Tag Archives: nutrition

What Exactly is Amish Chicken?

What exactly is Amish Chicken?

Is Amish chicken free range? Organic?

Lately, more and more supermarkets are carrying a variety of brands of “Amish chicken”. What exactly is Amish chicken? Is it as good as organic, free-range chicken? When we think of chickens raised on Amish farms, we think of chickens raised on a family farm that are able to run in and out of the coop freely to roam freely in green pastures. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

The New York Times interviewed Ariane Daguin, co-owner of D’Artagan, a supplier of Amish chicken to New York restaurants and markets. When asked what was meant when chicken was labeled as being “Amish”, she responded that it is simply “a marketing ploy, it doesn’t mean anything…..the mystique of the Amish Label comes from it’s aura of naturalness”.

In many cases, Amish chickens are not raised in a free-range environment. They still lead fairly confined lives as free-roaming chickens. Free-roaming chickens are typically provided natural light, feed, water and ventilation, and are free to roam, as long as it is within the four walls of chicken coop. There aren’t any clear regulations set on what type of living conditions farmers have to provide to their free-roaming chickens.

Be careful of companies that claim that most of the farms that supply them are Amish-owned farms. Note, the label doesn’t say most of the chicken comes from these farms. They could use 60 family-owned Amish farms, but then use two factory farms for the remainder of their required supply. They might get a few thousand chicken from the Amish farms, but a much greater number of their chickens would be coming from factory farms. It’s also important to note that most Amish chicken is not actually processed by the Amish, but alongside factory-farm chickens at USDA-inspected industrial processing plants.

You might notice the packaging on your locally available Amish chicken states that the chickens are raised on all vegetarian diets. This sounds comforting at first, I mean who would want to eat chicken that has been raised on a diet of beef, pork, or even worse chicken…it’s just not natural! Vegetarian-raised chickens are typically provided with feed that is comprised largely of soy and corn. These are two of the most genetically-modified foods in the United States (for more information on the dangers of GM foods, be sure to check out my recent post “Genetically Modified Foods: Are They Safe?”.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to play it safe and stick to free-range, organic, pastured chicken. Look for


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Coconut Oil – Which kind is better?

Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined vs Unrefined, Expeller Pressed vs Cold Pressed,  Virgin vs Extra Virgin – What to pick?

Today there are a lot of varieties of Coconut Oil on the store shelf, trying to figure out what type to purchase can quickly become quite confusing. What are the differences between the different varieties available? What type of coconut oil yields the greatest health benefits? Read my post on Why Is Coconut Oil Good For You.

Refined Coconut Oil vs. Unrefined Coconut Oil

Refined (Commercial Grade) Coconut Oil is both tasteless and odorless. It is the most processed coconut oil on the store shelf. It goes through a pretty intensive process that deodorizes and bleaches the oil. Sometimes Refined Coconut Oil is hydrogenated or partially-hydrogenated, which results in the creation of trans-fats.

Unrefined Coconut Oil has a richer flavor than Refined Coconut Oil. The oil is minimally processed, which results in an oil that has a much higher nutrient content (proteins, vitamins and anti-oxidants).

The Winner? Unrefined Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil vs. Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil involves squeezing the coconut oil out of the coconut meat in a screw-like machine. The pressure and friction in the expeller can lead to temperatures of around 99°C. At this temperature there are some, albeit minimal, nutrients lost.

Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil involves pressing the coconut milk out of the coconut meat at low temperatures, usually below 60°C. By utilizing this method the greatest amount of nutrients are preserved.

The Winner? It’s a close one but Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil wins.

Virgin Coconut Oil vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Surprisingly, according to Tropical Traditions, “there is no official classification or difference between ‘virgin’ and ‘extra virgin’ as there is in the olive oil industry, since the two oils are completely different in fatty acid composition, harvesting procedures, and terminology.” The classification of “extra virgin coconut oil” is completely arbitrary.

The Winner? It’s a tie!

Overall Results? Unrefined, Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil with Unrefined Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil being a very close 2nd.


Worried About High Cholesterol?

Coconut oil does raise cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. Even the good unrefined coconut. But Wait! What people don’t understand is that high cholesterol is not an issue. Scientifically we can demonstrate that having high cholesterol does not increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease.

In general, it’s LDL cholesterol that determines whether or not you are going to have cardiovascular disease. Other factors that determine this are CRP, and homocystine.

But that said, even having high LDL cholesterol does not necessarily increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. There are two types of LDL cholesterol, pattern A and pattern B.

if you have pattern A you are good to go… That’s what I have! If you have pattern B you were eating the wrong kinds of fats, primarily hydrogenated or super hydrogenated fats or refined coconut oil.

Read my articles below for more information and also keep an eye out for my upcoming book where I go more in-depth about Cholesterol

What is Wrong With the American Heart Association? Are They CocoLoco?
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 2
What Is Wrong With The American Heart Association? Part 3

Sources:
//www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm
//www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/unrefined-coconut-oil.html
//goldenbarrel.blogspot.com/2012/01/truth-about-coconut-oil.html
//www.livestrong.com/article/318185-refined-vs-unrefined-coconut-oil/
//www.livestrong.com/article/287991-what-is-the-difference-between-expeller-pressed-coconut-oil-cold-pressed-coconut-oil/

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”



Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form


Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

Digesting Animal Protein

Digesting Steak

How Are We Digesting Animal Protein?
Our bodies use enzymes for digesting animal protein. Anytime we ingest food, our body releases digestive enzymes to break the food down or digest the food. Because animal protein (meat) is a more complex food, our body expends a much larger amount of digestive enzymes to digest it.

The process of cooking meat destroys most of the naturally-occurring enzymes that are needed to break down meats complete proteins into amino acids that the body can utilize; the more the meat is cooked, the more naturally-occurring enzymes are destroyed. This is the main reason that a well-done steak is more difficult to digest than a rare steak.

It’s also important to note that as we get older, our bodies naturally start to produce fewer digestive enzymes. Some meats take longer to digest than others; pork takes the longest to digest, followed by beef and lamb. The longer the meat takes to digest, the more digestive enzymes are exhausted.

Protein Digestion Times

How Can We Help Our Bodies in Digesting Animal Protein?
There are several things we can do to make the digestion process of meat easier, especially when it comes to the harder-to-digest meats like pork, beef, and lamb.

There are a few foods and supplements that naturally contain digestive enzymes including fresh, raw pineapple and fresh, raw papaya. By eating these fruits as accompaniment to meat, our bodies are less likely to be depleted of its own digestive enzymes.

Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, while fresh papaya contains an enzyme called papain; both help the body to break down protein quickly. Sometimes, it may not be possible to eat fresh pineapple or papaya with your meal, especially if you are eating away from home. In this case, there are combination bromelain and papain supplements available. Remember to always check the labels of your supplements for unwanted ingredients such as artificial sweeteners, MSG, and other neurotoxins.

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for over 25 years and have always had good outcomes.  My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery.”


Does someone you love suffer from an eating disorder?

Dr. Renae Norton specializes in the treatment of eating disorders. Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Call 513-205-6543 to schedule an appointment or fill out our online contact form for someone to call you to discuss your concerns. Tele-therapy sessions available. Individual and family sessions also available.

Online Contact Form



Follow us on social media:

Use the website search function to search the blog for past articles.

View the archive of past Newsletters

Sign up for our Newsletter

Copyright The Norton Center – All rights reserved

Privacy Policy and Medical Disclaimer

Materials contained on this site are made available solely for educational purposes and as part of an effort to raise general awareness of the psychological treatments available to individuals with health issues. These materials are not intended to be, and are not a substitute for, direct professional medical or psychological care based on your individual condition and circumstances.  Dr. J. Renae Norton does not diagnose or treat medical conditions. While this site may contain descriptions of pharmacological, psychiatric and psychological treatments, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified mental health care provider.  You are advised to consult your medical health provider about your personal questions or concerns.

News You Can Use-Week of June 8th-14th, 2015

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of June 8th-14th, 2015.

NEWS: 5 Gut-Friendly Foods to Help You Lose Weight

You eat avocados for your heart and fish for your brain, but are you feeding your gut? Your gut is more than just the food processing plant for your body—it has major implications for your appetite, your immune system, and even your mood. LEARN MORE

NEWS: What is Most Harmful to Your Nutritional Health?

Here’s an interesting survey conducted recently by Civic Science. Over 4300 adults were asked the following question: “Which of these do you feel is most harmful to your nutritional health?” LEARN MORE

NEWS: Is Your Child Eating Cancer-Causing Glyphosate For Breakfast? Most Likely, Yes

Although there aren’t any genetically modified oats on the marketplace today, that doesn’t mean we should run to stores with open arms, thankful that we’re eating healthy foods. The truth is, products containing oats are typically sprayed with the cancer-causing herbicide ingredient — you know, the one that a division of the World Health Organization recently deemed “probably carcinogenic to humans” — known as glyphosate. LEARN MORE

News: Is Facebook Making Us Hate Our Bodies?

It is estimated that Facebook had nearly 1.3 billion users in 2013. That translates to 1/6 of the world population. In North America, just under half of the population is on Facebook and 71% of adults who are online are on Facebook. A 2010 study revealed that teens spend more than 7 ½ hours per day online, and much of that time is spent on social media sites like Facebook. Social media has become ingrained into our way of life. But what is the emotional cost of our immersion in social media? Specifically, how does social media, like Facebook, impact how we feel about our bodies? LEARN MORE

 

Sign up for our newsletter HERE!

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Sugar: The Good

sugar - the good, the bad, the ugly

Should I avoid all forms of sugar? This is a frequently asked question from many of my patients that are in treatment for obesity or eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED). As with all things polluted, sugar has developed a bad reputation. In its natural form, it is one of the most important sources of energy that we have on the planet. It is the only carbohydrate that circulates in the blood stream and it serves as the primary energy source for the brain. In the plant world, it is formed through photosynthesis, and is vital to the propagation of each plant species, as its job is to nurture the plant’s seed. Sugar is found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and even in milk. These sources of sugar are not a problem. It is the added sugar in all of its polluted forms, which is contributing to so many of our health problems today. It is also the amount of added sugar in the U.S. diet that is literally killing us. This week, we’ll be posting a three-part series about sugar, the good, the bad, and the ugly!

The Good

The two main types of sugar that we must know about in order to be healthy are glucose and fructose.

Glucose is a monosaccharide (simple sugar) that plays a critical role in providing energy for humans. It is found in the sap of plants, and in the bloodstream of humans where it is referred to as “blood sugar”. Glucose is one of the analytics the doctor looks at when you have a physical. The normal concentration of glucose in the blood is about 0.1%, or between 70mg/dl to 120mg/dl. It can be too high, as in pre-diabetes or Type II diabetes, or it can be too low, as in Hypoglycemia. Because it is the primary source of energy for the brain, it influences psychological processes such as self-control, decision-making and mood. Thus, when glucose is low these processes are impaired. So it is vital to our physiological as well as psychological well-being.

Glucose may come from fruits or grains. The majority of glucose in grain is combined into long chains of molecules called either amylose or amylopectin. Both are starches. Not all starches are created equal in terms of how much they raise blood sugar levels. Those with fiber have a lower glycemic load than those without it. Legumes, for example, convert from amylose into glucose + fructose, whereas sticky rice and potatoes convert from amylopectin into glucose + glucose. The latter produces a higher blood sugar level.

Fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple monosaccharide found in many plants. Like glucose, it is absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. Pure, dry fructose is a very sweet, white, odorless, crystalline solid and is the most water-soluble of all the sugars, making it ideal as a sweetener. Fructose is found naturally in plant sources such as honey, tree and vine fruits, flowers, berries, and most root vegetables.

Dr. J. Renae Norton is a clinical psychologist, specializing in the outpatient treatment of obesity and eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, and binge eating disorder (BED) and the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Director of The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

©2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’.

News You Can Use – Jan 16-23 2013

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of January 16-23 2013!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2013, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

LET’S EAT: Maji Teaches Mongo What It Means to Eat Clean!

LET'S EAT!: Maji Teaches Mongo What It Means to Eat Clean!

LET’S EAT: Maji Teaches Mongo What it Means to Eat Clean, the second book in the Maji & Mongo series, is set to release on March 15, but you can pre-order it now at amazon.com!

“Maji and Mongo were dogs of the same breed but they were very different, very different indeed! One a sad couch potato, the other a happy playful tornado!

When they met, Mongo ate chips and dips, cookies and candy. He didn’t even know how great water could taste! But Maji shows him that food from the ground is the best all around and that being healthy and strong can come in handy. Don’t miss the fun these two pups have together! Join them and make up your mind to eat clean forever!”

The Maji and Mongo books are lifestyle picture books for 3 to 7 year olds that address the issue of outdoor play and clean eating in a way that makes it sound like irresistible fun. They use a rhyming format that children love. The illustrations of Maji and Mongo are adorable and quickly capture the attention and the hearts of children. The books also contain valuable tips for parents who want to help their children be more active and enjoy more wholesome foods.

LET’S EAT addresses the importance of drinking water (versus soda), how it gives one energy and vitality. It presents guidelines on how to eat healthy in a fun way, i.e., eating clean, eating organic so you don’t have scrambled-up brains, eating foods that came from the ground versus from a bag, avoiding GMOs, pesticides, chemicals, and junk food in general.

