Tag Archives: healthy recipes

Hempseed Florets

Looking for a substitute for grains? Here you go!

I don’t think there’s a better substitute for grain than hempseed florets. I like them as a morning cereal or as a substitute for rice at dinner.  They are loaded with protein, 10 grams per 3 tablespoons. They also have 15 g of polyunsaturated fat, the good fat, and finally and best of all, they have effectively one carbohydrate.

I usually use the hempseed florets as a cold cereal in the morning. They’re perfect on a keto diet! I put berries on top, some cinnamon and heavy cream. If I’m not doing keto, I use coconut or almond milk. I like this warm as well as cold.

Another great way to use hemp seed florets is in place of rice. When I use it as a rice substitute, I heat it up in water or I sauté it with onions and celery. For the sauté, use a tablespoon of coconut oil and a half cup of diced celery and onion. Sauté celery and onion until translucent then add the hemp seed florets last. Season to taste. I use adobo seasoning on mine. Hempseed is the perfect complement to any meat or dish that you would normally serve with rice.

For more information on the health benefits of Hempseed florets be sure to check out the newsletter entitled Hemp as a Super Food.

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Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

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Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Scrumptious and Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Super Easy Chicken Parmesan

Today we are going to do a Chicken Parmesan that is scrumptious and super easy. 

I used only two chicken breasts which is enough to last me for three meals.  You could easily double the recipe. Here are the ingredients as I used them:

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coronavirus_prevention

Something else to protect us from Coronavirus?

Today I’m going to talk about coconut oil. I had a stye in my eye and the only thing that worked to get rid of it was putting a few drops of coconut oil on it each night. No matter what else I tried, nothing was working. But the coconut oil did.

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Cooking Corona Style

Eggplant Parmesan

So I made eggplant Parmesan last night. Best and Worst egg plant Parmesan I have ever tasted! Let me explain. I used some egg plant that I admit has been in the refrigerator for a while. When you see the pictures of it I think you’ll understand. Huge mistake! Huge. 

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Obesity and Eating Disorder Recovery Recipe: Organic Ketchup

Homemade Organic Ketchup Recipe

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Eating healthy can be quick and easy once you get the hang of it. The key is in the planning. When you get into the habit of having the right ingredients on hand, meal preparation is a breeze, not a source of agony.

For more recipes, be sure to visit The Recipe Corner.

Organic Ketchup

Use all organic ingredients unless otherwise instructed.

  • 2 (7 ounce) jars Bionature organic tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 2/3 cup Xylitol sugar
  • 4 to 6 caps garlic juice
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 1/2 cups water

Directions:

Put everything in food processor and blend until mixed.

Makes approximately 2 ¾ cups.

Nutrition (1 tbsp) – 10 calories, 0 g fat, 0 g protein, 3 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.
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Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2014, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2014, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Obesity & Eating Disorder Treatment Recipes: Apple Crisp and Baked Sweet Potato Rounds [video]

Eating Disorder Recovery: Apple Crisp

We recently started offering cooking classes in Cincinnati to patients that are in treatment for obesity, anorexia, bulimarexia, or binge eating disorder. During the class, participants pick up basic cooking tips for preparing “clean” luscious tasting dishes, dressings, marinades, and soups.  A few weeks ago we made Apple Crisp and Baked Sweet Potato Rounds.

Check out the video below to see how we made it!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship. This information is not necessarily the position of Dr. J. Renae Norton or The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’.

Recipe: Mushroom Gravy

clean eating gravy recipe

Mushroom Gravy

1 quart of mushrooms, cleaned and dried
2 tbsp of grass fed butter or ghee
1 cup Snowville Whipping Cream
garlic salt, garlic pepper
bourbon smoked paprika, to taste
1 tbsp organic corn starch (or other organic thickener)

Sautee mushrooms in butter or ghee. Add garlic pepper, garlic salt, and paprika.
When mushrooms are golden, add 1 cup of full fat snowville whipping cream.
Stir on medium heat until bubbly.
In the mean time, make a paste out of cornstarch and water.
Add to gravy mixture until you get the right consistency.

