weight loss strategies for improved health outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

Women with type 1 diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop an eating disorder as the general public. The symptoms of eating disorders specific to this population include insulin omission and insulin underdosing (skipping or reducing necessary insulin injections to control weight).

Research indicates that insulin omission and reduction increase the risk of long-term microvascular and macrovascular medical complications of diabetes—such as nerve damage, kidney disease, cardiac disease and eye disease—and may also increase mortality rates.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the relationship between diabetes and eating disorders. In her own studies and in collaboration with others, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri seeks to better understand how eating disorders affect long-term medical complications in women with diabetes and what types of interventions might help improve health outcomes in these high-risk patients.

In collaboration with Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N., Dr. Goebel-Fabbri completed a 12-year follow-up of a cohort of 470 female Joslin patients with type 1 diabetes. This study investigates the natural course of insulin omission and underdosing as a means of weight loss over time.

The study also examines how these behaviors affect psychological and functional health, quality of life, diabetes-related distress, diagnoses of eating disorders and long-term complications of diabetes.

In the future, Dr. Goebel-Fabbri hopes to undertake a treatment outcome study to determine whether interventions specifically tailored to treat issues related to insulin omission and other eating disorders in women with type 1 diabetes can improve overall health outcomes in this population.

People with type 2 diabetes also appear to be at higher risk of developing eating disorders, particularly binge eating. It remains unclear whether the binge eating leads to weight gain and type 2 diabetes, or if events occur in another order. Dr. Goebel-Fabbri is the chief psychologist for WhyWAIT, a Joslin program created expressly to address the unique weight-management needs of people with type 2 diabetes. A multidisciplinary clinical research team is studying the effectiveness of this program for delivery in routine diabetes care.

Dr. Goebel-Fabbri serves as the Behavioral Consultant to the Joslin team of the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study, a multicenterclinical trial, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), that examines the impact of weight loss and physical activity on cardiac outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes.

She is also the supervising Behavioral Psychologist to the Joslin team of the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) Study, a multicenter research trial funded by NIDDK. This project aims to improve medical and behavioral treatments for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Diabulimia

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which individuals with Type 1 Diabetes purposefully give themselves less insulin than they require, with the intention of losing weight. The eating disorder is most common in woman between the ages of 15 and 30. According to Dr. Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri, about 30% of diabetic woman restrict their insulin to induce weight loss at some point in their lives.

There are many serious short-term and long-term consequences associated with diabulimia:

According to Diabulimia Helpline, there are several telltale signs that an individual is suffering from diabulimia:

  • A1c of 9.0 or higher on a continuous basis.
  • Unexplained weight loss.
  • Persistent thirst/frequent urination.
  • Preoccupation with body image.
  • Blood sugar records that do not match HbA1c results.
  • Depression, mood swings and/or fatigue.
  • Secrecy about blood sugars, shots and or eating.
  • Repeated bladder and yeast infections.
  • Low sodium/potassium.
  • Increased appetite especially in sugary foods.
  • Cancelled doctors’ appointments.

Treatment for Diabulimia

The first step in Diabulimia is to break through the denial the individual may have that s/he is abusing insulin to manage weight. Unlike many eating disorders, this one may start as an attempt to control the diabetes but end up as a way of controlling weight. Those with Type I diabetes are at risk for addiction to empty carbs early in their disease as the first symptom is significant weight loss. Efforts to help the child regain the weight usually do not include clean eating, such that s/he may develop bad habits or even an addiction to carbs, fat and/or salt.

Treatment for Diabulimia resembles treatment for Bulimarexia, the combination of Anorexia and Bulimia, in as much as it often contains elements of each disorder. To the degree that the individual uses insulin to “binge” on empty carbs, the first step is to teach him or her to eat clean foods that have a healing impact on the endocrine system rather than a damaging effect.

The other essential ingredient in the treatment of the individual suffering from Diabulimia is to help the individual deal with the fear of gaining weight. As with many individual’s suffering from Anorexia, an excessively low weight seems like an accomplishment. The Diabetic is particularly at risk for having control issues, as so many things seem beyond his or her control, especially when it comes to the body’s reaction to food.

Interested in learning more about Diabulimia? We’ll be talking with Dr. Ann Goebel-Fabbri on next week’s podcast! We’ll be taking your questions live at 646-378-0494 or you can submit your questions HERE.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

Show Notes – Food Addiction with Dr. Vera Tarman

In this weeks episode we talked with addictions specialist Dr. Vera Tarman of addictionsunplugged.com. We talked about the science behind food addiction!

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we covered:

3:40 – About Dr. Tarman
4:45 – What is food addiction? How did you becomes interested in becoming a specialist in food addiction?
6:38 – What are the signs that someone is a food addict?
11:38 – Is there a relationship between food addiction, obesity, and/or eating disorders?
13:50 – There’s an article on your blog entitled “Are we dieting ourselves into obesity?”. What do you mean by this?
20:10 – What impact does food addiction have on recovery from drug and alcohol addiction?
21:55 – Caller Question – What does an addiction-free diet look like?
33:10 – What is the three-part brain model?
36:39 – What role do dopamine, seratonin, and endorphins play in food addiction? What are symptoms of low neurochemical levels?
42:05 – What is the most successful treatment for food addiction?

Links We Discussed

Addictions Unplugged
Anorexia, Addiction, and the Three-Part Brain Model
How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch! for purchase from EatingDisorderPro.com | amazon.com
Maji and Mongo: Let’s Eat! for preorder from amazon.com
Dangerous Liaisons: Comfort and Food – Understanding Food Addiction DVD

 

Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Top Ten Supplements

photo used under creative commons license

Dr. Donald W. Miller, Jr recently published an article listing the top ten supplements that he takes on a daily basis. The article is particularly informative, as it also lists both recommended dosages and the benefits of taking each supplement. These are the top ten supplements he recommends:

  1. Vitamin D3
  2. Iodine
  3. Selenium
  4. Vitamin K2
  5. Magnesium
  6. Alpha Lipoic Acid
  7. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)
  8. L-Carnitine
  9. Omega 3 Fatty Acids
  10. Resversatol

To read more about the benefits of taking each of these supplements, be sure to read the full article HERE. As always, be sure to consult with your physician before starting any new supplements!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Female Athlete Triad Syndrome

photo used under a creative commons license

Female Athlete Triad Syndrome is a condition that combines energy deficit created through restricting food intake or over-exercising, irregular menstruation, and bone loss. According to the Female Athlete Triad Coalition, the most common symptoms of Female Athlete Triad Syndrome include:

  • irregular or absent menstrual cycles
  • always feeling tired and fatigued
  • disrupted sleep
  • stress fractures and frequent or recurring injuriesrestricting food intake
  • obsessed with being thin
  • eating less than needed in an effort to improve performance or physical appearance
  • cold hands and feet

As with all eating disorders, some individuals are more at risk of developing Female Athlete Triad Syndrome. Athletes involved in sports that emphasize being “lean” (such as gymnastics, figure skating, ballet, long distance running, swimming, diving) are most commonly affected by Female Athlete Triad Syndrome. Other risk factors include: participating in sports that require weight checks, over-exercising, playing “high-pressure” sports, participating in sports that look down upon weight gain, working with controlling parents or coaches.

Psychologically speaking this syndrome can be driven by a number of dynamics. For different reasons, some young women associate motherhood with losing control of their bodies and/or their lives. The obvious one is the weight gain. But it may also be that they do not want to give up their devotion to their Eating Disorder, especially if they suffer from Anorexia or Bulimarexia. For others, it may have to do with giving up or modifying career or athletic success. This often stems from a fundamental belief that they “cannot have it or cannot do it all” and so they sacrifice the role of motherhood. For others, the mature or womanly body is frightening because they do not believe that they can take care of themselves. Thus keeping a child’s body means that someone, usually parents, will have to care for them. At the end of the day, the number of reasons for engaging in behaviors that are so detrimental to one’s health and future are as different and varied as the people suffering from them. Which is why all treatment has to take the individual where she is and not use a One Size Fits All Approach.

There are several steps that active women can take to prevent Female Triad Syndrome. The Female Athlete Triad Coalition suggests:

  • monitoring your menstrual cycle by using a diary or calendar
  • consult your physician if you have menstrual irregularities, having recurrent injuries or stress fractures
  • seek counseling if you suspect you are overly concerned about your body image
  • consult a sport nutritionist to help you design an appropriate diet that is specific to your sport and to your body’s energy needs
  • seek emotional support from parents, coaches and teammates

It is also important to make sure you are taking in enough calories to support normal body function. If you are a 120 pound woman, it takes 1600 calories per day to have a normal menstrual cycle. If you burn an additional 500 calories at the gym or in your sport, you would need to eat 2100 calories per day.

For more information for Female Athlete Triad Syndrome, be sure to visit the Female Athlete Triad Coalition.

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Podcast: The Effects of Food Additives on Our Children’s Health [Show Notes]

GMOs, Eating Disorders, ObesityIn this weeks episode we discussed the effects of food additives and genetically modified foods on our children’s health!

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In this episode we covered:

1:44 – What is Food Pollution?
4:50 – Characteristics of Pollution
6:45 – How to Protect Ourselves and Our Children from the Effects of Food Pollution
7:26 – When it Comes to Food Pollution, How Does the US Compare to Other Countries?
12:14 – Genetically Modified Foods in the United States
13:28 – The Impact of Food Pollution on Health
16:10 – The Effects of Food Pollution on Children’s Health
20:56 – Childhood Disorders and Genetically Modified Foods
24:10 – Neurological Disorders and Genetically Modified Foods
25:55 – The Immune System and Genetically Modified Foods
35:35 – The Health Effects of Genetically Modified Foods
40:52 – Genetically Modified Foods and Eating Disorders

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Anorexia Nervosa & Body Dysmorphia

photo used under a creative commons license, flickr user Ken Doerr

Many patients with anorexia nervosa experience body dysmorphia; they feel that they are much larger than they actually are. Recently, a study was published that investigated whether this overestimation of body size is a symptom of the eating disorder or if it is a general impairment in perception.