“What my research was showing me was that the American food supply is polluted and that many of those suffering from disordered eating, actually suffer from food addictions that are the result of these pollutants. I found an abundance of data available on the role that food additives play in damaging the biological systems that regulate weight. Specifically, the American food supply is polluted by:

        • Antibiotics
        • Artificial growth hormones
        • High fructose corn syrup
        • Artificial dyes (made from coal tar and petrochemicals)
        • Artificial sweeteners derived from chemicals
        • Synthetically created chemical pesticide and fertilizers
        • Genetically engineered proteins and ingredients
        • Sewage sludge
        • Irradiation

These substances have been shown to be carcinogenic, neurotoxic, obesogenic and addictive, especially for children, whose brains are still developing. As a result, the U.S. is among the top ten fastest countries in the world with the distinction of being number one for having the fattest children. The impact on the health of our nation has already been catastrophic and will get much worse if we do not do something to protect our children. Indeed, U.S. children today will be the first generation in decades to have a shorter life expectancy than that of their parents. The Maji & Mongo book series is an attempt at fighting back, by engaging children and their parents in an entertaining and endearing read that puts across the importance of getting outdoors and eating clean.”
-Dr. J. Renae Norton

Let’s Connect!
Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Nutritional Benefits of Adzuki Beans

photo used under a creative commons license

While shopping at Whole Foods Market I discovered a “new to me” food, adzuki beans (pronounced “azuki”). I haven’t seen these beans in stores before, so I had to find out if adzuki beans have any health benefits over other beans. Here’s what I’ve found out!

Adzuki beans are grown in East Asia. They are traditionally used for both sweet and savory dishes in East Asia. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, adzuki beans are believed to clear toxins from the body, clear heat from the body, reduce abdominal fullness and swelling due to edema, disperse blood statis, and improve jaundice. Adzuki beans are also high in iron, making it a good food for those who suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Adzuki beans may also promote good spleen and stomach health. They also believed to improve “yang” energy; you may have low yang energy if you have low productivity, are indecisive, are depressed or overly emotional, are controlling, are overly introverted, you tend to hold on to things too long, or have stagnant energy.

Nutritionally, how do adzuki beans compare to other beans? In comparison to mung beans, adzuki beans contain:

– almost twice as much iron

– more than twice as much potassium

– about 25% more magnesium

– almost twice as much phosphorous

– almost 2.5 times more zinc

– about 2 times more copper

– about 2 times more manganese

Mung beans beat adzuki beans in three areas. Mung beans contain less sodium, more selenium, and more vitamin A.

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – Aug 9-16

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your weekly news update for the week of August 9-16 2012!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Eating Disorder Pro Radio Show – Q&A – Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders

Listen to internet radio with Eating Disorder Pro on Blog Talk Radio

In this episode we answered your questions about last week’s episode on the Epidemic of Obesity & Escalation of Eating Disorders (you can also review the show notes for more information).

The obesity epidemic has negatively impacted the entire U.S. health care system and reversed a 20-year trend of longer life expectancy for certain segments of the population, primarily today’s children.

If the present rate of occurrence continues, the entire population will be obese by the year 2030. Likewise, eating disorders (ED’s) such as Anorexia, are growing in numbers and reaching new segments of the population, including younger children, middle-aged women and men. These are groups that have been relatively unaffected by ED’s in the past.

In this episode we covered:

1:47 – About Dr Norton

2:54 – Podcast Overview

4:27 – Obesity and Eating Disorders in the US

8:32 – Why Are We Seeing an Increase in Obesity and Eating Disorders in the US

12:04 – The Role of Pop Culture in Obesity and Eating Disorders

12:37 – The Role of Nutrition in Overcoming Obesity and Eating Disorders

14:27 – Caller Success Story

22:08 – Caller Question – What are some reliable websites to obtain accurate information about our food supply?

26:22 – Caller Question – How to Eat Healthy in the Workplace (Travelling, Prepared Meals)

39:14 – Importance of Understanding Good Nutrition for Both Ourselves and Our Children (GMOs, MSG, Neurotoxins)

42:48 – Caller Question – How to Eat Healthy Throughout College Life – Low Budget, Cafeteria Food, Dorm-Life

47:51 – Caller Question – Diabetes – What Food Should I Avoid Eating?

Links we discussed –
Sean Croxton’s Underground Wellness
The Institute for Responsible Technology
The Weston A Price Foundation
Coconut Crystals from Coconut Secret

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

 

 

News You Can Use! June 3 – 10 (part ii)

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update!”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible. Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – May 20 – 27 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of May 20 – May 27 2012!”

Friend groups may encourage kids to be more active

Obesity not always tied to higher heart risk: study

Over Half of Americans: Figuring out Taxes Easier than Nutrition

Here’s why kale is called the ‘beef’ of a plant-based diet

Fructose makes you stupid; DHA makes you smart

A Calorie Is a Calorie, Or Is It?

Battle Brewing Over Labeling of Genetically Modified Food

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What’s the Deal with Nuts?

Macadamia Nuts

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

There have been numerous studies that show that people who eat a healthy diet that incorporates nuts typically experience greater health benefits (such as weight loss, and lower levels of bad cholesterol) than those who eat a healthy diet that does not incorporate nuts. Do all nuts offer the same health benefits? Are all nuts created equal? There is one kind of nut that stands head and shoulders above the rest; the macadamia nut! High in protein, fiber, and healthy fat content, macadamia nuts are the most energy dense nut available.

Macadamia nuts contain the highest level of monounsaturated fat than any other natural, commercially available food. Monounsaturated fats have been shown to be beneficial in lowering bad cholesterol levels. A study published by UC Irvine demonstrated that foods that contain unsaturated fats curb the appetite and makes people feel fuller longer. Combine this with the high fiber content of macadamia nuts and they quickly become one of the most satisfying nuts on the store shelf.

Macadamia nuts also contain the best ratio of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acid ratio. The ideal diet contains an 1:1 ratio of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids. The typical person eating the Standard American Diet (SAD) is estimated to be at a 1:30 omega-3:omega-6 fatty acid ratio, mainly due to the increase of soy and corn in our food supply. Diets that have an unbalanced omega-3:omega-6 ratio lead to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. With the exception of macadamia nuts, the majority of nuts contain too little omega-3 fatty acids and too much omega-6 fatty acids. Check out these nutrition stats from Nutrition Data:

Omega-3 Fatty Acids (mg)

Omega-6 Fatty Acids (mg)

Macadamia

60

360

Almonds

2

3400

Hazelnuts

20

2200

Pistachios

70

3700

Brazil Nuts

5.1

5800

Cashews

7

2200

Walnuts

2500

10100

Pecans

280

5800

In addition to the aforementioned benefits, macadamia nuts:
  • Are low in polyunsaturated fats
  • Are low in linoleic acid
  • Are cholesterol-free
  • Contain all essential amino acids; and a few non-essential amino acids
  • Are a good source of vitamin e, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and folate
  • Contain antioxidants, such as squalene
  • Are rich in the minerals iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcum, zinc, copper, and selenium

Aside from coconut oil, macadamia nut oil is the healthiest cooking oil. Its low omega-6 fatty acid content makes it a highly stable oil that is least likely to oxidize when exposed to heat. The rich, buttery- tasting oil is also high in monounsaturated fat; even higher than the olive oil found in most kitchens today. Macadamia nut oil contains palmetoleic acid, an omega-7 fatty acid that is rarely found in food. Macadamia nut oil can be used for sautéing, stir frying, and salad dressings, basically anything you would typically use olive oil for.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Are Macadamia Nuts Superior to All Other Nuts?


//nutritiondata.self.com/

Mmmmmmmmmmmm… Fat


//www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-10/uoc–uss100608.php

Smart Fuel: Macadamia Oil

More on Omega


//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909

Food for Thought – May 2012

‘Food for Thought’ is The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity’s monthly e-newsletter designed to keep readers and clients (both past and present) up to date on the latest health, fitness and nutrition information. Many of my clients and readers find having this newsletter emailed directly to them is a quick and convenient way to receive this information. You can subscribe to my e-newsletter by sending your email address to drnortonPR at gmail dot com with the subject line ‘Sign me up for Food for Thought”.

May 2012
Food for Thought

Popular Articles:

Childhood Obesity

Working-In vs. Working-Out

Characteristics of the Traditional Diet

News You Can Use:

Brain Activity Gives Scientists a Clue About Eating Disorders

Spike in US Autism Rates Linked to High-Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption

Why Pasture Eggs Taste Better Than Those From Factory Farms

Connect with me!

Twitter

Hello and Welcome

Thank you for taking the time to check out the newsletter! This information is meant to provide you with up the minute news you can use on your journey to becoming a more mindful consumer and a healthier version of yourself! To that end, I invite you to submit requests and/or give your input. Maybe you have a recipe that you think others would enjoy. Or perhaps you have a question about food, exercise, or how to develop good habits. Please use this form to submit your question and I will make every effort to get back to you in the next issue.

Be well, be wise, be happy and healthy!

Renae Norton

Childhood Obesity

The average child spends almost 53 hours/week (7 hours 38 min/day) watching television, playing video games, using computers and/or cell phones. Add another 1 hour 25 minutes/week if you include texting. Clearly our children need more physical activity. However, parents who come home from work exhausted, have a difficult time being good role models. Likewise it is a challenge for overworked parents to ensure that their children are less sedentary and more active. Schools are generally not in a position to help. In 2011 the median Physical Education (PE) budget in elementary schools in the U.S. was $460/year. Many PE programs are optional, depending upon the grade. Some PE classes can even be taken online…..READ MORE.

 

Maji and Mongo Have Arrived!

As some of you may know, I recently completed a series of children’s books on Lifestyle issues designed to help parents protect their children from the dynamics that would otherwise rob them of their health and well-being. The books delight readers from age 3 to 10, because the adorable pups, Maji and Mongo make being healthy an exciting and fun-filled adventure. The first book in the series is entitled “How Maji Gets Mongo Off the Couch” and was released on May 1 2012.…..READ MORE

The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity, and Our Food Supply

I was recently asked to contribute an article to the Fooducate Blog about “The Connection Between Eating Disorders, Obesity, and Our Food Supply”. The article received an excellent response from both the Fooducate staff and readers of the blog. You can read the full article on the fooducate blog.

Recipe: Tunegg Salad

Fresh tuna, organic eggs and coconut oil mayonnaise make this delicious salad an excellent source of protein and healthy fats! It’s become a favorite recipe with both my family and clients….READ MORE.

Dr. J Renae Norton’s Center for Eating Disorders & Related Problems

drnorton@eatingdisorderpro.com

 

Wheat – The Staff of Life or the Kiss of Death?

Wheat

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Today’s wheat is not the same wheat eaten during biblical times, when wheat was referred to as the “Staff of Life”. The wheat consumed in the United States today is a product of many, many years of hybridization with the purpose of creating a greater yielding crop that is resistant to heat, drought and cold, making it a more lucrative crop for industrial farmers. (Shouldn’t “industrial farmer” be an oxymoron?) Besides being cheap and plentiful, it is virtually impossible for humans or animals to digest without significant health consequences.

How did the Staff of Life become the Kiss of Death?

The first variety of wheat, called Einkorn, was grown by man more than 12,000 years ago. Einkorn is a fairly simple plant with only 14 chromosomes. Today’s wheat is much more complex, it has 42 chromosomes. This is how we arrived to the type of wheat we consume today:


During the mid-18th century, there were 5 different varieties of Triticum Aestivum (commonly known as Bread Wheat), today there are 25,000 varieties.

It is no secret that the number of calories consumed by Americans has increased. A study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition documented a 440 calorie per day increase from 1977 to 2006 in 28,400 children and 36,800 adults. That is an extra 3080 calories per week. It only takes 3500 extra calories to gain a pound. At the same time that calorie intake began to increase, a new variety of wheat was introduced into the American food system. This wheat was unique, because it contained a protein called gliadin. According to Dr. William Davis, author of The Wheat Belly, gliadin “exerts opiate-like effects”. Gliadin binds to the opiate receptors in the brain but instead of resulting in a “high” that would typically be experienced with the use of an opiate drug, gliadin causes us to experience food cravings (for wheat products as well as for other foods). This explains why so many Americans began gaining weight around this time.

Dr. Davis has also seen a link between wheat consumption and the development of eating disorders. He recently published an article stating that “we know that when people with celiac disease remove all wheat/gluten from the diet, calorie intake goes down 400 calories per day. We know that normal volunteers administered an opiate-blocking drug, such as naloxone or naltrexone, reduce calorie intake by around 400 calories per day. We also know that people with eating disorders, such as binge eating disorder, reduce calorie intake, yup, 400 calories per day when injected with an opiate-blocking drug. We also know that a drug company filed its FDA application in 2011 for naltrexone, a drug already on the market for heroin addiction, to be prescribed for weight loss.

Einkorn, the original wheat, can still be purchased today and may be an alternative for those looking for a wheat replacement. A company called “Jovial Foods” sells organic einkorn flour, organic einkorn berries, and einkorn-based cookies and pasta. Jovial Foods grows their einkorn on five different organic farms in Italy. All the ingredients in their products are completely non-GMO. As an added bonus, they use palm fruit oil in their cookies! None of their foods contain excitotoxins, MSG, high fructose corn syrup, or any other concerning food additives. You can buy their products directly from their website, or in some stores.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – May 6-13

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of May 6 – May 13 2012!”

How to Be Happy Without the Perfect Body
Don’t Lose Sleep Over Weight
Major Overhaul of US Life Urged to Cure Obesity
Long Commutes Linked to Obesity
Eat Your Way to Better Brain Health|
What You Don’t Know About Organic Milk
Why Are We Eating So Much More Than We Used To?

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sugar Consumption Among US Children and Teenagers

Sugar Consumption in the US

photo used under creative common license

“For the past 10 years, I have noticed a connection between childhood obesity, eating disorders, and the increasing complications of both in my clinical work as well as in my research. As part of my mission to shed light on these problems, particularly as they relate to US children, I find it important to provide both by readers and clients with relevant informative articles.”