Serves 10.

Nutrition Information: 120 calories, 13 g fat, 0 g protein, 2 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Clean Eating Recipe: Mayonnaise

clean eating mayonnaise

As I mentioned on Tuesday night’s podcast, the mayonnaise on grocery store shelves are filled with food additives and unhealthy fats. As a result, I always make my own mayonnaise. I’ve received several requests for my recipe, so here it is! Enjoy!

Homemade Mayonnaise

2 egg yolks (How to Choose Healthy Eggs)
2/3 c macadamia oil (Why I use this oil)
1/4 white vinegar
sea salt, to taste
garlic salt, to taste
1 tsp coconut palm sugar (Why I use coconut palm sugar)
1 tsp lemon juice

Mix egg yolks in food processor.
Blending slowly, slowly stream in macadamia oil, add vinegar, lemon juice, coconut crystals, spices.
Refrigerate.

Serves 20.

Nutrition: 70 cal, 8 g fat, 0 g protein, 0 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’

Food Additives + A new kid-friendly recipe

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Corndogs! A favorite of almost every child in the US. What exactly are we feeding our children when we serve them this favorite? Are there any healthier alternatives?

Check out this long list of ingredients one of the most popular brands of corn dogs:

Batter Ingredients: Water, Enriched Wheat Flour (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Enriched Corn Meal (Enriched with Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate), Modified Food Starch, Soybean Oil, Honey Solids (with Wheat Starch, Calcium Stearate, Hydroxylated Lecithin), Artificial Flavor, and Onion Powder, Cooked in Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Hot Dog Ingredients: Pork, Mechanically Separated Turkey, Water, Corn Syrup, Dextrose, Modified Corn Starch, Contains 2% or Less of the Following: Salt, Potassium Lactate, Flavorings, Beef, Extractives of Paprika, Sodium Diacetate, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Sodium Nitrite.

Enriched wheat flour – Enriched wheat flour is made by removing all the ‘nutrients’ out of wheat when processing it into flour but then decides to the ‘nutrients’ back in once processing is complete. Wheat normally includes fifteen ‘nutrients’, this particular company only added five (likely synthetic) nutrients back in. Same sort of scenario with the ‘enriched corn meal’, but with the addition of corn (one of the most genetically modified crops in the US).

Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate. – Inhalation of this chemical can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and bronchial asthma. Although not inhaled in this case, but I am still not a fan of ingesting this chemical. The FDA does list this on their GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list, but consuming an excessive amount of phosphate will lead to bone loss.

Soybean oil AND partially hydrogenated soybean oil. Soy is another of the most highly genetically modified crops in the US. It’s a really unstable oil, especially when heated. Soybean oil also contains polyunsaturated fats and, once hydrogenated, trans fats. Trans fats are associated with major health issues, including ADHD, mood disturbances, depression, heart attacks and strokes. It takes the body nine months to detox from trans fats. You might notice that there is no mention of ‘trans fats’ on the nutrition label of corn dogs. Why? Because the FDA does not require trans fats to be labeled for any product containing less than 0.5 g of trans fats!

 

Corn syrup, modified food starch, wheat starch, artificial flavor, dextrose, hydroxylated lecithin, flavorings. All possible sources of the neurotoxin, monosodium glutamate (MSG). MSG wreaks havoc on many body systems, including the brain. For more information on the effects of MSG, see my article here.

So, what can we serve our children as an alternative to the store-bought corn dog? How about these super fun mini corn dog muffins?