The study involved fifty participants; 25 of the participants had anorexia nervosa, 25 participants were control participants. Participants were well-matched based on age and level of education. Within a test room, each participant was presented with a door. The participant had to judge whether the door was wide enough for them to pass through. Presented with the same door, the participant then had to judge whether the door was wide enough for another person in the test room to pass through.The participants with anorexia nervosa significantly overestimated their ability to pass through the door in comparison to the control group, suggesting that overestimation of the passability ratios in participants with anorexia nervosa are likely to be caused by an overestimation of their own body size and shape.

The study concluded that the overestimation in participants with anorexia nervosa occurred because the central nervous system had not yet registered that the participants body was emaciated; the central nervous system had an outdated image of the participants body in it’s pre-anorexic state.


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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Source: Guardia D, Conversy L, Jardri R, Lafargue G, Thomas P, et al. (2012) Imagining One’s Own and Someone Else’s Body Actions: Dissociation in Anorexia Nervosa. PLoS ONE 7(8): e43241. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043241

Tonight’s Podcast – Eating Disorders and Insurance Coverage with Lawyer Lisa Kantor

Tune into tonight’s podcast (at 7:30 pm ET) as I talk with Lisa Kantor, a Los Angeles lawyer and partner in Kantor & Kantor LLP. Lisa Kantor represents people denied health benefits for treatment of both physical and mental illnesses. Most recently, Ms. Kantor has focused her efforts litigating insurance company denials of coverage for residential treatment of eating disorders. Kantor & Kantor is the only law firm in the country with a distinct eating disorder practice staffed with lawyers and other professionals experienced in the specific needs of people who have been denied benefits for eating disorder treatment.

In 2007, she won the first published eating disorder decision in California in which the court applied the state’s mental health parity law to beneficiaries who sought treatment outside California. In August 2012, she won the first federal court ruling that determined health plans must pay for all medically necessary treatment for mental illnesses, including residential treatment.

Ms. Kantor was named a Top Woman Lawyer by the Los Angeles Daily Journal and an Attorney of the Year by the San Francisco Recorder. She received a “Special Recognition” award from the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation and a California Women Lawyers’ Woman of Distinction Award.

TONIGHT’S show starts at 7:30 pm ET! You can listen liveHERE!

You may also listen by phone by dialing 646.378.0494. This is the same number that you can use if you have questions for Lisa, just press “1” when prompted.

This is a podcast you don’t want to miss!

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News You Can Use – September 25 – October 2 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 25-October 2 2012!”

Ted Talk – Genetically Modified Food and Allergies

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – September 18-25 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 18-September 25 2012!”

French Study Finds Tumours in Rats Fed GM Corn

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – September 9-18 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of September 9-September 18 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!


Let’s Connect!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Meditation-Based Intervention for Binge Eating Disorder (BED)

Meditation and Binge Eating Disorder

Photo Used Under a Creative Commons License via AlicePopkorn

Is it possible that individuals with Binge Eating Disorder could gain a greater sense of control over eating by giving up a certain amount of conscious control? It’s quite the paradox, really. A study completed at the University of Indiana examined this very idea. The study explored the use of meditation-based intervention for Binge Eating Disorder. The six-week study introduced 18 obese women to standard and eating-specific mindfulness meditation. After completing the study, episodes of binge-eating decreased from 4.02 episodes per week, to 1.57 episodes per week. Additionally, the women’s scores on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) decreased significantly; anxiety and depression went from mild-moderate to non-clinical levels. The women also reported an improvement in their sense of mindfulness, perceived control, awareness of hunger and satiety cues.

There are numerous reasons that meditation may be a successful form of therapy for individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED):

– people that regularly meditate exhibit greater control over random flow of thought

– meditation lowers brain reactivity; this may lower the impulses associated with Binge Eating Disorder

– it is believed that the act of meditating puts a space between thought and action, allowing for more time to think situations through before acting

– people that meditate regularly show an increased amount of connection in the white matter that connects the Anterior Cingulate Gyrus (ACG) to the rest of the brain; deficiencies in these connections are associated with addiction (including food addiction), depression, ADHD, obsessive behaviors, compulsive behaviors, and eating disorders

If you want to incorporate the art of meditation into your everyday life, there are several free downloadable meditations available through Buddha Net. A good meditation to start with is the Body Scan, which gives instructions on bringing awareness to bodily sensations. Buddha Net also offers meditations for progressive relaxation, learning how to calm the body with breath, cultivating peace and joy with the breath, mindful standing and walking, mindfulness of breath, mindfulness of sound and thought, healing painful emotions, and loving-kindness meditation.

Let’s Connect!

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

J Health Psychol May 1999 vol 4 no 3 357-363

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show – Q&A – Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we answered your questions about last week’s episode on the Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders (you can also review the show notes for more information).

The obesity epidemic has negatively impacted the entire U.S. health care system and reversed a 20-year trend of longer life expectancy for certain segments of the population, primarily today’s children.

If the present rate of occurrence continues, the entire population will be obese by the year 2030. Likewise, eating disorders (ED’s) such as Anorexia, are growing in numbers and reaching new segments of the population, including younger children, middle-aged women and men. These are groups that have been relatively unaffected by ED’s in the past.

In this episode we covered:

1:47 – About Dr Norton

2:54 – Podcast Overview

4:27 – Obesity and Eating Disorders in the US

8:32 – Why Are We Seeing an Increase in Obesity and Eating Disorders in the US

12:04 – The Role of Pop Culture in Obesity and Eating Disorders

12:37 – The Role of Nutrition in Overcoming Obesity and Eating Disorders

14:27 – Caller Success Story

22:08 – Caller Question – What are some reliable websites to obtain accurate information about our food supply?

26:22 – Caller Question – How to Eat Healthy in the Workplace (Travelling, Prepared Meals)

39:14 – Importance of Understanding Good Nutrition for Both Ourselves and Our Children (GMOs, MSG, Neurotoxins)

42:48 – Caller Question – How to Eat Healthy Throughout College Life – Low Budget, Cafeteria Food, Dorm-Life

47:51 – Caller Question – Diabetes – What Food Should I Avoid Eating?

Links we discussed –
Sean Croxton’s Underground Wellness
The Institute for Responsible Technology
The Weston A Price Foundation
Coconut Crystals from Coconut Secret

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

 

 

The Science Behind Overeating

Many of my clients and readers who are seeking treatment for Binge Eating Disorder, Obesity, or Bulimia ask the question “Why do I overeat?” There are numerous factors that drive us to overeat. But first let’s identify the five main types of overeating; compulsive overeating, impulsive overeating, impulsive-compulsive overeating, anxious overeating and emotional overeating. The following are possible causes, and ways to decrease the tendency to overeat.

The Science Behind Overeating

Compulsive Overeating

Compulsive Overeaters tend to obsess over food and are compelled to eat with very little self-control. The condition characterized by low serotonin in the brain, which causes the portion of the brain known as the Anterior Cingulate Gyrus to overwork. The Anterior Cingulate Gyrus is the portion of the brain that is responsible for allowing us to move from thought to thought, co-operate, and see errors; it’s the brain’s gear-shifter. An overactive anterior cingulate gyrus can be caused by genetics, emotional trauma, or poor diet.

Your serotonin levels may be too low if you get thoughts stuck in your head, you worry excessively, you are easily upset, you obsess over food, or you tend to be a night time eater. Serotonin can be raised through aerobic exercise, and supplements (5HTP, saffron, inositol, vitamin B6).

Impulsive Overeating

Impulsive Overeaters often have good intentions when it comes to eating good foods, but have a hard time controlling urges when they see a not-so-healthy food.

Impulsive Overeating is characterized by low dopamine in the brain. Low dopamine decreases the function of the portion of the brain known as Pre-Frontal Cortex. The Pre-Frontal Cortex is the front third of the brain, responsible for allowing us to focus, control impulses, to be emotional organizers and planners, be empathetic and insightful, and to learn from our mistakes. You can think of it as the “then what?” part of your brain; if I eat this, then what will happen? If I say this, then what will happen?

When the function of the Pre-Frontal Cortex is decreased (either through injury or a condition like ADD), it makes it very difficult to think ahead, to focus, etc. Functionality of the Pre-Frontal Cortex is improved by raising dopamine levels. Dopamine may be raised through aerobic exercise and supplements (L-tyrosine, green tea extract, ginseng, rhodiola).

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeaters constantly think about food and have a difficult time controlling themselves around food. This condition is characterized by low dopamine and serotonin. Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating is commonly seen in those suffering from eating disorders, as well as children and grandchildren of alcoholics.

Impulsive-Compulsive Overeating can be improved by increasing both dopamine and serotonin. This can be accomplished through aerobic exercise and supplements (5HTP and L-Tyrosine in the right proportions).

Anxious Overeating

Anxious Overeaters typically use food in an attempt to alleviate feelings of anxiety and fear.

Anxious Overeating is common in those with overactive Basal Ganglia. The Basal Ganglia is a large collection of cells that are located deep within the brain. It’s the portion of the brain that integrates thought with movement; clapping our hands when we’re excited, jumping when we’re frightened.

Symptoms of overactive Basal Ganglia include anxiety, nervousness, tension, the tendency to predict the worst, the tendency to use food as a way to medicate, and physical symptoms of stress (headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome etc). Functionality of the Basal Ganglia can be improved through hypnosis, meditation, learning to correct negative thinking patterns, limiting alcohol and caffeine consumption, assertiveness training, and supplements (gaba and magnesium).

Emotional Overeating

Emotional Overeaters tend to use food to alleviate feelings of negativity and hopelessness.

Emotional Overeating is characterized by low levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in the brain. Low levels of these neurotransmitters cause the Deep Limbic System to become overactive. The Deep Limbic System sets our emotional tone; when it’s working at a normal level we tend to be more hopeful and positive.

You may have low levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine if you experience a lot of negative thoughts, are sad or depressed, have trouble sleeping, and/or experience a lack of motivation. These neurotransmitters can be increased though aerobic exercise, learning to replace automatic negative thoughts with healing, rational thinking, and supplements (fish oil, DHEA, S-adenosyl methionine aka SAMe).

Let’s Connect

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

KNOW YOUR BRAIN: One Size Does Not Fit Everyone — Targeted Interventions Just For You

Amen, D. G., & M.D., F. (2012). Change your brain, change your body, use your brain to get and keep the body you have always wanted. Three Rivers Press.