Recently, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) released a data brief which examined the consumption of “added sugar” among American children and teenagers. On average, today’s children and teens obtain 16% of their daily calories from added sugar; the USDA recommends that no more than 5-15% of daily calories come from a combination of added sugar AND solid fats. CDC defines added sugar as “all sugars used as ingredients in processed and prepared foods such as breads, cakes, soft drinks, jams, chocolates, ice cream, and sugars eaten separately or added to foods at the table”. Examples of added sugars include white sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, maple syrup, pancake syrup, fructose sweetener, liquid fructose, honey, molasses, anhydrous dextrose, crystal dextrose, and dextrin. Other key findings from the study include:

  • Non-Hispanic white children and teenagers consume more added sugar than Mexican-American children and teenagers
  • There was no difference in consumption by income among children and teenagers
  • More added sugar calories are coming from foods than beverages
  • More added sugar is consumed at home rather than away from home

Although it is unrealistic to remove all added sugar from our children’s diets, there are several dietary changes that can be made that will greatly reduce sugar consumption:

  • Cut out sugary sports drinks, soda and flavored milk.
  • Cut out artificially sweetened foods. “Diet” foods, such as diet soda, tend to increase cravings for sugary foods.
  • Replace sugary foods with foods that are low in added sugar. This can include fresh fruit, small amounts of unsweetened dried fruits and unsweetened cacao nibs.
  • Avoid foods that contain sugar, corn syrup, or high fructose corn syrup. Look for foods that contain “no added sugar”, “reduced sugar, or that are “low in sugar”, just make sure that the sugar hasn’t been replaced with an artificial sweetener.
  • Avoid processed foods that are marketing as being “low fat”. When food manufacturers remove fat from a product, they often add in more sugar to compensate for the reduction in flavor and texture.
  • Avoid products that contain “hidden” sources of sugar such as, flavored yogurt, processed cereal, granola bars, dried (sweetened) cranberries, energy bars, fruit snacks, sweetened apple sauce, ketchup, flavored instant oatmeal, fruit spread, store-bought salad dressings, store-bought bread.

Diets high in added sugar reduces the production of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Reduced levels of BDNF has been linked to reduced memory function, learning disabilities, depression, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s Disease (HD), dementia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder (BED). Decreased levels of BDNF negatively affect leptin and insulin signals in the brain, resulting in an increased tendency to overeat.

There are several simple lifestyle changes that can be made to increase and maintain brain levels of BDNF:

  • The most effective way to increase BDNF levels in the brain is through aerobic exercise. After exercising, levels of BDNF surge. Exercise regularly and BDNF levels remain increased.
  • BDNF can also be increased through dietary changes. Acetyl-L-Carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids (such as those found in fish oil), pantethine (found in foods like dairy, eggs, sweet potatoes, peas, spinach, and mushrooms), blueberries, and the curry spice curcumin have all been shown in increase or maintain BDNF levels.
  • Anti-depressants are proven to increase BDNF levels in the brain, so if prescribed anti-depressants be sure to take them as directed.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

BDNF Prevents and Reverses Alzheimer’s Disease
Consumption of Added Sugar Among US Children and Adolescents
What Eating Too Much Sugar Does to Your Brain

Chronic Sugar Intake Dampens Feeding-Related Activity of Neurons Synthesizing a Satiety Mediator, Oxytocin
Tips for Reducing Your Child’s Sugar Intake

Recipe – Asian Daikon Relish


In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.

Daikon radishes aid in the digestion of fats and carbs due to their high enzyme content. Research has also show that it helps to increase enzymes in the body that defend again cancer-causing agents. Daikon radishes are also high in vitamin c, phosphorus and potassium.

Asian Daikon Relish

Dice into small squares:
1 part organic carrot
1 part organic cucumber
1 part organic or non-organic daikon radish

Cover with:
3 parts organic rice vinegar or white vinegar
1 part macadamia nut oil
1 tsp. Himalayan Pink Salt
1 tsp. organic garlic salt
1 tsp. organic garlic pepper

Best on days two and three, but delicious anytime!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user mr and mrs stickyfingers

The Norton Center – News You Can Use

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 15 – April 22 2012!”

Urge Surfing – Riding the Wave of the Urge to Use Eating Disorder Behaviors
Spike in US Autism Rates Linked to HFCS Consumption
Pepsi’s ‘Next’ Generation – Less Sugar, More Toxins
The Four Best Functional Beverages for Health and Performance
Dr Russell Blaylock on Vaccinations
Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia: Not Just a Potted Pet. Now It’s a Health Food
Vegetarian Fed Meat, BCAAs and Bland Grassfed Beef

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – April 8-15 2012

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder and obesity treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of April 8 – April 15 2012!”

Tree nut consumption lowers chronic disease risks and assists successful weight loss

The Definitive Guide to Traditional Food Preparation and Preservation

Brain Activity Gives Scientists Clues About Eating Disorders


Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Childhood Obesity [A Norton Center Infographic]

photo used under a creative commons license

“For the past 10 years, I have noticed a connection between childhood obesity, eating disorders, and the increasing complications of both in my clinical work as well as in my research. As part of my mission to shed light on these problems, particularly as they relate to US children, I find it important to provide both by readers and clients with relevant informative articles. You can view all of my Childhood Obesity Articleshere. Also, be sure to read my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

The average child spends almost 53 hours/week (7 hours 38 min/day) watching television, playing video games, using computers and/or cell phones. Add another 1 hour 25 minutes/week if you include texting. Clearly our children need more physical activity. However, parents who come home from work exhausted, have a difficult time being good role models. Likewise it is a challenge for overworked parents to ensure that their children are less sedentary and more active. Schools are generally not in a position to help. In 2011 the median Physical Education (PE) budget in elementary schools in the U.S. was $460/year. Many PE programs are optional, depending upon the grade. Some PE classes can even be taken online.

The implications of the epidemic of childhood obesity are staggering when one considers that obesity leads to many of the most debilitating and costly medical problems of our time. It is not uncommon today for a child to leave the pediatrician’s office with a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart condition or joint deterioration. These diseases, which have historically been associated with middle age, are now showing up in younger and younger children. At the current rate of childhood obesity, it is estimated that the U.S. will have $344 billion in medical-related expenses driven by obesity and it’s complications by the year 2018 or 21% of medical costs. More importantly, today’s children will be the first generation since the Great Depression, projected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents.

Childhood Obesity Infographic

“While the medical costs and complications of childhood obesity are frightening, it could get worse. We don’t really know the extent to which these problems will impact the quality of life of individuals who suffer from chronic diseases so early in life, as this is an entirely new phenomenon. We know that depression, reduced earning power, infertility and isolation are common among adults who are obese. But what about individuals who have been obese since they were 3 or 4 and who suffer from Type II Diabetes when they are 10 or 11? What are the developmental issues at stake?” J. Renae Norton, 2012

And then there are the psychological costs. In a recent national survey of overweight sixth graders, 24 percent of the boys and 30 percent of the girls experienced daily teasing, bullying or rejection because of their size. The number doubles for overweight high school students with 58 percent of boys and 63 percent of girls experiencing daily teasing, bullying or rejection because of their size. The psycho-social conditions of overweight children and teens are depression, anxiety, social isolation and marginalization and low self-esteem. Obese children, as well as children who believe that they are overweight, are also at higher risk for suicide.

“The sad thing is that the problems plaguing America’s children are very preventable for parents in the know. Unfortunately, and through no fault of their own, most parents are not in the know, as the information they need is difficult to find and even more difficult to put into practice.” J. Renae Norton, 2012

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
Mean Body Weight, Height, and Body Mass Index, United States 1960-2002
Childhood Obesity in the United States
Fast Food Facts

Recipe: Grassfed Whipped Cream

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

Rich in CLA, Snowville Whipped Cream is one of my favorite guiltless pleasures. I use it in my “Grassfed Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping“, on a bowl of fresh fruit, and as a dip for bananas (I usually eat slightly green bananas, to lower the glycemic load).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Snowville Whipped Cream

Ingredients
1 cup Snowville Whipping Cream
1/4 cup organic powder sugar or Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals (Coconut Crystals will give more of a caramel taste)
1/2 tbsp pure vanilla

Directions
In a glass bowl, beat the cream and vanilla in a chilled non-reactive bowl with a whisk or an electric mixer just until they hold a loose peak.
Add the sugar, beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not too overbeat!
Refrigerate, up to four hours.

Makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)
Calories – 190
Fat – 19 grams
Protein – 0 grams
Carbs – 6 grams

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com

Characteristics of The Traditional Diet (as discovered by Dr. Weston A Price)

Dr Weston A Price

Dr Weston A Price

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Born in 1870, Weston A. Price was a dentist that was known for his discoveries in the relationship between nutrition, dental health, and physical health. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Price traveled to remote parts of the word that were virtually unaffected by western civilization to determine what type of diet was necessary to attain optimal health. Price found fourteen groups of people ranging from inhabitants of remote Swiss Valleys, South Sea Islanders and Eskimos that had perfect dental health, beautiful facial structure, excellent physical development, and virtually no degenerative diseases.

Price analyzed the diets of all fourteen groups of people and made a great discovery: although each groups varied greatly, dependent on geographic location, all the diets had some definite commonalities. All of their diets were the exact opposite of the “politically correct” nutrition standards, and of the guidelines set out in the food pyramid that is published by the USDA. Specifically, all of their diets:

  • Contained no refined or denatured foods or ingredients (refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, white flour, canned foods, pasteurized/homogenized lowfat milk products, refined/hydrogenated vegetable oils, protein powders, artificial vitamins, food additives and colorings.)
  • Contained some sort of animal product, typically the entire animal was consumed (muscle meat, organs, bones, fats). Bones were consumed in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths
  • Had 4 times more minerals and water-soluble vitamins then that of that found in the Standard American Diet (SAD), and 10 times more fat-soluble vitamins from animal sources (Vitamin A, D and K2)
  • Contained some cooked foods, but all traditional cultures ate at least a portion of their animal foods raw (raw dairy, etc)
  • Incorporated foods that were high in food enzymes and beneficial bacteria from lacto-fermented foods.
  • Included grains, seeds and nuts that were prepared by soaking, sprouting, fermenting or naturally leavening to neutralize anti-nutrients
  • Contained between 30%-80% fat calories, only about 4% of these coming from naturally occurring polyunsaturated oils. The remaining fats were in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Had an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids
  • Contained some salt
  • Made provisions for the health of generations to come. Pregnant women and children were provided with additional nutrient-rich animal foods

So, how can we integrate some of Weston A. Price’s findings into our diets? Here are some things that the Weston A. Price Foundation suggests you can do – keep in mind that while it may be difficult and in some cases unrealistic to follow all these guidelines 100% of the time, anything that you can integrate into your diet will offer health benefits.

  • Eat whole, unprocessed foods
  • Eat meat and animal products from grass-fed animals, which are rich in CLA
  • Eat wild-caught fish and shellfish from unpolluted water
  • Eat full fat dairy products (raw or fermented when available) from grass-fed cows
  • Use animal fats, specifically butter liberally
  • Use traditional vegetable oils only. This includes extra virgin olive oil, expeller-expressed sesame oil, small amounts of expeller-expressed flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil
  • Supplement with Cod Liver Oil
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, when possible)
  • Use properly prepared whole grains, legumes and nuts (soaked, sprouted or sour leavened)
  • Make fermented foods a regular part of your diet (examples include – kefir, miso, kimchee, sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, sour cream – Bubbie’s brand of sauerkraut and pickles are properly fermented)
  • Incorporate bone broth into your diet on a regular basis
  • Use filtered water for cooking and drinking
  • Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and a small amount of expeller-expressed flax oil.
  • Use natural sweeteners in moderation (raw honey, maple syrup, maple sugar, date sugar, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder)
  • Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals
  • Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel
  • Use only natural, food-based supplements
  • Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light
  • Think positive thoughts and practice forgiveness

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources: The Weston A Price Foundation www.westonaprice.org

Recipe: Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

Chicken Breast with Coconut Paprika Green Beans

“In my experience, clients that are in treatment for eating disorders such as bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

If you want a meal in 8 minutes that is mouth watering and really good for you, all you need is a chicken breast (Organic and free range), organic frozen green beans, some coconut fat and the right spices! Just look at that au jus and the fat glistening off of the beans. Yum!

1 heaping tbsp + 1 tsp extra virgin, unrefined coconut fat
1 organic, free-range chicken breast
Bourbon Barrel Bourbon-Smoked Paprika
garlic salt
garlic pepper
himalayan salt or sea salt
any other MSG-free seasonings that you love

1. In a cast iron (or stainless steel) frying pan, heat up coconut fat.
2. Wash and dry the chicken breast and place it in the hot coconut fat.
3. Coat both sides of the chicken breast with the fat.
4. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken with Bourbon Smoked Paprika, Garlic Salt, Garlic Pepper, Himalayan Salt or Sea Salt and any other seasonings that you love.
5. Brown on both sides and reduce heat. Put lid on pan.
DO NOT OVERCOOK THE CHICKEN – It only needs 7 or 8 minutes and just barely done to be the most mouthwatering
6. While the chicken is finishing: Microwave for 3 minutes organic frozen green beans.
7. Drain the beans and salt them and put a teaspoon of coconut fat on them and microwave them for 30 more seconds.
8. You can either throw the green beans into the frying pan to coat them with the delicious juices from the fried chicken or leave them in a ceramic bowl and throw the chicken and the juice on top of them like I did.

It is the smoked paprika that makes this dish so delicious!


Nutrition Information (using an 8 oz chicken breast, 2 cups of green beans)
Calories – 459
Fat – 23 g (all coconut fat)
Protein – 48 g
Carbs – 10 g
Fiber – 4 g

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

News You Can Use – March 26 – April 1 2012

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 26 – April 1 2012!”

FDA will not ban BPA in Food Packaging

What’s Inside the 26-ingredient School Lunch Burgers?

Hunger Games: 20 Tips to Teach Healthy Eating to Kids (and Ourselves)

How to Give Your 7-Year-Old Daughter an Eating Disorder

What are the Real Differences Between EPA and DHA?

Anxiety and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Recipe: Grassfed Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping

In my experience, clients that are in treatment for bulimia, binge eating disorder, anorexia or bulimarexia are typically faced with an increased risk of inadequate nutrition. To this end, I try to provide my clients and readers nutritious and delicious recipes to enjoy both during and after their recovery journey at ‘The Norton Center for Eating Disorders & Obesity’.”

My Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping is made with grassfed cream and grassfed yogurt, making it an excellent source of CLA. Whether your goal is to lose weight or to restore weight, CLA will help your body gain lean skeletal muscle and reduce stored fat. For more information on the benefits of CLA, be sure to read ‘CLA + Trans-fats‘ and ‘Why Does CLA Cause an Increase in Lean Skeletal Muscle Mass and a Decrease in Stored Body Fat?

Grassfed Creamy Yogurt Fruit Topping
Ingredients
1/2 cup Snowville Whipped Cream (preparation directions follow below)
1/2 cup Traders Point Plain Whole Milk Yogurt
1 tbsp Uncle Matt’s Organic Orange Juice
1 tbsp unsweetened strawberry preserves

Directions
In a small mixing bowl, combine whipped cream and whole milk yogurt.
Add orange juice and strawberry preserves.
Stir until combined.
Pour over diced fruit. I use oranges, pears, bananas, blueberries, and chopped prunes.
Top with walnuts, almonds or coconut, if desired.

Serves 3.

Nutrition Information/per serving (for sauce only)
Calories – 125
Fat – 9 grams
Protein – 2 grams
Carbs – 10 grams

Snowville Whipped Cream
Ingredients
1 cup Snowville Whipping Cream
1/4 cup organic powder sugar or Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals
1/2 tbsp pure vanilla

Directions
In a glass bowl, beat the cream and vanilla in a chilled non-reactive bowl with a whisk or an electric mixer just until they hold a loose peak.
Add the sugar, beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not too overbeat!
Refrigerate, up to four hours.

Makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)
Calories – 190
Fat – 19 grams
Protein – 0 grams
Carbs – 6 grams

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Norton Center: News You Can Use – March 18-26

News to help in your recovery from anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disroder and obesity

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of March 18 – 26 2012!”

Into the Wild Science of Sourdough Bread-Making

Intense Aromas Lead to Smaller Bites

Popcorn: The Snack with Even Higher Antioxidant Levels than Fruits and Vegetables

How to Feel Good When Things Go Bad

Gluten Sensitivity: Nonsense or New Disease?

Body Image: What Do Girls Need From Their Moms

When Teenage Dieting Does and Does Not Lead to Adult Overeating – The Latest Research on Binge-Eating

How Your Nose May Help with Portion Control

Food and the Brain: Antioxidants

5 Tips for Surviving the Supermarket with Your Children

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Why Does CLA Cause an Increase in Lean Skeletal Muscle Mass and a Decrease in Stored Body Fat?

Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Upon posting the article on ‘CLA + Trans-Fat’, I received a few inquiries about how CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue, and decrease in stored body fat. In order to understand the process involved, we first need to examine the process involved in gaining lean skeletal muscle mass and the process involved in accumulating body fat.

How Do We Gain Lean Muscle Mass?

Every muscle cell has a protein-transporter which exists in a dormant cell in the center of the cell. This protein-transporter is known as ‘Glucose Transporter 4’ or simply ‘GLUT4’.

GLUT4 becomes activated in muscle cells when the cells experience tension and vibration, such as that which occurs during strength-training.

When GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose. The muscle cell uses this glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, resulting in an increase in lean muscle mass.


How Do We Accumulate Body Fat?

Much like muscle cells, every fat cell in the body also contains a dormant protein-transporter known as GLUT4.

GLUT4 becomes activated in fat cells when they experience an increase in insulin, most commonly occurring when we eat.

When we take in nutrients, some of those nutrients are converted into glucose, resulting in increased blood sugar levels. In response, our bodies begin to produce insulin. This insulin travels through our blood stream, activating the GLUT4 within our fat cells.

When the GLUT4 is activated, it comes to the cell’s surface and takes in glucose, resulting in an increase in the size of our fat cells.

How does CLA Effect the Growth of Muscle + Fat Cells?

Studies clearly show that CLA causes an increase in lean skeletal muscle tissue and a decrease in stored body fat. What causes this?

When we eat a food that contains CLA, our muscle cells experience an increased concentration of GLUT4. Conversely, our fat cells experience a decreased concentration of GLUT4. This change in concentration allows our muscle cells to take in more glucose to fuel and repair muscle tissue, while forcing our fat cells to taking in less glucose after eating. The result? Increased growth in muscle tissue, decreased growth in fat tissue.

And that’s why we can enjoy foods like grass-fed whipped cream, grass-fed cheeses and grass-fed butter without worrying about gaining body fat!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

The Benefits of Butter

 

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

For decades, we have been told that saturated fats are unhealthy, the root cause of the epidemic of heart disease, obesity and high cholesterol that is plaguing our society. I can’t help but to wonder where this theory originated from and if there is really any truth to it? Can something my own grandparents regularly incorporated into their diet really be the cause of many of the health issues that are afflicting our nation?

When it was first announced that saturated fats were unhealthy, the soybean industry saw an opportunity for profit. They spent millions of dollars on an anti-saturated fat campaign, which resulted in butter and other saturated fats being viewed as “evil villains” that had no place in our diet. We were convinced that in order to attain optimal health, we should stop consuming butter and start consuming (often soy-based) margarine. The soybean industry wasn’t the only industry to profit off of this campaign, producers of America’s other main crops (cotton and corn) also benefited, as the majority of margarine is primarily composed of cottonseed, corn and soy oil.

The Weston A Price Foundation has done extensive research about these claims that saturated fats, like butter, have a negative effect on our health. Their research demonstrated that butter actually contains ingredients that PREVENT heart disease. They found that margarine INCREASES the risk of heart disease, due to the free-radicals that are generated during the process of producing margarine. Research by the Medical Research Council demonstrated that men who incorporate butter into their diets ran half the risk of developing heart disease than those who used margarine. Their research also demonstrated that butter does not cause weight gain. To the contrary, margarine is much more likely to result in weight gain because it lacks so many important nutrients, resulting in “cravings and bingeing.”

Butter, especially grassfed butter, is an excellent source of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K2. It is also somewhat unique in the fact that it contains all of these vitamins co-factors that are required for our bodies to experience optimal benefit. Depending on the source of the butter, the concentration of these vitamins will vary. As a general rule, the more yellow the butter, the more concentrated the nutrients. Also, grassfed butter will typically be higher in nutrient content in the Spring and Autumn when the grass is greenest.

Vitamin A (or retinol) from butter is more easily absorbed by the body than from any other dietary source. Vitamin A is a ‘catalyst’, in that it helps our body to absorb other minerals. Since it is a fairly stable vitamin, little to no damage is done during the pasteurization of butter. Some of the main health benefits of vitamin A include:

  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it promotes good eye health
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents urinary stones
  • it reduces the risk of developing cancer
  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it improves reproductive health

Vitamin D is essential to obtaining maximum health. Much like Vitamin A, it serves as a catalyst in the absorption of minerals. Some of the health benefits of Vitamin D include:

  • it improves the health of our skin
  • it strengthens the immune system
  • it maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • it prevents osteomalacia and rickets
  • it improves cardiovascular health
  • it protects against osteoporosis and arthritis
  • it improves mental health
  • assists many bodily processes, such as regulating blood pressure, reducing muscle spasms, helps in cell formation, regulating insulin secretion

‘Activator X’, which is now known to be vitamin K2 was discovered by Dr Weston A Price in 1945. Grainfed butter is only a moderate source of this vitamin, grassfed butter contains up to 50 times more vitamin K2. This is because grass and other leafy greens contain vitamin K1, which is converted into vitamin K2 during the fermentation process that occurs in the cows stomach. Corn-based feed contains little vitamin K1 (0.3 µg/100 grams, some leafy greens contain more than 800µg/100 grams). Vitamins A, D and K all work together in our bodies. When we ingest foods containing vitamin A and vitamin D, a signal is sent to our cells to create certain proteins, vitamin K then activates these proteins. Vitamin K2 also plays a major role in:

  • the prevention of tooth decay
  • growth and development
  • reproduction
  • protection against heart disease
  • brain function

Vitamin E has many biological functions, it’s anti-oxidant function is the most well-known. In addition to it’s anti-oxidant content, vitamin e:

  • Promotes heart health
  • Promotes respiratory health
  • Helps with normal PMS symptoms
  • Supports circulation
  • Supports prostate and breast health
  • Is good for your brain
  • May help hot flashes in menopausal women

Butter possesses many other health benefits beyond it’s content of vitamins A, D, E and K2.

  • Butter is a good sources of short and medium chain triglycerides (these are the types of fat that cannot be stored in adipose tissue)
  • Butter contains the medium chain triglyceride, lauric acid. There are only two dietary choices when it comes to lauric acid: small amounts of butter or large amounts of coconut oil
  • Butter contains the short chain triglyceride, butyric acid. This short chain triglyceride is only found in butter
  • Grassfed butter contains a perfect balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids
  • Grassfed butter is an excellent source of CLA. It contains 300-500 times more CLA than grainfed butter
  • Butter contains lecithin, which helps the body utilize cholesterol and other components of fat
  • It is an excellent source of many trace minerals, including manganese, zinc, chromium and iodine.

I often make my own butter, using whipping cream from Snowville Creamery. The Snowville Creamery website provides directions on how to make it:

It is best to start with cream at about 55-60 F.

There are many ways to churn butter, but any form of agitation will cause the butter to form. The easiest way is to pour cream into a food processor up to the liquid fill line and run the processor beyond whipped cream until the butter separates from the buttermilk. You can also use a mixer, a hand whisk, or put cream in a jar and shake it.

Once the butter has separated from the buttermilk, pour the butter and milk into a strainer or colander. The milk that pours off of the butter is good to drink or use for cooking.

The butter that is retained in the strainer should be rinsed with cool water and repeatedly kneaded with a wooden spoon until all the milk is expelled and the water runs clear.

The butter can then be placed into a butter mold or bowl. For salted butter, add salt before pressing. Enjoy!

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

 

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

Why Butter is Better – Weston A Price
The Skinny on Fats – Weston A Price
Why Butter is Better – Mercola
Grass Fed Butter – Choosing a Better Butter
On the Trail of the Elusive X-Factor – Weston A Price
7 Health Benefits of Vitamin A
Benefits of Vitamin E
Health Benefits of Vitamin D

Dairy: Raw vs. Pasteurized

Choosing Healthy Dairy Products

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

In support of the raw dairy community and the education of dairy consumers, Natural News has just released an infographic about organic raw (fresh) dairy products versus conventional (pasteurized) dairy products.

This infographic is an excellent resource as it explains the differences between the nutritional properties, animal compassion and health implications of raw dairy versus pasteurized dairy.

For more information on choosing health dairy products see my article ‘Dairy Aisle Confusion

Copyright (c) 2012 by Mike Adams. All rights reserved. Posted with permission from Natural News.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

CLA + Trans-Fat

Grassfed Beef and Dairy are Excellent Sources of CLA

photo used under a creative commons license

“I’ve been treating eating disorders (ED’s) and obesity for nearly 25 years and have always had good outcomes. My rate of success improved dramatically, however, when I discovered the critical role that processed food plays in causing as well as in preventing recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, (a combination of the two) Binge Eating Disorder (BED,) Emotional Eating and Obesity. To this end, I find it of great importance to provide both my patients and readers with relevant nutrition information to aid in their recovery. You can view all my Nutrition, Fitness, and Health articles here.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is both a trans-fatty and cis-fatty acid that is naturally produced in the stomachs of ruminant animals (like cattle, sheep and goats). Wait. I know what you’re thinking, “You said CLA is a trans-fat. Aren’t trans-fats bad?”.

There are some trans-fats that have no place in our foods today. The trans-fats that are detrimental to our health are of the “industrially-produced” variety. Indeed, 80% of the trans-fats consumed in the Standard American Diet are industrially-produced. Maria Emmerich gives a good description of how our bodies process these types of trans-fats:

“Trans-fats in foods are like BIG SUV’s trying to park into ‘compact’ parking spaces of our cells that are reserved for healthy Omega-3 fats (DHA). When this happens, our neurotransmitters responsible for focus, mood and memory have a hard time finding and recognizing their receptors due to the inflammation of the membranes on the brain cells caused by the consumption of trans-fats.”

Naturally-occurring trans-fats, like CLA, are thought to be beneficial to our overall health. Studies show that individuals that include CLA in their diets may:

  • reduce their risks of developing certain cancers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure and heart disease
  • experience an increase in metabolism
  • lower their cholesterol and triglycerides
  • lower their insulin resistance (a Penn State study found that CLA mimicked synthetic diabetes medication)
  • experience a reduction in belly fat, especially in the overweight and obese
  • experience an increase in lean muscle

Although CLA can increase metabolism, including it in one’s diet is less likely to produce weight loss and more likely result in a change in body composition; i.e. a reduction in body fat and an increase lean muscle. CLA appears to reduce body fat because of it’s ability to regulate fat metabolism. In other words, CLA may not reduce the number of fat cells in our bodies, but it does keep small fat cells from getting larger.

So what are the best sources of CLA? I typically use beef, full-fat milk (raw, if available in your area), full-fat raw cheese and butter. I always get organic, grass-fed meat and dairy, it contains 300%-500% more CLA (for more information on choosing healthy dairy products, read this article). There are also CLA supplements available, but these are rarely beneficial. CLA supplements are typically a synthetic form of CLA that is derived from plant oils. I always recommend getting all nutrients in their natural form, when possible.


Currently, the FDA does not require trans-fats to be listed on nutrition labels, if the product contains less than 0.5 g of trans-fats per serving.

If you are really serious about keeping all unhealthy trans-fats out of your diet, be sure to check the ingredients list for “hydrogenated oils” and/or “partially hydrogenated oils”. These ingredients are actually trans-fats. Just because some of your favorite foods contain trans-fats, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy these foods. Here are some popular grocery store items that contain trans-fats, with healthy alternatives*….