Low Carb Mini Corn Dog Muffins

2 US Wellness Sugar Free Beef Franks (sugar free, MSG free, nitrate free, nitrite free, gluten free, and grass-fed)

1 cup Almond Flour

¾ tsp baking powder

¼ tsp salt

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 tbsp coconut oil (or grass-fed butter), melted

¼ cup plain greek yogurt

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Cut the hot dogs into 15 pieces, set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix eggs, coconut oil and yogurt until well combined.

Add in almond flour, baking powder and salt. Mix again.

Pour batter into mini muffin cups or into a greased mini muffin pan.

Push down one piece of hot dog into the center of each muffin.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until edges begin to brown.

Serves 5 (3 mini muffins each)

Nutrition Info (per serving):

245 calories, 20 g fat, 14 g protein, 5 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Nutrition Info for Store-bought corn dogs (baked):
220 calories, 11 g fat, 6 g protein, 25 g carbs, 0 g fiber

Nutrition Info for fast-food corn dogs (fried):
375 calories, 21 g fat, 14 g protein, 36 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Is There Really a Connection Between Full-Time Working Moms and Child Obesity?

photo used under creative common license

Over the past 35 years, the percentage of U.S. mothers who hold down a job while raising kids have soared from less than 50% to more than 70%. During this same time frame, the childhood obesity rate-which is now close to 17%- has more than tripled. Many researchers are claiming that there’s a direct connection between these two figures. The journal of Childhood Development just published a study, which showed that the longer a mother is employed, the more likely her children are to be overweight or obese. The study demonstrated that for each additional five-month period that his or her mother is employed, a child of average height could be expected to gain 1 extra pound over and above normal growth. In addition, six graders with working mothers were found to be six times more likely than those with stay-at-home moms to be overweight.

Another study published in Business Week supports this same concept, finding that was a correlation between the number of hours a women works outside the home and the BMI of her children. This research found that for a third grader of average height, the increase in BMI was equivalent to an extra one and a half to two extra pounds over what that child would normally gain in a year.

With studies like these being done, the idea that American kids are getting fat because women work outside the home now, could seem convincing. But hold on. These are correlative studies, not experimental research. The problem with these conclusions is that there may be several other things occurring simultaneously “causing” or contributing to this dietary epidemic.

Obviously, if women are spending long hours at work, as many do, home cooked meals are less of an option. In our nation it has become far too common for the wife to pop something pre packaged into the oven at night or pick up a pizza on her way home in order to accommodate her family with a meal that is quick and tasty.

The issue is that convenience foods have become a way of life for Americans. The ability to buy ready-made food is so much the norm that cooking for yourself seems like overkill, like you’re trying to win the best mom ever trophy. When push comes to shove, and it often does, most moms say the heck with it! Bring on the pizza. But that’s when the real problem kicks in, as processed foods are loaded with MSG, HFCS, Aspartame and Acesulfame, all of which are neurotoxins and all of which contribute to weight gain or disturbed eating. It doesn’t matter if the wife had the WHOLE DAY to cook a meal anymore because she wouldn’t anyway. Not when she can just run down the street to KFC and have a bucket of chicken in less than 10 minutes.

Thus it is the additives in these convenience foods that are directly responsible for why our nation and our children have become so fat. The percentage of mothers working full time may have gone up over the past 35 years, but so has the amount of MSG and high fructose corn syrup being poured into the foods we buy. They are found in just about all prepackaged, frozen and fast foods. They keep our stomachs saying “yum!” and “more,” and our blood sugar levels on a constant rollercoaster.  Working mothers who have jobs don’t directly cause weight problems in their children. Reliance on and trust in processed foods containing dangerous addictive additives should be getting blamed. Unfortunately, most people don’t even know they’re there!

Sources:

Verropoulou G, Joshi H. Mothers’ Employment and Child Development. London, UK: Center for Longitudinal Development. 2006.

Business Week (online version) – WHAT! WORKING MOTHERS = FAT KIDS??? (http://www.businessweek.com/careers/workingparents/blog/archives/2007/05/who_knew_seems.html)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. http://edpro.wpengine.com’