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show – The Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we discussed: The Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Links we discussed:

Maji and Mongo: How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch

Full Text Transcript

Good Evening! Welcome to Eating Disorder Pro. I’m Dr. Renae Norton and I’ll be your host. This is our very first blog talk radio show. Our debut. Our maiden voyage, as it were. So I’m sure there’ll be some mistakes, a few dead silences, accidental hang-ups. Just don’t change that channel. Because we have good content show here and something worth hearing if you are struggling with disordered eating.

Our topic this evening is going to be the connection between obesity and eating disorders in the U.S. So if you have been struggling with an eating disorder, if you’ve been in and out of treatment, and nothing works, you’re still bingeing, purging or restricting you’ve come to the right place. Maybe you are on that roller coaster that many of us have been on of losing and gaining weight, and you can’t figure out what you are doing wrong. You’ve come to the right place. Maybe you have a child that can’t stop eating, or maybe you have a child that is terrified of food. Whatever the problem, if it has to do with eating, you are right where you should be!

So log on, tune in and call in. The number, by the way, is 646-378-0494.

I think it’s probably a good idea to start with a little bit about me. I’m a clinical psychologist with a specialty in family treatment and neuropsychology. I’ve been in practice for the last 25 years and have specialized in the treatment of eating disorders almost exclusively for the past ten years. I’d appreciate if you’d visit my website at www.eatingdisorderpro.com.

Be sure to check out my latest book called “How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch!”. It is the first of a series of books for children designed to interest them in a healthier lifestyle. Maji, who is a very healthy little dog, meets Mongo and takes him under his wing. When they meet Maji is very active and Mongo is pretty much a couch potato. Maji patiently gets Mongo to move out of his comfort zone and off the couch. Eventually Mongo finds the healthy part of himself and the two have great adventures together. Check it out by going to my website.

As far as the content for this evening’s show, much of it is result of research that I am doing for another more serious book, coming out in the Fall called “Cycles of Shame”. “Cycles of Shame” looks at the epidemic of obesity that we have in the United States, the expanding eating disorder population, and the role that food, or more specifically, food addiction plays in both problems. That’s right, I said ‘food addiction’. Our foods in the United States are polluted with MSG, GMO’s (or genetically modified ingredients) neurotoxins, obesogens, carcinogens and allergens. And they are killing us! Perhaps you think that I’m exaggerating? Consider a few statistics –

  • Obesity is epidemic in the US and has reversed a 20-year trend of longer life expectancy especially for today’s children.
  • If the present rate of obesity continues, the entire population will be obese by the year 2030.
  • Likewise, eating disorders such as anorexia are growing reaching new segments of the population, primarily younger children (sometimes cases with children that are only 6 years of age), middle-aged women and many more men. It used to be that only about 5% of the eating disorder population was men, this has moved up recently to about 10%. I think it’s actually continuing to move. The important thing about these new groups is they were relatively unaffected by eating disorders in the past. It’s very significant that they are getting worse.

So, how do we compare to other developed nations?

One thing to think about is whether this is just us or whether this is something that is happening around the world. In fact, it really is mostly just us. Other countries are getting fatter, eating disorders are pretty much a phenomenon of the United States. They are a phenomenon of other countries, but only when they become westernized or in other words, start eating our food.

What’s happening in our country that’s different than in other countries, is that our food is essentially polluted and its taking a terrible toll on the populous.

The United States life expectancy is 42nd in the world, lagging behind almost all other developed nations. In the 1990’s the U.S. was in 11th place. That’s a tremendous difference, a huge difference

Infant Mortality – In 1960, the U.S. had the 12th lowest infant mortality rate in the world. In 2008 we were in 34th place. One of the variables that significantly impacts infant mortality rates is the nutritional status of the mother during pregnancy.

Health Care – It isn’t that we are ignoring health care. We pay more for it than any other country in the world. In the United States, we spend on average $6,714. This is more than twice the average for individuals in any other country, unfortunately. A sizeable portion of the overall health care spending in the U.S. is directly or indirectly related to obesity and its many complications.

So, what is causing this? Why is this happening in the United States and not in other countries? Part of the problem is definitely our culture. Pop culture plays a significant role. There are several factors that may be contributing to these problems. Pop culture weighs in by glamorizing extreme thinness, while simultaneously promoting excessive, often gluttonous eating.

Most people who overeat assume that they are entirely at fault. To begin with, they ignore the fact that our culture puts a lot of pressure on them. We are also bombarded with advertisements extolling the virtues of foods that are actually extremely dangerous. We are not clued in that the foods are dangerous. We are pretty much clueless when it comes to the safety of or food supply. It’s sort of a cultural myth that “the government protects us from dangerous substances”, because of that we assume that it’s our fault that there is something wrong with us. “Maybe it’s my metabolism, maybe I’m just lazy”.

The self-blame and shame that follows drive yo-yo dieting, bingeing followed by purging, and restricting followed by overeating or bingeing. That puts us in a frame of mind that makes the problem significantly worse. The behaviors that we’re talking about and the pressures people in the United States are under are the opposite of reality.

Despite the fact that scientists and public interest groups point to the escalation of toxic additives in the U.S. food supply as a major contributing factor in our declining health, the warnings go unheeded.

We have a tendency to “blame the victim”. So, what this refers to is that the individual with the problem is often blamed for having the problem. This is really unfortunate because it’s very difficult for someone who is blamed for the problem (especially if they accept the blame) to solve the problem under these circumstances. The upshot of “blaming the victim” is that those seeking treatment for obesity and eating disorders are often stigmatized, the may be disenfranchised, managed care may cost them.

In the industry today, it’s not uncommon for people that are obese to be excluded from their managed care policies. Perhaps they are excluded for anything that has to do with their obesity or weight problem. This is definitely “blaming the victim” and disenfranchising people who need help. By disenfranchising, their condition gets worse and expenses go up.

We really have a problem with affordable or available treatment, of course this increases relapse rates. Often, the anorexic patient is allowed one inpatient stay. After that, if she needs residential care again, she pays for it out of pocket. A month of residential stay can cost as much as $30,000, that’s usually prohibitive for most families.

The misplaced blame that “it’s the way we eat” makes it very difficult to find real solutions to the problems that people have today.

Another problem, another thing that is part of our culture is that treatment ignores or is often ignorant of the role of safe nutrition. In general, most of the treatment we get in this country is for the symptoms. Often treatment incorporates pharmaceutical remedies, some of which make the symptoms even worse.

In a nutshell, treatment does not recognize the role that food additives play in obesity and eating disorders. They damage parts of the endocrine system that are responsible for healthy weight management.

Because treatment uses in incorrect underlying assumption, the focus is always on the relative amounts of food; the number of calories, or the relative amounts of fat, carbs and protein. It rarely looks at the quality of the food that we should be looking at. That frame of reference often prevents people from actually recovering from their eating disorders. A good example would be: if you suffer from anorexia and you are in a residential treatment program, it’s very possible that the food that you would eat during the refeeding phase has so many toxins, obesogens, allergens and sweeteners that they actually do more damage than good. Likewise, for people that are dieting, the severe reduction in calories during the diet impacts your metabolism in a way that is suppressed, getting slower and slower. This results in “normal” eating causing rapid weight gain.

In future programs, we’ll be talking about what happens to the endocrine system depending on the types of food we are eating and what the endocrine system does. It actually tries to do many adaptive things that are actually maladaptive.

There are also “new” eating disorders on the horizon that are very troublesome. The one that worries me most that I’ve been seeing the most of in my private practice is a combination of anorexia and bulimia, known as bulimarexia. Bulimarexia is very troubling because if there is such thing as the “best of both worlds” it’s the “worst of both worlds”. The complications of bulimarexia are significant and often life threatening, more so than anorexia. Anorexia is currently the most life threatening emotional disorder one can have. Bulimarexia, which again is not on the radar of most practitioners, is popping up frequently. We don’t really seem to know what to do with it, how it is happening, why it is happening, let alone know how to help people overcome it or recover. I think there is a direct link between bulimarexia and the food that we are eating in this country presently.

Finally, last but not least, in terms of how our culture plays in these problems there is very little applied research. In the research that is available, it’s very unclear that certain food additives damage parts of the brain responsible for weight management. However, the very obvious indicators that there is a problem are being ignored. There is very little research demonstrating the safety of GMOs, yet in the United States you can barely buy a food that doesn’t have a genetically modified ingredient. But, that’s another show for the future. We’ll be talk about what that means, how it impacts obesity, how it impacts eating disorders. So stay tuned for that one.

The main problem , or saddest thing, is what is happening right now to children in the country, they pay the biggest price. There is an epidemic of obesity among U.S. children. It is not uncommon today for a child to leave the pediatrician’s office with a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart condition or joint deterioration. These diseases, are things our grandparents used to get. Right?

It’s crazy what we are seeing with little children. We have the fattest children in the world. We are the only country in the world right now that has obese infants. If you want to know, it’s because food additives target children’s foods. Just as an example, I have a can of Gerber Goodstart baby formula. Let me read some of the ingredients. Ok, the first one is “corn maltodextrin”. First of all, it’s GMO. Second of all, it’s MSG. “Vegetable Oil”, we have “palm” (that’s good), “soy” (that’s bad), “coconut” (that’s good), “safflower” and “sunflower” (those are both bad). Then we have “enzymatically hydrolyzed soy protein isolate”, that’s MSG. Then we have “sucrose”, that’s not good. We finally get to a relatively “good” ingredient; we have some “calcium” here, but only 2%. What we’re talking about here is that out of the first ten ingredients or so, seven or eight of them are either GM or some form of MSG. MSG is a neurotoxin; GMOs cause all kinds of endocrine problems including obesity.

We have some major problems when it comes to the foods we are feeding our children. The result is they are the first generation in many, many years to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. They are the fattest children in the world, they are tied only with Scotland.

So what is causing this mess? A list of things we’ll be talking about in the future are:

  • Food Addiction
  • GMOs
  • MSG and the impact it has on obesity
  • Healthy vs Unhealthy Fats
  • Grass-fed animal protein versus grain-fed animal protein.

Be sure to catch us when we are reviewing these topics. The call-in number tonight is 646-378-0494.