Not so good choice – Girl Scout Samoa Cookies
Better choice – Homemade “Samoa Cookies

Not so good choice – Pay Day Candy Bar
Better choice – Homemade “Pay Day” Bar

Not so good choice – Premium Plus Crackers
Better choice – Homemade “Premium Plus” Crackers

Not so good choice – Aunt Jemima Buttermilk Pancakes
Better Choice – My Quinoa Pancakes or my Protein Pancakes

Not so good choice – Taquitos
Better Choice – Homemade “Taquitos”

*I prefer using Jay Robb protein powder for recipes that incorporate Whey Protein

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:

//articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/04/26/natural-trans-fats-actually-have-health-benefits.aspx
//articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/10/18/dairies-unite-to-set-safety-standards-for-raw-milk-cheese.aspx
//jn.nutrition.org/content/130/12/2943.full
//www.adsa.org/jointabs/iaafs108.pdf
//www.springerlink.com/content/jx34483r3888840n/
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20463040
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820159

Is All Butter Created Equal?

Omega Fatty Acids, Explained.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Almonds are one source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

Omega Fatty Acids can be categorized as either Monounsaturated Fats or Polyunsaturated Fats. Omega-7 Fatty Acids and Omega-9 Fatty Acids are Monounsaturated, while Omega-3, Omega-5 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids are Polyunsaturated.

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids are considered to be an Essential Fatty Acid; our bodies need them to function, but are not capable of self-producing. As a result, we need to obtain Omega-3 Fatty Acids from dietary sources. In addition to supporting the heart, brain and eyes, studies show that Omega-3s have a positive impact on:

  • Asthma
  • Diabetes
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Some Cancers
  • Skin Disorders
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Attention Disorders
  • Depressive Disorders
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Digestive Difficulties

The most common Omega-3s are α-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Some good food sources of Omega-3s include:

  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • sardines
  • cod liver oil
  • nuts (walnuts, almonds, pistachios)
  • dark leafy greens
  • tuna and wild salmon

Like Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-6 Fatty Acids are also an Essential Fatty Acid. Omega-6s improve hair and skin health. Additionally, studies show that Omega-6s are associated with:

  • regulating pressure in the blood vessels, joints and eyes
  • transporting oxygen from red blood cells to tissues
  • managing proper kidney function
  • dilating or constricting blood vessels
  • regulating muscles and reflexes
  • positive effect on diabetes, arthritis and skin disorders

The most common Omega-6 is Linoleic acid (LA). LA accounts for 85-90% of dietary sources of Omega-6. Some good food sources of Omega-6s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • nuts
  • chicken
  • eggs
  • avocado
  • flaxseed/flaxseed oil
  • chia seeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • acai berries

For a larger version of this chart, click HERE.

Omega-5, Omega-7, and Omega-9 – Non-Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-5, 7 and 9 Fatty Acids are Non-Essential Fatty Acids; our bodies need them to function but can produce them without receiving them directly from food. The majority of people get enough of these Omegas from dietary sources, so the need for supplementation is rare. As with all supplements, if you think you aren’t getting enough of these Omegas, you should always consult with your physician before supplementing.

Omega-5 Fatty Acids are believed to have a positive effect on weight-related cardiovascular health and blood sugar balance. Omega-5s can potentially ease the symptoms of menopause due to it’s phytonutrient content. The most common Omega-5s are Punicic Acid (PA) and Myristoleic Acid (MA). Some food sources of Omega-5 include:

  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • tropical oils (coconut and palm)
  • saw palmetto
  • wild salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • pomegranate seeds/oil

Studies show that Omega-7 Fatty Acids have a positive effect on healthy weight loss and bowel regularity. Due to the antioxidant and anti-aging properties, Omega-7s also play a rold in nourishing healthy cells, especially in the digestive tract. The most common Omega-7s are Vaccenic Acid (VA) and Palmitoleic Acid (PA). Common food sources are:

  • grassfed meat
  • full-fat grassfed dairy
  • wild-caught salmon
  • macadamia nuts
  • sea buckthorn berries

Omega-9 Fatty Acids are linked with healthy cardiovascular systems, healthy cholesterol levels, improved immune function and healthy blood sugar levels. The most common Omega-9s are Oleic Acid (OA), Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE), and Erucic acid (EA). Natural sources of Omega-9s include:

  • olives/olive oil
  • avocado
  • grassfed meat
  • nuts
  • sesame oil

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
photo used under a creative commons license
//www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

//www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcsums/o3asthsum.htm
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616147
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7490601
//www.ajcn.org/content/85/3/647.full
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12540506
//www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omega-3-000316.htm
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17353568
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8339414
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15867048
//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12888186
//www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcsums/o3lipidsum.htm
//www.ehow.com/about_5420758_omega-benefits.html
//www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

Dear Mark: Mysterious Omegas and a Beginner’s Exercise Routine

Mercury in Seafood. Is it Really Unsafe?

“Making informed nutrition and fitness-related decisions can be somewhat overwhelming for those in therapy for eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, bulimarexia, binge eating disorder) and obesity. To this end, I’ve compiled a set of handouts to provide handy reference guides to both my readers and clients. You can view all my Nutrition and Fitness Handouts here. Be sure to check back frequently, as I am always adding new handouts to my list!”

We’ve all seen headlines like this in the media, warning against the dangers of the mercury content of seafood. Are headlines like this completely true? Is eating a diet rich in fish truly going to lead to mercury toxicity?

Looking exclusively at the mercury content of fish is an inaccurate measure of “the dangers” of eating fish. In order to be accurate, it is essential to look at the big picture. Are there other components that play a role in the way our bodies process mercury? Let’s investigate.

Aside from mercury, what other important element does fish contain? Selenium! The USDA has released a report of the best food sources of selenium. Out of the top 25 food sources, 16 of these were fish.

Selenium is sort of a “magnet” to mercury. When we consume mercury with selenium, the mercury seeks out the selenium and binds to it. This binding makes it impossible for the mercury to bind to anything else in our body, such as brain tissue, organ tissue etc. Dr Nicholas Ralston, a top researcher in the “Selenium-Mercury” relationship in fish and seafood explains it like this:

“Think of dietary selenium as if it were your income and dietary mercury as if it were a bill that you need to pay. Just as we all need a certain amount of money to cover living expenses such as food and rent, we all need a certain amount of selenium … Only one major study has shown negative effects from exposure to mercury from seafood, and that seafood was pilot whale meat. Pilot whale meat is unusual in that it contains more mercury than selenium. When you eat pilot whale meat, it’s like getting a bill for $400 and a check for less than $100. If that happens too much, you go bankrupt. On the other hand, if you eat ocean fish, it’s like getting a check in the mail for $500 and getting a bill for $25. The more that happens, the happier you are.”

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, released a really useful chart that shows the ratio of selenium:mercury content in the most commonly eaten types of fish. Print it out, put it on your fridge, refer to it often, eat fish!

For a printable version of this chart click here.

Let’s Connect!

Take my new Eating Disorder survey!

Like me on Facebook

Twitter @drrenae

Contact Dr Norton by phone 513-205-6543 or by form

Inquire about booking Dr Norton for a speaking engagement

Read About Dr Norton

View video about Dr Norton

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2012, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Sources:
//www.wpcouncil.org
//www.nal.usda.gov

Your Health In The News – Nov 27 – Dec 4

News You Can Use

“As an Eating Disorder Professional, I know that many of my clients that are in treatment for Anorexia, Bulimia, Bulimarexia, Binge Eating Disorder or Obesity are overwhelmed by all the information in the news about our health. In hopes of relieving some of the stress this can inflict on both my patients and readers, I’ve highlighted some of the weekly health news that was of particular interest to all of us at The Norton Center for Eating Disorders and Obesity. From my eating disorder treatment center in Cincinnati, here is your news update for the week of November 27-December 4 2011”

Were there any news articles that you saw this week that really grabbed your attention? Leave a comment with a link. If the article helped you, it will likely help some of my other readers!

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Why is Coconut Oil Good For You?

We have been brain-washed into believing that saturated fat is bad for us. I have always had trouble with this idea because both of my sets of grandparents were dairy farmers whose diets were heavy in delicious saturated fats. None of them had a weight problem, nor did any of their 15 children. Indeed, my maternal grandmother never weighed more than 90 pounds soaking wet, even after a dozen or so children! She and my mother loved buttermilk (yuck), put heavy cream in everything, and slathered toast with homemade butter. I can still remember the mouthwatering poached our eggs mom made by poaching them in butter and milk.Speaking of the milk that we drank growing up, it had to have the cream skimmed off the top. This we used to make our own version of “ice cream”. We lived between Kings Mills and Loveland, Ohio back then, close to Landen Farms. (This was when it was still an actual farm, now it is a subdivision.) My mother was no fan of the milkman and his homogenized/pasteurized dairy products! So she drove to Landen for milk, eggs and butter several times a week. Old habits die hard.My grandparents are all gone. Some died young, some reached old age, but none were overweight by today’s standards. My mother is also gone. She died very young of a rare form of lymphoma, but was also a normal weight all her life despite what would be considered today a diet very high in saturated fat. Every once in a while when I put the unsweetened apple butter on my whole grain or pumpernickel toast, I remember how mom used to butter her toast with regular full-fat butter, then put on a layer of peanut butter and then top it off with a liberal amount of apple butter! Scrumptious!Just one more walk down memory lane; if you happened to catch the John F. Kennedy special that aired on HBO this winter, you may have noticed, as I did, how different everyone looked. At first I thought they all looked like concentration camp victims because they seemed so thin. Then I realized, they were all a normal weight and I’m just not accustomed to seeing so many people in one place that are a normal weight. For example, I am sitting in the Barnes & Nobel bookstore in the Sycamore Center mall, which is north of Cincinnati, Ohio, a pretty typical Midwest city. Of the 17 people within eyesight, 4 are a normal weight, and the rest range from overweight to morbidly obese. What’s my point? I would be willing to bet that most of the people that I can see, whether or not they are overweight, do not drink whole milk or eat real butter. And I’m not even sure you can buy buttermilk anymore, so I’m almost positive they’re not drinking that. (Thank Goodness! Sorry mom.) I would also be willing to bet that at least a sizeable proportion of the overweight individuals I can see try to avoid saturated fats. If I’m correct, it isn’t working. So maybe saturated fats are not the problem.

It turns out that the best fat we could be eating is coconut fat and it is definitely a saturated fat. I use it for all baked goods, popcorn (yum) and anything else I am frying. I have also recently switched to whole organic butter and whole milk, to avoid MSG, both of which have saturated fat, with no adverse effects so far, although I don’t use a lot of either. I actually haven’t ever completely avoided saturated fats, as too many of the foods I love are made with them, such as chocolate, goat or swiss cheese not to mention the occasional steak. I do avoid trans fats and only eat beef, fowl and pork that are organic and free range.

So what really determines whether or not a fat is good for you?

We know that trans fat raises your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol and lowers your “good” (HDL) cholesterol and that this increases your risk of heart disease. What you may not know is that it’s another man-made, or genetically modified substance that is added to our food, especially the foods we eat as snacks and breakfast foods to preserve the food’s shelf life. Some shortenings and margarines are very high in trans fat.

Until very recently, it was added to commercial baked goods, such as crackers, cookies and cakes, and many fried foods, such as doughnuts and french fries, without notice to the consumer. Presently, it must be designated as part of the nutritional information on the package. Our government has made it clear that these things have to be apparent to us so that we can avoid them, right? Not quite. Food manufacturers can still secretly add them to any food and state on the package that the food is “trans fat free” as long as the amount is below .5% per serving. How often do you eat one serving of a snack food?

I can’t help wondering how this negotiation went.

The FDA says,This stuff is really bad and causes terrible diseases that cost people their lives and ups the cost of health care. Consumers have to be notified!”

And the food manufacturers say, “That’s not fair, it will cost us a fortune in terms of shorter shelf life. Our profits will go down.” And the FDA says,Oh, ok, you can put it in and not mention it, as long as it is below .5%.” Seriously?

Why Is Coconut Oil So Good For You? It’s a Saturated Fat, Right?

We’ve been told for the past 20 years that it is the saturation of the fat molecule that matters. There are saturated fats, which we try to avoid, and the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats that we try to include. But there is another less well-known system of classification that is based on the length of the carbon chain within each fatty acid. In this system there are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). Coconut oil is composed predominately of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), also known as medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). The vast majority of fats and oils in our diets, 98% to 100%, whether they are saturated or unsaturated, or come from animals or plants, composed of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). Both the saturated and unsaturated fat found in meat, milk, eggs, and plants (including most all vegetable oils) are composed of LCFA.

While we have been led to believe that all saturated fatty acids are bad for us, the MCFA from the coconut, which is a saturated fat, has health benefits that rival those of fish oil, or omega-3 fats. In general, they do not raise cholesterol, but actually protect against heart disease. They also help to lower the risk of both atherosclerosis and they can be a significant weight loss aid.

To read the history and learn of the many other benefits of the mighty coconut and it’s healing oil check out Coconut Secret and the Coconut Research Center. For a somewhat biased, but interesting article on saturated fats in general see this article “The Truth About Saturated Fat” from T-Nation.

If you aren’t already confused enough about fat, let’s really get into it. Omega-3’s also come in short- and long-chain varieties. The short-chain form, which is alpha-linolenic acid, is found in flaxseed oil (53%), canola oil (11%), English walnuts (9%), and soybean oil (7%). The long-chain, or marine omega-3’s are found mainly in fish and shellfish. Compared with their plant Omega 3 counterparts, the marine long chain Omega 3’s have two advantages; Firstly, they are highly unsaturated. Secondly, they are excellent sources of low fat protein. Bottom line, they are critical to our neurological well being. Fish oil, when combined with exercise, is the only thing presently known to prevent Alzheimer’s.

So How Does it Work?

Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) found in plant and animal fat are not easily absorbed by the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and require pancreatic enzymes and bile salts to break them down so that they can be absorbed by the intestine. Next, the long chain fatty acids must go through a complicated process through which they are delivered to a variety of tissues, including adipose, cardiac and skeletal tissue, and are then transported to the liver, and are finally oxidized for energy use. This is how all saturated fat, unsaturated fat, and cholesterol that consists of long chain fatty acids (almost all of your dietary fat) is transported throughout the body.