For this evening, suffice it to say, the missing link for many is the role that food additives play. Most Americans assume that foods in the U.S. are safe. WRONG! We have been led to believe that we are the problem and that the reason we are having all of these problems is that we are lazy, or glutinous or uninterested in being healthy. WRONG! Finally we believe that our children are spoiled which is why they fall on the floor frothing at the mouth when they don’t get Chicken McNuggets. WRONG AGAIN!

For the past 40 years, there has been an escalation of substances known for their neuro-toxic, obesogenic, diabetic, carcinogenic, addictive and allergic impact added to the American food supply for the simple reason that these things increase profits for the food industry. Scientists convincingly demonstrate that these additives damage the systems that regulate appetite, fat storage and weight gain or weight loss.

The fact is that they are highly addictive, they cause food cravings, binge eating, food obsessions, weight gain, weight loss, allergies and some of the worst chronic illnesses of our time. The problem is that they are everywhere!

Food additives and/or GMO ingredients are found in 95% of processed foods in the U.S. A processed food is any food that comes in a bottle, box, bag, can, carton or shrink-wrap, as well as the vast majority of deli and restaurant foods. So, pretty much everything we are eating, unless we are eating a fruit or vegetable, frying up a chicken breast, or maybe having some fish. Dangerous additives are more common, and found in higher quantities in children’s foods. This is a serious problem for our future generations.

The problem is that most people don’t know what they are, let alone how dangerous they are. And then there is the issue of finding foods without them. It’s tricky; however it’s really worth it. When you do find the foods that don’t have food additives in them, you are going to discover some amazing things. First of all, the foods are absolutely delicious. What you will discover is that it’s very easy to maintain the correct weight. How can that be?

  • For one thing, when you are eating foods that are not toxic, your blood sugar levels will stabilize. This means it will be hard to gain weight; unless you are anorexic, in which case your weight gain will be slow and steady.
  • Your cravings will disappear, since you will be extinguishing the food addictions you have developed unknowingly.
  • Your allergies will improve or go away.
  • For those of you who think you are gluten intolerant (and so many people today do), you may discover that you are not, that you are allergic to GMO’s or herbicides and insecticides. It’s interesting, I have a patient that was certain that she was gluten-intolerant. She went to Italy, where there are no GMOs. She ate the pasta and the bread (because she was in Italy) and had no allergic reactions whatsoever. Likewise, I have many patients that thinking they have dairy allergies. When I turn them onto whole milk that is from an A2 casein grassfed or pastured cow, they have no allergic reaction. What’s more delicious than a glass of whole milk, or whipped cream that you can put blueberries in? One of my obese patients (who has lost well over 100 pounds at this point) said that the most significant, positive thing about this approach was the fact that he was able to eat homemade whipped cream and strawberries every night before bed.
  • Your immune system will improve because it will no longer be under attack.

I have patients that come in today that are bulimarexic or anorexic that are losing their teeth, are having kidney failure and losing their hair. In the last 2 years, on three different occasions, I’ve had patients with no teeth. In one case, it wasn’t even possible for her to have implants because she had no jaw left. I also have patients at a very young age that have such severe osteoporosis that they suffer from kyphosis. That isn’t something that any one should experience anyone should experience. The reason they are experiencing these things at such a young age is because not only are they anorexic, but the foods they do eat are loaded with dangerous food additives, one of which is a sweetener.

For those of you that are guzzling down those diet soft drinks, you really need to find some substitutes. If you go to my website (www.eatingdisorderpro.com), you will find a lot of really good suggestions in handouts and articles on my blog. One drink, for example, that I think is exceptionally good is a drink by a company called “Q”. There’s a “Q Cola” a “Q Gingerale” and, for those of you who like a good vodka and tonic, there’s “Q Tonic” and it’s excellent. They only have 16 grams of carbohydrates.

What impact does obesity have on us? We know for the adult there is depression, reduced earning power, infertility and isolation are common among adults who are obese. It’s very difficult if not impossible for people to travel, very difficult for the morbidly obese to go to restaurants and to the movies. But what about individuals who have been obese since they were 3 or 4, and end up with Type II Diabetes by the time they are 10 or 11? What are the developmental issues at risk for such individuals? What are the implications for our society? Where does this leave us in comparison to other countries in the world that aren’t having these problems?

What impact are we seeing with eating disorders? Eating disorders also take a toll on life expectancy. For example, females between the ages of 15 and 24 who suffer from anorexia have the highest mortality rate for that age range. Studies have also shown that the risk for early death is twice as high for anorexic’s that purge.

Presently, the prevalence of purging anorexics or bulimarexics is on the rise. That particular type of eating disorder is a perfect example of what happens when you take someone who is afraid of eating and expose her to foods that are addictive. She can’t resist the impulse to eat these addictive foods. Unfortunately, she often learns to eat them when she is in a residential treatment center. Once this happens, she is at her wit’s end to know what to do and ends up purging. These are the patients I see with such horrendous complications; liver failure, cirrhosis of the liver, kidney failure, calcium problems (bones shattering, being unable to keep their teeth in their mouth) and endless horrible things like that. This new disorder appears to be driven by food addictions and/or intense food cravings, both of which have increased with the increase in food additives that we see in the American diet.

There seems to be a connection between the variables driving the epidemic of obesity, the changing demographics of eating disorders, and the escalating medical complications in both populations. Just as an example (aside from the fact that we are being subjected to food additives that are extremely dangerous), another connection is being obese as a child puts one at greater risk for being anorexic, or bulimarexic, later in life.

Today 17% of U.S. children between the ages of 2 and 19 are obese according the Center for Disease Control, that’s a scary scenario. By implication many more children may be at risk for developing an eating disorder in the future. A history of childhood obesity also makes recovery less likely for those suffering from anorexia or bulimarexia. They tend to be much more frightened of the refeeding process and has a much higher likelihood of relapse.

Not only is the general public unaware of the impact that food additives may be having on their health or the health of their children, especially when it comes to disordered eating, but practitioners also appear to be fairly in the dark. This is unacceptable. Americans can’t help that they are basically being sold a bill of goods about the safety of our foods. Practitioners should have a higher standard to meet.

There is research documenting the role that food additives are having on weight regulatory systems in the body, yet this connection is not yet on the radar of a lot of practitioners, which may help to explain why recovery rates for obesity and eating disorders are so low. It’s really not uncommon today, if you have anorexia, to have your physician or if you end in the ER to have the physician to ask you a question like “Why are you doing this to yourself?” This tends to be experienced as very judging for most people in that situation, it’s just not helpful.

What are the recovery rates for these problems? Not great. For example, recovery rates across treatment modalities for those with anorexia and bulimia are only about 50% at best. They drop to 30% for treatment that relies primarily upon residential care. For those who are obese, or overweight, the failure rate is even higher, in as much as 95% percent of all those who try to lose weight by dieting alone fail. Finally, when one considers that yo-yo dieting is a significant risk factor for developing an ED and that approximately 41% of the U.S. population is on a diet at any given time; the outlook is dismal at best.

Why is this happening here and not in other countries? In a nutshell other countries regulate these additives or prohibit them altogether. The pollution of the American food supply is a silent but deadly problem. It is also comes at a high cost.

It is silent because the American public buys products assumed to be safe that are anything but safe. The average citizen is simply not aware that Citric Acid, Malted Barley, or Natural Flavorings are neurotoxins.

Likewise, most people assume that buying a food that is certified “organic” is safe. But organic foods are not necessarily safe, in as much as the FDA allows unsafe additives to be put into the vast majority of processed foods, including those that are “organic.”

If you want to be sure that your food is safe, it must say 100% organic. If it doesn’t, it’s not necessarily safe. It if says “USDA Certified Organic”, it will be 95% safe, but can still contain 5% GMO ingredients, MSG and other unhealthy additives. If it says it is made with “organic ingredients” it doesn’t mean anything; it could have anything in it. We have to be very careful, and that’s the point. Why do we have to be careful? Why do we have to mistrust a label? The reason is simple: If we don’t mistrust the label we are likely putting ourselves in danger.

The pollution of our food supply is deadly because it results in decreased life expectancy, premature infant mortality, and the mortal complications of ED’s and obesity. The toxification of the U.S. food supply is costly because it contributes to the increased incidence of the most costly diseases of our time, including obesity and its complications, various types of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

These problems have long-term implications, as the largest and most profitable market targeted for dangerous food additives is children’s food, beginning with infant formula. Not surprisingly, childhood obesity in the U.S. is epidemic, beginning with obese infants. This is a first in our history and does not occur in other countries.

There are a number of things that you can do to protect yourself; you can find help for what to do on our website. There are also other organizations that are watching out for you, those are watch-out groups. It would be very helpful and worth your while for you to search these out if you haven’t already. Again, we have a list of resources and places you can find good information that you can trust.

[Caller Question] I have a question. I was wondering what is more dangerous: anorexia, bulimia or obesity?

[Dr. Norton] That’s a very good question. Let’s take obesity first. Most people don’t die from obesity; they die from the complications of obesity. I guess I could say that about anorexia as well and also about bulimia. This is a very good question because the answer is changing. It used to be that you didn’t start to become obese until middle age, and then you might die from some of the complications like heart disease, perhaps type II diabetes. However, with obesity beginning in childhood and infancy we don’t really know what it’s going to do. We know that it has lowered life expectancy of children presently for the first time in several decades. At this point, I would have to pick obesity as being the most dangerous. I can tell you that since bulimarexia doesn’t really have a diagnosis; we aren’t really tracking it, but at some point I’m sure we will. At that point, I am thinking it’s going to be viewed as a more lethal disorder. So, I’m not sure if I really answered your question.

[Call dropped]

Please tune in next Tuesday at 7 pm. We’ll be doing some show notes, of course. We’ll make sure you have access to those. Please visit www.eatingdisorderpro.com, and be sure to check out the ‘Maji and Mongo’ book. Please look for ‘Cycles of Shame’ that will be coming out in the Fall. Thank you very much to those of you that joined us tonight.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder Pro – The Podcast

photo used under a creative commons license

I’m going Live! Please join me for my very first BlogTalkRadio show! EATING DISORDER PRO debuts tomorrow night from 7:00 to 8:00. I’ll be talking about the connection between the epidemic of obesity in the U.S. and the increase in eating disorders. Ever wonder why you just cannot lose the extra weight, or why if you suffer from an eating disorder, your symptoms are getting worse instead of better. Log on, tune in and get the answers!

Listen to “Eating Disorder Pro – The Epidemic of Obesity & Eating Disorders” here!

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

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News You Can Use – April 22 – 29 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 22 – April 29 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – January 15 – 22

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 12-22 2012”

Obama says NO to WhiteHouse.gov petition to legalize raw milk at federal level
Popular orange juices flavored with secret “flavor packs” not listed on the label
New scientific study links bee deaths to pesticides
Watching ‘The Biggest Loser’ may increase anti-fat attitudes
A randomized controlled trial of adjunctive family therapy and treatment as usual following inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa adolescents
Children Diet To Keep Off Pounds And Ward Off Bullying, Survey Says
Good Intentions Ease Pain, Add to Pleasure
Mindful Eating Restaurant Study

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

iTherapy – Integrating the iPhone into Therapy

iPhone Therapy

photo used under creative commons license

I recently read an article by Dr. Weissman of the Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis that introduced the concept of using an iPhone in the treatment of anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder.

Times are changing faster than ever. Technological advances, such as the introduction of the iPhone, have drastically changed the way we communicate and perform everyday activities. We can easily observe our everyday lives via the video and photo component of the iPhone. Weissman believes that this component of iPhone technology could be an effective tool in the treatment of the body dysmorphia that often accompanies anorexia.

Many of my patients that are in treatment for anorexia also experience some level of body dysmorphia; they see an obese person looking back at them in the mirror even though they are drastically underweight. Today, body dysmorphia is typically treated through psychotherapy, nutritional support and medication. For some patients, these approaches have limited success rates.

When a patient talks to me about the “obese person” that they see in the mirror, I often introduce a body image exercise involving “photo-therapy”. I ask the patient to take a photograph of themselves and bring it to their next treatment session. Oftentimes, when the patient returns and we talk about the photograph, the same body that was once described as being “fat” and “obese” is now described as being “underweight” and “malnourished”.

Weissman explains that when an anorexic patient looks in the mirror, their self perception is instantly fused with a distorted body image. The brain is so overwhelmed by this distortion, that it cannot process the image of the “real” body. The brain becomes trapped in this optical illusion, this distorted view. In contrast, when an anorexic patient sees his or her self in a photograph, the brain first acknowledges that there is a person in the photograph, it then focuses on the physicality of the photographed person. The brain then sends the message to the patient that they are the person in the photograph.

Integrating iPhone Therapy into the treatment of anorexia could definitely be a powerful tool in overcoming the body dysmorphia associated with anorexia. Based upon psychotherapy techniques developed by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann in Principles of Intensive Psychotherapy I, the steps below are Weissman’s suggested approach to integrating the iPhone into treatment:

  1. Patient and therapist look at patient in the mirror. Patient describes what they see.
  2. Therapist takes a photograph of the patient with iPhone. Patient describes what s/he sees.
  3. Therapist and patient discuss the differences between the description of the patient in the mirror and the patient in the photograph.
  4. A photograph of the patient standing beside the therapist is taken. Patient describes the image of the therapist. If the patient see distortion in the therapists image, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the therapist.
  5. Patient describes image of self. If patient sees distortion, the therapist and patient develop a jointly shared description of the patient.

Weissman points out the importance of the therapist not correcting the distorted view of the patient. If the patient does experience distortion in the photograph, the therapist should remind the patient that they both agreed on the description of the image of the therapist in the same photograph. It is necessary that the therapist and patient try to come to an agreement on the description of the patient.

Weissman predicts that utilizing this iPhone exercise will lead to an eventual reduction in the amount of distortion that the patient experiences when looking in the mirror. A combination of iPhone Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and nutritional counseling may lead to the patient gaining the important ability to maintain a healthy weight with little outside assistance. If the therapist successfully teaches the patient to be able to independently perform this exercise on a regular basis, there could be a drastic drop in relapse rates.

Sources: “Photo-Therapy: A Promising Intervention in Anorexia Nervosa?”

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

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Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Jan 9 – 16 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of January 9-16 2012”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Appetite Hormones 101: Peptide YY

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. To view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles, use the search feature to search on the topic of your choice.”

In this third and final installment of the series, “Appetite Hormones 101”, we will discuss Peptide YY (PYY). The purpose of this series is to explain the role of hormones on both appetite and body weight goals, as it relates to both weight loss and weight restoration. If you’re a new reader, be sure to check out “Appetite Hormones 101: Leptin” and “Appetite Hormones 101: Ghrelin“.

Peptide YY (PYY)

PYY is a hormone that suppresses appetite. It was discovered to play a role in digestion in 1985. PYY regulates food intake, and is believed to improve leptin sensitivity. The amount of PYY released by our bodies is influenced by the number of calories we ingest; the more calories we ingest, the more PYY is released. The diagram below shows how our PYY levels, ghrelin and leptin levels typically fluctuate before and after meals:

PYY levels are highest in individuals battling anorexia, followed by those individuals that are lean,which explains why both groups have less hunger and also may have more difficulty eating. PYY levels are lowest among obese and morbidly obese individuals. Individuals with bulimia also experience low levels of PYY, which helps to explain why all three groups feel more hunger. Research shows that the obese individual can decrease their PYY levels by 30% by reducing their body weight by 5.4%. PYY levels are not believed to be effected by weight restoration during recovery from anorexia. It is also important to note that high levels of PYY in anorexic individuals is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD).

Our mood also effects our PYY levels. Recent studies show that PYY levels are higher in those suffering from major depression. This explains why many people with major depression have a decreased appetite and experience weight loss.

PYY levels can be regulated through both diet and exercise. Diets high in quality protein tend to raise PYY levels highest, followed by diets high in healthy fats. High carbohydrate diets tend to raise PYY levels the least. Aerobic exercise has also been proven to raise PYY levels, whereas strength-training has no effect on PYY levels (although strength-training does lower ghrelin levels).

In conclusion, PYY regulates our appetite. The higher our PYY levels are, the more satiated we will feel. You can ensure your PYY levels are highest by eating a high protein diet and including aerobic exercise in our workout routine.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.
Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com)’.

Sources
J Clin Endocrinal Metab. 2009 Nov; 94(11): 4463-71 Epub 2009 Oct 9
//news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2006/09/06-02.html
//jcem.endojournals.org/content/91/3/1027
//www2.massgeneral.org/harriscenter/about_bn.asp
//www.eatingdisordersreview.com/nl/nl_edr_18_1_5.html
//www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00162-2/abstract
//ajpregu.physiology.org/content/296/1/R29.full
J Endocrinal Invest. 2011 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Your Health in the News – Dec 12 – 19

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of December 12-19 2011.”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Your Health In The News – Nov 27 – Dec 4

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of November 27-December 4 2011”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Norton Center Video – Eating Disorder Therapy in Cincinnati

What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens – Part II

Whole Foods

As discussed yesterday in the first installment of “What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens“, Whole Foods Market is taking steps to make us more aware of products containing obesogens. Yesterday, we discussed their use of obesogen-free take-out containers, and changes that are being made in their “Cleaning Supply Aisle”. What else is Whole Foods Market doing?

Whole Foods Market is also helping us make more informed choices when it comes to personal care products. They clearly label products that they have rated “premium” or “organic” body products. All of these products had to meet a strict set of criteria, set by Whole Foods Market. They have banned the use of over 400 chemicals in the personal care products they sell. Whole Foods implemented this rating system because there are few government standards set in regards to what the word “natural” means when it came to body care products.

◦ “Premium Body Care Products” do not contain parabens, polyproylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, sodium lauryl sulfates or sodium laureth sulfates. The only permissable “fragrances” will be those made from “natural essential oils” and “components of natural essential oils”.

◦ “Organic Body Care Products” will meet all the requirements of “Personal Body Care Products”, but will also be required to meet other standards. These products are the highest quality products available.

▪ If a company labels their product “organic”, the product must contain at least 95% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a company claims their product is “Made with Organic X”, the product must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet USDA National Organic Standards

▪ If a product is labeled “Contains Organic X”, the products must contain 70% organic ingredients and meet NSF/ANSI 305 standards

Whole Foods Market is making many positive advances in their product packaging. According to their website, they have done more than any US retailer when it comes to keeping the customer informed and taking the actions needed to find safe packaging alternatives. Some of the advances they have made include:

◦ They use Polyethylene Terephthalate (PETE) in packaging for their ‘private label’ products, when possible. PETE is a plastic that is not known to leach any carcinogenic or hormone- disruptive chemicals.

◦ They have banned child cups, baby bottles, and individual refillable water bottles that are made of polycarbonate plastic.

◦ When there are safe alternatives to packaging containing BPA, Whole Foods Market uses that alternative.

◦ They are putting pressure on their current suppliers to switch to BPA-free packaging.

It doesn’t stop here! Whole Foods Market is continually doing research to do everything they can to go completely BPA free. They hear us when we tell them we are concerned about the use of BPA, they are on our side. I feel relief that they are thoroughly investigating all of their options, instead of making an uneducated change.

The standards set by Whole Foods Market are helping us make more informed purchases. They are allowing our voices to be heard in telling the industry that we want full disclosure of the substances that we are allowing in our households, that we want non-toxic cleaning products!

Sources:

Whole Foods Market – Products (//wholefoodsmarket.com/products/)

Inhabitat – EATware Compostable Food Containers (//inhabitat.com/compostable-containers-by-eatware/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What Whole Foods Market Is Doing To Help Us Reduce Our Exposure to Obesogens.

Whole Foods
“Is Your Shampoo Affecting Your Weight Management Goals?”
revealed a lot of information about the presence of obesogens in our environment. Since that post, I’ve found some really comforting news! Whole Foods Market is taking steps to make us more aware of products containing obesogens. This means we will be able to make more informed decisions without having to read every label for every product we purchase, they’ve already done some of the work for us. What are they doing to make us more informed consumers?

  1. The take-out containers in their Prepared Foods Area are made of uncoated “molded pulp”. As mentioned in “Is Your Shampoo Affecting Your Weight Management Goals?”, many leaders in the food industry line use BPA-lined take-out containers to prevent grease and other liquids seeping through the containers.