In contrast, medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil are absorbed by the GI tract with ease, they do not require any pancreatic enzymes to break them down, which means less work for your pancreas. Next, medium chain fatty acids are transported through the blood stream, directly to the liver, where they go directly into mitochondria and are immediately oxidized for energy. Medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil do not get packaged into lipoproteins, and do not get transported to a variety of tissues and are not stored as body fat, they go directly to the liver and are metabolized for energy.

The bottom line is that medium chain fatty acids from coconut oil produces almost exclusively energy, whereas, long chain fatty acids found in all other dietary fats produce body fat (and some energy).

Coconut Oil Boosts Energy

Because the medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil are easily and rapidly transported into the mitochondria, unlike long chain fatty acids, they are immediately used for energy, which “heats up” the body and increases metabolism. Several animal studies and clinical studies have proven that ingestion of coconut oil increases metabolism and decreases body fat both in animal studies performed on mice, and humans. Rats that were fed a diet consisting of medium chain fatty acids had less subcutaneous fat, a visibly evident decrease in overall body fat, and increased metabolism and increased thermogenesis.[1]

The energy burst that is produced by medium chain fatty acids is also important for athletic endurance. In one study, researchers tested the physical endurance of mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids vs. those fed a diet high in long chain fatty acids for six weeks. The mice were subjected to a swimming endurance test, where they had to swim against a current, every other day. The mice that were fed medium chain fatty acids continually performed better then the others and displayed a much higher physical endurance.[2] These studies in mice provide us with evidence that medium chain fatty acids increase metabolism and promote the loss of fat while providing a burst of energy that increases physical endurance. Yes, this boost in energy means you feel less lethargic, and it can help you feel less tired as you perform daily activities.

Coconut Oil Decreases Body Fat

Numerous studies have shown that coconut oil clearly has an effect on men and women very analogous to what has been demonstrated in other mammalian animal models: it increases metabolism and decreases overall body fat. For example, healthy men and women were administered either medium chain fatty acids or long chain fatty acids in addition to a diet similar in fat, protein, and carbohydrates for 12 weeks. Throughout the 12 weeks, individuals that took medium chain fatty acids had significantly less body weight and, specifically, body fat[3].

It Gets Even Better!

Not only do you store less body fat, studies have shown that medium chain fatty acids also increase the oxidation of long chain fatty acids that are already in your body, tucked away in your love handles! So not only does it prevent weight gain, it aids in weight loss.[4] Similar to the animal studies, medium chain fatty acids also boost energy production in humans by speeding up metabolism.[5] Finally, for those with cholesterol problems, this study found that people with high triglyceride levels who were given medium chain fatty acids for eight weeks had a 14.5% decrease in their triglyceride levels! [6]

Bottom line: for those of you that have completely lost focus:

1. Coconut oil, which is a medium chain fatty acid, is metabolized by a different process than long chain fatty acids, this process expedites use as energy instead of storage.

2. Because the body has to preferentially burn the fat off, it ramps up the metabolism by increasing thermogenesis.

3. This ramping up of the metabolism then proceeds to not only burn off coconut oil, but long chain fatty acids pre-existing the consumption of coconut oil.

4. These effects have been demonstrated both in animal studies, and more importantly, human studies as well.

 


[1] (Lipids 22 (6): 442-444).
[2] (Journal of Nutrition 125 (3):531-9)
[3] (The Journal of Nutrition 131 (11): 2853-2859)
[4] (International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 24 (9): 1158-1166)
[5] (Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental 38 (7): 641-648)

[6] (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 63 (7): 879-886).

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

17 Most Important Foods to Eat Organic

1. Baby Food. The very young are extraordinarily susceptible to pesticides. Here are some organic baby food brands, Earth’s Best, Tender Harvest, and Healthy Times, which are available for your baby’s safety and health. Or better yet, make your own baby food by cooking and pureeing organic produce. See “Make Your Own Baby Food”.

2. Strawberries. Enjoy them while they are in season from local organic farms or buy frozen organic strawberries from your local whole market.

3. Rice. Domestic rice has mega-doses of pesticides, and now, the chemicals companies are producing “pharm” rice a crop used to produce and store pharmaceuticals. Buy organic rice where you can find it! Store it in an airtight container. It stores very well.

4. Green and Red Bell Peppers. Super sources of Vitamin C, but wrought with pesticides if grown “conventionally”. Buy organic, or, better yet, grow your own. Seeds of Change has a plethora of organic seeds, and pepper plants prove to be a hardy bunch!

5. Got Milk? We hope not, at least, not from conventionally raised cows. Today’s commercial brands are loaded with antibiotics and growth hormones. Make sure your milk and other dairy is from organically-fed cows without the extra rBST, rBGH and antibiotics.

If you are feeding your child goat milk, and/or goat products, be aware that our science community has now genetically-mutated a goat to spin silk in her milk. See the New Scientist article.

6. Corn. Corn is typically not a scale tipper when it comes to pesticide residues. But, take into account that 75- 90% of all domestic corn has been genetically-modified, that the average American eats 11 pounds of it, that most cooking oils include corn oil, and that most everything is sweetened with corn syrup, and suddenly, buying organic corn and corn products, makes more than a little sense. Eat local organic corn in season and freeze some for later, or, leave some kernels to dry, and plant them in the spring.

7. Bananas. This tropical favorite has a short window of ripeness and a very long distance to market (quick, how many local banana farms does your town have?). All of which adds up to a lot of heavy chemical dousing along the way.

8. Green Beans. Over 60 different pesticides are used on green beans. Even beans used in baby food have been found to be contaminated.

9. Peaches. Nothing beats a peach. Until you realize that they often have the highest rates of illegally-applied pesticides. Isn’t that just peachy . . .

10. Apples. A decade after the dangers of Alar were exposed, apples are still soaked in pesticides. Put only organic apples in your pie.

11. Cherries. Cherries, so expensive, so rich, so fabulous, . . . so heavily doused in poison. Make sure that the cherries in your Cherries Jubilee or Bing Cherry Ice Creams are as clean and wonderful as they were meant to be.

12. Celery. Why would anyone think of spraying the heck out of that innocuous little stem vegetable?! But they do. Stay organic, the taste of organic celery will amaze you and make you a celery-nibbler once again.

13. Apricots and Grapes. Apricots, Peaches and Grapes, what would summer be without them? Less toxic! Keep conventionally grown fruits and veggies, and their pesticide residuals, out of your system or minimize them with a vegetable rinse, such as the one by Healthy Harvest.

14. Soybeans. If you are not yet a label-reader, it is time to start. Everything you buy, from bread to cookies to crackers to margarine to dry mixes, has some sort of soy product in it. Most soybean in the USA is genetically-modified. So, why the fuss over modified soy?

Monsanto, in an effort to increase the use (and profit potential) of Round-Up Ready, spliced the herbicide into soybean plant DNA. Two problems with this action.

1) No matter what you or I do, we can never wash RoundUp Ready herbicide off the soybean–ever. It is “permanently imbedded”.

2) It appears that soy increases production of estrogen. High estrogen levels facilitate the potential for contracting various cancers and for hastening puberty in young children. Although the jury is still out on whether soy consumption, in general, is beneficial, or whether only fermented soy should be consumed, never, we mean NEVER, consume foods laced with poisons.

15. Potatoes. Mashed potatoes are delicious and worth the calories, unless they’re laden with pesticides or have been genetically-modified.

When genetically modified, potatoes impair the immune system and shrink the brain, liver and heart.

So, mash a clean, real, organic potato and forgo the new-fangled monstrosity.

Got soft, green-sprouting organic potatoes? Don’t toss them,bury them!

16. Raisins. Concentrated little grapes, concentrated levels of pesticides.

17. Cucumbers. Ever wonder why this delicious crisp vegetable was loosing its appeal on your palate? Yep! The answer is, once again, pesticides. The answer to pesticides, is, once again, go organic, or grow your own.

Sources:

Kids Organics – Most Important Foods to Eat Organic (//kidsorganics.com/10%20Most%20Important%20Foods%20to%20Eat%20Organic.htm)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2011, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

What is Glycemic Load & Why Is It Important?

eating disorder treatment cincinnati

The health benefits of incorporating low GL foods into your daily diet include, a lower blood glucose level, decrease in cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of heart disease and type II diabetes. But determining which foods have a low Glycemic load can be confusing. You have probably noticed that many foods today have listed the glycemic index (GI), but if you are like most people you may not know what it is or why it is important. Specifically it is used in developing a scale that ranks carbohydrates by how much they raise blood glucose levels compared to a reference food. The problem with using the GI alone is that it is based on a small quantity of food, 50 grams, which is typically less than a normal serving of food.

A more accurate or relevant measure is the glycemic load (GL) which reflects both the quality and quantity of dietary carbohydrates. This is important because, to put it very simply, blood glucose levels determine whether or not and how much fat your body stores. Understanding GL allows us to maintain a healthy weight for our size. Because most foods with a low GL are whole foods (came out of the ground or had a face) instead of processed foods, this means that we will be eating more fruits and vegetables and healthier proteins.

To calculate the glycemic load of a food, divide the GI by 100 and multiply by the grams of carbohydrate in the serving size. GL=GI/100 x # Carb grams per serving

Examples of How to Lower A Meal’s GL:

glpicglpic2

GI = 60 GL = 48 GI = 42 GL = 31

A cereal with fiber plus a fruit, which also has fiber lowers the GL.

pretzelspeanuts

GI = 83 GL = 19 GI = 14 GL = 1

Pretzels are made from bleached white flour, salt and a little sugar. Peanuts, even with the fat, are a much better snack because of the fiber.

So What is High, Medium and Low in Terms of the GL for a food

Low 0-10

Moderate 11-19

High 20+

What Should I Shoot for During the Course of a Day?

Low: less than 80

Moderate: less than 100

High: greater than 100

How to Increase Consumption of Low GI Foods

*Eat high-fiber breakfast cereals, especially oats, bran and barley OR

*Add berries, nuts, flaxseed and cinnamon to high GI cereals

*Choose dense, whole grain and sourdough breads and crackers OR

*Add a heart healthy protein and/or condiment to high GI breads and crackers.

*Include 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables every day

*Replace white potatoes with yams or sweet potatoes OR

*Eat smaller portions of high GI potatoes

*Eat less refined sugars and convenience foods OR

*Combine nuts, fruits, yogurt with commercial sweets – just watch portion sizes

It is important that one does not eat only low GL foods. The result could be a calorically dense, high fat, low fiber, low carb diet (such as the Atkin’s Diet). It is best to aim for a well balanced diet that includes low GL carbohydrates, such as fruits and vegetables and hi fiber grains and use the glycemic load as a guide for increasing these foods and for keeping blood sugar levels stable.

Sources:

The Glycemic Index – Glycemic Index (www.glycemicindex.com/glycemic.index.ppt)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2009, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Prevention: Getting Your Child Off the Couch

childhood obesity treatment cincinnati

Currently in the United States we are experiencing an epidemic of obesity, especially among children. The fastest growing age group is from 2-5 years old. Many of my patients started out as overweight children.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the percentage of overweight children 2-5 years of age has doubled, with one in four pre-schooler’s being overweight or at risk for obesity. Fifty percent of these children will become obese adults. Prevention requires reaching children before the age of 6.

Here are a few tips to help your child be more active. Organized sports are great, but not all children are comfortable with competitive activities or they just get burned out on them. That can turn them off to being physically active, sometimes for good.

There are lots of other activities your child may enjoy besides organized sports. Your best bet is to lead by example and keep it simple. It doesn’t have to cost a lot of money to keep your child active but it may require some creativity and it does take time. For busy parents, that means making the most of every opportunity. For example, little children love to help with things like vacuuming or gardening. It won’t be as efficient, but it teaches them good habits and gets them off the couch.

Probably the single most important thing that you can do is limit the amount of time your child spends in front of the TV, and/or with electronic devices such as Game Boys and computers. These devices keep your child absorbed for long periods of time during which there is no physical activity. There is a growing body of research suggesting that the over use of electronics compromises neurological development and can lead to sleep disturbances, excessive aggression and even wrist and back injury. And of course, we know that the lack of activity is a key factor in the increased incidence of obesity.

Here are some other activities that may interest your child:

• Riding a bike – ride with them if you can. The best thing you can do is set an example!
• Climbing on a jungle gym – If you don’t have one, they are in almost every park today.
• Jumping rope – this can even be done in-doors if you have a basement.
• Playing hopscotch – can also be done indoors on a foam version of this old time favorite
• Bouncing a ball, throwing a ball, hitting a ball…children love balls
• Dancing – my grandsons (a 3 year old and a 14 month old) become hysterical when we dance together. We can do it on and off for hours to the beat of pop music. We even “seat dance” during long car rides. You can teach a 2 year old to “raise the roof” which provides more exercise than you might think.
• Shooting hoops – you can now get back-boards that are adjustable for younger children and simply grow with them. If that isn’t in the budget, many parks have hoops, just bring your own basketball
• A trampoline – either an in-door or an out-door version, is a great way for kids and their parents to get exercise in a confined space
• Hiking is a great family activity – or barring a convenient place to hike, walk with your child to a nearby store instead of driving

In general, the more fun it is, the more likely they are to engage. For example, little children love running through water sprinklers, even the ones who don’t enjoy swimming. They can get plenty of exercise at a water-playground, which more and more parks have instead of pools. Or you can purchase an attachment for your backyard hose that many children find delightful.

Maybe your child doesn’t like organized sports such as basketball, soccer, soft-ball or tennis. Let him or her kick the soccer ball around in the park, or hit a tennis ball against the garage or play a game of PIG with you at a local park. Parents tend to lose sight of why children need sports in their life. They need the exercise. Yes they need to learn self-discipline and sportsmanship and how to be a part of a team, but too often the pressure to be great at all of these things backfires and the child’s self-image is damaged. Some children turn to food as a way of compensating for low self-esteem. Others decide that they are inadequate when it comes to sports and refuse to engage in any physical activities as teenagers and young adults.