According to ‘Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World’, some of the take-out containers at Whole Foods are manufactured by a company called ‘EATware’. EATware manufactures the containers using natural raw pulp fibers. The organic containers are water resistant, oil resistant, and free of chemical and insecticides. They are also biodegradable, recyclable and renewable. So, not only are we protecting ourselves, but we are protecting the environment too. Double win!

  1. On September 23, Whole Foods Market announced that they are moving towards an “eco-scale rating system” on their cleaning products. This new system is expected to be implemented by Earth Day 2012. This will allow time for their current suppliers to meet the new standards being set by Whole Foods Market. According to the Whole Foods Market blog, they are the first major retailer to set standards on their household cleaners.
  1. No phthalates will be permitted in any cleaning products sold at Whole Foods Market (for a complete list of ingredients that will be considered ‘unacceptable’ . View Here. All products will be reviewed by a third-party company.
    • An “orange” rating will be assigned to those cleaning products that are free of phosphates, chlorine and fake colors.
    • A “yellow” rating will be assigned to those cleaning products that contain 100% natural fragrance and have minimal safety concerns
    • A “green” rating will be assigned to those cleaning products that contain 100% natural ingredients and non-petroleum ingredients.
    • Any products that are rated “red” will contain ingredients that Whole Foods Market has deemed ‘unacceptable’. These products will not be sold in Whole Foods stores.

It doesn’t stop here! Check in tomorrow to read more about what Whole Foods Market is doing to help us reduce our exposure to obesogens!

Sources:

Whole Foods Market – Products (//wholefoodsmarket.com/products/)

Inhabitat – EATware Compostable Food Containers (//inhabitat.com/compostable-containers-by-eatware/)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What You Need to Know In Order to Help Your Obese or ED Patient

Eating Disorder Research

photo used under creative commons license


Research has clearly established a relationship between neurotoxins such as MSG, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sweeteners Splenda and NutraSweet and the current epidemic of obesity. I believe that there is also a relationship between these neurotoxins and the proliferation of eating disorders in the US. For example, research has shown that patients suffering from Anorexia as well as those who are obese, suffer from a condition called leptin resistance.
1 ,2 Further, this condition appears to be a function of the type and amount of neurotoxin ingested. In my practice, when I have helped those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, and Bulimarexia and obesity eliminate such neurotoxins from their re-feeding regimens, recovery time has shortened and the likelihood of relapse has decreased significantly. (I am in the process of publishing these anecdotal results and have also applied for several grants to research this relationship experimentally in greater depth.)

Treatment of obesity and eating disorders is negatively impacted for the uninformed treating professional i.e. re-feeding is a nightmare for those suffering from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder and Obesity when the role of these neurotoxins is not taken into consideration. Thus, to the degree that their impact on the eating habits of individuals suffering from ED’s and obesity is not understood, or worse, ignored, treatment is less likely to succeed, and in many cases, more likely to make the problem worse. For help on refeeding contact me directly. Also check out all of the blog articles on this site. 3

For the past 40 years food additives, known to have neurotoxic effects, especially in children, have been added to the American food supply because they were profitable. These additives include MSG, sweeteners Aspartame and Aceulfame, (Splenda and NutraSweet) growth-enhancing hormones, and pesticides that are incorporated into the DNA of crops like soybeans. The amount of these neurotoxins added to our food has increased enormously since their introduction. For example, since 1948 the amount of MSG doubled every decade. By 1972 over 262,000 metric tons were being added. (Whetsell, 1993)[1] Today it is impossible to determine the actual amounts of the various neurotoxins that are added to the U.S. food supply, as the additives are effectively unregulated by the FDA or any other regulatory agency. As a result, they can be added in ways which make them difficult, if not impossible, to quantify.

Besides being difficult to quantify, the additives are very difficult for the average consumer to identify, as they can be called such innocuous names as “citric acid” “malted barley” and “natural flavoring”! Even for individuals who are well-informed, and therefore know what to look for, it is still a daunting task to try and avoid them. Presently, they are in 90 to 95% of all packaged, bottled, and/or processed foods, including organic and/or foods that are marketed as “healthier” choices.

Perhaps the most alarming issue is that food manufacturers target children’s foods for inclusion of these additives. In the U.S. to day, 1 in 3 children are obese. Many will remain that way for life. We are one of the only countries in the world to have children who suffer from Type II Diabetes, which heretofore has been a disorder of middle adulthood. The connection between childhood obesity and an eating disorder such as Anorexia, for example, is that a history of premorbid obesity increases the risk of the development and decreases the likelihood of recovery from the disorder.

1 J Lab Clin Med. 2002 Feb;139(2):72-9.Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation.

2 Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental [1997, 46(12):1384-9]Neuropeptide Y, galanin, and leptin release in obese women and in women with anorexia nervosa.

3 Other resources: //dorway.com/ //www.drkaslow.com/html/leptin_and_amylose.html www.msgtruth.org/obesity.htm

 

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

More Survey Results

Eating Disorders Survey

photo used under a creative commons license

Since most of the individuals taking this survey probably have an Eating Disorder (ED), the results are not surprising. One interesting finding is how many people are afraid to handle food (nearly 15%). Another is the high percentage of people who obsess about food and or have food cravings (71%) Given what we know about MSG, that it is highly addicting, obsessive thoughts and food cravings would make sense.

If you have not yet taken the survey please do!

*These results are based upon 260 responses.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

 

Survey Results – The Positive Effects of Residential Treatment For Eating Disorders Are Minimal!

Eating Disorders Survey

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In analyzing the current results from my survey regarding the effects residential treatment has had on individuals taking the survey, only 16% acknowledged that residential treatment had a positive impact on their disorder. Over half of the respondents said that minimal changes resulted from residential treatment, and that, “my relationship with food did not improve during or after treatment and I still have the same symptoms.” Finally, a whopping 70% (combining the last four categories) stated that their eating disorder either worsened or that they developed another eating disorder after receiving residential treatment!

If you have not yet taken the survey please do!

*These results are based upon 260 responses.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Survey Results – Interesting Results Regarding Shopping Behavior

Eating Disorders Survey

photo used under a creative commons license

Here are the current, detailed results from my survey regarding shopping behavior. Notice that over half (52%) of the respondents specifically buy “binge” food and that only 31.5% buy healthy food all the time. What’s also interesting is that only 7% of respondents buy fast foods or processed foods. These numbers are generated primarily by the eating disordered population. However, in the general public the truth remains that our nation consumes 41% more processed foods than fresh foods! How much fast food or processed foods is your body consuming?

If you have not yet taken the survey please do!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Swimming Into a Cultural Health Crisis

photo used under a creative commons license

Many people would say that we are becoming less and less healthy as a nation because we overindulge. On the surface, this appears to be a safe assumption. At present we have the distinction of being one of the top ten countries in the world for overweight adults! Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the population at large with a whopping 60% of all adults being overweight and one out of four being morbidly obese. Break out the numbers specifically for the aging Baby Boomers and the stats are even more distressing- practically three out of four mature U.S. adults are classified as overweight or obese. But the worst part is that obesity is increasing at such an alarming rate among U.S. children at present, that they will be the first generation in decades that are projected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents! So the future looks even worse than the present. Eating disorders are also proliferating, affecting new segments of the population that include younger and younger children, as well as older women and men.

The complications of obesity alone have wreaked havoc with our health care system as well as our national economy. For example, “Health care costs related to obesity- which is associated with conditions like hypertension and diabetes- would total $344 billion in 2018, or more than one of every five dollars spent on health care, if the trends continue. If the obesity rate were held to its current level, the country would save nearly $200 billion a year (or $1.4 Trillion)by 2018, according to the study.” (Sack 2008) In terms of Eating Disorder’s, Anorexia alone, kills more women between the ages of 15 and 24 than any other cause of death.

The question is why is this happening? The answer is that if you are a fish, you do not see the water. Because you are immersed in it, you take it for granted. In much the same way, we are immersed in a culture that we assume to be safe. This is our underlying assumption. The fish may remain in polluted water until it becomes so polluted that it is no longer life sustaining. By then, it is too late. Like the fish, we are oblivious to the forces surrounding us. To change our culture, we must first be able to identify the underlying assumptions that are driving the current epidemic of obesity and eating disorders in the U.S. We must each then act to change our lifestyle and advocate for our safety. Stay tuned for Dr. Norton’s soon to be released book that details the problems, their causes and the solutions.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What role has the American culture had in the development of eating disorders and obesity?

photo used under a creative commons license

Right now, America has the distinction of being one of the top ten countries in the world for overweight adults. 60% of all American adults are classified as overweight, one out of four being morbidly obese. Also, obesity is increasing at such an alarming rate among U.S. children that they will be the first generation in decades that are projected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents! The question we must ask is why is this happening? A common theory is that we are lazy slugs who eat too much and exert too little. Really?

First of all, let’s consider our lifestyle. With the advancement of technology, most developed nations have experienced negative health consequences of more sedentary lifestyles. However, when it comes to exercising and activity level, Americans are actually right in the middle of the pack. Yet still, we are at the top of the list for obesity and the attendant health problems! So much for our lack of physical fitness as the answer!

If it isn’t the exercise, it must be the way we eat. Cross-cultural studies have demonstrated that “Westernized” societies are at greatest risk for obesity and weight related health problems. Of the top ten heaviest countries in the world, eight are located in the South Pacific. The only exceptions are the U.S. and Kuwait. Guess what the other eight have in common? If your thinking coconuts, think again. It’s us, the U.S. of A! For the past 50 years these eight countries have established significant economic ties with the U.S., which caused a surge in Western food imports and significant changes in their diet. Namely, they ate more processed and fast foods that originated in the U.S. Likewise, although China and Japan rank 148th and 163rd respectively for obese adults, compared to our ranking of 8th, both countries have shown marked increases in obesity the more “westernized” they have become. Nothing like a Micky D’s to increase the average waist size of the populace!

These statistics demonstrate that the American diet has some major issues. But how is it that our food supply has become so fattening and why in the world have we allowed it? One of the issues is that we are dependent upon the convenience of packaged and/or fast foods. We like things now, because we don’t have time to wait. We are overworked to the point of having to rely upon the convenience of basic things like already prepared foods, because we simply don’t have the time to shop and cook.

It’s true, American workers play less and work more than the workers of any other developed nation in the world. In a report comparing international vacation and holiday laws, the researchers found that the United States is the only advanced economy that does not guarantee its workers any paid vacation or holidays. And vacation time is not the only problem. American workers are overworked day in and day out as well. Consider the following: At least 134 countries have laws setting the maximum length of the workweek; the U.S. does not. In the U.S. 85.8 percent of males and 66.5 percent of females work more than 40 hours per week, and according to the International Labor Organization, “Americans work 137 more hours per year than Japanese workers, 260 more hours per year than British workers, and 499 more hours per year than French workers.” The fact is that in our country, you’ve got to come in early, (before 7:00 a.m.) stay late, carry your cell and/or pager all weekend, and become a road-warrior, lest you fall behind in the never-ending work piled on top of you day in and day out!

So we are not lazy, we are overworked!

Another part of the problem is that we have come to view cooking as an inconvenience. It has become synonymous with being “old fashioned” or with traditionalism. As a result, we rely on packaged, processed, pre-cooked, pre-pared foods because it’s quick and easy. What’s wrong with that? Nothing except that these prepared foods are TOXIC. The FDA looks the other way while food manufacturers pocket the profits from loading our food supply with additives that are addictive and cheap to manufacture.

Hard to believe? Believe it. The research has been done. The data is good. The information is out there. The U.S. food industry has been polluting our food supply with addictives, poisonous additives called excitatory neurotoxins, like MSG, high fructose corn syrup, Splenda, and NutraSweet since the 1970’s. These neurotoxins have been shown to cause all manner of neurological problems as well as obesity and it’s complications. Guess when we started to become more obese? The 1980’s, shortly after we began to ingest sweeteners, and all manner of hydrolyzed proteins that literally excite the neurons in the centers of our brains that were designed to regulate appetite and fat storage! At about the same time the rates of autism, ADD, Aspergers, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and a number of different types of cancers, all of which appear to be driven by environmental toxins, began to climb, peaking recently. The sad thing is that these issues are not even on the radar of the vast majority of Americans, who blame themselves for their obesity, binge eating, bulimia, anorexia and all manner of disturbed eating patterns. Where does it end?

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Forbes Magazine (online version) – World’s Fattest Countries (//www.forbes.com/2007/02/07/worlds-fattest-countries-forbeslife-cx_ls_0208worldfat.html)

New York Times (online version) – Americans’ International Lead in Hours Worked Grew in 90’s, Report Shows (//www.nytimes.com/2001/09/01/us/americans-international-lead-in-hours-worked-grew-in-90-s-report-shows.html)

DORway (//www.dorway.com)

Russell Blaylock, MD (//www.russellblaylockmd.com/)

 

The Connection Between Leptin Levels and Eating Disorders

Leptin

image used under a creative commons license

Recently the Division of Endocrinology at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine performed a study on the connection between Leptin levels and eating disorders. Leptin is a peptide hormone neurotransmitter produced by fat cells and involved in the regulation of appetite. It signals your brain when you’ve eaten enough and stimulates you to burn more calories. In order to span a full range of human body weights for their investigation, the analysts, examined serum leptin levels in anorexic, bulimic, obese, and control individuals.

Compared to the analysis generated from non-anorexic patients, patients with anorexia nervosa were found to have much higher serum leptin levels values. In effect, having leptin levels so high is contributory to a blunted physiologic response to being underweight and consequently builds resistance to dietary treatment. Simply put, they have too many of these leptin hormones being sent to the brain that are saying, “You are full.” Therefore, anorexic patients repel the need to consume enough of the nutrients their body realistically needs to function properly.

On the other hand, what this study found in bulimic patients when compared to non-bulimic patients is the opposite effect. Bulimic patients were found to have much lower leptin levels. This deficiency of leptin hormones is usually caused by a form of Leptin resistance and this contributes to the patients food-craving behavior. The Leptin resistance found in most bulimic patients comes from a chemical surge located in the pleasure center of our brain. This chemical surge overrules leptin’s messages that are trying to tell the bulimic patient “your tank is full.” So in other words, there is a chemical battle going on inside a bulimic patients brain. The leptin hormones are trying to tell the defense to kick in and protect them against overeating but at the same time, in a much louder voice, the pleasure center of the brain is saying, “No! Pass those cookies this-a-way.”

When examining leptin levels in most obese people, it was found that they actually have high leptin levels. However, their bodies usually cannot respond to these leptin hormones because they have another form of leptin resistance. Instead of leptin messages being rejected and overruled by the pleasure center of the brain (like the type of resistance indicated in most bulimic patients), obese patients cells’ have completely stopped accepting leptin messages all together. Therefore, they do not receive any message from their leptin hormones that would be telling them to stop eating.

Essentially, regulating your leptin levels and defeating leptin resistance plays a large role in overcoming an eating disorder. Foods that are high in sugar or additives such as high fructose corn syrup and MSG should be avoided because these ingredients excited the pleasure center of your brain making it much more difficult to respond to your leptin hormones. So basically, the more foods you consume with these ingredients, the louder the voice saying, “Pass those cookies this-a-way,” will become and the softer the voice saying, “You are full!” will become. Also, your cells become more sensitive and responsive to leptin when you exercise and build muscle!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

The National Center for Biotechnology Information – Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation (//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11919545)

 

Sweeteners, No Good News Here!

NutraSweet and Equal are two popular sweeteners on the market today. Both are made primarily of Aspartame. Aspartame is another very dangerous substance that you and your loved ones should think twice before consuming. It is comprised of three ingredients: It is 40% aspartic acid, which is an excitotoxin that stimulates the neurons of the brain to death, causing brain damage according to Dr. Russell Blaylock; It is 10% methyl ester, which eventually breaks down to formaldehyde and formic acid; (You remember Formaldehyde, that horrible smelling stuff from the biology lab that is used to preserve dead bodies?) The remaining 50% is phenylalanine, which by itself, is a neurotoxin that lowers the seizure threshold, thereby increasing the likelihood of brain seizures. Phenylalanine also depletes serotonin levels, which triggers severe psychiatric and behavioral problems. The break down of these chemicals into increasingly toxic substances is hastened with exposure to heat. Do the sniff test if you don’t believe it. Let a can of diet soda get warm and smell it. It smells like Formaldehyde!

Wonder what happens when you put NutraSweet or Equal into your steaming hot coffee? How come you don’t taste the Formaldehyde? Probably because these sweeteners also have Maltodextrine, also known as MSG, or some other form of MSG, in them, which makes everything taste good. Splenda, while it doesn’t have Aspartame, does have Maltodextrine as an ingredient. The main ingredient of Splenda, however, is Sucralose, kin to DDT, the extremely nasty insecticide. So don’t go there either!

Guess what happens when you put Aspartame and an MSG excitotoxin together? They potentiate, or excite each other in such a way that they are even more toxic than if you added their individual toxic effects together. This is a good thing to know about excitotoxins because their manufacturers often cop to the fact that they are present in very small quantities in our food supply. This actually isn’t true, but even if it were, what they fail to point out is that there are usually several different versions of them in the same product. In addition, they are in 90 to 95% of all processed foods, including many organic and “all natural” foods, such that avoiding them is virtually impossible. The upshot is that we ingest a lot of these excitotoxins, even when we are trying not to do so. So there may not be a lot of MSG per ingredient, but there are a lot of ingredients that are actually MSG masquerading as something as innocent as “citric acid.” When you add them all together……it’s not good!

In an article entitled: Still drinking diet soda? Don’t be a fashion victim!

BYTom Philpott

10 FEB 2011 1:51 PM

Mr. Philpott reports:

“In findings involving 2,564 people in the large, multi-ethnic Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), scientists said people who drank diet soda every day had a 61 percent higher risk of vascular events than those who reported no soda drinking.”

What do they mean by “vascular events”? They mean strokes. Sixty-one percent? That’s a lot!

(Follow this link for the article; //www.grist.org/article/2011-02-10-still-drinking-diet-soda-dont-be-a-fashion-victim-pepsi-strokes )

According Dr. Russell Blaylock the heart is also in jeopardy:

“ recent research has shown that the brain is not the only tissue having glutamate receptors. Numerous glutamate receptors have been found within the heart’s electrical conduction system, as well as heart muscle. When an excess of food-borne excitotoxins, such as MSG, hydrolyzed protein, soy protein isolate and concentrate, natural flavoring, sodium caseinate and aspartate from aspartame, are consumed, these glutamate receptors are over stimulated, producing cardiac arrhythmias.”

He goes on to report:

“High consumption of aspartame adds an additional cardiac muscle toxin, methanol. A number of studies have shown that consuming aspartame and MSG (and similar excitotoxins) together greatly magnifies the toxicity!”

So, strokes and heart attacks? What next?

Remember the Gulf War Syndrome? And all the poor kids that came back with their brains scrambled? Remember the methyl ester in Aspartame that eventually breaks down to formaldehyde in diet soft drinks? Guess what our troops are drinking? Diet pop! Lots of it, because trying to protect your country in the Persian Gulf is a thirsty business. It’s hot over there! But the pop they were drinking sat on pallets in 120-degree temperatures for weeks! Oh, and of course, the drinks were also in plastic bottles known for their propensity to off-gas as well when they got hot! They were basically drinking Formaldehyde, Brain Eating, Heart Attacking, Brain Stroking, but oh so refreshing soft drinks! This gives collateral damage a whole new meaning!

Do you know where your diet soft drink has been or how hot it has gotten? Do you know what’s in it? Maybe you should. Actually, you should stop drinking it and find something with low amounts of natural sweeteners to quench your thirst.

For a link on food additives broken down into levels of toxicity go here:

//www.cspinet.org/reports/chemcuisine.htm

For a blog on healthy, safe foods and drinks stay tuned, we’re working on it. If you’d like to contribute a food item, a grocery store, or an organic farmer’s co-operative, use the contact form on this site.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Regulating Our Glutamate Intake

The term “glutamate” refers to a number of forms of glutamic acid, an amino acid found naturally in many foods and in our bodies. It is a powerful excitatory neurotransmitter that is released by nerve cells in the brain. It is responsible for sending signals between nerve cells, and under normal conditions it plays an important role in learning and memory. There are two general ways, however, that glutamate can actually be damaging to nerve cells and the brain as a whole.