The idea, especially for little children, is for them to have fun using their bodies and being creative when it comes to entertaining themselves. If you are a city dweller and your child does not have access to a soccer field, but you live on a street where there isn’t much traffic, help the neighborhood children organize a street ball or sand lot game. Children learn a lot about cooperation and teamwork when they are the ones responsible for organizing their free time.

This is all easier if you start them off on the right foot, i.e. when they are very small. But don’t worry if you haven’t. There is no time like the present. Start slow and keep trying. You couldn’t make a better investment in your child’s health and well-being!

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Childhood Obesity Facts (//www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/facts.htm)

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. This information is intellectual property of Dr J Renae Norton. Reproduction and distribution for educational purposes is permissible.

Please credit ‘© 2008, Dr J Renae Norton. //edpro.wpengine.com’

Scrambled Eggs with Onions + Peppers

eating disorder recovery recipes

This recipe serves: 4
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes

INGREDIENTS
1 teaspoon coconut oil
1/2 cup diced organic red bell pepper
4 tablespoons diced organic Vidalia onion
4 large organic, pastured, eggs
salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons chopped parsley

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat the oil in an 8″ non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat.
2. Add the peppers and onions to the pan and cook for about 2 minutes. Remove the vegetables and set aside. Wipe the pan clean so that it can be reused for the eggs.
3. Whisk the eggs with the salt and pepper until well blended.
4. Pour the eggs and vegetables into the frying pan and stir constantly over low heat with a rubber spatula. When the eggs begin to get firm, add the parsley and continue stirring.
5. When the eggs have reached the desired degree of doneness, put them on warm plates and serve immediately.

NUTRITION INFO (per serving)
Calories 84
Total Fat 5 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Protein 7 g
Total Carbohydrate 3 g
Dietary Fiber 1 g
Sodium 113 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 54%
Percent Calories from Protein 33%
Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 14%

Kimchee, Spinach & Goat Cheese Frittata

//whats4dinnersolutions.com/2010/11/16/spinach-feta-frittata/

//whats4dinnersolutions.com/2010/11/16/spinach-feta-frittata/

INGREDIENTS

5 large eggs
2-3 ounces fresh organic spinach, coarsely chopped
About ½ cup kimchee
About 2 ounces organic goat cheese, crumbled
1/2 cup Snowville or Trader’s Point Grassfed whole milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon *coconut oil (why coconut oil?)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk the eggs and milk in a medium large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Add the spinach and kimchee and stir. Heat the oil on a 6-9 inch oven safe skillet (smaller if want a thicker frittata, larger for a thinner one) over medium high heat. Make sure oil coats entire surface and then pour in the egg mixture. Cook for 1 or 2 minutes, gently stirring the egg mixture and pushing away from the edges. Add the chevre evenly across the top. Transfer pan to the oven and cook 4 to 6 minutes (depending on how thick the frittata is) until eggs are just firm. Let sit at least five minutes before trying to pull the sides away from the pan, gently, with a spatula. Cut into wedges and serve immediately.

Makes one 8 inch frittata or 3-4 servings

NUTRITION INFO

Calories: 184
Fat: 14g
Protein: 12g
Carbohydrates: 3g

Spinach Turkey Meatloaf

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

20 oz Organic ground Turkey Breast
3/4 c organic salsa
1 c chopped organic onion
1 c frozen organic spinach (thawed)
2 organic, pastured, egg whites
1/3 cup organic old fashioned oats
1 tsp paprika
2 tbsp organic mustard
black pepper
2 tbsp coconut amino ‘soy’ sauce

In a medium bowl, combine ground turkey, salsa, onion, spinach, egg whites, paprika, 1 tbsp mustard, 1 tbsp “soy” sauce.
Mix until well incorporated.
Press into greased loaf pan.
Mix remaining mustard and soy sauce. Spread over meatloaf.
Bake at 350°F for 45-60 min, until cooked through.

Daikon Relish

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user mr and mrs stickyfingers

photo used under creative commons license, flickr user mr and mrs stickyfingers

1. Dice Daikon radish, cucumber and carrots in equal amounts (small squares are best but not grated) and combine

2. Pour rice vinegar over to cover

3. Salt and pepper (garlic pepper)

4. 1 to 2 capfuls of garlic juice (teaspoon of olive oil optional)

Combine ingredients and refrigerate for several hours turning every once and awhile and enjoy. Gets better as it ages.

Grilled Tomato Salsa

//www.flickr.com/photos/ginnerobot/

//www.flickr.com/photos/ginnerobot/

This recipe makes: 2 cups

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 ripe organic plum tomatoes, cored

1 medium organic vidalia onion, peeled and sliced into 1/2-inch slices

1 jalapeño pepper

1/2 cup chopped, fresh cilantro leaves

Salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon coconut sugar, or to taste

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to high.

2. Grill the whole tomatoes and whole jalapeño on all sides until they are evenly charred. Grill the onion slices until they are lightly charred on both sides. Cut the jalapeño in half and remove the seeds.

3. Place the tomatoes, seeded jalapeño, onion, and cilantro in a blender and puree. Season with salt, pepper and sugar. Chill.

The salsa can be made ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 2 tablespoons

Calories 11

Protein 0 g

Total Carbohydrate 3 g

Dietary Fiber 1 g

Sodium 40 mg

Total Fat 0 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Percent Calories from Fat 8%

Percent Calories from Protein 13%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 78%

Chilled Artichokes with Champagne Vinaigrette

//summertomato.com

//summertomato.com

This recipe serves: 2

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 40 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 large artichokes

2 teaspoons Champagne vinegar

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon finely chopped shallots

1 tablespoon macadamia nut oil

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Slice about 1 inch off the top of each artichoke and trim the stems. Remove the tough outer leaves and trim any sharp, thorny leaf tips with scissors.

2. Put about 2 inches of water in a large pot, insert a rack or steamer basket into the pot and bring the water to a boil. Meanwhile, prepare an ice bath.

3. Place the artichokes on the rack (stem end down) and steam uncovered, until the bottom is tender and the outer leaves can be pulled off easily, about 30 to 40 minutes.

4. Remove the artichokes with a large spoon and plunge them into the ice bath. Drain and refrigerate until serving time. Turn the artichokes upside down and leave them upside down in the refrigerator so that all of the water drains from the leaves. The artichokes can be cooked in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

5. In a small bowl, whisk the Champagne vinegar and lemon juice together. Add the shallots and slowly whisk in the oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. The vinaigrette can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

6. Serve the artichokes with a little bowl of vinaigrette to dip the leaves in.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 artichoke with vinaigrette

Calories 185

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Protein 3 g

Total Carbohydrate 27 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 360 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 35%

Percent Calories from Protein 7%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 58%

Turkey Vegetable Meatloaf

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

//www.flickr.com/photos/56832361@N00/

INGREDIENTS

1 lb organic ground turkey

1 lb grassfed beef

½ organic onion, diced

½ bag organic frozen spinach leaves

½ cup organic old fashioned oatmeal or ½ cup cooked quinoa

1 can drained organic garlic and basil diced tomatoes (MSG Free)

¼ cup Organic BBQ sauce (MSG Free)

2 organic, pastured eggs

2 tsp garlic juice

1 tsp bourbon smoked paprika

Pinch of red pepper, sea salt, garlic salt, and garlic pepper

2 tbs coconut oil

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Sauté tomatoes, onion, spinach, herbs and spices in 2 tablespoons of coconut oil. Let cool.

In a large bowl, mix 2 eggs and meats until they are combined (use wide pronged fork).

Add sautéed ingredients.

Grease 2 small pans with coconut oil.

Bake at 325 for 40 minutes.

Then, pour ¼ cup BBQ sauce on top and bake for another 5-10 minutes.

NUTRITION INFO

Calories: 257

Fat: 10.7 g

Carbohydrates: 9.8 g

Protein: 29 g

Springtime Pilaf with Asparagus and Salmon

//www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/

//www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/

This recipe serves: 6

Preparation time: 35 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 salmon fillets about 1 inch thick (1 ½ lbs.), broiled

1 tablespoon coconut oil

2 ½ cups (1-inch) diagonally cut asparagus

2 cups cooked brown rice (properly prepared)

1 ½ cup fresh or frozen organic, peas, thawed

½ cup bone broth

2 tablespoons parsley, chopped

2 tablespoons fresh chives, chopped

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the broiler. Place salmon on a broiler pan coated with coconut oil.

2. Broil 8 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Remove from the oven and set aside.

3. In a large skillet add the oil and asparagus. Cook the asparagus over medium-high heat until tender, stirring occasionally.

4. Stir in the rice, peas, and broth.

5. Cook for 1 minute before adding the salmon, parsley, and remaining ingredients. Cook 2 minutes or until thoroughly heated.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1/6 recipe

Calories 257

Protein 27 g

Total Carbohydrate 20 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 95 mg

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Cholesterol 85 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 26%

Percent Calories from Protein 42%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 32%

Pineapple Barbecued Shrimp Skewers

//www.flickr.com/photos/clotee_allochuku/

//www.flickr.com/photos/clotee_allochuku/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup organic barbecue sauce (MSG Free)

1/2 cup pineapple juice

2 tablespoons lime juice

2 tablespoons chopped, fresh cilantro leaves

1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 ripe pineapple, peeled, cored and sliced into 2-inch chunks

4 metal or bamboo (soaked in water) skewers

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a mixing bowl, combine the barbecue sauce, pineapple juice, lime juice and cilantro. Pour half of the pineapple-barbecue sauce mixture into a resealable bag, add the shrimp and marinate for 15 to 30 minutes. (Reserve the remaining sauce mixture for basting and serving.)

2. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

3. Remove the shrimp from the marinade, discarding the leftover marinade. Skewer the shrimp and pineapple onto the skewers. Grill the skewers on both sides until the shrimp are just cooked through, about 3 to 4 minutes per side. While the skewers are cooking, brush them with some of the reserved sauce.

4. Serve the skewers with the extra pineapple-barbecue sauce for dipping.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1/4 pound of shrimp plus pineapple

Calories 201

Total Fat 2 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Protein 25 g

Total Carbohydrate 2 g

Dietary Fiber 0 g

Sodium 276 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 9%

Percent Calories from Protein 48%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 43%

Marinade/Infusion for Meat, Fish, Poultry and Pork Tenderloins

//www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/

//www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/

I tend to stick with organic and/or free range protein and stay away from farm-raised fish and livestock that has been given antibiotics or hormones. I also stick with the tenderloins as they have the least amount of overall fat, and no trans fat.

INGREDIENTS

½ cup olive oil

1 tsp. Garlic juice

Garlic Pepper (MSG Free)

Salt

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Mix this up in a small bowl and swish the piece of meat/fish or turkey in it until covered. Freeze, let sit in fridge for a few hours, or use immediately.

When I make this infusion for fish, I substitute Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos for salt.

Grilled Pomegranate Chicken with Cucumber Relish Recipe

//www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 cup peeled, seeded and chopped organic cucumber

1 cup chopped fresh organic tomatoes

1/4 cup diced organic red onion

1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves

zest and juice of 1 lemon

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

4 boneless, skinless, organic chicken breasts, about 4 to 6 ounces each

2 tablespoons pomegranate juice concentrate

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon coconut palm sugar

1/2 cup grassfed greek yogurt

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a mixing bowl, combine the cucumber, tomato, red onion, mint, lemon zest and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper and refrigerate.

2. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

3. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Grill the chicken on one side for 6 minutes, turn, brush with pomegranate juice concentrate and continue grilling until the chicken is cooked through.

4. In a small dish, combine the cinnamon and sugar. Brush the cooked chicken with more pomegranate juice and sprinkle it with cinnamon-sugar mixture.

5. Serve the chicken with a large spoonful of cucumber relish and an optional dollop of yogurt or sour cream.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 1 chicken breast with relish (without yogurt)

Calories 276

Total Fat 9 g

Saturated Fat 2 g

Protein 32 g

Total Carbohydrate 16 g

Dietary Fiber 2 g

Sodium 96 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 27%

Percent Calories from Protein 48%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 24%

Grilled Eggplant Roll-Ups Stuffed with Goat Cheese

food.unl.edu/localfoods/discover-seasonal-cooking

food.unl.edu/localfoods/discover-seasonal-cooking

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 cups organic spinach leaves washed

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

8 slices eggplant, sliced lengthwise about 1/4″ thick

1/4 cup organic goat cheese

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

8 strips roasted red bell peppers, cut 1/4″ wide

For the sauce:

1 tablespoon coconut oil

1 tablespoon chopped shallots

1/4 cup fresh, chopped organic tomatoes

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to medium and the oven to 350°F.

2. Heat 1 teaspoon of the coconut oil in a skillet. Add the spinach and a pinch each of salt and pepper and toss in the pan for about 1 minute. Remove from the pan and let cool.

3. Brush the eggplant slices with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, taking care not to overcook.

4. Mix the goat cheese and parsley together. Season with salt and pepper. Shape the cheese into 8 cork-sized pieces.

5. To assemble: On the top of each slice of eggplant, place a strip of pepper, a few leaves of spinach, and a “cork” of cheese. Begin with the wide end of the eggplant and roll toward the narrow end. Place on a lightly oiled cookie sheet, seam side down.

6. Warm the roll-ups in the oven until thoroughly heated, about 8 to 10 minutes, longer if they have been refrigerated. While the roll-ups are warming, make the sauce.

For the sauce:

1. Heat the coconut oil in a small skillet over low heat. Add the shallots and cook until soft and translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the balsamic vinegar. Add the tomatoes and toss for 1 minute. Bring to a boil. Remove from the heat.