First, there can be too much glutamate around; abnormally high concentrations of glutamate can lead to overexcitation of the receiving nerve cell. Second, the receptors for glutamate on the receiving nerve cell can be oversensitive so that less glutamate molecules are necessary to excite that cell. People who are often oversensitive as so, are those diagnosed with ADD or ADHD, people with depression, Hypoglycemic patients, pregnant women, people with kidney problems, people who get migraine headaches, people with pre-existing vascular disease, and people with Congestive heart failure. Babies and children are also more sensitive to glutamate.

In these cases, cells activated by glutamate become overexcited. This overexcitation can lead to effects that can cause cell damage and/or death. For this reason, glutamate is referred to as an excitotoxin.

Food that contains high levels of glutamate like milk, eggs, meat cheese, peas, and mushrooms do not usually cause overexcitation to a person’s neurons because it consists of glutamate in its bound form. Glutamate in its bound form is slowly broken down with digestion so you’re delivering the amount in slower and smaller quantities. Glutamate never acts as an excitoxin in its bound form. What we as consumers must be watchful of is Glutamate in it’s free form. When we ingest glutamate in it’s free form, it doesn’t have to be broken off of a protein chain so it can be absorbed into the bloodstream more quickly and in higher doses.

Monosodium Glutamate, also known as MSG, is the most dangerous substance containing the highest concentration of glutamate in its free form. Glutamate in the form of MSG almost always acts as an excitoxin- especially to those who are sensitive to glutamate. This is why it is important to avoid MSG at all costs.
Despite the increased knowledge of the health complications MSG causes, thanks to the food industry, Americans are consuming 300 times the amount of Monosodium Glutamate than they did in 1950. Because MSG enhances the flavor of food so drastically (since it is almost completely made up of glutamates and glutamates excites the brain), this harmful chemical has filled the shelves of our local grocery stores, and is being poured into the food we eat at restaurants with no restraints from the FDA. A person must truly go out of their way to avoid this additive.

The most successful way I can tell you to avoid monosodium glutamate is to make the effort to buy organic certified foods. Certified “organic” foods by the USDA cannot legally contain monosodium glutamate. However, what organic foods can contain are ingredients like Yeast extracts, Maltodexrin, Autolyzed yeast extract, citric acid, whey protein concentrate, monopotassium glutamate, and hydrolyzed protein products. All of these do contain substantial amounts of glutamates in its free form but nowhere near the concentration found in MSG. In some cases, when we ingest too much of these ingredients in our diet, they will act as an excitotoxin as well. Therefore, even when buying organic people must be careful in regulating the intake of foods with these substances on their label. Grocery Stores like Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s are both safe places to shop because none of their products may contain MSG. Other than shopping organic, read food labels and try to eat whole, unprocessed foods in order to regulate your glutamate intake!

Sources:

Russell Blaylock, MD (//www.russellblaylockmd.com/)

Truth in Labeling (//www.truthinlabeling.org)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Night Eating Syndrome & Sleep Related Eating Disorders

Night eating syndrome treatment cincinnati

Night Eating Syndrome and Sleep Related Eating Disorders; When “Midnight Snacks” Turn into Calorie Loaded Nightmares.

It is estimated that over 6 million Americans are affected by Night Eating Syndrome (NES) or Sleep Related Eating Disorders (SRED), yet most of us have never heard of either of these disorders. Essentially they involve consumption of large quantities of high carb foods during the night. Because NES and SRED share the characteristics of other eating, mood and sleep disorders they can easily be misdiagnosed and mistreated. Those affected by NES or SRED often feel misunderstood, isolated and hopeless. These feelings can exacerbate other eating disorders and perpetuate a cycle of disturbed eating patterns during the day as well as during the night.

How are NES and SRED different?

While they are similar in as which they involve uncontrolled night eating that interferes with sleep and daytime activities they are fundamentally different. Those with NES have a difficult time falling asleep and wake frequently with an intense urge to eat, sleep is prevented until the urge is satisfied. This syndrome usually occurs when the individual is battling stress and depression. SRED is the act of preparing and eating food while sleep walking, these individuals will awake with no memory of eating the night before. This disorder is very common in those who suffer from restrictive eating disorders.

Is Treatment Available for NES and SRED?

Yes, treatment is available. NES and SRED are a combination of disorders so each disorder must be addressed. The most effective treatment involves a combination of psychotherapy and behavior therapy, in some cases medication may also be necessary. When seeking treatment it is advised that you find a health care provider that has experience with NES and SRED.


Sources:

Allison K, Stunkard A, Thier S. Overcoming Night Eating Syndrome. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications; 2004.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders…What People Are Really Saying About Their Treatment

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

photo used under a creative commons license

According to recent result’s of Dr. Norton’s online survey, in which more than 125 people have participated, Out-Patient Psychotherapy was found to be the most therapeutic of the following treatment options: Hospitalization for medical stability, Forced weight gain via feeding tube, In-Patient residential, In-Patient therapy group, Out-Patient psychotherapy, Out-Patient therapy group, Over Eaters Anonymous, Nutritional Counseling and Gastric Bypass Surgery.

Participants in Dr. Norton’s Survey rated their forms of treatment as follows:

Out-Patient Psychotherapy

*39.7% found Out-Patient Psychotherapy to be Very Therapeuticand

*36.2% found it to be Somewhat Therapeutic

*3.4% felt that this therapy did more harm than good

In-Patient Residential

*20.9% found In-Patient residential treatment to be Very Therapeutic and

*33.9% found it to be Somewhat Therapeutic

*18.3% felt that In-Patient Therapy did them more harm than good

Limitations of In-Patient Treatment

The learning taking place often does not generalize to the home environment. Patients are put on meal plans and are monitored 24/7 by staff such that they are not really learning to make new choices. Also the daily stressors of family dynamics, school/work pressures and social demands are not present. The patient has been removed from daily triggers that may have contributed to the eating-disorder in the first place. Finally this treatment can also be very costly and often results in no insurance coverage as many HMO’s will not cover once the person has been in-patient.

Pro’s of Out-Patient Treatment.

Out-Patient Treatment, especially if it includes Family Treatment, allows the individual to deal with the eating disorder in their everyday setting and provides an atmosphere conducive for family involvement which can be key to recovery. This method also involves persistent effort for the person with the eating-disorder to get better on their own. Finally Out-Patient is more cost effective when compared to In-Patient treatment.

Our Strategy: We approach the problem by aligning with the patient rather than colluding against her, blaming her, or casting her in the role of someone who is incapacitated. While those suffering from an eating disorder do have severe and/or debilitating distortions regarding food, weight and body image, they will ultimately have to choose for themselves whether or not to face their fears and change their relationship with food. Taking away control only delays that decision and may have serious side effects.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’


HOW CHORES HELP CREATE HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES

benefits of household chores

3 Good Reasons to Assign Household Chores for Children:

1. It can help create healthy habits. On average children age 8 – 18 spend 3 hours a day either watching t.v., playing video games or on the computer. The responsibility of a household chore would get them away from the t.v. and up and moving. Vacuuming, mopping, mowing the lawn and gardening are all good ways to increase your heart rate. Children need at least 90 minutes of moderate to strenuous physical activity a day, chores are a great way to get your child moving.

2. It can help reduce stress and family tension. A messy, cluttered house can cause a lot of tension and resentment within a family. Often parents just complain or yell at their children for not helping. This can create feelings of failure and anger for both the parent and the child. A sedentary lifestyle combined with feelings of shame, failure and anger can lead into emotional eating habits.

3. Allows parents more time to spend with their children. Why should parents spend their evenings and weekends doing all the housework? When the kids pitch in the work could be done in half the time. This time could be used to go for a family bike ride, walk or maybe even a game of chase or hide and seek. Remember ” a family that plays together stays together”.

The prevelance of childhood obesity in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the percentage of overweight children 2-5 years of age has doubled, with one in four pre-schooler’s being overweight or at risk for obesity. Fifty percent of these children will become obese adults. For more information about this study you can visit the CDC’s website at HERE.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Grocery Shopping – Simple Task or Time Consuming Nightmare?

grocery shopping eating disorder anxiety

I don’t know of many people who actually enjoy the mundane task of going grocery shopping but for those who suffer from an eating disorder it can be an absolute nightmare. For them going to the grocery can be time consuming, mentally exhausting and costly. Check the results we collected from Dr. Norton’s Online Survey concerning grocery shopping.

  • 75.2% debate whether or not to purchase each particular item
  • 44.4% find themselves fantasizing about binging on certain foods while grocery shopping
  • 30.1% spend more than they can afford on food

These statistics, which are from a sample of over 125 respondents, are good examples of why Dr. Norton provides the service of shopping coach.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

BULIMAREXIA, DID YOU KNOW?

Bulimarexia Treatment Cincinnati

BULIMAREXIA – An eating disorder that has the characteristics of both Anorexia and Bulimia. The person affected by this disorder will cycle between the restricting habits that are associated with Anorexia and the bingeing and purging characteristics of Bulimia. This eating disorder is very dangerous and is physically and emotionally damaging.

After reviewing the data from Dr. Norton’s online survey we found that Bulimarexia had the largest population of those who took the survey.

  • 38% identified themselves as having Bulimarexia
  • 25% identified themselves as having Anorexia
  • 12.5% identified themselves as having Bulimia
  • 10.8% identified themselves as Emotional Eaters
  • 13.3% identified themselves as Obese

Why Bulimarexia Is So Dangerous

1. The fact that it is not a recognized diagnosis yet so many people suffer from it causes a serious problem for the therapist/physician and creates a serious gap in treatment.

2. The cycle of binging and restricting is very dangerous and can cause many serious health problems such as decreased bone density, loss of menses (difficulty conceiving), tooth decay and kidney damage just to name a few.

3. Bulimarexia often goes undetected or thought of as “just a phase”. For example a parent might notice their child’s decreased food intake and some weight loss but just as they start to take notice of this the child cycle’s into the binging component of this disorder. The parent is relieved to see their child eating again and their previous concerns are dismissed.

If you are in the Cincinnati area and are seeking treatment for your eating disorder, whether it be anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or bulimarexia, there is help! You can set up a consultation with me by calling 513.205.6543.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’