2. Place 2 roll-ups on each plate. Spoon sauce over the top and serve.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 2 roll-ups

Calories 213

Total Fat 16 g

Saturated Fat 4 g

Protein 5 g

Total Carbohydrate 14 g

Dietary Fiber 5 g

Sodium 232 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 65%

Percent Calories from Protein 9%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 26%

Linguine with Chicken, Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Basil, and Pine Nuts

//www.flickr.com/photos/71284893@N00/

//www.flickr.com/photos/71284893@N00/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 pound boneless, skinless organic chicken cutlets, cut into strips

salt to taste

freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons *coconut oil

2 cloves organic garlic, minced

1/4 cup dry white wine

1 cup sun-dried tomatoes, rehydrated and sliced

1 cup chicken bone broth

1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped

1/4 cup toasted pine nuts

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3/4 pound Jovial Foods Einkorn Linguine

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil for the pasta.

2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the coconut oil in a large nonstick skillet over high heat and sauté the chicken on both sides until it is golden brown. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Transfer the chicken to a warm plate and keep warm.

3. Turn the heat to medium and quickly add the wine to the pan, stir with a wooden spoon to release any caramelized bits that may be stuck to the bottom and cook until the wine has almost completely evaporated.

4. Add the sun-dried tomatoes and the chicken broth and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the basil, pine nuts and lemon juice.

5. Meanwhile, cook the pasta (in the boiling water) until it is al dente, about 9 to 11 minutes. Drain and toss with the sun-dried tomato mixture.

6. Divide the pasta among the serving plates and arrange the chicken on top.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: pasta with 4 ounces of chicken

Calories 528

Total Fat 15 g

Saturated Fat 2 g

Cholesterol 66 mg

Sodium 385 mg

Total Carbohydrate 58 g

Dietary Fiber 5 g

Protein 40 g

Percent Calories from Fat 25%

Percent Calories from Protein 31%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 44%

Butternut Squash Hash

Butternut Squash

starr-070730-7821-plant-Cucurbita_pepo-butternut_squash-Foodland_Pukalani

 

INGREDIENTS

1 heaping cup shredded organic butternut squash

2 tbsp. chopped organic onion

1/4 tsp. onion powder

1/4 tsp. garlic powder

Dash ground cumin

Dash salt and pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Spread the shredded squash out between 2 layers of paper towels.

Press down to absorb as much of the moisture from the squash as possible.

Repeat if necessary, until no more water an be removed.

Toss squash shreds with onion powder, garlic powder, cumin, salt and pepper.

Bring small to medium pan greased with coconut oil to high heat.

Add mixture to the pan and cook for 2 minutes.

Flip shreds with a spatula and cook for another 2 minutes or so.

NUTRITION INFO

1 serving = 1 cup

Calories: 85

Fat: 1g

Carbohydrates; 20g

Fiber: 3g

Sugar: 5g

Protein: 2g

Basil Pesto

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

INGREDIENTS

2 cups firmly packed fresh, organic basil leaves

¼ cup organic walnuts or pine nuts

3 cloves garlic

¾ cup grated, organic Parmesan or Romano Cheese (without enzymes, this could be MSG)

½ cup macadamia nut oil

Salt & Pepper To Taste

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

In a food processor, chop the basil, nuts, garlic and cheese.

With machine running, stream the oil in slowly through the feed tube.

Process until the oil is blended in and pesto is smooth.

Season to taste with salt & pepper. Refrigerate or freeze.

Makes about 1 ½ cups

Chicken and Vegetable Kebabs

totalnoms.com

totalnoms.com

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts (organic pastured), cut into 1 inch cubes

2 small organic red onions, peeled and cut into eighths

2 medium organic zucchini, cut into 3/4-inch half rounds

2 organic red bell peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces

1/2 pound medium-sized organic mushrooms

18 metal or bamboo (soaked in water) skewers

2 tablespoons coconut oil

Salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

Juice of 1 lemon

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat the grill to medium-high. Thread 6 of the skewers with chicken and 12 with vegetables. Brush the chicken and vegetables with oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

2. Grill the skewers until the chicken is cooked through, about 10 to 12 minutes, and the vegetables are tender, about 8 minutes.

3. Squeeze the lemon juice over the skewered chicken, just prior to serving.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 chicken, 2 vegetable kebabs

Calories 219

Protein 29 g

Total Carbohydrate 13 g

Dietary Fiber 3 g

Sodium 79 mg

Total Fat 6 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Percent Calories from Fat 25%

Percent Calories from Protein 52%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 23%

Zucchini Salad with Tomatoes and Basil Vinaigrette

//www.flickr.com/photos/roseannadana/

//www.flickr.com/photos/roseannadana/

This recipe serves: 6

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 large organic zucchini, cut into half-circles about 1/2 inch thick

1 large organic yellow squash (or 2 small), cut into half-circles about 1/2 inch thick

2 teaspoons organic dijon mustard (MSG Free)

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon finely chopped organic shallots

1 tablespoons macadamia nut oil

2 tablespoons freshly chopped, organic basil

salt to taste

1 large fresh organic tomato, diced

freshly ground black pepper

Cooking Instructions

1. Place about 2 inches of water in a large pot, insert a rack or steamer basket into the pot and bring the water to a boil. Steam the zucchini and squash in the basket for about 3 minutes, or until their colors turn bright. Remove the basket and run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Set aside.

2. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the dijon mustard, red wine vinegar and lemon juice together. Add the shallots and slowly whisk in the oil and basil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. (The vinaigrette can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.)

3. Gently toss the zucchini and squash in the vinaigrette with the tomatoes and serve at room temperature or chilled.

Nutrition Info

Serving Size: 3/4 cup salad with vinaigrette

Calories 50

Total Fat 3 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Cholesterol 0 mg

Sodium 145 mg

Total Carbohydrates 6 g

Dietary Fiber 2 g

Protein 2 g

Percent Calories from Fat 44%

Percent Calories from Protein 13%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 43%

Spinach, Honey Tangerine and Cashew Salad

//www.flickr.com/photos/77568040@N08/

//www.flickr.com/photos/77568040@N08/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

For the vinaigrette:

2 teaspoons Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos

4 teaspoons fresh lime juice

2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots

4 teaspoons macadamia nut oil

Salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

For the salad:

4 tablespoons coarsely chopped, unsalted cashews

2 1/2 cups fresh, organic spinach, cleaned and torn into bite-sized pieces

2 honey tangerines, peeled and sectioned

Instructions

For the vinaigrette:

1. Place all the ingredients in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Shake well.

2. Add the salt and pepper to taste.

For the salad:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Spread the cashews on a baking sheet and toast in the oven until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

3. Place the spinach in a bowl and toss with the vinaigrette.

4. Transfer the dressed spinach leaves to a serving plate.

5. Arrange the tangerine sections on top and sprinkle with the cashews.

Nutrition Info

Serving Size: 2/3 cup salad

Calories: 131

Protein: 3 g

Total Carbohydrate: 13 g

Dietary Fiber: 3 g

Sodium: 184 mg

Total Fat: 9 g

Saturated Fat: 1 g

Percent Calories from Fat 56%

Percent Calories from Protein 7%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 37%

Raw Broccoli Salad

//thestonesoup.com/blog/2011/08/the-easiest-way-to-save-time-in-the-kitchen-and-eat-more-vegetables/

//thestonesoup.com/blog/2011/08/the-easiest-way-to-save-time-in-the-kitchen-and-eat-more-vegetables/

Ingredients

4 cups organic broccoli florets or broccolini

1/4 cup organic red onion, minced

2 tablespoons coconut sugar

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

2 tablespoons homemade mayonnaise

2 tablespoons sunflower seeds, roasted and salted

3 tablespoons seedless organic raisins

Instructions

Discard Broccoli stems and finely chop florets. Set aside.

Place remaining ingredients into a meduim mixing bowl. Mix well.

Add broccoli. Toss until coated.

Chill until ready to serve.

Serves 6

Nutrition Info (per serving):90 calories, 5 g fat, 3 g protein, 10 g carbs, 2 g fiber

Cranberry Walnut Quinoa Salad

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

//www.flickr.com/photos/mealmakeovermoms/

INGREDIENTS

1 cup quinoa

1 cup dried organic cranberries

1 cup canned beets, drained & chopped

1 cup organic walnuts, chopped

¼ cup green onions, sliced

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

1 ½ tbsp macadamia nut oil

4 cloves organic garlic, minced

½ tsp salt

¼ tsp pepper

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Combine quinoa with 2 cups of water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and continue cooking until all liquid is absorbed (per package directions).

In a medium bowl, combine cooked quinoa, dried cranberries, beets, walnuts and green onions until well mixed.

In a small bowl, whisk the balsamic vinegar, macadamia oil and garlic until well blended.

Pour over quinoa mixture and toss until well blended. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Chill in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before serving.

Makes 10 servings

NUTRITION INFO

One Serving:

Calories: 239

Fat: 10.7

Protein: 4.5

Carbohydrates: 33.7

Baby Greens with Grilled Turkey, Cranberries + Roasted Shallot Vinaigrette

//www.flickr.com/photos/rusvaplauke/

//www.flickr.com/photos/rusvaplauke/

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

For the roasted shallot vinaigrette:

1 shallot

drizzle of coconut oil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon organic Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon macadamia nut oil

2 tablespoons bone broth

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1/2 tablespoon freshly chopped chives

freshly ground black pepper

For the grilled turkey:

4 organic, pastured, turkey cutlets, (about 4 ounces each)

2 teaspoons coconut oil

salt and pepper to taste

For the green salad:

8 cups fresh organic baby greens, washed

1/2 cup dried cranberries

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

For the roasted shallot vinaigrette:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. With the skin on, cut the shallot in half lengthwise. Grease a baking sheet with coconut oil. Drizzle the shallot with a bit of the coconut oil and place them on the baking sheet cut side down.

3. Roast in the oven until the shallot is very soft, about 20 to 30 minutes.

4. When the shallot is cool enough to handle, remove the skin and the root end. Puree the shallot and salt in a food processor.

5. Add the mustard and puree. Add the vinegar by the tablespoon, pureeing after each addition.

6. With the motor running, add the macadamia nut and stock slowly through the feed tube.

7. Stir in the chives and pepper. Adjust the salt and pepper to taste.

For the grilled turkey:

1. Preheat the grill to medium-high.

2. Rub the cutlets with coconut oil and season with salt and pepper.

3. Grill the turkey for about 4 to 6 minutes each side, depending on the thickness until the turkey is cooked through.

4. Remove the turkey from the grill and place on a cutting board to rest. Cut the turkey into strips.

For the green salad:

1. Place the turkey strips in a mixing bowl, add the cranberries and half of the vinaigrette.

2. Place the lettuce in a separate salad bowl and toss it with the remaining vinaigrette.

3. Arrange the turkey and cranberry mixture on top.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving size: 1 turkey cutlet with salad

Calories 283

Total Fat 7 g

Saturated Fat 1 g

Protein 36 g

Total Carbohydrate 17 g

Dietary Fiber 4 g

Sodium 317 mg

Percent Calories from Fat 24%

Percent Calories from Protein 52%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 25%

Sweet Nutty Raisin Snacks

Coconut Crystals

This recipe serves: 16

Preparation time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups organic rolled oats

1 organic, pastured egg

1 organic, pastured egg white

1 cup Coconut Secret Coconut Crystals, packed

1 tablespoon *coconut oil

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2/3 cup raisins

1/4 cup chopped pecans

1 tablespoon Jovial Food Einkorn flour

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat the oven to 350° F. Spread the oats on a baking sheet and toast, stirring occasionally until oats are browned, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.

2. Reduce the oven to 325° F. Cover an 8 by 11-inch baking pan with foil and then spray with butter or coconut oil.

3. Whisk the egg, egg white, brown sugar, oil, cinnamon, salt and vanilla extract together in a large bowl.

4. Stir in the oats, raisins, pecans and flour. Make it a team effort and let your kids do this step.

5. Let your kids spread the batter in the prepared pan.

6. Bake until golden brown about 30 to 35 minutes.

7. Remove the pan from the oven and place it on a wire rack to cool.

Slice into 16 bars and serve.

This recipe can be made ahead and stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 1 bar

Calories 81

Protein 2 g

Total Carbohydrate 12 g

Dietary Fiber 1 g

Sodium 52 mg

Total Fat 3 g

Saturated Fat 0 g

Percent Calories from Fat 30%

Percent Calories from Protein 11%

Percent Calories from Carbohydrate 59%

Melon Kebabs with Yogurt Dipping Sauce

photo used under creative commons license

This recipe serves: 4

Preparation time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 cup Snowville 6% plain yogurt

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

1 tablespoon coconut palm sugar (or to taste)

1 teaspoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1 1/2 cups cubed seedless watermelon (about 1 inch cubes)

1 1/2 cups cubed cantaloupe (about 1 inch cubes)

1 1/2 cups cubed honeydew (about 1 inch cubes)

8 metal or bamboo skewers (soaked in water)

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a small mixing bowl, stir the yogurt, lime juice, sugar and cilantro together.

2. Transfer the yogurt mixture to a small serving dish, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

3. Thread the cubes of watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew melon onto the skewers.

4. Serve the melon kebabs with the yogurt dipping sauce.

NUTRITION INFO

Serving Size: 2 kebabs

Per Serving: 120 calories, 3 g fat, 4 g protein, 20 g carbs, 2 g fiber

 

Banana Nut Bread

photo used under creative commons license

This recipe serves: 18
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Baking time: 55 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4-5 ripe bananas, mashed
1 ¾ cup coconut sugar
3 tablespoons Snowville whipping cream
3 tablespoons coconut oil
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups Jovial foods Einkorn flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
2 cups organic walnuts, chopped

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Mash bananas with fork and put into mixing bowl.

2. Add melted butter, eggs, sugar, and cream. Beat well.

3. Add dry ingredients and stir until blended. Add nuts (Break half nuts in two) and mix well.

4. Place into 2 small greased bread pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 55 minutes.

Serves 18.

NUTRITION INFO – 225 calories, 10 g fat, 4 g protein, 27 g carbs, 2 g fiber